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  • 1.
    Harrison, Katherine
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute.
    ‘A sweaty-smelling, disheveled, anorectic-looking waif’ : alternative representations of women in cyberpunk fiction2009In: 7th European Feminist Research Conference, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Popular representations of technoscience exist in constant dialogue with technoscience itself, and inevitably encompass ongoing negotiations between technology and gendered bodies. Fictional representations of technoscience, such as those offered by cyberpunk, reveal the anxieties and assumptions surrounding these negotiations, whilst simultaneously coining neologisms and concepts which shape understandings of gender and technoscience. However, cyberpunk has been heavily critiqued for reinforcing certain stereotyped notions of gender. This paper is concerned with a short story by Candas Jane Dorsey which has been explicitly billed as a parody of cyberpunk and which thus provides a valuable fictional complement to work done within feminist Science and Technology Studies on relationships between ‘technology’ and ‘gender’. In Dorsey’s short story, ‘(Learning About) Machine Sex’, the protagonist is a woman programmer called Angel who designs an Artificial Intelligence. Disillusioned when the small company for which she works is sold to a larger corporation by her boss and ex-lover, Angel enacts her own personal revenge by designing a program called ‘Machine Sex’, and a special piece of hardware on which to run it – the ‘MannBoard’. The hardware-software combination Angel creates results in a piece of equipment with touch pads through which the user is effectively ‘programmed’ to orgasm. This paper focuses on two particular actors - Angel herself and the MannBoard technology – in order to trace the relationships between bodies and machines, desire and emotion, technoscience and gendered embodiment in this text. In this distinctive text Dorsey adapts the technophilic rhetoric and motifs of cyberpunk fiction to produce a circular, repetitive text which challenges stereotypical representations of women in technology. This parody of cyberpunk thus reflects contemporary ideas about technology whilst maintaining a critical distance to the gender norms often reproduced in this genre

  • 2.
    Harrison, Katherine
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Abject/noise: a new tool for feminist analysis of technoscienceManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article contributes to existing feminist technoscience analyses by proposing a new tool for examining how norms governing viable and unviable bodies are discursively constructed in an increasingly technologised world. This tool is the result of synthesising two existing concepts: white noise from the field of media theory/information studies, and the abject from psychosemiotics/gender studies. Synthesising these two concepts produces an enriched term for detecting interrelations between discursive disturbances and disturbances in bodily norms.

    In this paper, the synthesised concept (abject/noise) is used as a tool to analyse material concerning the assignment of International Nonproprietary Names (or „generic‟ names) to biotechnological drugs. Biotech offers itself as a prime testing ground for this new tool, replete as it is with bodily anxieties, powerful discourses and innovative technologies. This article compares three versions of an INN guidance document showing how anxieties about bodily norms are reflected in, and managed through, these documents.

  • 3.
    Harrison, Katherine
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Anonymously going public: gender and blogging2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Harrison, Katherine
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Combining theory and practice – an integrated approach to blogging2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Harrison, Katherine
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies.
    Detecting bodily and discursive noise in the naming of biotech products2010In: EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF WOMENS STUDIES, ISSN 1350-5068, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 347-361Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article contributes to existing feminist technoscience analyses by proposing a new tool for examining how norms governing viable and unviable bodies are discursively constructed in an increasingly technologized world. This tool is the result of synthesizing two existing concepts: white noise from the field of media theory/information studies, and the abject from psychosemiotics/gender studies. Synthesizing these two concepts produces an enriched term for detecting interrelations between discursive disturbances and disturbances in bodily norms. In this article, the synthesized concept (abject/noise) is used as a tool to analyse material concerning the assignment of International Nonproprietary Names (or generic names) to biotechnological drugs. Biotech offers itself as a prime testing ground for this new tool, replete as it is with bodily anxieties, powerful discourses and innovative technologies. This article compares three versions of an INN guidance document showing how anxieties about bodily norms are reflected in, and managed through, these documents.

  • 6.
    Harrison, Katherine
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Discursive skin: Entanglements of gender, discourse and technology2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to explore the relationship between gender, discourse and technology, and the resulting construction of bodily norms, in a contemporary environment dominated by info- and bio-technologies. The premise from which this study starts is that the ‘intra-action’ between gender, discourse and technology plays a central role in shaping contemporary identities. The study is based on close readings of material from three case studies: cyberpunk fiction, (in)fertility weblogs and the World Health Organisation guidelines on naming of biotechnologies. The distinctive combination of the three case studies provides a unique perspective on the relationship between gender, discourse and technology, showing how it shifts across different contexts, and demonstrating the socio-historical contingency of the bodily norms produced therein.

    This study is comprised of three empirical texts, one theoretical text and a kappa. The analysis shows how innovative cyberpunk narratives challenge not only human/non-human boundaries, but also genre and gender conventions. The specific format of the blog allows women’s experiences of infertility to be heard and produces hybrid discourses which challenge contemporary authoritative discourses about femininity. The third case study explores the assignment of International Nonproprietary Names to new biotechnologies, and the implications of this on the construction of patients’ bodies. Finally, the theoretical text contributes to existing feminist analyses of technoscience by proposing a new tool called abject/noise for examining disruptions to discursive and bodily coherence. This tool is then tested on a series of documents about the assignment of International Nonproprietary Names to new biotechnologies. Throughout, the importance of ‘situated knowledges’ is emphasised, both in how gender, discourse and technology are understood, but also in the norms produced and the position of the researcher.

    List of papers
    1. Gender resistance: interrogating the ‘punk’ in cyberpunk
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gender resistance: interrogating the ‘punk’ in cyberpunk
    2010 (English)In: Humanity in Cybernetic Environments / [ed] Daniel Riha, Oxford: Inter-Disciplinary Press , 2010, p. 103-113Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, I examine two cyberpunk texts to assess whether their apparentresistance to mainstream society includes resistance to gender stereotypes.Writing from a feminist perspective, I suggest that much of the disruptivepotential of this genre is derived from its integration of ‘punk’ as a discourseor practice of resistance to social ‘norms’. I focus on Candas Jane Dorsey’sshort story ‘(Learning About) Machine Sex’ and Neal Stephenson’s novelSnow Crash. I have deliberately chosen texts whose relationship with firstwavecyberpunk is complicated either by an explicitly feminist standpoint(Dorsey) or a generational distance (Stephenson), in order to assess whetherthese authors avoid or succumb to the same critiques levelled at earlycyberpunk about gender representation. I am concerned with who and whatthese texts are resisting, and how this resistance is performed. This line ofenquiry, however, also demands a closer examination of the positiveconnotations attached to ‘resistance’ in cyberpunk, and, consequently, to askwhose interests are not represented. To do this, I use the disruptiveassociations of ‘punk’ as a tool, looking not only at particular themes ofresistance within the text, but also how the authors’ innovative stylisticmanoeuvres resist genre conventions.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Oxford: Inter-Disciplinary Press, 2010
    Keywords
    Gender, Cyberpunk, Dorsey, Stephenson, Technology, Punk
    National Category
    Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-64132 (URN)978-1-904710-71-4 (ISBN)
    Available from: 2011-01-13 Created: 2011-01-13 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
    2. Online negotiations of infertility
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Online negotiations of infertility
    2011 (English)In: Imaging the Female Body: Feminist Perspectives on Gynaecological KnowledgeProduction and Learning Processes / [ed] Nina Lykke and Barbro Wijma, New York London: Routledge , 2011Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2004 weblogs (or ‘blogs‘) made the front cover of New York Times Magazine, marking them as the latest internet-based trend to take popular culture by storm. Although now used for a wide range of functions such as education, soft marketing and political commentary, blogs were originally a space for narrating personal life stories, and have emerged as the leading technology for individuals to narrate their stories in a digital, public form, in dialogue with other bloggers and blog visitors.

    One of the best examples of this is infertility blogs, which represent a distinctive subgenre of blogs in which women write about their experiences of trying to conceive, undergoing fertility treatments, adoption and pregnancy. Drawing on a series of conversations with a small group of women bloggers, together with extracts from their blogs, this paper asks: how does blogging allow these women to 'make sense' of their experiences of infertility?

    These blogs are notable for their detailed yet accessible reporting of the medical tests and procedures which the writers undergo in their attempts to conceive. This 'translation' of medical discourse, and the network of comments/support which emerge, are facilitated by the format and style of the blog and help the women to renegotiate their identities during a difficult transitional period in their lives. These blogs, however, are embedded in broader contexts which shape their use, and which suggest the contingency and limitation of the 'sense' that is produced.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    New York London: Routledge, 2011
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-64684 (URN)
    Available from: 2011-02-01 Created: 2011-02-01 Last updated: 2013-04-29Bibliographically approved
    3. What's in a name?: The importance of nomenclature in biotechnology
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>What's in a name?: The importance of nomenclature in biotechnology
    2008 (English)In: Women in Biotechnology: Creating Interfaces / [ed] Francesca Molfino and Flavia Zucco, Berlin Heidelberg: Springer Verlag , 2008, 1, p. 183-197Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In June 2006 the World Health Organisation published a review of the issues concerning International Nonproprietary Names (INN) for biotechnological products, reflecting a growing awareness of the challenges posed by novel therapies to established scientific naming conventions. Like many aspects of the biotechnology industry, the process of naming and branding new drugs is complex and often shrouded in technical vocabulary. Examining fictional representations of biotechnology in parallel with analysis of the 'real life' processes for product naming reveals some of the implications of nomenclature whilst rendering the scientific discourse more transparent. In this paper, I use Margaret Atwood's 2003 novel, Oryx and Crake, as an entry point for exploring these implications from a feminist perspective, examining biotech both as a space for critical analysis and its effects on the medical discourse surrounding women's bodies.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Berlin Heidelberg: Springer Verlag, 2008 Edition: 1
    Keywords
    gender, fiction, biotechnology, nomenclature, Oryx and Crake
    National Category
    Gender Studies
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-50500 (URN)978-1-4020-8610-6 (ISBN)
    Available from: 2009-10-12 Created: 2009-10-12 Last updated: 2013-05-31Bibliographically approved
    4. Abject/noise: a new tool for feminist analysis of technoscience
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Abject/noise: a new tool for feminist analysis of technoscience
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article contributes to existing feminist technoscience analyses by proposing a new tool for examining how norms governing viable and unviable bodies are discursively constructed in an increasingly technologised world. This tool is the result of synthesising two existing concepts: white noise from the field of media theory/information studies, and the abject from psychosemiotics/gender studies. Synthesising these two concepts produces an enriched term for detecting interrelations between discursive disturbances and disturbances in bodily norms.

    In this paper, the synthesised concept (abject/noise) is used as a tool to analyse material concerning the assignment of International Nonproprietary Names (or „generic‟ names) to biotechnological drugs. Biotech offers itself as a prime testing ground for this new tool, replete as it is with bodily anxieties, powerful discourses and innovative technologies. This article compares three versions of an INN guidance document showing how anxieties about bodily norms are reflected in, and managed through, these documents.

    Keywords
    abject, biotechnology, body, discourse, International Nonproprietary Names, white noise
    National Category
    Gender Studies
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-64685 (URN)
    Available from: 2011-02-01 Created: 2011-02-01 Last updated: 2011-02-01Bibliographically approved
  • 7.
    Harrison, Katherine
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Gender and MUDding: applying critical theory to Internet research2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Harrison, Katherine
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Gender resistance: interrogating the ‘punk’ in cyberpunk2010In: Humanity in Cybernetic Environments / [ed] Daniel Riha, Oxford: Inter-Disciplinary Press , 2010, p. 103-113Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, I examine two cyberpunk texts to assess whether their apparentresistance to mainstream society includes resistance to gender stereotypes.Writing from a feminist perspective, I suggest that much of the disruptivepotential of this genre is derived from its integration of ‘punk’ as a discourseor practice of resistance to social ‘norms’. I focus on Candas Jane Dorsey’sshort story ‘(Learning About) Machine Sex’ and Neal Stephenson’s novelSnow Crash. I have deliberately chosen texts whose relationship with firstwavecyberpunk is complicated either by an explicitly feminist standpoint(Dorsey) or a generational distance (Stephenson), in order to assess whetherthese authors avoid or succumb to the same critiques levelled at earlycyberpunk about gender representation. I am concerned with who and whatthese texts are resisting, and how this resistance is performed. This line ofenquiry, however, also demands a closer examination of the positiveconnotations attached to ‘resistance’ in cyberpunk, and, consequently, to askwhose interests are not represented. To do this, I use the disruptiveassociations of ‘punk’ as a tool, looking not only at particular themes ofresistance within the text, but also how the authors’ innovative stylisticmanoeuvres resist genre conventions.

  • 9.
    Harrison, Katherine
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Online negotiations of infertility2011In: Imaging the Female Body: Feminist Perspectives on Gynaecological KnowledgeProduction and Learning Processes / [ed] Nina Lykke and Barbro Wijma, New York London: Routledge , 2011Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2004 weblogs (or ‘blogs‘) made the front cover of New York Times Magazine, marking them as the latest internet-based trend to take popular culture by storm. Although now used for a wide range of functions such as education, soft marketing and political commentary, blogs were originally a space for narrating personal life stories, and have emerged as the leading technology for individuals to narrate their stories in a digital, public form, in dialogue with other bloggers and blog visitors.

    One of the best examples of this is infertility blogs, which represent a distinctive subgenre of blogs in which women write about their experiences of trying to conceive, undergoing fertility treatments, adoption and pregnancy. Drawing on a series of conversations with a small group of women bloggers, together with extracts from their blogs, this paper asks: how does blogging allow these women to 'make sense' of their experiences of infertility?

    These blogs are notable for their detailed yet accessible reporting of the medical tests and procedures which the writers undergo in their attempts to conceive. This 'translation' of medical discourse, and the network of comments/support which emerge, are facilitated by the format and style of the blog and help the women to renegotiate their identities during a difficult transitional period in their lives. These blogs, however, are embedded in broader contexts which shape their use, and which suggest the contingency and limitation of the 'sense' that is produced.

  • 10.
    Harrison, Katherine
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    ‘‘Sometimes the meaning of the text is unclear’: making ‘sense’ of the SCUM Manifesto in a contemporary Swedish context2009In: Gender Delight. Science, Knowledge, Culture and Writing...for Nina Lykke, / [ed] Cecilia Åsberg, Katherine Harrison, Björn Pernrud and Malena Gustavson, Linköping: LiU , 2009, 1, p. 341-353Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Harrison, Katherine
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    "Sometimes the meaning of the text is unclear": making 'sense' of the SCUM Manifesto in a contemporary Swedish context2009In: Journal of International Women's Studies, ISSN 1539-8706, E-ISSN 1539-8706, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 33-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2003 the first Swedish translation of the well known second-wave feminist manifesto, the SCUM Manifesto by Valerie Solanas, was published. Publication of this text became intricately involved with a number of other contemporary events in Sweden which pose questions about that country‟s widely perceived status as one of the most „gender equal‟ in the world. In this paper, I use the text‟s own challenging content, provocative language and complicated history as a way into exploring its disruptive effects on Swedish society. I ask how and why the text retains its power to provoke and challenge some forty years after its initial publication, and its place in the so-called „feminist canon".

  • 12.
    Harrison, Katherine
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Spatial reconfigurings: the ‘textual body’ in the MUD2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Harrison, Katherine
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute.
    Unpicking the 'sticky threads' of biotechnology nomenclature2008In: Women's Worlds 2008: 10th Interdisciplinary Congress on Women, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Harrison, Katherine
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    ‘‘We have a dream...’: the hopes and anxieties of your conference organisers2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Harrison, Katherine
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    What's in a name?: The importance of nomenclature in biotechnology2008In: Women in Biotechnology: Creating Interfaces / [ed] Francesca Molfino and Flavia Zucco, Berlin Heidelberg: Springer Verlag , 2008, 1, p. 183-197Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In June 2006 the World Health Organisation published a review of the issues concerning International Nonproprietary Names (INN) for biotechnological products, reflecting a growing awareness of the challenges posed by novel therapies to established scientific naming conventions. Like many aspects of the biotechnology industry, the process of naming and branding new drugs is complex and often shrouded in technical vocabulary. Examining fictional representations of biotechnology in parallel with analysis of the 'real life' processes for product naming reveals some of the implications of nomenclature whilst rendering the scientific discourse more transparent. In this paper, I use Margaret Atwood's 2003 novel, Oryx and Crake, as an entry point for exploring these implications from a feminist perspective, examining biotech both as a space for critical analysis and its effects on the medical discourse surrounding women's bodies.

  • 16.
    Harrison, Katherine
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Callertsig, Anne-Charlott
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lindholm, Kristina
    SCORE.
    Genus och Räddningsjänst2008Report (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Harrison, Katherine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Engdahl, UlricaLinköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Transgender Studies: Building up the Field in a Nordic Context2010Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Harrison, Katherine
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Imlinger, Fabienne
    Cornelia Goethe Centrum Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt, Germany.
    "Unsettling the Canon: Generating Alternative feminist knowledge practices": Report from the NOISE summer school 20072007In: Feminist and Women's Studies Association Newslettter, no 51Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Hearn, Jeff
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Biricik, Alp
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sadowski, Helga
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Harrison, Katherine
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hegemony, transpatriarchies, ICTs and virtualization2013In: Rethinking transnational men: beyond, between and within nations / [ed] Jeff Hearn, Marina Blagojevic, Katherine Harrison, New York: Routledge , 2013, p. 91-108Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The world is becoming more transnational. This edited collection examines how the immense transnational changes in the contemporary world are being produced by and are affecting different men and masculinities. It seeks to shift debates on men, masculinities and gender relations from the strictly local and national context to much greater concern with the transnational and global. Established and rising scholars from Asia, Australia, Europe and North America explore subjects including economies and business corporations; sexualities and the sex trade; information and communication technologies and cyberspace; migration; war, the military and militarism; politics; nationalism; and symbolism and image-making.

  • 20.
    Hearn, Jeff
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Blagojevic, MarinaInstitute for Criminological and Sociological Research, Belgrade, Serbia.Harrison, KatherineLinköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rethinking Transnational Men: Beyond, Between and Within Nations2013Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The world is becoming more transnational. This edited collection examines how the immense transnational changes in the contemporary world are being produced by and are affecting different men and masculinities. It seeks to shift debates on men, masculinities and gender relations from the strictly local and national context to much greater concern with the transnational and global. Established and rising scholars from Asia, Australia, Europe and North America explore subjects including economies and business corporations; sexualities and the sex trade; information and communication technologies and cyberspace; migration; war, the military and militarism; politics; nationalism; and symbolism and image-making.

  • 21.
    Åsberg, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies.
    Harrison, KatherineLinköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.Pernrud, BjörnLinköping University, The Tema Institute. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.Gustavson, MalenaLinköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Gender Delight. Science, Knowledge, Culture and Writing...for Nina Lykke2009Collection (editor) (Refereed)
1 - 21 of 21
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