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  • 1.
    Lagali, Neil
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Edén, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Paaske Utheim, Tor
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
    Chen, Xiangjun
    Synslaser Kirurgi AS, Norway.
    Riise, Ruth
    Innland Hospital, Norway.
    Delby, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Ophthalmology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Fagerholm, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    In Vivo Morphology of the Limbal Palisades of Vogt Correlates With Progressive Stem Cell Deficiency in Aniridia-Related Keratopathy2013In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 54, no 8, p. 5333-5342Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose. To investigate morphologic alterations in the limbal palisades of Vogt in a progressive form of limbal stem cell deficiency.

    Methods. Twenty Norwegian subjects (40 eyes) with congenital aniridia and 9 healthy family members (18 eyes) without aniridia were examined. Clinical grade of aniridia-related keratopathy (ARK) was assessed by slit-lamp biomicroscopy, and tear production and quality, corneal thickness, and sensitivity were additionally measured. The superior and inferior limbal palisades of Vogt and central cornea were examined by laser scanning in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM).

    Results. In an aniridia patient with grade 0 ARK, a transparent cornea and normal limbal palisade morphology were found. In grade 1 ARK, 5 of 12 eyes had degraded palisade structures. In the remaining grade 1 eyes and in all 20 eyes with stage 2, 3, and 4 ARK, palisade structures were absent by IVCM. Increasing ARK grade significantly correlated with reduced visual acuity and corneal sensitivity, increased corneal thickness, degree of degradation of superior and inferior palisade structures, reduced peripheral nerves, increased inflammatory cell invasion, and reduced density of basal epithelial cells and central subbasal nerves. Moreover, limbal basal epithelial cell density and central corneal subbasal nerve density were both significantly reduced in aniridia compared to healthy corneas (P = 0.002 and 0.003, respectively).

    Conclusions. Progression of limbal stem cell deficiency in aniridia correlates with degradation of palisade structures, gradual transformation of epithelial phenotype, onset of inflammation, and a corneal nerve deficit. IVCM can be useful in monitoring early- to late-stage degenerative changes in stem cell–deficient patients.

  • 2.
    Neira, Waldir
    et al.
    University of Helsinki.
    Hammar, Bjorn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Ophthalmology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL/MH.
    M Holopainen, Juha
    University of Helsinki.
    Tuisku, Ilpo
    University of Helsinki.
    Dellby, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Ophthalmology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL/MH.
    Tervo, Timo
    University of Helsinki.
    Fagerholm, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Ophthalmology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL/MH.
    Dystrophia Helsinglandica - corneal morphology, topography and sensitivity in a hereditary corneal disease with recurrent erosive episodes2010In: ACTA OPHTHALMOLOGICA, ISSN 1755-375X, Vol. 88, no 4, p. 401-406Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to describe the morphology, corneal topography and sensitivity in individuals with Dystrophia Helsinglandica. This autosomal dominant corneal disease is characterized by recurrent corneal erosive episodes and progressive subepithelial fibrosis not significantly affecting visual acuity. Methods: The corneas of nine affected and nine unaffected individuals were examined using slit-lamp biomicroscopy, in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) and videokeratography. Corneal mechanical sensitivity was also measured using a non-contact esthesiometer. Results: Slit-lamp biomicroscopy revealed that the affected individuals represented different stages of corneal changes, from a nearly normal cornea to subepithelial fibrosis of the central cornea. Corneal changes in affected individuals did not significantly decrease the best spectacle-corrected visual acuity. In vivo confocal microscopy detected morphological changes in the epithelium and stroma. Subepithelial opacity formation including altered keratocytes could be found in the anterior stroma in all affected eyes. With the exception of two eyes (one affected and one unaffected), all videokeratographies showed irregular astigmatism. Corneal sensitivity was significantly lower in affected individuals (p = 0.01). Age and corneal sensitivity showed no correlation. Conclusion: The main morphological findings in affected individuals were discrete and progressive subepithelial fibrosis, in the in vivo confocal microscope corresponding to optically dense extracellular matrix and activated keratocytes. Subbasal nerve morphology was changed in the affected family members who also showed a decreased corneal sensitivity. The findings are per se not specific to the disease. The changes probably reflect a healing response to erosive events on the corneal surface influenced by the genotype.

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