liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 21 of 21
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Classon, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Correction: Early ERR signature of hearing impairment in visual rhyme judgment2013In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 4, p. 897-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 2.
    Classon, Elisabet
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Representing sounds and spellings: Phonological decline and compensatory working memory in acquired hearing impairment2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis examined phonological processing in adults with postlingually acquired moderate-to-severe hearing impairment (HI) and whether explicit working memory processing of phonology and individual working memory capacity (WMC) can compensate for degraded phonological representations in this group (papers I-III). A second aim was to provide reference data for a test of WMC, the reading span test, and to examine the relation between reading span test performance and speech recognition in noise in a larger sample of 50-89 year olds with HI (paper IV). Non-auditory tasks of phonological processing, episodic long-term memory and WMC were used in papers I-III, and both behavioral and electrophysiological measures were collected. Results showed that phonological processing was impaired in the group with HI but that WMC and explicit working memory processing of phonology could be employed to compensate for degraded phonological representations. However, this compensation may come at the cost of interfering with episodic memory encoding. An  electrophysiological marker of HI in text-based rhyme judgments was found. Paper IV presented reference data for reading span test performance in two versions of the test in individuals with HI, and results suggesting that WMC may be differentially predictive of speech recognition in noise in different age groups of older adults with HI. The clinical implications of the present results concerns the double disadvantage of individuals with lower WMC and HI. A structured assessment of WMC in rehabilitative settings would help to identify these individuals and tailor treatment to their needs. The reading span test is suggested as a suitable future candidate for clinical WMC assessment.

    List of papers
    1. Early ERP signature of hearing impairment in visual rhyme judgment
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Early ERP signature of hearing impairment in visual rhyme judgment
    2013 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 4, no 241Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Postlingually acquired hearing impairment (HI) is associated with changes in the representation of sound in semantic long-term memory. An indication of this is the lower performance on visual rhyme judgment tasks in conditions where phonological and orthographic cues mismatch, requiring high reliance on phonological representations. In this study, event-related potentials (ERPs) were used for the first time to investigate the neural correlates of phonological processing in visual rhyme judgments in participants with acquired HI and normal hearing (NH). Rhyme task word pairs rhymed or not and had matching or mismatching orthography. In addition, the inter-stimulus interval (ISI) was manipulated to be either long (800 ms) or short (50 ms). Long ISIs allow for engagement of explicit, top-down processes, while short ISIs limit the involvement of such mechanisms. We hypothesized lower behavioral performance and N400 and N2 deviations in HI in the mismatching rhyme judgment conditions, particularly in short ISI. However, the results showed a different pattern. As expected, behavioral performance in the mismatch conditions was lower in HI than in NH in short ISI, but ERPs did not differ across groups. In contrast, HI performed on a par with NH in long ISI. Further, HI, but not NH, showed an amplified N2-like response in the non-rhyming, orthographically mismatching condition in long ISI. This was also the rhyme condition in which participants in both groups benefited the most from the possibility to engage top-down processes afforded with the longer ISI. Taken together, these results indicate an early ERP signature of HI in this challenging phonological task, likely reflecting use of a compensatory strategy. This strategy is suggested to involve increased reliance on explicit mechanisms such as articulatory recoding and grapheme-to-phoneme conversion.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Switzerland: Frontiers Research Foundation, 2013
    Keywords
    event-related potentials, hearing impairment, phonology, visual rhyme judgment, inter-stimulus interval, N2, N400, FP
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-92284 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2013.00241 (DOI)000330942000001 ()
    Available from: 2013-05-08 Created: 2013-05-08 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
    2. Working memory capacity compensates for hearing related phonological processing deficit
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Working memory capacity compensates for hearing related phonological processing deficit
    2013 (English)In: Journal of Communication Disorders, ISSN 0021-9924, E-ISSN 1873-7994, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 17-29Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Acquired hearing impairment is associated with gradually declining phonological representations. According to the Ease of Language Understanding (ELU) model, poorly defined representations lead to mismatch in phonologically challenging tasks. To resolve the mismatch, reliance on working memory capacity (WMC) increases. This study investigated whether WMC modulated performance in a phonological task in individuals with hearing impairment. A visual rhyme judgment task with congruous or incongruous orthography, followed by an incidental episodic recognition memory task, was used. In participants with hearing impairment, WMC modulated both rhyme judgment performance and recognition memory in the orthographically similar non-rhyming condition; those with high WMC performed exceptionally well in the judgment task, but later recognized few of the words. For participants with hearing impairment and low WMC the pattern was reversed; they performed poorly in the judgment task but later recognized a surprisingly large proportion of the words. Results indicate that good WMC can compensate for the negative impact of auditory deprivation on phonological processing abilities by allowing for efficient use of phonological processing skills. They also suggest that individuals with hearing impairment and low WMC may use a non-phonological approach to written words, which can have the beneficial side effect of improving memory encoding. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanLearning outcomes: Readers will be able to: (1) describe cognitive processes involved in rhyme judgment, (2) explain how acquired hearing impairment affects phonological processing and (3) discuss how reading strategies at encoding impact memory performance.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    ELSEVIER, 2013
    Keywords
    Hearing impairment, Phonology, Working memory capacity, Episodic recognition
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-74276 (URN)10.1016/j.jcomdis.2012.10.001 (DOI)000314140200002 ()
    Available from: 2012-01-23 Created: 2012-01-23 Last updated: 2017-12-08
    3. Verbal fluency in adults with postlingually acquired hearing impairment
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Verbal fluency in adults with postlingually acquired hearing impairment
    2013 (English)In: Speech, Language and Hearing, ISSN 2050-571X, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 88-100Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined verbal retrieval in participants with acquired moderate-to-severe sensorineural hearing impairment (M age = 63, M education level = 13 years) compared to participants with normal hearing thresholds (M age = 62, M education level = 14 years) using the letter and category fluency tasks. Analyses of number of words produced, clustering, and switching, were conducted. There was no significant difference between the groups in category fluency performance. In letter fluency, however, the participants with hearing impairment produced significantly fewer words than the normal hearing participants and their production was characterized by fewer switches. Regression analyses were conducted to examine the relationship between demographic, auditory, and cognitive variables and letter fluency performance in the two groups. Phonological skills and auditory acuity predicted letter fluency output only in participants with hearing impairment and a hearing-related link between phonological skills, working memory capacity, and letter fluency switching was found.

    Keywords
    Hearing impairment, Letter fluency, Category fluency, Clustering, Switching, Phonology, Working memory capacity
    National Category
    Other Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-99778 (URN)10.1179/205057113X13781290153457 (DOI)
    Available from: 2013-10-21 Created: 2013-10-21 Last updated: 2017-11-06Bibliographically approved
    4. Reading span performance in 339 Swedish 50-89 year old individuals with hearing impairment: Effects of test version and age, and relation to speech recognition in noise
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reading span performance in 339 Swedish 50-89 year old individuals with hearing impairment: Effects of test version and age, and relation to speech recognition in noise
    Show others...
    2013 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish reading span test (Rönnberg, Lyxell, Arlinger, & Kinnefors, 1989) is often used to assess working memory capacity (WMC) in the field of cognitive hearing science. The test has proven useful as a predictor of speech recognition in noise in adverse conditions. It has been used in a wide range of experimental studies and has been translated to several languages. The purpose of this paper was to provide reference data for the Swedish reading span test (Rönnberg et al., 1989) in a large sample of adults with hearing impairment aged 50-89 years that are representative of patients seeking rehabilitation at audiological clinics. Data from finished and ongoing projects were collated and reanalyzed for this purpose. The original full version and a shortened version of the test were compared, in terms of percentage correct. In addition, performance on the full version was compared across two different age-cohorts, 50-69 year olds and 70-89 year olds. Frequency distributions and percentile scores are reported, as well as relations with demographic variables, and speech recognition in noise. Results showed that reading span performance was related to age, but not sex, with lower scores in older participants. Pure tone hearing thresholds accounted for a small but significant amount of the variance such that higher reading span scores were related to better hearing. The frequency distributions of scores did not differ across the two versions of the test, but the long version seemed to be more sensitive to age. Performance in both versions was significantly correlated with speech recognition in noise. Regression analyses however showed that reading span explained additional variance in speech in noise recognition, after the effects of age and pure tone hearing thresholds were accounted for, only in the 50-69 year olds. These findings are discussed in relation to  age-related differences in the ability to recruit cognitive resources in the service of speech communication.

    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-99780 (URN)
    Available from: 2013-10-21 Created: 2013-10-21 Last updated: 2017-11-06Bibliographically approved
  • 3.
    Classon, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Löfkvist, Ulrika
    Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Linköping University, Sweden/Department of Speech and Language Pathology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Verbal fluency in adults with postlingually acquired hearing impairment2013In: Speech, Language and Hearing, ISSN 2050-571X, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 88-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined verbal retrieval in participants with acquired moderate-to-severe sensorineural hearing impairment (M age = 63, M education level = 13 years) compared to participants with normal hearing thresholds (M age = 62, M education level = 14 years) using the letter and category fluency tasks. Analyses of number of words produced, clustering, and switching, were conducted. There was no significant difference between the groups in category fluency performance. In letter fluency, however, the participants with hearing impairment produced significantly fewer words than the normal hearing participants and their production was characterized by fewer switches. Regression analyses were conducted to examine the relationship between demographic, auditory, and cognitive variables and letter fluency performance in the two groups. Phonological skills and auditory acuity predicted letter fluency output only in participants with hearing impairment and a hearing-related link between phonological skills, working memory capacity, and letter fluency switching was found.

  • 4.
    Classon, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Löfkvist, Ulrika
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Verbal fluency in adults with postlingually acquired hearing impairment2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Classon, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ng, Hoi Ning Elaine
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kilman, Lisa
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Mishra, Sushmit
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Reading span performance in 339 Swedish 50-89 year old individuals with hearing impairment: Effects of test version and age, and relation to speech recognition in noise2013Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish reading span test (Rönnberg, Lyxell, Arlinger, & Kinnefors, 1989) is often used to assess working memory capacity (WMC) in the field of cognitive hearing science. The test has proven useful as a predictor of speech recognition in noise in adverse conditions. It has been used in a wide range of experimental studies and has been translated to several languages. The purpose of this paper was to provide reference data for the Swedish reading span test (Rönnberg et al., 1989) in a large sample of adults with hearing impairment aged 50-89 years that are representative of patients seeking rehabilitation at audiological clinics. Data from finished and ongoing projects were collated and reanalyzed for this purpose. The original full version and a shortened version of the test were compared, in terms of percentage correct. In addition, performance on the full version was compared across two different age-cohorts, 50-69 year olds and 70-89 year olds. Frequency distributions and percentile scores are reported, as well as relations with demographic variables, and speech recognition in noise. Results showed that reading span performance was related to age, but not sex, with lower scores in older participants. Pure tone hearing thresholds accounted for a small but significant amount of the variance such that higher reading span scores were related to better hearing. The frequency distributions of scores did not differ across the two versions of the test, but the long version seemed to be more sensitive to age. Performance in both versions was significantly correlated with speech recognition in noise. Regression analyses however showed that reading span explained additional variance in speech in noise recognition, after the effects of age and pure tone hearing thresholds were accounted for, only in the 50-69 year olds. These findings are discussed in relation to  age-related differences in the ability to recruit cognitive resources in the service of speech communication.

  • 6.
    Classon, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johansson, Mikael
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Early ERP signature of hearing impairment in visual rhyme judgment2013In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 4, no 241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Postlingually acquired hearing impairment (HI) is associated with changes in the representation of sound in semantic long-term memory. An indication of this is the lower performance on visual rhyme judgment tasks in conditions where phonological and orthographic cues mismatch, requiring high reliance on phonological representations. In this study, event-related potentials (ERPs) were used for the first time to investigate the neural correlates of phonological processing in visual rhyme judgments in participants with acquired HI and normal hearing (NH). Rhyme task word pairs rhymed or not and had matching or mismatching orthography. In addition, the inter-stimulus interval (ISI) was manipulated to be either long (800 ms) or short (50 ms). Long ISIs allow for engagement of explicit, top-down processes, while short ISIs limit the involvement of such mechanisms. We hypothesized lower behavioral performance and N400 and N2 deviations in HI in the mismatching rhyme judgment conditions, particularly in short ISI. However, the results showed a different pattern. As expected, behavioral performance in the mismatch conditions was lower in HI than in NH in short ISI, but ERPs did not differ across groups. In contrast, HI performed on a par with NH in long ISI. Further, HI, but not NH, showed an amplified N2-like response in the non-rhyming, orthographically mismatching condition in long ISI. This was also the rhyme condition in which participants in both groups benefited the most from the possibility to engage top-down processes afforded with the longer ISI. Taken together, these results indicate an early ERP signature of HI in this challenging phonological task, likely reflecting use of a compensatory strategy. This strategy is suggested to involve increased reliance on explicit mechanisms such as articulatory recoding and grapheme-to-phoneme conversion.

  • 7.
    Classon, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johansson, Mikael
    Lunds universitet, Psykologiska institutionen.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Electrophysiological indices of hearing related phonological processing deficit2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Classon, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johansson, Mikael
    Lunds universitet, Psykologiska institutionen.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Electrophysiological indices of hearing related phonological processing deficit2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Classon, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    On the role of working memory in hearing related phonological processing deficit2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Classon, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Working memory capacity compensates for hearing related phonological processing deficit2013In: Journal of Communication Disorders, ISSN 0021-9924, E-ISSN 1873-7994, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 17-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Acquired hearing impairment is associated with gradually declining phonological representations. According to the Ease of Language Understanding (ELU) model, poorly defined representations lead to mismatch in phonologically challenging tasks. To resolve the mismatch, reliance on working memory capacity (WMC) increases. This study investigated whether WMC modulated performance in a phonological task in individuals with hearing impairment. A visual rhyme judgment task with congruous or incongruous orthography, followed by an incidental episodic recognition memory task, was used. In participants with hearing impairment, WMC modulated both rhyme judgment performance and recognition memory in the orthographically similar non-rhyming condition; those with high WMC performed exceptionally well in the judgment task, but later recognized few of the words. For participants with hearing impairment and low WMC the pattern was reversed; they performed poorly in the judgment task but later recognized a surprisingly large proportion of the words. Results indicate that good WMC can compensate for the negative impact of auditory deprivation on phonological processing abilities by allowing for efficient use of phonological processing skills. They also suggest that individuals with hearing impairment and low WMC may use a non-phonological approach to written words, which can have the beneficial side effect of improving memory encoding. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanLearning outcomes: Readers will be able to: (1) describe cognitive processes involved in rhyme judgment, (2) explain how acquired hearing impairment affects phonological processing and (3) discuss how reading strategies at encoding impact memory performance.

  • 11.
    Classon, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johansson, Mikael
    Lunds universitet, Psykologiska institutionen.
    Hearing impairment, linguistic prcessing and access to verbal long-term memory: In search of behavioral and electrophysiological indices2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Classon, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hearing impairment, linguistic processing and access to verbal long-term memory: An ERP-study.2009In: The HEAD Graduate School Second Summer Workshop, Båsenberga, Sweden. June 15-16 2009., 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Classon, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johansson, Mikael
    Lunds universitet, Psykologiska institutionen.
    Hearing impariment, linguistic processing and access to verbal long-term memory:  an ERP-study2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Classon, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Working memory compensates for hearing related phonological processing deficit2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Acquired hearing impairment is associated with gradually declining phonological representations. According to the Ease of Language Understanding (ELU) model, poorly defined representations lead to mismatch in phonologically challenging tasks. To resolve the mismatch, reliance on working memory capacity (WMC) increases. This study investigated whether WMC modulated performance in a phonological task in individuals with hearing impairment. A visual rhyme judgment task with congruous or incongruous orthography, followed by an incidental episodic recognition memory task, was used. In participants with hearing impairment, WMC modulated both rhyme judgment performance and recognition memory in the orthographically similar non-rhyming condition; those with high WMC performed exceptionally well in the judgment task, but later recognized few of the words. For participants with hearing impairment and low WMC the pattern was reversed; they performed poorly in the judgment task but later recognized a surprisingly large proportion of the words. Results indicate that good WMC can compensate for the negative impact of auditory deprivation on phonological processing abilities by allowing for efficient use of phonological processing skills. They also suggest that individuals with hearing impairment and low WMC may use a non-phonological approach to written words, which can have the beneficial side effect of improving memory encoding.

    LEARNING OUTCOMES:

    Readers will be able to: (1) describe cognitive processes involved in rhyme judgment, (2) explain how acquired hearing impairment affects phonological processing and (3) discuss how reading strategies at encoding impact memory performance.

  • 15.
    Classon, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Johansson, M
    Hearing impairment, Linguistic processing and access to verbal long-term memory:: In search of electrophysiological indices2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Classon, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Den hjärnvänliga arbetsplatsen: kognition, kognitiva funktionsnedsättningar och arbetsmiljö2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Dagens arbetsliv ställer allt större krav på kognitiva förmågor. Vi arbetar alltmer med information inte bara i traditionellt intellektuella yrken, utan även inom industri, hantverk och sjukvård. Informationsteknologi i form av datorer, avancerad teknisk utrustning och andra komplexa system blir allt viktigare att kunna hantera. Detta ställer nya krav på arbetsmiljöarbetet, något som gäller för alla arbetstagare, men särskilt för de av oss som har en kognitiv funktionsnedsättning.

    I denna rapport sammanfattar vi arbetsmiljörelaterade hinder förknippade med nedsatt funktion inom nio kognitiva områden: språk, exekutiva funktioner, minnesfunktioner, visuospatiala funktioner, snabbhet, uppmärksamhet, emotion/social kognition, mental trötthet samt global kognitiv förmåga/intelligens. Vi uppmärksammar även mental trötthet (”fatigue”) som ett viktigt problemområde i  sammanhanget.

    Den första delen av rapporten ger en bakgrund till området. Avsnittet ger en kort översikt över neuropsykologi och kognitiv neurovetenskap.

    Den andra delen sammanfattar kunskap om omfattningen av problemet: hur vanliga är kognitiva funktionsnedsättningar i arbetslivet? En stor del av de människor som är i yrkesverksam ålder antingen har, eller kommer någon gång under yrkeslivet att drabbas av kognitiva funktionsproblem. Vi uppskattar att detta berör en femtedel till en tredjedel av de yrkesverksamma. Eftersom kognitiv funktionsnivå långt ifrån enbart beror på individens begränsningar till följd av sjukdom eller annan funktionsnedsättning, utan även på miljön och dess krav på individen, är problemen och lösningar på dessa både giltiga och viktiga för alla.

    Rapportens andra del visar att kognitiv nedsättning inte begränsas till ett enstaka funktionellt område, exempelvis minnesbesvär, utan kan innefatta flera av de funktionella områden som berörs. Det finns alltså ingen enkel koppling mellan en sjukdom och vilka kognitiva funktionsproblem den medför för den enskilde arbetstagaren. Problemen måste ses i ljuset av både de erfarenheter och begränsningar den enskilde personen har och den aktuella arbetsuppgiften.

    Rapportens tredje del diskuterar mer ingående arbetsmiljörelaterade konsekvenser av kognitiva funktionsnedsättningar. Den börjar med att sammanfatta en modell för att analysera funktionsnedsättningar som en produkt av fyra samverkande faktorer: individen (till exempel kognitiva funktionsbegränsningar efter en sjukdom), individens förhållningssätt (till exempel motivation), arbetsuppgiften och miljön. En kognitiv funktionsproblematik finns aldrig enbart i en av dessa faktorer utan i skärningspunkten mellan dessa faktorer. Av detta skäl är kunskap om arbetsmiljömässiga aspekter av kognitiva funktionsnedsättningar giltig för alla. Även de som inte har nedsatt kognitiv funktion hamnar i situationer där faktorer kopplade till miljön eller arbetsuppgiften (eller vår inställning till uppgiften) resulterar i att kognitiva förmågor belastas!

    Vidare identifierar och sammanfattar rapportens tredje del praktiska lösningar som stödjer arbetsförmåga vid nedsättning av funktioner inom de nio områden som rapporten omfattar: språk, exekutiva funktioner, minnesfunktioner, visuospatiala funktioner, snabbhet, uppmärksamhet, emotion/social kognition, mental trötthet samt global kognitiv förmåga/intelligens. Särskilt betonas att det idag finns många tillgängliga men sannolikt mindre ofta utnyttjade åtgärder som kan utnyttjas för att mildra eller eliminera arbetsmiljöproblem relaterade till kognitiva funktionsnedsättningar. Rapporten redovisar sju sådana övergripande åtgärder. Därtill diskuteras kognitiva funktionsnedsättningar i samband med arbetstagare som är över 65 år och arbetsgivarens roll. Avslutningsvis identifieras kunskapsbehov för fortsatt arbete inom området.

  • 17.
    Ng, Elaine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Classon, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Relationships between working memory capacity and speech recognition threshold in first-time hearing aid usersArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Ng, Hoi Ning, Elaine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Classon, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Dynamic relation between working memory capacity and speech recognition in noise during the first six months of hearing aid use2014In: Trends in Hearing, ISSN 2331-2165, Vol. 18, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study aimed to investigate the changing relationship between aided speech recognition and cognitive function during the first six months of hearing aid use. Twentyseven first-time hearing aid users with symmetrical mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss were recruited. Aided speech recognition thresholds in noise (SRTs) were obtained in the hearing aid fitting session as well as at three and six months post-fitting. Cognitive abilities were assessed using a reading span test, which is a measure of working memory capacity, and a cognitive test battery. Results showed a significant correlation between reading span and SRT during the hearing aid fitting session. This relation was significantly weakened over the first six months of hearing aid use. Multiple regression analysis showed that reading span was the main predictor of SRT when hearing aids were first fitted, but that pure-tone average hearing threshold (PTA) was the main predictor six months later. This indicates that working memory capacity plays a more important role in speech recognition in noise before than after six months of use. We argue that new hearing aid users engage working memory capacity to recognize unfamiliar processed speech signals but that as familiarization proceeds, engagement of working memory capacity is reduced.

  • 19.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Classon, Elisabet
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Danermark, Berth
    Örebro universitet.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Örebro universitet.
    Forskning om funktionsnedsättning och funktionshinder 2002-2010: Kartläggning, analys och förslag: Regeringsuppdrag till FAS från Socialdepartementet2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Regeringsuppdraget ”Att kartlägga och analysera forskning inom området funktionsnedsättning” (2011-1631) har utförts i samverkan mellan Forskningsrådet för arbetsliv och socialvetenskap (FAS) och en för ändamålet utsedd arbetsgrupp vid Institutet för Handikappvetenskap (IHV), Linköpings universitet. I utredningen ges en bred teoretisk bakgrund till forskning om funktionsnedsättning och funktionshinder.

    Den definition som använts baseras på att funktionsnedsättningen skall vara långvarig och medföra inskränkningar i vardagslivet. Dels är funktionsned-sättningen i sig intressant att studera, dels är forskning om samspelet med omgivningens möjligheter och hinder relevant, samt också hur samhälleliga hindrande/stödjande processer påverkar personer/grupper med funktionsnedsättning i samhället.

    Datainsamlingen baserades på denna definition och delades in i två steg. Tidsperioden för vilken vi samlade in data var 2002–2010, detta bland annat för att knyta an till tidigare utredningar på området. I STEG 1 inkluderades projekt (n=1411) utifrån de databaser som statliga och icke-statliga finansiärer tillsänt oss. I STEG 2 gjordes publikationsanalyser utifrån namnen på de ovanstående projektägarna samt på namnlistor (n=970) från alla Sveriges centrumbildningar för forskning om funktionsnedsättning och handikapp.

    Förutom basinformation om projekten (projektår/medelstilldelning/diagnoskategori, ålderskategori, eller arbetslivsinriktning) klassificerades projekten i STEG 1 utifrån om de betonade individen, samspelet individen-omgivning, eller enbart omgivningsaspekter. Dessutom klassificerades projekten med avseende på perspektiv, dvs. om de tillhörde ett tekniskt/naturvetenskapligt perspektiv, ett medicinskt/vårdvetenskapligt, ett beteendevetenskapligt, eller ett humanistiskt/samhällsvetenskapligt perspektiv, vidare om projektet var tvärvetenskapligt, eller om det rörde det i direktivet utpekade området ”disability studies”, dvs. om fokus är på hindrande eller underlättande mekanismer i samhället.

    Resultaten visar entydigt att den totala forskningsfinansieringen under tidsperioden ökat från cirka 35 mnkr år till cirka 150 mnkr. Den statliga reala finansieringen har varit relativt konstant sedan 2008, och stagnerat på en nivå runt 90–95 mnkr/år. De individinriktade, medicinska/vårdvetenskapliga projekten dominerar och har ökat under perioden både till projektantal och monetärt. Få företrädare finns för s.k. ”disability studies” och för det tekniska/naturvetenskapliga perspektivet. Femtio procent av all forskningsfinansiering är tvärvetenskaplig, 48 procent utgörs av forskning om samspelet individ-omgivning, och här dominerar det beteendevetenskapliga perspektivet. Den tvärvetenskapliga forskning som fokuserar olika diagnoser rör internationella excellensområden som hörsel, rörelsehinder, stroke, psykiska funktionshinder och CP-skador. Forskning som jämför olika grupper av personer med funktionsnedsättning finns också väl företrädd.

    I STEG 2 gjordes publikationsanalyser både på tidskriftsartiklar för sig och på bokkapitel/böcker och avhandlingar för sig. Närmare analyser visar att cirka 200 författare kan betraktas som ”bärare” av området i den meningen att de aktivt publicerar fler än fem tidskriftsartiklar eller fler än tre bokkapitel/böcker för varje femårsperiod. Nätverksanalyser visar att området integreras över tid, att större kluster av forskare bildats och att publiceringstakten ökat påtagligt mer än riksgenomsnittet. Citeringsanalysen visar dessutom att citeringsgraden är klart över världsgenomsnittet. Innehållsanalyser visar att rehabiliteringsforskning respektive språk, kognition och hörsel existerar som två huvudkluster.

  • 20.
    Signoret, Carine
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johnsrude, Ingrid
    Department of Psychology, Queen's University, Canada.
    Classon, Elisabet
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Does semantic context facilitate perceptual clarity?2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Giving people an opportunity to hear an unintelligible noise-vocoded (NV) sentence after they know its identity produces pop-out, a clearer percept of the NV sentence (Davis, Johnsrude, Hervais-Adelman, Taylor, & McGettigan, 2005), which can be measured using a magnitude-estimation procedure (Wild, Davis, & Johnsrude, 2012). Pop-out appears to occur when the auditory system is able to match input with top-down predictions that can be used to perceptually organize/’explain’ that input. Semantically coherent sentences (e.g. “his new clothes were from France”) are more predictable than matched anomalous sentences (e.g. “his great streets were from Smith”), raising the possibility that semantic information may also give rise to popout. In the present study we investigated how the magnitude of the pop-out effect produced by prior knowledge in the form of identical text cues (100% predictable) compared to that produced by semantic coherence. Twenty normal-hearing native Swedish-speaking participants listened to Swedish NV (1, 3, 6 and 12 bands) and clear sentences, and rated the clarity on a 7-point Likert scale. The sentences were semantically coherent or anomalous. Each spoken word was preceded (200 ms) by either its text equivalent or a consonant string of matched length. We observed the expected main effects of speech quality and text cues on clarity ratings (Wild et al., 2012). Semantically coherent sentences were rated as clearer than anomalous sentences, even when both types of sentences were preceded by identical text cues, suggesting that the effect of semantic context on perceptual clarity is not entirely due to greater predictability.

  • 21.
    Signoret, Carine
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johnsrude, Ingrid
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department of Psychology, Queen’s University, Canada.
    Classon, Elisabet
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lexical access speed determines the role of working memory in pop-out2013In: Abstract book: Second International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication, 2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Prior knowledge about what is going to be said produces a clearer percept ofunintelligible noise-vocoded (NV) sentences. This is called the pop-out effect andcan be measured using a magnitude-estimation procedure. Sentence coherencesubstantially improves intelligibility of NV sentences, suggesting that semanticcontext may produce a pop-out effect. Moreover, understanding speech in challengingconditions is supported by cognitive skills such as working-memorycapacity and inference-making. In the present study, we investigated whether apop-out effect could be identified for sentence coherence and whether such a popouteffect would be additive to the pop-out effect generated by prior knowledge.Twenty normal-hearing native Swedish-speaking participants listened to SwedishNV (1, 3, 6 and 12 bands) and clear sentences, and rated the clarity on a 7-pointscale. The sentences were semantically coherent (e.g. “his new clothes were fromFrance”) or incoherent (e.g. “his great streets were from Smith”). Each spokenword was preceded (200 ms) by either its text equivalent or a consonant string ofmatched length. We found a pop-out effect due to sentence coherence as well asa pop-out effect due to prior knowledge. These two effects interacted, suggestingthat they are supported by different mechanisms. Lexical access speed predictedthe magnitude of pop-out due to prior knowledge. Further, in participants withslow lexical access speed, working memory capacity predicted pop-out magnitudewhile in participants with high lexical access speed, pop-out magnitude was bestpredicted by inference-making ability.

1 - 21 of 21
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf