liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 26 of 26
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Baklanov, D. V.
    et al.
    Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, NH, USA.
    Moodie, K. M.
    Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, NH, USA.
    McCarthy, F. E.
    Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, NH, USA.
    Mandrusov, E.
    Guidant Corp., Santa Clara, CA, USA.
    Chiu, J.
    Guidant Corp., Santa Clara, CA, USA.
    Aswonge, G.
    Guidant Corp., Santa Clara, CA, USA.
    Cheng, J.
    Guidant Corp., Santa Clara, CA, USA.
    Chow, M.
    Guidant Corp., Santa Clara, CA, USA.
    Simons, M.
    Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, NH, USA.
    de Muinck, Ebo D.
    Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, NH, USA.
    Comparison of transendocardial and retrograde coronary venous intramyocardial catheter delivery systems in healthy and infarcted pigs2006In: Catheterization and cardiovascular interventions, ISSN 1522-1946, E-ISSN 1522-726X, Vol. 68, no 3, p. 416-423Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We compared two routes for myocardial delivery of therapeutics, transendocardial (TE) delivery with an intramyocardial injection catheter, and retrograde coronary venous (RCV) delivery with a balloon occlusion catheter in the interventricular vein. Methods: TE and RCV injection of 15 mu m, neutron-activatable microspheres was compared in healthy pigs (Group I, n = 3), pigs with a 1-week-old myocardial infarction (MI; group II, n = 5), and pigs with a 2-weeks-old MI (group III, n = 4). The MI was induced by a 1-hr balloon occlusion in the LAD. Both methods were compared in the same animal using different microspheres. The RCV catheter allowed for continuous measurement of distal pressure and 2.5 x 10(6) microspheres were injected in 10 ml at 300 mmHg above balloon occlusion pressure. The TE injections were targeted to the infarct zone and 2.5 x 10(6) microspheres were distributed over 10 injections of 200 mu l. Results: The retention of microspheres decreased with increase in MI age, but was comparable between devices within the groups. RCV delivery resulted in (14.3 +/- 0.9)% microsphere retention in Group I, (10.3 +/- 0.2)% in Group II, and (6.4 +/- 0.1)% in group III (P less than 0.05 versus group I). Microsphere retention after TE was (15.1 +/- 0.7)% in group I, (18.9 +/- 0.6)% in group II, (4.1 +/- 0.1)% in Group III (P less than 0.05 versus groups I and II). The RCV catheter delivered primarily to midventricular, antero-septal segments, whereas TE targeted apical areas predominantly. Conclusions: Delivery efficacy was comparable between devices in each group however RCV targeted midventricular areas whereas TE targeted apical areas.

  • 2.
    Baklanov, Dmitri V.
    et al.
    Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Centre, NH, USA.
    de Muinck, Ebo D.
    Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Centre, NH, USA.
    Simons, Michael
    Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Centre, NH, USA.
    Moodie, Karen L.
    Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Centre, NH, USA.
    Arbuckle, Brenda E.
    Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Centre, NH, USA.
    Thompson, Craig A.
    Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Centre, NH, USA.
    Palac, Robert T.
    Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Centre, NH, USA.
    Live 3D echo guidance of catheter-based endomyocardial injection2005In: Catheterization and cardiovascular interventions, ISSN 1522-1946, E-ISSN 1522-726X, Vol. 65, no 3, p. 340-345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Local delivery of therapeutic agents into the myocardium is limited by suboptimal imaging. We evaluated the feasibility and accuracy of live 313 echo to guide left ventricular endomyocardial injection. An intramyocardial injection catheter was positioned in the left ventricle in five healthy Yorkshire pigs using fluoroscopy. All other catheter manipulations were performed with live biplane and 3D echo guidance. In each animal, a total of 12 endomyocardial injections (volume, 50-100 mu l) of echo contrast mixed with blue tissue dye were performed. Four injections, 10 mm apart, were directed to three myocardial target zones: the anterior septum at the mitral valve level (zone 1); the posterolateral wall between the heads of the papillary muscles (zone 2); and the apex (zone 3). The injections were aimed to form a transverse line in zones 1 and 2 and an inverted triangular pyramid in zone 3. The animals were sacrificed, the hearts were inspected and the left ventricular endocardium was examined to create a map of injection marks. Success, defined as a visible injection of tissue dye, was 95%, and accuracy, defined as an injection into the target zone, was 83%. There was no significant difference in accuracy between the zones. Live 3D echo can successfully guide endomyocardial injections by accurately targeting specific myocardial zones, verifying catheter apposition and, when combined with echo contrast, providing real-time visualization of injectate deposition. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  • 3.
    Buehler, Alexandra
    et al.
    CARIM, University of Maastricht, The Netherlands.
    van Zandvoort, Marc
    CARIM, University of Maastricht, The Netherlands.
    Stelt, Bram
    CARIM, University of Maastricht, The Netherlands.
    Hackeng, Tilman
    CARIM, University of Maastricht, The Netherlands.
    Schrans-Stassen, Bianca
    CARIM, University of Maastricht, The Netherlands.
    Bennaghmouch, Abdelkader
    CARIM, University of Maastricht, The Netherlands.
    Hofstra, Leo
    CARIM, University of Maastricht, The Netherlands.
    Cleutjens, Jack
    CARIM, University of Maastricht, The Netherlands.
    Duijvestijn, Adriaan
    CARIM, University of Maastricht, The Netherlands.
    Smeets, Mirjam
    University Hospital Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    de Kleijn, Dominique
    University Hospital Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Post, Mark
    University Hospital Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    de Muinck, Ebo D.
    Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, NH, USA.
    cNGR: A novel homing sequence for CD13/APN targeted molecular imaging of murine cardiac angiogenesis in vivo2006In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 26, no 12, p. 2681-2687Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    Previously, the peptide sequence cNGR has been shown to home specifically to CD13/APN (aminopeptidase N) on tumor endothelium. Here, we investigated the feasibility of selective imaging of cardiac angiogenesis using the cNGR-CD13/APN system.

    METHODS AND RESULTS:

    CD13/APN induction and cNGR homing were studied in the murine myocardial infarction (MI) model. By real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) at 7 days after MI, CD13/APN expression was 10- to 20-fold higher in the angiogenic infarct border zone and the MI area than in non-MI areas. In vivo fluorescence microscopy confirmed specific homing of fluorophore-tagged cNGR to the border zone and MI territory at 4 and 7 days after MI with a local advantage of 2.3, but not at 1 or 14 days after MI. Tissue residence half-life was 9.1+/-0.3 hours, whereas the half-life in plasma was 15.4+/-3.4 minutes. Pulse chase experiments confirmed reversible binding of cNGR in the infarct area. Fluorescent labeled cNGR conjugates or antibodies were injected in vivo, and their distribution was studied ex vivo by 2-photon laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM). cNGR co-localized exclusively with CD13/APN and the endothelial marker CD31 on vessels.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    In cardiac angiogenesis endothelial CD13/APN is upregulated. It can be targeted specifically with cNGR conjugates. In the heart cNGR binds its endothelial target only in angiogenic areas.

  • 4.
    de Muinck, Ebo
    Dartmouth Medical School.
    Gene and Cell Therapy for Heart Failure2009In: Antioxidants and Redox Signaling, ISSN 1523-0864, E-ISSN 1557-7716, Vol. 11, p. 2025-2042Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cardiac gene and cell therapy have both entered clinical trials aimed at ameliorating ventricular dysfunction in patients with chronic congestive heart failure. The transduction of myocardial cells with viral constructs encoding a specific cardiomyocyte Ca2+ pump in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), SRCa2+-ATPase has been shown to correct deficient Ca2+ handling in cardiomyocytes and improvements in contractility in preclinical studies, thus leading to the first clinical trial of gene therapy for heart failure. In cell therapy, it is not clear whether beneficial effects are cell-type specific and how improvements in contractility are brought about. Despite these uncertainties, a number of clinical trials are under way, supported by safety and efficacy data from trials of cell therapy in the setting of myocardial infarction. Safety concerns for gene therapy center on inflammatory and immune responses triggered by viral constructs, and for cell therapy with myoblast cells, the major concern is increased incidence of ventricular arrhythmia after cell transplantation. Principles and mechanisms of action of gene and cell therapy for heart failure are discussed, together with the potential influence of reactive oxygen species on the efficacy of these treatments and the status of myocardial-delivery techniques for viral constructs and cells.

  • 5.
    De Muinck, Ebo D.
    et al.
    Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, New Hampshire, USA.
    Nagy, Norbert
    Tirziu, Daniela
    Murakami, Masahiro
    Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, New Hampshire, USA.
    Gurusamy, Narasimman
    Goswami, Shyamal K.
    Ghatpande, Satish
    Engelman, Richard M.
    Simons, Michael
    Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, New Hampshire, USA.
    Das, Dipak K.
    University of Connecticut, USA.
    Protection against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury by the angiogenic masterswitch protein PR 39 gene therapy: the roles of HIF1 alpha stabilization and FGFR1 signaling2007In: Antioxidants and Redox Signaling, ISSN 1523-0864, E-ISSN 1557-7716, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 437-445Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PR-39, a proline-arginine-rich angiogenic response peptide, has been implicated in myocardial ischemic reperfusion injury. The present study examined the cardioprotective abilities of PR39 gene therapy. Male C5713146 mice were randomized to intramyocardial injecton of 10(9) p.f.u. adenovirus encoding PR39 (PR39), FGFR1 dominant negative signaling construct (FGFR1-dn), empty vector (EV), or PR39 adenovirus plus 4 mu g of plasmid endcoding a HIF1 alpha dominant negative construct (PR39 + HIF1 alpha-dn). Seven days later, hearts were subjected to 20 min of ischemia (1) and 2 h. reperfusion (R) ex vivo and aortic and coronary flow, left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP), and LVdp/dt were measured. Myocardial infarct (MI) size and cardiomyocyte apoptosis were measured by TTC staining and TUNEL, respectively. PR39 expression was robust up to 14 days after gene transfer and was absent after EV and FGFR1-dn. Hemodynamics showed no differences at baseline, and heart rate remained unchanged in all groups throughout the experiment. After I-R, hemodynamics remained unchanged in PR39 hearts, but deteriorated significantly in the other groups, except for aortic flow, which remained significantly higher in FGFR1-dn than in EV and PR39 + HIF1 alpha-dn (p less than 0.05), although it was lower than in PR39 (p less than 0.05). MI was 8.7 +/- 0.9 % in PR39, 23.8 +/- 1.1 % in FGFR1-dn, 29.9 +/- 2.2% in EV, and 30.8 +/- 2.7 % in PR39 + HIF1 alpha-dn (PR39 vs. other groups: p less than 0.05; FGFR1-dn vs. EV and PR39 + HIF1 alpha-dn: p less than 0.05). In PR39, HIF-1 alpha protein was higher than in FGFR1-dn and EV. Importantly, cotransfection of HlF1 alpha-dn with PR39 completely abolished cardioprotection by PR39. Cardioprotection by PR39 is likely conveyed by protective metabolic and survival responses through HIF1-alpha stabilization and not by angiogenesis, because baseline coronary How was the same in all groups. Abrogation of FGFR1 signaling conveyed an intermediate degree of cardioprotection.

  • 6. de Muinck, Ebo D.
    et al.
    Pearlman, Justin D.
    Targeted Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Angiogenesis in the Vascular System2007In: Cardiovascular Molecular Imaging, Informa Healthcare, 2007, 1, p. 251-262Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    de Muinck, Ebo D.
    et al.
    Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH, USA.
    Simons, Michael
    Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH, USA.
    Calling on reserves: Granulocyte colony stimulating growth factor in cardiac repair2005In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539, Vol. 112, no 20, p. 3033-3035Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    de Muinck, Ebo D.
    et al.
    Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH, USA.
    Thompson, C.
    Angiogenesis Research Center and Section of Cardiology, Lebanon, NH, USA.
    Simons, M.
    Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH, USA.
    Progress and prospects: Cell based regenerative therapy for cardiovascular disease2006In: Gene Therapy, ISSN 0969-7128, E-ISSN 1476-5462, Vol. 13, no 8, p. 659-671Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Experimental and clinical studies are progressing simultaneously to investigate the mechanisms and efficacy of progenitor cell treatment after an acute myocardial infarction and in chronic congestive heart failure. Multipotent progenitor cells appear to be capable of improving cardiac perfusion and/or function; however, the mechanisms still are unclear, and the issue of whether or not trans-differentiation occurs remains unsettled. Both experimentally and clinically, cells originating from different tissues have been shown capable of restoring cardiac function, but more recently multiple groups have identified resident cardiac progenitor cells that seem to participate in regenerating the heart after injury. Clinically, cells originating from blood or bone marrow have been proven to be safe whereas injection of skeletal myoblasts has been associated with the occurrence of ventricular arrhythmias. Myoblasts can transform into rapidly beating myotubes; however, thus far convincing evidence for electro-mechanical coupling between myoblasts and cardiomyocytes is lacking. Moving forward, mechanistic studies will benefit from the use of genetic markers and Cre/lox reporter systems that are less prone to misinterpretation than fluorescent antibodies, and a more convincing answer regarding therapeutic efficacy will come from adequately powered randomized placebo controlled trials.

  • 9.
    Dilip Deb, Kaushik
    et al.
    DiponEd BioIntelligence LLP, Bangalore, India.
    Griffith, May
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Ophthalmology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    De Muinck, Ebo
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Rafat, Mehrdad
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Regenerative Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Department of Regenerative Medicine (IGEN) .
    Nanotechnology in stem cells research: advances and applications2012In: Frontiers in Bioscience, ISSN 1093-9946, E-ISSN 1093-4715, Vol. 17, p. 1747-1760Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human beings suffer from a myriad of disorders caused by biochemical or biophysical alteration of physiological systems leading to organ failure. For a number of these conditions, stem cells and their enormous reparative potential may be the last hope for restoring function to these failing organ or tissue systems. To harness the potential of stem cells for biotherapeutic applications, we need to work at the size scale of molecules and processes that govern stem cells fate. Nanotechnology provides us with such capacity. Therefore, effective amalgamation of nanotechnology and stem cells - medical nanoscience or nanomedicine - offers immense benefits to the human race. The aim of this paper is to discuss the role and importance of nanotechnology in stem cell research by focusing on several important areas such as stem cell visualization and imaging, genetic modifications and reprogramming by gene delivery systems, creating stem cell niche, and similar therapeutic applications.

  • 10.
    Dobrucki, Lawrence W
    et al.
    Yale University.
    de Muinck, Ebo D
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindner, Jonathan R
    Oregon Health and Science University.
    Sinusas, Albert J
    Yale University.
    Approaches to Multimodality Imaging of Angiogenesis2010In: Journal of Nuclear Medicine, ISSN 0161-5505, E-ISSN 1535-5667, Vol. 51, p. 66S-79SArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Angiogenesis, defined as the formation of new capillaries by cellular outgrowth from existing microvessels, can be assessed by the evaluation of perfusion, function, and metabolism. However, more recently, novel, noninvasive imaging strategies for the evaluation of molecular events associated with the angiogenic process have been developed.

  • 11.
    Eisenbrey, John R.
    et al.
    Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, USA.
    Sridharan, Anush
    Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, USA.
    deMuinck, Ebo D.
    Dartmouth Coll, Hitchcock Med Ctr, Dartmouth Med Sch, Dept Cardiol, Hanover,USA.
    Doyley, Marvin M.
    University of Rochester, New York, USA.
    Forsberg, Flemming
    Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, USA.
    Parametric Subharmonic Imaging Using a Commercial Intravascular Ultrasound Scanner: An In Vivo Feasibility Study2012In: Journal of ultrasound in medicine, ISSN 0278-4297, E-ISSN 1550-9613, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 361-371Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives— The feasibility of visualizing atherosclerotic plaque using parametric subharmonic intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) was investigated in vivo.                    

    Methods— Atherosclerosis was induced in the aorta of 2 rabbits. Following injection of Definity (Lantheus Medical Imaging, North Billerica, MA), radiofrequency IVUS signals were acquired at 40 MHz with a Galaxy IVUS scanner (Boston Scientific/Scimed, Natick, MA).        Subharmonic imaging (SHI; receiving at 20 MHz) was performed offline by applying an 8-order equalization filter. Contrast-to-tissue ratios (CTRs) were computed for the vessel relative to the plaque area over 4 time points. Contrast-to-tissue ratios were also calculated for the plaque-tissue and vessel-tissue from 4 tissue regions of interest at 4 time points. Finally, parametric images showing the cumulative maximum intensity (CMI), time to peak, perfusion (PER), and time-integrated intensity (TII) were generated for the fundamental and subharmonic data sets, and CTR measurements were repeated.                    

    Results— Injection of the contrast agent resulted in improved delineation between plaque and the vessel lumen. Subharmonic imaging resulted in noticeable tissue suppression, although the intensity from the contrast agent was reduced. No improvement in the plaque to vessel lumen CTR was observed between the subharmonic and fundamental IVUS (2.1 ± 3.64 versus 2.2 ± 4.20; P = .5). However, the CTR for plaque-tissue was improved (11.8 ± 7.32 versus 9.9 ± 7.06; P < .0001) for SHI relative to fundamental imaging. Cumulative-maximum-intensity and TII maps of both fundamental and subharmonic data provided increased CTRs relative to nonparametric data sets (P < .002). Additionally, the CMI, PER, and TII of SHI IVUS showed significantly improved vessel-plaque CTRs relative to the fundamental (P < .04).                    

    Conclusions— Parametric SHI IVUS of atherosclerotic plaque is feasible and improves the visualization of the plaque.

  • 12.
    Gelmi, Amy
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Imperial Coll London, England.
    Cieslar-Pobuda, Artur
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Silesian Technical University, Poland.
    de Muinck, Ebo
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Los, Marek Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Rafat, Mehrdad
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jager, Edwin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Direct Mechanical Stimulation of Stem Cells: A Beating Electromechanically Active Scaffold for Cardiac Tissue Engineering2016In: Advanced Healthcare Materials, ISSN 2192-2640, E-ISSN 2192-2659, Vol. 5, no 12, p. 1471-1480Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The combination of stem cell therapy with a supportive scaffold is a promising approach to improving cardiac tissue engineering. Stem cell therapy can be used to repair nonfunctioning heart tissue and achieve myocardial regeneration, and scaffold materials can be utilized in order to successfully deliver and support stem cells in vivo. Current research describes passive scaffold materials; here an electroactive scaffold that provides electrical, mechanical, and topographical cues to induced human pluripotent stem cells (iPS) is presented. The poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) fiber scaffold coated with conductive polymer polypyrrole (PPy) is capable of delivering direct electrical and mechanical stimulation to the iPS. The electroactive scaffolds demonstrate no cytotoxic effects on the iPS as well as an increased expression of cardiac markers for both stimulated and unstimulated protocols. This study demonstrates the first application of PPy as a supportive electroactive material for iPS and the first development of a fiber scaffold capable of dynamic mechanical actuation.

  • 13.
    Good, Elin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Wilhelm, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Perk, Joep
    3Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    de Muinck, Ebo
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    High-grade carotid artery stenosis: A forgotten area in cardiovascular risk management2016In: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, ISSN 2047-4873, E-ISSN 2047-4881, Vol. 23, no 13, p. 1453-1460Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Patients with high-grade (≥70%) carotid artery stenosis (CAS) rank in the highest risk category for future cardiovascular (CV) events, but the quality of cardiovascular risk management in this patient group is unknown.

    DESIGN: Cross-sectional retrospective study.

    METHODS: Data were collected for all patients diagnosed with high-grade CAS in Östergötland county, Sweden between 1 January 2009 and 31 July 2012 regarding the quality of cardiovascular risk management, co-morbidity and outcomes during the 2-year follow-up period after a diagnosis of CAS with a carotid ultrasound scan. Patients were included regardless of whether they underwent carotid endarterectomy (CEA).

    RESULTS: A total of 393 patients with CAS were included in the study; 133 (33.8%) underwent CEA and 260 (66.2%) were assigned to a conservative management (CM) group. In both groups of patients the prescription of platelet inhibitors, statins and antihypertensive drugs increased significantly (p < 0.001) after diagnosis. However treatment targets were not met in the majority of patients and the low-density lipoprotein level was on target in only 13.5% of patients. During follow-up, low-density lipoprotein levels were not measured in 19.8% of patients who underwent CEA and 44.2% of patients in the CM group (p < 0.001); HbA1c was not measured in 24.4% of patients with diabetes in the CEA group and in 18.8% of patients in the CM group (p = 0.560). There was no documentation of counselling on diet, exercise, smoking cessation or adherence to medication. The combined clinical event rate (all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality and non-fatal cardiovascular events) was high in both groups (CEA 36.8% and CM 36.9%; p = 1.00) with no difference in the occurrence of ipsilateral ischaemic stroke.

    CONCLUSIONS: The clinical event rate was high in patients with high-grade CAS and the management of cardiovascular risk was deficient in all aspects.

  • 14.
    Gustafsson, Håkan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Berg, Kirsti
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
    Lindgren, Mikael
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    De Muinck, Ebo
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Zachrisson, Helene
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Fe(3+) Heterogeneity in Ex Vivo Carotid Atherosclerotic Plaques2011In: Free Radical Biology & Medicine, ISSN 0891-5849, E-ISSN 1873-4596, Vol. 51, no Suppl. 1, p. S40-S40Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 15.
    Gustafsson, Håkan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Hallbeck, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Lindgren, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Kolbun, Natallia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Jonson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    de Muinck, Ebo
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Zachrisson, Helene
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Visualization of oxidative stress in ex vivo biopsies using electron paramagnetic resonance imaging2015In: Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, ISSN 0740-3194, E-ISSN 1522-2594, Vol. 73, no 4, p. 1682-1691Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to develop an X-Band electron paramagnetic resonance imaging protocol for visualization of oxidative stress in biopsies.

    METHODS: The developed electron paramagnetic resonance imaging protocol was based on spin trapping with the cyclic hydroxylamine spin probe 1-hydroxy-3-methoxycarbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine and X-Band EPR imaging. Computer software was developed for deconvolution and back-projection of the EPR image. A phantom containing radicals of known spatial characteristic was used for evaluation of the developed protocol. As a demonstration of the technique electron paramagnetic resonance imaging of oxidative stress was performed in six sections of atherosclerotic plaques. Histopathological analyses were performed on adjoining sections.

    RESULTS: The developed computer software for deconvolution and back-projection of the EPR images could accurately reproduce the shape of a phantom of known spatial distribution of radicals. The developed protocol could successfully be used to image oxidative stress in six sections of the three ex vivo atherosclerotic plaques.

    CONCLUSIONS: We have shown that oxidative stress can be imaged using a combination of spin trapping with the cyclic hydroxylamine spin probe cyclic hydroxylamine spin probe 1-hydroxy-3-methoxycarbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine and X-Band EPR imaging. A thorough and systematic evaluation on different types of biopsies must be performed in the future to validate the proposed technique. Magn Reson Med, 2014.

  • 16.
    Koppal, Sandeep
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Moreno, Rodrigo
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Warntjes, Marcel
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    de Muinck, Ebo
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Optimal validering av MR-bildtagning av aterosklerotiska plack genom användning av multi-modal MR och 3D histologi2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    BAKGRUND: Magnetkamera (MR) kan identifiera aterosklerotiska plack som löper risk att brista och därmed orsaka stroke eller hjärtinfarkt. Metoden är dock bristfälligt validerad på grund av den osäkerhet som uppstår då 2D histologiska snitt ska registreras med 3D MR-bilder.

    SYFTE: Att optimera validering av MR-bildtagning av aterosklerotiska plack genom användning av multi-modal MR och 3D histologi.

    MATERIAL och METOD: Patienter som skulle opereras för att avlägsna aterosklerotiska plack från arteria karotis genomgick dedikerad plack-MR där följande parametrar undersöktes: plackets fettinnehåll, blödning inuti placket och maximal intensitet av turbulent blodflöde. Undersökningarna gjordes med en Philips 3T MR-kamera: (a) 4-punkt Dixon 3D gradient-eko, (b) T1-viktad spin-eko, (c) 4D fas-kontrast. Upplösningen var 0.6x0.6x0.7mm, 0.35x0.35x3mm respektive 1.14x1.25x1.14mm x 25ms. Vatten-, fett- and R2*-bilder (blödning) beräknades utifrån Dixon-sekvensen.Efter operation bäddades placken in i paraffin och enface-bilder togs varje 50µm i Z-riktning. Bilderna registrerades i ImageJ/Fiji och användes för att bygga en 3D-volym av placket. Vid varje 200µm togs snitt för biologiska markörer och histologiska färgningar. De färgade snitten registrerades med motsvarande enface-bilder. Detta resulterade i 3D-volymer med en upplösning på 1.02x1.02x200µm. Den histologiska 3D-volymen registrerades manuellt med uppsamplade och co-registrerade MR-bilder.

    RESULTAT: T1-viktade bilder var bäst för registrering av plack inom varje snitt. Registrering av kärlets lumen optimerades genom en kombination av 4D fas-kontrast, det första Dixon-ekot och vatten-bilder. Registrering av fett och R2* från MR-bilder med fett och blödning från 3D histologi uppvisade god överensstämmelse.

    SLUTSATS: Optimal validering av MR-bilder av aterosklerotiska plack kan åstadkommas genom att kombinera olika anatomiska landmärken från multimodala MR-bilder av plack och 3D-histologi. Genom att använda 3D-histologi korrigerar man för registreringsproblem som är relaterade till ”out-of-plane” vinklingar av vävnadssnitt och krympning och deformering till följd av histologiskt bearbetning av placket. Den detaljerade biologiska informationen från 3D-histologi kan förväntas förstärka fynden från in vivo MR-bilder.

  • 17.
    Listz Maurice, Roch
    et al.
    University of Montreal Hospital and University of Montreal, Canada.
    Fromageau, Jérémie
    University of Montreal Hospital, Canada .
    Roy Cardinal, Marie-Hélène
    University of Montreal Hospital, Canada .
    Doyley, Marvin
    Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, and Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, NH, USA.
    de Muinck, Ebo
    Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, NH, USA.
    Robb, John
    Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, NH, USA.
    Cloutier, Guy
    University of Montreal Hospital and University of Montreal, Canada.
    Characterization of atherosclerotic plaques and mural thrombi with intravascular ultrasound elastography: A potential method evaluated in an aortic rabbit model and a human coronary artery2008In: IEEE transactions on information technology in biomedicine, ISSN 1089-7771, E-ISSN 1558-0032, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 290-298Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plaque rupture is correlated with the plaque morphology, composition, mechanical properties, and with the blood pressure. Whereas the geometry can accurately be assessed with intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging, intravascular elastography (IVE) is capable of extracting information on the plaque local mechanical properties and composition. This paper reports additional IVE validation data regarding reproducibility and potential to characterize atherosclerotic plaques and mural thrombi. In a first investigation, radio frequency (RF) data were acquired from the abdominal aorta of an atherosclerotic rabbit model. In a second investigation, IVUS RF data were recorded from the left coronary artery of a patient referred for angioplasty. In both cases, Galaxy IVUS scanners (Boston Scientific, Freemont, CA), equipped with 40 MHz Atlantis catheters, were used. Elastograms were computed using two methods, the Lagrangian speckle model estimator (LSME) and the scaling factor estimator (SFE). Corroborated with histology, the LSME and the SFE both clearly detected a soft thrombus attached to the vascular wall. Moreover, shear elastograms, only available with the LSME, confirmed the presence of the thrombus. Additionally, IVE was found reproducible with consistent elastograms between cardiac cycles (CCs). Regarding the human dataset, only the LSME was capable of identifying a plaque that presumably sheltered a lipid core. Whereas such an assumption could not be certified with histology, radial shear and tangential strain LSME elastograms enabled the same conclusion. It is worth emphasizing that this paper reports the first ever in vivo tangential strain elastogram with regards to vascular imaging, due to the LSME. It is concluded that the IVE was reproducible exhibiting consistent strain patterns between CCs. The IVE might provide a unique tool to assess coronary wall lesions.

  • 18.
    Mandinov, L.
    et al.
    Maine Medical Center, Scarborough, Maine, USA.
    L. Moodie, K.
    Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Hanover, NH, USA.
    Mandinova, A.
    Maine Medical Center, Scarborough, Maine, USA.
    Zhuang, Z.
    Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Hanover, NH, USA.
    Redican, F.
    Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Hanover, NH, USA.
    Baklanov, D.
    Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Hanover, NH, USA.
    Lindner, V.
    Maine Medical Center, Scarborough, Maine, USA.
    Maciag, T.
    Maine Medical Center, Scarborough, Maine, USA.
    Simons, M.
    Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Hanover, NH, USA.
    de Muinck, Ebo D.
    Maine Medical Center, Scarborough, Maine, USA.
    Inhibition of in-stent restenosis by oral copper chelation in porcine coronary arteries2006In: American Journal of Physiology. Heart and Circulatory Physiology, ISSN 0363-6135, E-ISSN 1522-1539, Vol. 291, no 6, p. H2692-H2697Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stress-induced release of IL-1 alpha and fibroblast growth factor-1 is dependent on intracellular copper and is a major driver of neointimal hyperplasia. Therefore, we assessed the effect of tetrathiomolybdate (TTM), a clinically proven copper chelator, on in-stent restenosis. Nine pigs were treated with TTM (5 mg/kg po) twice daily for 2 wk before stent implantation and for 4 wk thereafter, and nine pigs served as controls. In-stent restenosis was assessed by quantitative coronary angiography (QCA), intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), and histomorphometry. Serum ceruloplasmin activity was used as a surrogate marker of copper bioavailability. In TTM-treated animals, ceruloplasmin dropped 70 +/- 10% below baseline levels. Baseline characteristics were comparable in TTM-treated and control animals. At 4-wk follow-up, all parameters relevant to in-stent restenosis were significantly reduced in TTM-treated animals: minimal lumen diameter by QCA was 2.03 +/- 0.57 and 1.47 +/- 0.45 mm in TTM-treated and control animals, respectively (P less than 0.05), percent stenosis diameter was 39% less in TTM-treated animals (27.1 +/- 16.6% vs. 44.5 +/- 16.1%, P less than 0.05), minimal lumen area by IVUS was 60% larger in TTM-treated animals (4.27 +/- 1.56 vs. 2.67 +/- 1.19 mm(2), P less than 0.05), and neointimal volume by histomorphometry was 37% less in TTM-treated animals (34.9 +/- 11.5 vs. 55.2 +/- 19.6 mm(3), P less than 0.05). We conclude that systemic copper chelation with a clinically approved chelator significantly inhibits in-stent restenosis.

  • 19.
    Moreno, Rodrigo
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Koppal, Sandeep
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    de Muinck, Ebo
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Robust Estimation of Distance Between Sets of Points2013In: Pattern Recognition Letters, ISSN 0167-8655, E-ISSN 1872-7344, Vol. 34, no 16, p. 2192-2198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper proposes a new methodology for computing Hausdorff distances between sets of points in a robust way. In a first step, robust nearest neighbor distance distributions between the two sets of points are obtained by considering reliability measures in the computations through a Monte Carlo scheme. In a second step, the computed distributions are operated using random variables algebra in order to obtain probability distributions of the average, minimum or maximum distances. In the last step, different statistics are computed from these distributions. A statistical test of significance, the nearest neighbor index, in addition to the newly proposed divergence and clustering indices are used to compare the computed measurements with respect to values obtained by chance. Results on synthetic and real data show that the proposed method is more robust than the standard Hausdorff distance. In addition, unlike previously proposed methods based on thresholding, it is appropriate for problems that can be modeled through point processes.

  • 20.
    Moreno, Rodrigo
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Romu, Thobias
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    de Muinck, Ebo
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Effects of denoising in the estimation of T2* from images acquired through Dixon imaging2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Shen, Li
    et al.
    Image and Pattern Analysis Laboratory, Department of Computer and Information Science, University of Massachusetts.
    Gaob, Ling
    Angiogenesis Research Center, Departments of Radiology and Cardiology, Dartmouth Medical School, Lebanon.
    Zhuang, Zhenwu
    Angiogenesis Research Center, Departments of Radiology and Cardiology, Dartmouth Medical School, Lebanon.
    De Muinck, Ebo
    Angiogenesis Research Center, Departments of Radiology and Cardiology, Dartmouth Medical School, Lebanon.
    Huang, Heng
    Dartmouth Experimental Visualization Laboratory, Department of Computer Science, Dartmouth College, Hanover.
    Makedon, Fillia
    Dartmouth Experimental Visualization Laboratory, Department of Computer Science, Dartmouth College, Hanover.
    Pearlman, Justin
    Angiogenesis Research Center, Departments of Radiology and Cardiology, Dartmouth Medical School, Lebanon.
    An interactive 3D visualization and manipulation tool foreffective assessment of angiogenesis and arteriogenesis usingcomputed tomographic angiography2005In: Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging, ISSN 1605-7422, E-ISSN 1042-4687, Vol. 5744, no II, p. 848-858Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents IVM, an Interactive Vessel Manipulation tool that can help make effective and efficient assessment

    of angiogenesis and arteriogenesis in computed tomographic angiography (CTA) studies. IVM consists

    of three fundamental components: (1) a visualization component, (2) a tracing component, and (3) a measurement

    component. Given a user-specified threshold, IVM can create a 3D surface visualization based on it. Since

    vessels are thin and tubular structures, using standard isosurface extraction techniques usually cannot yield

    satisfactory reconstructions. Instead, IVM directly renders the surface of a derived binary 3D image. The image

    volumes collected in CTA studies often have a relatively high resolution. Thus, compared with more complicated

    vessel extraction and visualization techniques, rendering the binary image surface has the advantages of being

    effective, simple and fast. IVM employs a semi-automatic approach to determine the threshold: a user can adjust

    the threshold by checking the corresponding 3D surface reconstruction and make the choice. Typical tracing

    software often defines ROIs on 3D image volumes using three orthogonal views. The tracing component in IVM

    takes one step further: it can perform tracing not only on image slices but also in a 3D view. We observe that

    directly operating on a 3D view can help a tracer identify ROIs more easily. After setting a threshold and tracing

    an ROI, a user can use IVM’s measurement component to estimate the volume and other parameters of vessels

    in the ROI. The effectiveness of the IVM tool is demonstrated on rat vessel/bone images collected in a previous

    CTA study.

  • 22.
    Sherman, Jonathan A.
    et al.
    Dartmouth Medical School, Lebanon, New Hampshire, USA.
    Hall, Amy
    Dartmouth Medical School, Lebanon, New Hampshire, USA.
    Malenka, David J.
    Dartmouth Medical School, Lebanon, New Hampshire, USA.
    De Muinck, Ebo D.
    Dartmouth Medical School, Lebanon, New Hampshire, USA.
    Simons, Michael
    Dartmouth Medical School, Lebanon, New Hampshire, USA.
    Humoral and cellular factors responsible for coronary collateral formation2006In: American Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0002-9149, E-ISSN 1879-1913, Vol. 98, no 9, p. 1194-1197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clinical observations suggest that patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) display a marked heterogenerty in collateral formation despite similar degrees of coronary obstruction. The development of coronary collaterals helps protect the myocardium from ischemic damage, yet the factors responsible for collateral formation are poorly understood. To better understand the biochemical and cellular mechanisms of collateral artery formation, monocyte function and circulating levels of pro- and antiangiogenic factors were measured in 101 patients with angiographically assessed CAD and extensively developed (score 2, n = 33) or absent (score 0, n = 68) collateral circulations. Compared with patients with score 0, those with score 2 were slightly older and had more advanced CAD. The score 2 group, was also more likely to have had a previous myocardial infarction or coronary artery bypass grafting and a family history of CAD. At the same time, there were no significant differences between groups with regard to circulating levels of vascular endothelial growth factor-A(165), platelet-derived growth factor-beta beta, fibroblast growth factor-2, fibroblast growth factor-4, hepatocyte growth factor, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1 beta, endostatin, matrix metalloproteinase-9, promatrix metalloproteinase-1, and CD40 ligand. Monocytes isolated from patients with score 2 and 0 collateral circulations demonstrated no differences in migration assays. However, adhesion to fibrinogen and collagen was significantly higher for monocytes from patients with score 0 (p = 0.05 and 0.04, respectively). In conclusion, these data suggest that the degree of coronary collateral formation is not determined by differences in systemically measurable levels of pro- or antiangiogenic factors assessed in this study. Rather, cellular properties, such as cell adhesion, or genetic differences between patients may be the driving force for collateral development. (c) 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 23.
    Sherrell, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Cieślar-Pobuda, Artur
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Institute of Automatic Control, Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland.
    Silverå Ejneby, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sammalisto, Laura
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gelmi, Amy
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    de Muinck, Ebo
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Brask, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jan Los, Marek
    Malopolska Centre of Biotechnology, Jagiellonian University, Kraków, Poland.
    Rafat, Mehrdad
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rational Design of a Conductive Collagen Heart Patch2017In: Macromolecular Bioscience, ISSN 1616-5187, E-ISSN 1616-5195, Vol. 17, no 7, article id 1600446Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cardiovascular diseases, including myocardial infarction, are the cause of significant morbidity and mortality globally. Tissue engineering is a key emerging treatment method for supporting and repairing the cardiac scar tissue caused by myocardial infarction. Creating cell supportive scaffolds that can be directly implanted on a myocardial infarct is an attractive solution. Hydrogels made of collagen are highly biocompatible materials that can be molded into a range of shapes suitable for cardiac patch applications. The addition of mechanically reinforcing materials, carbon nanotubes, at subtoxic levels allows for the collagen hydrogels to be strengthened, up to a toughness of 30 J m-1 and a two to threefold improvement in Youngs' modulus, thus improving their viability as cardiac patch materials. The addition of carbon nanotubes is shown to be both nontoxic to stem cells, and when using single-walled carbon nanotubes, supportive of live, beating cardiac cells, providing a pathway for the further development of a cardiac patch.

  • 24.
    Wickham, Abeni
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Koppal, Sandeep
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dånmark, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Aili, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    de Muinck, Ebo
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Influence of Polycaprolactone Scaffold Topography on Progenitor and Mesenchymal Cell ProliferationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Polycaprolactone (PCL) is a frequently used polymer for tissue engineering applications and has been suggested as a suitable scaffold for cardiac regeneration. PCL can be effectively procesed using electrospinning to form fibrous scaffolds with defined topographies. The topography, as well as the materials and suraface properties, signficanltly effect the performance and host response of the scaffold. We have investigated the effect of PCL scaffold topology on protein adsorption and how this translate to cell adhesion and proliferation. PCL sheets are relatively hydrophobic with a water contact angle of 72o. The surface energy of PCL (20 mJ m‐2) was obatined using the Good van OSS and Chaudhury (GvOC) method, and is in the range of many antifouling materials. Non-specific protein adsorption on PCL sheets was yet substantial (0.45 mg cm‐2) when exposed to serum. A lower protein surface concentration was seen on fibrous PCL scaffolds prepared by electrospinning, presumably as a consequence of the lower diffusion in the scaffold. Proliferation of mesenchymal stem cells and cardiac progenitor cells was significantly improved when cultured on PCL sheets pre-treated with serum, but significantly lower than for fibrous PCL scaffolds. For the latter, no significant effect of serum pretreatment was observed, indicating that for PCL, fibre dimensions and scaffold topography has a larger influence on cell adhesion and proliferation than a high surface concentration of adsorbed proteins.

  • 25.
    Yu, Jun
    et al.
    Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.
    de Muinck, Ebo D.
    Dartmouth Medical School, Lebanon, NH, USA.
    Zhuang, Zhenwu
    Dartmouth Medical School, Lebanon, NH, USA.
    Drinane, Mary
    Dartmouth Medical School, Lebanon, NH, USA.
    Kauser, Katalin
    Berlex Biosciences, Richmond, CA, USA.
    Rubanyi, Gabor M.
    Berlex Biosciences, Richmond, CA, USA.
    Qian, Hu Sheng
    Berlex Biosciences, Richmond, CA, USA.
    Murata, Takahisa
    Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.
    Escalante, Bruno
    Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico .
    Sessa, William C
    Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.
    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase is critical for ischemic remodeling, mural cell recruitment, and blood flow reserve2005In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 102, no 31, p. 10999-11004Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The genetic loss of endothelial-derived nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in mice impairs vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and ischemia-initiated blood flow recovery resulting in critical limb ischemia. This result may occur through impaired arteriogenesis, angiogenesis, or mobilization of stem and progenitor cells. Here, we show that after ischemic challenge, eNOS knockout mice [eNOS (-/-)] have defects in arteriogenesis and functional blood flow reserve after muscle stimulation and pericyte recruitment, but no impairment in endothelial progenitor cell recruitment. More importantly, the defects in blood flow recovery, clinical manifestations of ischemia, ischemic reserve capacity, and pericyte recruitment into the growing neovasculature can be rescued by local intramuscular delivery of an adenovirus encoding a constitutively active allele of eNOS, eNOS S1179D, but not a control virus. Collectively, our data suggest that endogenous eNOS-derived NO exerts direct effects in preserving blood flow, thereby promoting arteriogenesis, angiogenesis, and mural cell recruitment to immature angiogenic sprouts.

  • 26.
    Zhuang, Zhen W.
    et al.
    Dartmouth Medical School, Lebanon, NH, USA.
    Gao, Ling
    Dartmouth Medical School, Lebanon, NH, USA.
    Murakami, Masahiro
    Dartmouth Medical School, Lebanon, NH, USA.
    Pearlman, Justin
    Dartmouth Medical School, Lebanon, NH, USA.
    Sackett, Terry
    Dartmouth Medical School, Lebanon, NH, USA.
    Simons, Michael
    Dartmouth Medical School, Lebanon, NH, USA.
    de Muinck, Ebo D.
    Dartmouth Medical School, Lebanon, NH, USA.
    Arteriogenesis: Noninvasive quantification with multi-detector row CT angiography and three-dimensional volume rendering in rodents2006In: Radiology, ISSN 0033-8419, E-ISSN 1527-1315, Vol. 240, no 3, p. 698-707Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    To evaluate two-dimensional (2D) multi-detector row computed tomographic (CT) angiography and three-dimensional (3D) volume rendering for depiction of patterns of arterial growth and quantification of blood vessel density and volume.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS:

    The institutional animal care and use committee approved this study. The right femoral artery and its branches were ligated and excised in 16 inbred Lewis rats; animals were randomly assigned to receive 70 microL Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) or 1.5 x 10(7) bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BMC) from isogenic donor rats in 70 microL DMEM. At 2 weeks, CT angiography was performed with injection of 0.45 mL barium sulfate suspension at 0.7 mL/min, followed by silver staining. Number of blood vessels, area, mean area, volume, and blood vessel size distribution derived from digitally subtracted 2D CT angiographic sections were quantified; 3D images were reconstructed. Two-way analysis of variance and paired and unpaired Student t tests were performed.

    RESULTS:

    CT angiography showed two patterns of arterial growth: collateral arterial formation and branching arteriogenesis. Two-way analysis of variance indicated that differences within subjects (ischemic vs nonischemic legs) and between subjects (BMC vs DMEM treatment) were significant for total blood vessel area, total blood vessel volume, and mean of blood vessel area (P < .001). In the BMC group, there were significantly more arteries (mean, 241.6 +/- 77.0 [standard deviation] vs 196.4 +/- 75.2, P = .028), but mean cross-sectional area of these arteries was smaller in ischemic versus nonischemic legs (5.4 mm(2) +/- 1.2 vs 6.8 mm(2) +/- 1.3, P = .006). Total arterial area and volume did not differ significantly between ischemic and nonischemic legs.

    CONCLUSION:

    BMC injection had a substantial effect on arteriogenesis, with normalization of total arterial area and volume in the BMC group; this effect was successfully depicted.

1 - 26 of 26
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf