liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Karresand, Helena
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Molin, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Energy Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Persson, Johannes
    Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan, KTH, Stockholm.
    Åberg, Magnus
    Uppsala universitet.
    How passive are your activities?: An interdisciplinary comparative energy analysis of passive and conventional houses in Linköping2009Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study a number of new built passive and conventional houses in the residential area of Lambohov, Linköping, are studied. The effect of household activities on the building’s energy balance is investigated along with an investigation of the effects of an extensive adaptation to passive houses in the energy system of Linköping. The study compares how the heating system affects the thermal indoor climate for the tenants. Further on, the study also contains in-depth interviews on the expectations on the passive houses of the recently moved in tenants. Also the expectations from the housing company on the tenants and the factors that motivated the actual building of the passive houses are investigated, both out of the housing company’s perspective and the perspective of the City of Linköping.

  • 2.
    Molin, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Energy Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Moshfegh, Bahram
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Energy Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Widén, Joakim
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Increasing photovoltaic power supply self-consumption by on-site batteries for a large flat-roof industrial premise2013In: Proceedings of the 28th European Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conference (EU PVSEC), 2013, 2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    PV electricity is booming world-wide and grid parity can be found in many countries. Nonetheless, animportant factor that still usually affects the economy of the PV project is the value of the power produced. Selfconsumptionis important in Sweden and on other markets where the bought electricity is higher valued than the soldelectricity. For many large roof tops, on-site batteries can be used as a measure for increasing self-consumption. Inthe present study, the logistics terminal owned by DB Schenker in Jönköping, Sweden, where a 20 kWp pilot plantwas installed in 2011, has been analyzed. The main focus is on the increasing self-consumption with batteries forelectric lifters. The results show that the self-consumption rate can increase 12 % (from 66 to 78 %) by using thepresent batteries for the electric lifters in the case-study, based on PV supply power (1 MWp) similar to the electricload capacity (1 MW). This enables 120 MWh per year more self-consumption out of annual 1000 MWh solar PVproduction. The conclusion for the Swedish case is that it is economically feasible to install battery inverters for onsitebatteries.

  • 3.
    Molin, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Energy Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Rohdin, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Energy Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Moshfegh, Bahram
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Energy Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Investigation of energy performance of newly built low-energy buildings in Sweden2011In: Energy and Buildings, ISSN 0378-7788, E-ISSN 1872-6178, Vol. 43, no 10, p. 2822-2831Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Energy use in the built environment represents a large part of total energy use in Sweden and is oneimportant sector where energy conservation needs to be significantly improved in order to meet thenational implementation of the European goals. One key question that needs to be investigated in relationto these goals is the performance and implementation of passive or low-energy houses. This paperpresents results and an evaluation of a newly built house in an area with passive houses in Linköping,Sweden. Nine passive houses were built with the aim to be energy efficient, with an annual space heatingdemand of 21kWh/m2, and at the same time to have the same visual appearance as any other buildingin the surrounding area.This study evaluates the energy performance of a residential area with low-energy buildings basedon Building Energy Simulation (BES) (IDA ICE 4), and measurements from the real object. Both annualand hourly validation is performed using room by room modeling and internal heat gains. A novelapproach to internal heat gain modeling is presented using time-use data (TUD). The resultsshowpossibleimprovements in the design, the building envelope and in the heating control.

  • 4.
    Molin, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Energy Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Rohdin, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Energy Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Moshfegh, Bahram
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Energy Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Positive power market value for grid-connected roof-top solar power in Sweden2010In: World Renewable Energy Congress XI25-30 September 2010, Abu Dhabi, UAE, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Grid-connected PV-systems receive extensive investment subsidies in Sweden. Due to lack of net debiting or other production credits, it is still not feasible to invest in PV-system, resulting in long economic payback time. This study shows the positive value of the periodic intermittency of solar power, based on daily production and electricity market price profiles. A rooftop PV-system was modelled with PVSYST-software and evaluated hourly, monthly and annually using historical prices 1996–2009 in the Swedish, Spanish and German electricity markets. The daily profile value is always positive for solar power, due to daytime production when electricity prices are higher, while the monthly profile value is usually negative. The total market value of solar power in all three countries is higher than for constant production of the same energy amount. The results show that annual net debiting would facilitate zero energy buildings and still be beneficial for the Power Company.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • 5.
    Molin, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Energy Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Schneider, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Energy Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rohdin, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Energy Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Moshfegh, Bahram
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Energy Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Assessing a regional building applied PV potential - Spatial and dynamic analysis of supply and load matching2016In: Renewable energy, ISSN 0960-1481, E-ISSN 1879-0682, Vol. 91, p. 261-274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electricity production by PV is growing world-wide, and grid parity of PV-electricity can be found in many countries, even in low sunlight countries, such as Sweden (at latitude 58 degrees). High installation-rate of PV-systems poses a challenge to the grid-operator. Building-integrated PV-supply potential analysis was performed for Linkoping municipality in Sweden based on GIS-data for all the buildings in the municipality. The Linkoping model provides a high spatial resolution (>180 000 buildings). The data are sorted based on azimuth and tilt, categorized in steps of 10 degrees, and then used to construct hourly power supply data. The supply data are fed into the existing electricity load-profile of Linkoping municipality. The strength and novelty of the method is that it provides the possibility of varying the installation-rate in different spatial directions to better match the load-profile. The results indicate a solar supply-rate of 19, 43 and 88% respectively if using the tilted roofs (>900 kWh/m(2) x yr), the flat-roofs optimized with tilted panels for a winter solar supply and the fully available PV-area on existing buildings (8.1 km(2)). Nevertheless, in approximately 70,1400 and >3000 h/yr, respectively, surplus-power is created, which could be used to match a future load in a wider electromobility scenario. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 6.
    Molin, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Widén, Joakim
    Uppsala univeristet.
    Stridh, Bengt
    Malmö högskola.
    Karlsson, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Energy Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Konsekvenser av avräkningsperiodens längd vid nettodebitering av solel2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The way that owners of PV systems are handled today gives, in practice, installations of very small PV systems relative to what would be possible if all appropriately oriented roof and facade surfaces were fully exploited. This problem occurs because there is a surplus of PV electricity for the system owner, who receives a zero or low value in relation to the electricity purchases that are avoided. For single-family houses, this means that without net billing it is economically optimal to install only up to about 2-7 m2 of the approximately 60 m2 that are available on the roof of a single-family house. Other end-user types, such as multi-family buildings, agriculture and industry, also show low use of available surfaces. With the current system, the major part of the possible PV production on buildings is hindered. This electricity production does not exploit any new land and has a potential in Sweden of about 10-15 TWh, assuming that 25% of the roof and wall surfaces that have at least 70% of optimum solar radiation are exploited.

    The effects of five different scenarios, without and with monthly or annual net billing for an electricity consumer who is also a PV electricity producer have been studied for ten different building types, including three single-family houses, two multi-family buildings and five other properties. The implications for four actors – the solar electricity producer, the grid owner, the electricity trader and the Swedish state – have been calculated. It is thus 200 different combinations that are reported. For each combination the outcome at any system size can also be seen in the reported figures.

    The amount of saved electricity for the PV owner depends substantially on the time-horizon of the net billing period. Monthly net billing would drastically improve the utilization of roof areas, but still limits the utilization. Annual net billing gives a similar additional improvement. With annual net billing, the roofs of all the studied types of properties could be covered either entirely with solar cells or as much as needed to cover the annual needs of electricity. A net billing limit, for example 63A=43.5 kW=313 m2, would be a size delimiter for larger buildings.

    Grid owners would be affected in the form of reduced revenues for the electricity transfer, reduced losses in the local grid and increased revenue from excess electricity which the PV owner donates to the grid.

    For electricity traders increasing system size means that sales to the PV owner decrease in the same way as bought electricity is saved for the PV owner. The balance responsible actor (BA), which takes care of generated solar electricity, can usually make a profit due to the price profile. This could also be the grid owner, or the BA designated by the grid owner, or an electricity trader chosen by the system owner depending on how the net billing is handled. If the same electricity trader is affected by the reduction in electricity sales and earnings due to the price profile, this will be favourable for the electricity trader.

    Looking at tax from PV installations, net billing has the same economic effect as if the PV owner had made an energy efficiency measure. The calculations have not taken into account the state's tax revenue of the investment, which today is higher than the loss of revenue for energy tax and VAT.

    For the further development of the PV market in Sweden it is of utmost importance to make it possible, as soon as possible, for PV system owners to get a reasonable compensation for their excess electricity. Net billing would be an easy way to solve this problem. The most practical and easiest way to achieve net billing would be if the grid owner could send a net value to the electricity trader. The period for net billing should be longer than one month if all available roof and wall areas are to be optimally utilized.

  • 7.
    Rohdin, Patrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Energy Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Molin, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Energy Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Moshfegh, Bahram
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Energy Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Experiences from nine passive houses in Sweden - Indoor thermal environment and energy use2014In: Building and Environment, ISSN 0360-1323, E-ISSN 1873-684X, Vol. 71, p. 176-185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents experiences from a recently built area with passive houses in Linkoping, Sweden and compares them with conventional buildings, mainly from an indoor environment perspective, but also based on energy use. The built area consists of 39 recently constructed terraced houses, of which nine are built according to the passive house standard. The aspects of thermal comfort as well as local discomfort are studied. The methodology is based on on-site measurements and two types of simulations - CFD and Building Energy Simulation. In addition a post-occupancy evaluation was made using a standardized questionnaire to relate the occupants perception of the indoor environment one year after the buildings were completed. The thermal comfort for these newly built passive houses is well within the limits in the local building code. However, some interesting findings related to local comfort such as cold floors are found in the post-occupancy evaluation as well as in the predictions. The occupants of the passive houses experience cold floors to a higher degree than in the conventional buildings. It was also shown that there are a higher number of complaints related to high temperatures during summer in the passive houses. It is worth noting that the buildings do not have external shading installed by default. The effect of varying temperatures was also observed in the passive houses to a higher degree than in the more conventional buildings, especially related to cooking and other heat-generating activities, which is normal in a more well insulated and airtight building.

  • 8.
    Widén, Joakim
    et al.
    Dept. of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University.
    Molin, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Energy Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ellegård, Kajsa
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Models of domestic occupancy, activities and energy use based on time-usedata: deterministic and stochastic approaches with application to variousbuilding-related simulations2012In: Journal of Building Performance Simulation, Taylor & Francis, ISSN 1940-1493, E-ISSN 1940-1507, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 27-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Time-use data (TUD) have a large potential for improving occupancy and load modelling and for introducingrealistic behavioural patterns into various simulations. In this article, previously developed models of occupancy,activities and energy use based on TUD are extended and described in a general framework. Two extensions arestudied: deterministic conversion of empirical TUD is extended into a complete thermal load model encompassingboth occupancy and various end-uses and a Markov-chain approach for generating synthetic TUD sequences isextended to include a model for load management. Three examples of building-related applications are presented:simulation of indoor climate in a low-energy building, household electricity load management in response to timedifferentiatedelectricity tariffs and simulations of load matching in a net zero energy building. The main conclusionis that the extended model framework can generate detailed and realistic behavioural patterns that allow diversityand correlations between end-uses to be taken into account.

  • 9.
    Åberg, Magnus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Molin, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Energy Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wäckelgård, Ewa
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Moshfegh, Bahram
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Energy Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Greenhouse Gas Emission from General District Heat use in Sweden: An Approach for Justified Comparisons in Residential Energy Use2009In: Scientific Conference on Energy Saving and Green Energy, Älvsjömässan, Stockholm, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Significant uncertainties regarding the evaluation of environmental impact from the use ofenergy motivates the need for a unified evaluation approach. In this paper a marginalapproach for general evaluation of CO2 equivalent emissions from the use of district heat inSweden is proposed. A predefined national marginal heat production mix is used to define amarginal heat evaluation approach to calculate the greenhouse gas emissions from the use ofdistrict heating. The novel approach offers a method for justified comparisons of differenttypes of energy use. By using the marginal heat evaluation approach it was shown that theevaluation of the electricity used in heat production for district heating is significant for theCO2 equivalent emissions. A survey of general district heating CO2 emission evaluationexamples is also included in the paper. The marginal heat use approach generates high CO2equivalent emission values in comparison with earlier studies. The overall conclusion of thepaper is that there is a need for further research and discussion regarding development ofmethods for energy use evaluation. The general marginal heat use approach is part of thesolution to this problem.

1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf