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  • 1.
    Alvarez, Yolanda
    et al.
    University College Dublin, Ireland.
    Astudillo, Olaya
    University College Dublin, Ireland.
    Jensen, Lasse Dahl
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Reynolds, Alison L
    University College Dublin, Ireland.
    Waghorne, Nora
    University College Dublin, Ireland.
    Brazil, Derek P
    Queen's University Belfast, UK.
    Cao, Yihai
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    O'Connor, John J
    University College Dublin, Ireland.
    Kennedy, Breandán N
    University College Dublin, Ireland.
    Selective inhibition of retinal angiogenesis by targeting PI3 kinase2009In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 4, no 11, p. e7867-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ocular neovascularisation is a pathological hallmark of some forms of debilitating blindness including diabetic retinopathy, age related macular degeneration and retinopathy of prematurity. Current therapies for delaying unwanted ocular angiogenesis include laser surgery or molecular inhibition of the pro-angiogenic factor VEGF. However, targeting of angiogenic pathways other than, or in combination to VEGF, may lead to more effective and safer inhibitors of intraocular angiogenesis. In a small chemical screen using zebrafish, we identify LY294002 as an effective and selective inhibitor of both developmental and ectopic hyaloid angiogenesis in the eye. LY294002, a PI3 kinase inhibitor, exerts its anti-angiogenic effect in a dose-dependent manner, without perturbing existing vessels. Significantly, LY294002 delivered by intraocular injection, significantly inhibits ocular angiogenesis without systemic side-effects and without diminishing visual function. Thus, targeting of PI3 kinase pathways has the potential to effectively and safely treat neovascularisation in eye disease.

  • 2.
    Bayat, Narges
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Lopes, Viviana
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Schoelermann, Julia
    University of Bergen, Norway.
    Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Cristobal, Susana
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Stockholm University, Sweden; University of Basque Country, Spain.
    Vascular toxicity of ultra-small TiO2 nanoparticles and single walled carbon nanotubes in vitro and in vivo2015In: Biomaterials, ISSN 0142-9612, E-ISSN 1878-5905, Vol. 63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ultra-small nanoparticles (USNPs) at 1-3 nm are a subset of nanoparticles (NPs) that exhibit intermediate physicochemical properties between molecular dispersions and larger NPs. Despite interest in their utilization in applications such as theranostics, limited data about their toxicity exist. Here the effect of TiO2-USNPs on endothelial cells in vitro, and zebrafish embryos in vivo, was studied and compared to larger TiO2-NPs (30 nm) and to single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). In vitro exposure showed that TiO2-USNPs were neither cytotoxic, nor had oxidative ability, nevertheless were genotoxic. In vivo experiment in early developing zebrafish embryos in water at high concentrations of TiO2-USNPs caused mortality possibly by acidifying the water and caused malformations in the form of pericardial edema when injected. Myo1C involved in glomerular development of zebrafish embryos was upregulated in embryos exposed to TiO2-USNPs. They also exhibited anti-angiogenic effects both in vitro and in vivo plus decreased nitric oxide concentration. The larger TiO2-NPs were genotoxic but not cytotoxic. SWCNTs were cytotoxic in vitro and had the highest oxidative ability. Neither of these NPs had significant effects in vivo. To our knowledge this is the first study evaluating the effects of TiO2-USNPs on vascular toxicity in vitro and in vivo and this strategy could unravel USNPs potential applications. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 3.
    Block, Keith I.
    et al.
    Block Centre Integrat Cancer Treatment, IL 60077 USA.
    Gyllenhaal, Charlotte
    Block Centre Integrat Cancer Treatment, IL 60077 USA; National Cancer Centre, South Korea.
    Lowe, Leroy
    Getting Know Canc, Canada; University of Lancaster, England.
    Amedei, Amedeo
    University of Florence, Italy.
    Ruhul Amin, A. R. M.
    University of Florence, Italy.
    Amin, Amr
    University of Florence, Italy.
    Aquilano, Katia
    United Arab Emirates University, U Arab Emirates.
    Arbiser, Jack
    Atlanta Vet Adm Medical Centre, GA USA; Emory University, GA USA.
    Arreola, Alexandra
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    Arzumanyan, Alla
    University of N Carolina, NC 27599 USA.
    Salman Ashraf, S.
    Temple University, PA 19122 USA.
    Azmi, Asfar S.
    United Arab Emirates University, U Arab Emirates.
    Benencia, Fabian
    Wayne State University, MI USA.
    Bhakta, Dipita
    Ohio University, OH 45701 USA.
    Bilsland, Alan
    SASTRA University, India.
    Bishayeen, Anupam
    University of Glasgow, Scotland.
    Blain, Stacy W.
    Larkin Health Science Institute, FL USA.
    Block, Penny B.
    Block Centre Integrat Cancer Treatment, IL 60077 USA.
    Boosani, Chandra S.
    Suny Downstate Medical Centre, NY USA.
    Carey, Thomas E.
    Creighton University, NE 68178 USA.
    Carnero, Amancio
    University of Michigan, MI USA.
    Carotenuto, Marianeve
    CSIC, Spain; Centre Ingn Genet and Biotecnol Avanzate, Italy.
    Casey, Stephanie C.
    University of Naples Federico II, Italy.
    Chakrabarti, Mrinmay
    Stanford University, CA 94305 USA.
    Chaturvedi, Rupesh
    University of S Carolina, SC USA.
    Zhuo Chen, Georgia
    Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, GA, United States.
    Chenx, Helen
    Jawaharlal Nehru University, India.
    Chen, Sophie
    University of British Columbia, Canada.
    Charlie Chen, Yi
    Ovarian and Prostate Cancer Research Lab, England; Alderson Broaddus University, PA USA.
    Choi, Beom K.
    National Cancer Centre, South Korea.
    Rosa Ciriolo, Maria
    United Arab Emirates University, U Arab Emirates.
    Coley, Helen M.
    University of Surrey, England.
    Collins, Andrew R.
    University of Oslo, Norway.
    Connell, Marisa
    Jawaharlal Nehru University, India.
    Crawford, Sarah
    So Connecticut State University, CT 06515 USA.
    Curran, Colleen S.
    University of Wisconsin, WI USA.
    Dabrosin, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Damia, Giovanna
    Ist Ric Farmacol Mario Negri, Italy.
    Dasgupta, Santanu
    University of Texas Health Science Centre Tyler, TX USA.
    DeBerardinis, Ralph J.
    University of Texas SW Medical Centre Dallas, TX 75390 USA.
    Decker, William K.
    Baylor Coll Med, TX 77030 USA.
    Dhawan, Punita
    Vanderbilt University, TN 37212 USA.
    Diehl, Anna Mae E.
    Duke University, NC 27710 USA.
    Dong, Jin-Tang
    Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, GA, United States.
    Ping Dou, Q.
    United Arab Emirates University, U Arab Emirates.
    Drew, Janice E.
    University of Aberdeen, Scotland.
    Elkord, Eyad
    United Arab Emirates University, U Arab Emirates.
    El-Rayes, Bassel
    Emory University, GA 30322 USA.
    Feitelson, Mark A.
    University of N Carolina, NC 27599 USA.
    Felsher, Dean W.
    University of Naples Federico II, Italy.
    Ferguson, Lynnette R.
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Fimognari, Carmela
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Firestone, Gary L.
    University of Bologna, Italy.
    Frezza, Christian
    University of Calif Berkeley, CA 94720 USA.
    Fujii, Hiromasa
    University of Cambridge, England.
    Fuster, Mark M.
    Nara Medical University, Japan.
    Generali, Daniele
    University of Calif San Diego, CA 92103 USA; University of Calif San Diego, CA 92103 USA.
    Georgakilas, Alexandros G.
    University of Trieste, Italy.
    Gieseler, Frank
    Azienda Osped Ist Ospitalieri Cremona, Italy.
    Gilbertson, Michael
    National Technical University of Athens, Greece.
    Green, Michelle F.
    University Hospital Schleswig Holstein, Germany.
    Grue, Brendan
    Getting Know Canc, Canada.
    Guha, Gunjan
    Ohio University, OH 45701 USA.
    Halicka, Dorota
    Duke University, NC USA.
    Helferich, William G.
    Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Heneberg, Petr
    New York Medical Coll, NY 10595 USA.
    Hentosh, Patricia
    University of Illinois, IL 61820 USA.
    Hirschey, Matthew D.
    University Hospital Schleswig Holstein, Germany.
    Hofseth, Lorne J.
    Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic.
    Holcombe, Randall F.
    Old Domin University, VA USA.
    Honoki, Kanya
    Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Nara Medical University, Kashihara, Nara, Japan.
    Hsu, Hsue-Yin
    University of S Carolina, SC 29208 USA.
    Huang, Gloria S.
    Mt Sinai School Med, NY USA.
    Jensen, Lasse D.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jiang, Wen G.
    Cardiff University, Wales.
    Jones, Lee W.
    Mem Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre, NY 10021 USA.
    Karpowicz, Phillip A.
    University of Windsor, Canada.
    Nicol Keith, W.
    SASTRA University, India.
    Kerkar, Sid P.
    Mayo Clin, MN USA.
    Khan, Gazala N.
    Henry Ford Hospital, MI 48202 USA.
    Khatami, Mahin
    National Institute Heatlh, MD USA.
    Ko, Young H.
    University of Maryland BioPark, MD USA.
    Kucuk, Omer
    Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, GA, United States.
    Kulathinal, Rob J.
    University of N Carolina, NC 27599 USA.
    Kumar, Nagi B.
    University of S Florida, FL USA.
    Kwon, Byoung S.
    National Cancer Centre, South Korea; Tulane University, LA 70118 USA.
    Le, Anne
    Johns Hopkins University, MD USA.
    Lea, Michael A.
    Rutgers State University, NJ USA.
    Lee, Ho-Young
    Seoul National University, South Korea.
    Lichtor, Terry
    Rush University, IL 60612 USA.
    Lin, Liang-Tzung
    Taipei Medical University, Taiwan.
    Locasale, Jason W.
    Cornell University, NY 14853 USA.
    Lokeshwar, Bal L.
    Georgia Regents University, GA USA.
    Longo, Valter D.
    University of So Calif, CA USA.
    Lyssiotis, Costas A.
    University of Michigan, MI USA; University of Michigan, MI USA.
    MacKenzie, Karen L.
    Childrens Cancer Institute Australia, Australia.
    Malhotra, Meenakshi
    McGill University, Canada.
    Marino, Maria
    University of Rome Tre, Italy.
    Martinez-Chantar, Maria L.
    Technology Pk Bizkaia, Spain.
    Matheu, Ander
    Biodonostia Institute, Spain.
    Maxwell, Christopher
    Jawaharlal Nehru University, India.
    McDonnell, Eoin
    University Hospital Schleswig Holstein, Germany.
    Meeker, Alan K.
    Johns Hopkins University, MD 21205 USA.
    Mehrmohamadi, Mahya
    Cornell University, NY USA.
    Mehta, Kapil
    University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Centre, TX 77030 USA.
    Michelotti, Gregory A.
    Duke University, NC 27710 USA.
    Mohammad, Ramzi M.
    United Arab Emirates University, U Arab Emirates.
    Mohammed, Sulma I.
    Purdue University, IN 47907 USA.
    James Morre, D.
    Mor NuCo Inc, IN USA.
    Muqbil, Irfana
    United Arab Emirates University, U Arab Emirates.
    Muralidhar, Vinayak
    Harvard University, MA USA; MIT, MA 02139 USA.
    Murphy, Michael P.
    MRC Mitochondrial Biol Unit, England.
    Purnachandra Nagaraju, Ganji
    Emory University, GA 30322 USA.
    Nahta, Rita
    Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, GA, United States.
    Niccolai, Elena
    University of Florence, Italy.
    Nowsheen, Somaira
    Mayo Clin, MN USA.
    Panis, Carolina
    State University of West Parana, Brazil.
    Pantano, Francesco
    University of Campus Bio Med, Italy.
    Parslow, Virginia R.
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Pawelec, Graham
    University of Tubingen, Germany.
    Pedersen, Peter L.
    Johns Hopkins University, MD USA.
    Poore, Brad
    Johns Hopkins University, MD USA.
    Poudyal, Deepak
    Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic.
    Prakash, Satya
    McGill University, Canada.
    Prince, Mark
    University of Michigan, MI USA.
    Raffaghello, Lizzia
    Ist Giannina Gaslini, Italy.
    Rathmell, Jeffrey C.
    University Hospital Schleswig Holstein, Germany.
    Kimryn Rathmell, W.
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    Ray, Swapan K.
    Stanford University, CA 94305 USA.
    Reichrath, Joerg
    Saarland University Hospital, Germany.
    Rezazadeh, Sarallah
    University of Rochester, NY 14627 USA.
    Ribatti, Domenico
    University of Bari, Italy.
    Ricciardiello, Luigi
    National Cancer Institute Giovanni Paolo II, Italy.
    Brooks Robey, R.
    University of Bologna, Italy; White River Junct Vet Affairs Medical Centre, VT USA.
    Rodier, Francis
    Geisel School Medical Dartmouth, NH USA; University of Montreal, Canada.
    Vasantha Rupasinghe, H. P.
    Institute Cancer Montreal, Canada.
    Luigi Russo, Gian
    University of Montreal, Canada.
    Ryan, Elizabeth P.
    Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Samadi, Abbas K.
    Sanus Biosciences, San Diego, CA, United States.
    Sanchez-Garcia, Isidro
    CNR, Italy.
    Sanders, Andrew J.
    Cardiff University, Wales.
    Santini, Daniele
    University of Campus Bio Med, Italy.
    Sarkar, Malancha
    Colorado State University, CO 80523 USA.
    Sasada, Tetsuro
    Department of Immunology, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume, Fukuoka, Japan.
    Saxena, Neeraj K.
    University of Salamanca, Spain.
    Shackelford, Rodney E.
    University of Miami, FL USA.
    Shantha Kumara, H. M. C.
    St Lukes Roosevelt Hospital, NY 10025 USA.
    Sharma, Dipali
    Kurume University, Japan.
    Shin, Dong M.
    Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, GA, United States.
    Sidransky, David
    University of Maryland, MD 21201 USA.
    David Siegelin, Markus
    Louisiana State University, LA 71105 USA.
    Signori, Emanuela
    Johns Hopkins University, MD 21205 USA; Johns Hopkins University, MD USA.
    Singh, Neetu
    Johns Hopkins University, MD USA; King Georges Medical University, India.
    Sivanand, Sharanya
    Columbia University, NY USA; University of Penn, PA 19104 USA.
    Sliva, Daniel
    Institute Translat Pharmacol, Italy; Purdue Research Pk, IN USA.
    Smythe, Carl
    University of Sheffield, England.
    Spagnuolo, Carmela
    University of Montreal, Canada.
    Stafforini, Diana M.
    University of Utah, UT USA.
    Stagg, John
    University of Utah, UT USA.
    Subbarayan, Pochi R.
    University of Montreal, Canada.
    Sundin, Tabetha
    University of Miami, FL USA.
    Talib, Wamidh H.
    Sentara Healthcare, VA USA.
    Thompson, Sarah K.
    Appl Science University, Jordan.
    Tran, Phuoc T.
    Royal Adelaide Hospital, Australia.
    Ungefroren, Hendrik
    Azienda Osped Ist Ospitalieri Cremona, Italy.
    Vander Heiden, Matthew G.
    MIT, MA 02139 USA.
    Venkateswaran, Vasundara
    Johns Hopkins University, MD USA; University of Toronto, Canada.
    Vinay, Dass S.
    Tulane University, LA USA.
    Vlachostergios, Panagiotis J.
    Johns Hopkins University, MD USA; New York University, NY USA.
    Wang, Zongwei
    Johns Hopkins University, MD USA; Harvard University, MA USA.
    Wellendx, Kathryn E.
    Columbia University, NY USA; University of Penn, PA 19104 USA.
    Whelan, Richard L.
    St Lukes Roosevelt Hospital, NY 10025 USA.
    Yang, Eddy S.
    University of Alabama Birmingham, AL USA.
    Yang, Huanjie
    Harbin Institute Technology, Peoples R China.
    Yang, Xujuan
    Dalhousie University, Canada.
    Yaswen, Paul
    Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, CA USA.
    Yedjou, Clement
    Jackson State University, MS USA.
    Yin, Xin
    Nara Medical University, Japan.
    Zhu, Jiyue
    Washington State University, WA USA.
    Zollo, Massimo
    CSIC, Spain; Centre Ingn Genet and Biotecnol Avanzate, Italy.
    Designing a broad-spectrum integrative approach for cancer prevention and treatment2015In: Seminars in Cancer Biology, ISSN 1044-579X, E-ISSN 1096-3650, Vol. 35, p. S276-S304Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Targeted therapies and the consequent adoption of "personalized" oncology have achieved notable successes in some cancers; however, significant problems remain with this approach. Many targeted therapies are highly toxic, costs are extremely high, and most patients experience relapse after a few disease-free months. Relapses arise from genetic heterogeneity in tumors, which harbor therapy-resistant immortalized cells that have adopted alternate and compensatory pathways (i.e., pathways that are not reliant upon the same mechanisms as those which have been targeted). To address these limitations, an international task force of 180 scientists was assembled to explore the concept of a low-toxicity "broadspectrum" therapeutic approach that could simultaneously target many key pathways and mechanisms. Using cancer hallmark phenotypes and the tumor microenvironment to account for the various aspects of relevant cancer biology, interdisciplinary teams reviewed each hallmark area and nominated a wide range of high-priority targets (74 in total) that could be modified to improve patient outcomes. For these targets, corresponding low-toxicity therapeutic approaches were then suggested, many of which were phytochemicals. Proposed actions on each target and all of the approaches were further reviewed for known effects on other hallmark areas and the tumor microenvironment Potential contrary or procarcinogenic effects were found for 3.9% of the relationships between targets and hallmarks, and mixed evidence of complementary and contrary relationships was found for 7.1%. Approximately 67% of the relationships revealed potentially complementary effects, and the remainder had no known relationship. Among the approaches, 1.1% had contrary, 2.8% had mixed and 62.1% had complementary relationships. These results suggest that a broad-spectrum approach should be feasible from a safety standpoint. This novel approach has potential to be relatively inexpensive, it should help us address stages and types of cancer that lack conventional treatment, and it may reduce relapse risks. A proposed agenda for future research is offered. (C) 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  • 4.
    Brautigam, Lars
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Dahl Ejby Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Poschmann, Gereon
    University of Dusseldorf, Germany .
    Nystrom, Staffan
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Bannenberg, Sarah
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Dreij, Kristian
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Lepka, Klaudia
    University of Dusseldorf, Germany .
    Prozorovski, Timour
    University of Dusseldorf, Germany .
    Montano, Sergio J
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Aktas, Orhan
    University of Dusseldorf, Germany .
    Uhlen, Per
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Stuehler, Kai
    University of Dusseldorf, Germany .
    Cao, Yihai
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Holmgren, Arne
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Berndt, Carsten
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Glutaredoxin regulates vascular development by reversible glutathionylation of sirtuin 12013In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 110, no 50, p. 20057-20062Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Embryonic development depends on complex and precisely orchestrated signaling pathways including specific reduction/oxidation cascades. Oxidoreductases of the thioredoxin family are key players conveying redox signals through reversible posttranslational modifications of protein thiols. The importance of this protein family during embryogenesis has recently been exemplified for glutaredoxin 2, a vertebrate-specific glutathione-disulfide oxidoreductase with a critical role for embryonic brain development. Here, we discovered an essential function of glutaredoxin 2 during vascular development. Confocal microscopy and time-lapse studies based on two-photon microscopy revealed that morpholino-based knockdown of glutaredoxin 2 in zebrafish, a model organism to study vertebrate embryogenesis, resulted in a delayed and disordered blood vessel network. We were able to show that formation of a functional vascular system requires glutaredoxin 2-dependent reversible S-glutathionylation of the NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase sirtuin 1. Using mass spectrometry, we identified a cysteine residue in the conserved catalytic region of sirtuin 1 as target for glutaredoxin 2-specific deglutathionylation. Thereby, glutaredoxin 2-mediated redox regulation controls enzymatic activity of sirtuin 1, a mechanism we found to be conserved between zebrafish and humans. These results link S-glutathionylation to vertebrate development and successful embryonic angiogenesis.

  • 5.
    Cao, Renhai
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jensen, Lasse Dahl
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Söll, Iris
    Södertörns University College, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Hauptmann, Giselbert
    Södertörns University College, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Cao, Yihai
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hypoxia-induced retinal angiogenesis in zebrafish as a model to study retinopathy2008In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 3, no 7, p. e2748-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mechanistic understanding and defining novel therapeutic targets of diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) have been hampered by a lack of appropriate adult animal models. Here we describe a simple and highly reproducible adult fli-EGFP transgenic zebrafish model to study retinal angiogenesis. The retinal vasculature in the adult zebrafish is highly organized and hypoxia-induced neovascularization occurs in a predictable area of capillary plexuses. New retinal vessels and vascular sprouts can be accurately measured and quantified. Orally active anti-VEGF agents including sunitinib and ZM323881 effectively block hypoxia-induced retinal neovascularization. Intriguingly, blockage of the Notch signaling pathway by the inhibitor DAPT under hypoxia, results in a high density of arterial sprouting in all optical arteries. The Notch suppression-induced arterial sprouting is dependent on tissue hypoxia. However, in the presence of DAPT substantial endothelial tip cell formation was detected only in optic capillary plexuses under normoxia. These findings suggest that hypoxia shifts the vascular targets of Notch inhibitors. Our findings for the first time show a clinically relevant retinal angiogenesis model in adult zebrafish, which might serve as a platform for studying mechanisms of retinal angiogenesis, for defining novel therapeutic targets, and for screening of novel antiangiogenic drugs.

  • 6.
    Cao, Ziquan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jensen, Lasse
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Rouhi, Pegah
    Karolinska Institute.
    Hosaka, Kayoko
    Karolinska Institute.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Steffensen, John F
    University of Copenhagen.
    Wahlberg, Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Vascular surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Cao, Yihai
    Karolinska Institute.
    Hypoxia-induced retinopathy model in adult zebrafish2010In: Nature Protocols, ISSN 1754-2189, E-ISSN 1750-2799, Vol. 5, no 12, p. 1903-1910Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hypoxia-induced vascular responses, including angiogenesis, vascular remodeling and vascular leakage, significantly contribute to the onset, development and progression of retinopathy. However, until recently there were no appropriate animal disease models recapitulating adult retinopathy available. In this article, we describe protocols that create hypoxia-induced retinopathy in adult zebrafish. Adult fli1: EGFP zebrafish are placed in hypoxic water for 3-10 d and retinal neovascularization is analyzed using confocal microscopy. It usually takes 11 d to obtain conclusive results using the hypoxia-induced retinopathy model in adult zebrafish. This model provides a unique opportunity to study kinetically the development of retinopathy in adult animals using noninvasive protocols and to assess therapeutic efficacy of orally active antiangiogenic drugs.

  • 7.
    Chen, Xiaoyun
    et al.
    Sun Yat Sen University, Peoples R China; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Wang, Jian
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Shandong University, Peoples R China.
    Cao, Ziquan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hosaka, Kayoko
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Yang, Huasheng
    Sun Yat Sen University, Peoples R China.
    Sun, Yuping
    Shandong University, Peoples R China.
    Zhuang, Rujie
    Chinese Medical University, Peoples R China.
    Liu, Yizhi
    Sun Yat Sen University, Peoples R China.
    Cao, Yihai
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden; University of Leicester, England; Glenfield Hospital, England.
    Invasiveness and metastasis of retinoblastoma in an orthotopic zebrafish tumor model2015In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, no 10351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Retinoblastoma is a highly invasive malignant tumor that often invades the brain and metastasizes to distal organs through the blood stream. Invasiveness and metastasis of retinoblastoma can occur at the early stage of tumor development. However, an optimal preclinical model to study retinoblastoma invasiveness and metastasis in relation to drug treatment has not been developed. Here, we developed an orthotopic zebrafish model in which retinoblastoma invasion and metastasis can be monitored at a single cell level. We took the advantages of immune privilege and transparent nature of developing zebrafish embryos. Intravitreal implantation of color-coded retinoblastoma cells allowed us to kinetically monitor tumor cell invasion and metastasis. Further, interactions between retinoblastoma cells and surrounding microvasculatures were studied using a transgenic zebrafish that exhibited green fluorescent signals in blood vessels. We discovered that tumor cells invaded neighboring tissues and blood stream when primary tumors were at the microscopic sizes. These findings demonstrate that retinoblastoma metastasis occurs at the early stage and antiangiogenic drugs such as Vegf morpholino and sunitinib could potentially interfere with tumor invasiveness and metastasis. Thus, this orthotopic retinoblastoma model offers a new and unique opportunity to study the early events of tumor invasion, metastasis and drug responses.

  • 8.
    Dahl Jensen, Lasse
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cao, Ziquan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nakamura, Masaki
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Yang, Yunlong
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Brautigam, Lars
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Andersson, Patrik
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Zhang, Yin
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Wahlberg, Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Vascular surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Hosaka, Kayoko
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Cao, Yihai
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Opposing Effects of Circadian Clock Genes Bmal1 and Period2 in Regulation of VEGF-Dependent Angiogenesis in Developing Zebrafish2012In: Cell Reports, ISSN 2211-1247, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 231-241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Molecular mechanisms underlying circadian-regulated physiological processes remain largely unknown. Here, we show that disruption of the circadian clock by both constant exposure to light and genetic manipulation of key genes in zebrafish led to impaired developmental angiogenesis. A bmal1-specific morpholino inhibited developmental angiogenesis in zebrafish embryos without causing obvious nonvascular phenotypes. Conversely, a period2 morpholino accelerated angiogenic vessel growth, suggesting that Bmal1 and Period2 display opposing angiogenic effects. Using a promoter-reporter system consisting of various deleted vegf-promoter mutants, we show that Bmal1 directly binds to and activates the vegf promoter via E-boxes. Additionally, we provide evidence that knockdown of Bmal1 leads to impaired Notch-inhibition-induced vascular sprouting. These results shed mechanistic insight on the role of the circadian clock in regulation of developmental angiogenesis, and our findings may be reasonably extended to other types of physiological or pathological angiogenesis.

  • 9.
    Dahl Jensen, Lasse
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rouhi, Pegah
    Karolinska Institute.
    Cao, Ziquan
    Karolinska Institute.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Wahlberg, Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Vascular surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Cao, Yihai
    Karolinska Institute.
    Zebrafish Models to Study Hypoxia-Induced Pathological Angiogenesis in Malignant and Nonmalignant Diseases2011In: Birth Defects Research. Part C: Embryo Today Reviews, ISSN 1542-975X, Vol. 93, no 2, p. 182-193Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most in vivo preclinical disease models are based on mouse and other mammalian systems. However, these rodent-based model systems have considerable limitations to recapitulate clinical situations in human patients. Zebrafish have been widely used to study embryonic development, behavior, tissue regeneration, and genetic defects. Additionally, zebrafish also provides an opportunity to screen chemical compounds that target a specific cell population for drug development. Owing to the availability of various genetically manipulated strains of zebrafish, immune privilege during early embryonic development, transparency of the embryos, and easy and precise setup of hypoxia equipment, we have developed several disease models in both embryonic and adult zebrafish, focusing on studying the role of angiogenesis in pathological settings. These zebrafish disease models are complementary to the existing mouse models, allowing us to study clinically relevant processes in cancer and nonmalignant diseases, which otherwise would be difficult to study in mice. For example, dissemination and invasion of single human or mouse tumor cells from the primary site in association with tumor angiogenesis can be studied under normoxia or hypoxia in zebrafish embryos. Hypoxia-induced retinopathy in the adult zebrafish recapitulates the clinical situation of retinopathy development in diabetic patients or age-related macular degeneration. These zebrafish disease models offer exciting opportunities to understand the mechanisms of disease development, progression, and development of more effective drugs for therapeutic intervention.

  • 10.
    Fernandez-Barral, Asuncion
    et al.
    University of Autonoma Madrid, Spain CSIC UAM Madrid, Spain .
    Luis Orgaz, Jose
    University of Autonoma Madrid, Spain CSIC UAM Madrid, Spain Kings Coll London, England .
    Baquero, Pablo
    University of Autonoma Madrid, Spain CSIC UAM Madrid, Spain University of Glasgow, Scotland .
    Ali, Zaheer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Moreno, Alberto
    CSIC UAM Madrid, Spain University of Dundee, Scotland .
    Tiana, Maria
    University of Autonoma Madrid, Spain CSIC UAM Madrid, Spain .
    Gomez, Valenti
    University of Autonoma Madrid, Spain CSIC UAM Madrid, Spain UCL, England .
    Riveiro-Falkenbach, Erica
    University of Complutense Madrid, Spain Institute Invest I 12, Spain .
    Canadas, Carmen
    Capio Fdn Jimenez Diaz, Spain .
    Zazo, Sandra
    Capio Fdn Jimenez Diaz, Spain .
    Bertolotto, Corine
    CHU Nice, France CHU Nice, France .
    Davidson, Irwin
    University of Strasbourg, France .
    Luis Rodriguez-Peralto, Jose
    University of Complutense Madrid, Spain Institute Invest I 12, Spain .
    Palmero, Ignacio
    CSIC UAM Madrid, Spain .
    Rojo, Federico
    Capio Fdn Jimenez Diaz, Spain .
    Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    del Peso, Luis
    University of Autonoma Madrid, Spain CSIC UAM Madrid, Spain .
    Jimenez, Benilde
    University of Autonoma Madrid, Spain CSIC UAM Madrid, Spain Institute Invest I 12, Spain .
    Regulatory and Functional Connection of Microphthalmia-Associated Transcription Factor and Anti-Metastatic Pigment Epithelium Derived Factor in Melanoma2014In: Neoplasia, ISSN 1522-8002, E-ISSN 1476-5586, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 529-542Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), a member of the serine protease inhibitor superfamily, has potent anti-metastatic effects in cutaneous melanoma through its direct actions on endothelial and melanoma cells. Here we show that PEDF expression positively correlates with microphthalmia-associated transcription factor ( MITF) in melanoma cell lines and human samples. High PEDF and MITF expression is characteristic of low aggressive melanomas classified according to molecular and pathological criteria, whereas both factors are decreased in senescent melanocytes and naevi. Importantly, MITF silencing down-regulates PEDF expression in melanoma cell lines and primary melanocytes, suggesting that the correlation in the expression reflects a causal relationship. In agreement, analysis of Chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to high throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) data sets revealed three MITF binding regions within the first intron of SERPINF1, and reporter assays demonstrated that the binding of MITF to these regions is sufficient to drive transcription. Finally, we demonstrate that exogenous PEDF expression efficiently halts in vitro migration and invasion, as well as in vivo dissemination of melanoma cells induced by MITF silencing. In summary, these results identify PEDF as a novel transcriptional target of MITF and support a relevant functional role for the MITF-PEDF axis in the biology of melanoma.

  • 11.
    Folkesson, Maggie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sadowska, Natalia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Vikingsson, Svante
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Carlhäll, Carl-Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Wågsäter, Dick
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Differences in cardiovascular toxicities associated with cigarette smoking and snuff use revealed using novel zebrafish models2016In: Biology Open, ISSN 2046-6390, Vol. 5, no 7, p. 970-978Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tobacco use is strongly associated with cardiovascular disease and the only avoidable risk factor associated with development of aortic aneurysm. While smoking is the most common form of tobacco use, snuff and other oral tobacco products are gaining popularity, but research on potentially toxic effects of oral tobacco use has not kept pace with the increase in its use. Here, we demonstrate that cigarette smoke and snuff extracts are highly toxic to developing zebrafish embryos. Exposure to such extracts led to a palette of toxic effects including early embryonic mortality, developmental delay, cerebral hemorrhages, defects in lymphatics development and ventricular function, and aneurysm development. Both cigarette smoke and snuff were more toxic than pure nicotine, indicating that other compounds in these products are also associated with toxicity. While some toxicities were found following exposure to both types of tobacco product, other toxicities, including developmental delay and aneurysm development, were specifically observed in the snuff extract group, whereas cerebral hemorrhages were only found in the group exposed to cigarette smoke extract. These findings deepen our understanding of the pathogenic effects of cigarette smoking and snuff use on the cardiovascular system and illustrate the benefits of using zebrafish to study mechanisms involved in aneurysm development.

  • 12.
    Gnosa, Sebastian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Capodanno, Alessandra
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dahl Ejby Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    AEG-1 knockdown in colon cancer cell lines inhibits radiation-enhanced migration and invasion in vitro and in a novel in vivo zebrafish model2016In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 7, no 49, p. 81634-81644Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Radiotherapy is a well-established anti-cancer treatment. Although radiotherapy has been shown to significantly decrease the local relapse in rectal cancer patients, the rate of distant metastasis is still very high. Several studies have shown that radiation enhances migration and invasion both in vitro and in vivo. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether AEG-1 is involved in radiation-enhanced migration and invasion in vitro and in a novel in vivo zebrafish model.

    Materials and Methods We evaluated the involvement of AEG-1 in migration and invasion and radiation-enhanced migration and invasion by Boyden chamber assay in three colon cancer cell lines and respective AEG-1 knockdown cell lines. Furthermore, we injected the cells in zebrafish embryos and evaluated the amount of disseminated cells into the tail.

    Results Migration and invasion was decreased in all the AEG-1 knockdown cell lines. Furthermore, radiation enhanced migration and invasion, while AEG-1 knockdown could abolish this effect. The results from the zebrafish model confirmed the results obtained in vitro. MMP-9 secretion and expression were decreased in AEG-1 knockdown cells.

    Conclusion Our results demonstrate that AEG-1 knockdown inhibits migration and invasion, as well as radiation-enhanced migration and invasion. We speculate that this is done via the downregulation of the intrinsic or radiation-enhanced MMP-9 expression. The zebrafish model can be used to study early events in radiation-enhanced invasion.

  • 13.
    Gómez-Maldonado, L
    et al.
    Departamento de Bioquímica, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (UAM) and Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas 'Alberto Sols' (CSIC-UAM), Madrid, Spain, .
    Tiana, M
    Departamento de Bioquímica, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (UAM) and Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas 'Alberto Sols' (CSIC-UAM), Madrid, Spain.
    Roche, O
    IdiPaz, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria del Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, Spain, IdiPaz, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria del Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, Spain.
    Prado-Cabrero, A
    Departamento de Bioquímica, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (UAM) and Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas 'Alberto Sols' (CSIC-UAM), Madrid, Spain.
    Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fernandez-Barral, A
    Departamento de Bioquímica, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (UAM) and Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas 'Alberto Sols' (CSIC-UAM), Madrid, Spain.
    Guijarro-Muñoz, I
    Molecular Immunology Unit, Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro Majadahonda, Madrid, Spain.
    Favaro, E
    Molecular Oncology Laboratories, Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK.
    Moreno-Bueno, G
    Departamento de Bioquímica, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (UAM) and Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas 'Alberto Sols' (CSIC-UAM), Madrid, Spain.
    Sanz, L
    Molecular Immunology Unit, Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro Majadahonda, Madrid, Spain.
    Aragones, J
    Research Unit, Hospital Universitario Santa Cristina, Research Institute Princesa, Autonomous University of Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
    Harris, A
    Molecular Oncology Laboratories, Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK.
    Volpert, O
    Urology Department, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Jimenez, B
    Departamento de Bioquímica, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (UAM) and Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas 'Alberto Sols' (CSIC-UAM), Madrid, Spain.
    Del Peso, L
    Departamento de Bioquímica, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (UAM) and Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas 'Alberto Sols' (CSIC-UAM), Madrid, Spain, IdiPaz, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria del Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, Spain.
    EFNA3 long noncoding RNAs induced by hypoxia promote metastatic dissemination.2015In: Oncogene, ISSN 0950-9232, E-ISSN 1476-5594, Vol. 34, no 20, p. 2609-2620Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The presence of hypoxic regions in solid tumors is an adverse prognostic factor for patient outcome. Here, we show that hypoxia induces the expression of Ephrin-A3 through a novel hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-mediated mechanism. In response to hypoxia, the coding EFNA3 mRNA levels remained relatively stable, but HIFs drove the expression of previously unknown long noncoding (lnc) RNAs from EFNA3 locus and these lncRNA caused Ephrin-A3 protein accumulation. Ephrins are cell surface proteins that regulate diverse biological processes by modulating cellular adhesion and repulsion. Mounting evidence implicates deregulated ephrin function in multiple aspects of tumor biology. We demonstrate that sustained expression of both Ephrin-A3 and novel EFNA3 lncRNAs increased the metastatic potential of human breast cancer cells, possibly by increasing the ability of tumor cells to extravasate from the blood vessels into surrounding tissue. In agreement, we found a strong correlation between high EFNA3 expression and shorter metastasis-free survival in breast cancer patients. Taken together, our results suggest that hypoxia could contribute to metastatic spread of breast cancer via HIF-mediated induction of EFNA3 lncRNAs and subsequent Ephrin-A3 protein accumulation.Oncogene advance online publication, 14 July 2014; doi:10.1038/onc.2014.200.

  • 14.
    Hosaka, Kayoko
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Yang, Yunlong
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Seki, Takahiro
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Nakamura, Masaki
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Andersson, Patrik
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Rouhi, Pegah
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Yang, Xiaojuan
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Lim, Sharon
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Feng, Ninghan
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Xue, Yuan
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Li, Xuri
    Sun Yat Sen University, Peoples R China .
    Larsson, Ola
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Ohhashi, Toshio
    Shinshu University, Japan .
    Cao, Yihai
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Tumour PDGF-BB expression levels determine dual effects of anti-PDGF drugs on vascular remodelling and metastasis2013In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 4, no 2129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anti-platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) drugs are routinely used in front-line therapy for the treatment of various cancers, but the molecular mechanism underlying their dose-dependent impact on vascular remodelling remains poorly understood. Here we show that anti-PDGF drugs significantly inhibit tumour growth and metastasis in high PDGF-BB-producing tumours by preventing pericyte loss and vascular permeability, whereas they promote tumour cell dissemination and metastasis in PDGF-BB-low-producing or PDGF-BB-negative tumours by ablating pericytes from tumour vessels. We show that this opposing effect is due to PDGF-beta signalling in pericytes. Persistent exposure of pericytes to PDGF-BB markedly downregulates PDGF-beta and inactivation of the PDGF-beta signalling decreases integrin alpha 1 beta 1 levels, which impairs pericyte adhesion to extracellular matrix components in blood vessels. Our data suggest that tumour PDGF-BB levels may serve as a biomarker for selection of tumour-bearing hosts for anti-PDGF therapy and unsupervised use of anti-PDGF drugs could potentially promote tumour invasion and metastasis.

  • 15.
    Hu, Zhiwei
    et al.
    Ohio State University, OH 43210 USA; Ohio State University, OH 43210 USA.
    Brooks, Samira A.
    University of N Carolina, NC 27599 USA.
    Dormoy, Valerian
    University of Strasbourg, France; University of Calif Irvine, CA 92697 USA.
    Hsu, Chia-Wen
    NIH, MD 20892 USA.
    Hsu, Hsue-Yin
    Tzu Chi University, Taiwan.
    Lin, Liang-Tzung
    Taipei Medical University, Taiwan.
    Massfelder, Thierry
    University of Strasbourg, France.
    Rathmell, W. Kimryn
    University of N Carolina, NC 27599 USA.
    Xia, Menghang
    NIH, MD 20892 USA.
    Al-Mulla, Fahd
    Tzu Chi University, Taiwan.
    Al-Temaimi, Rabeah
    Kuwait University, Kuwait.
    Amedei, Amedeo
    University of Firenze, Italy.
    Brown, Dustin G.
    Colorado State University, CO 80523 USA.
    Prudhomme, Kalan R.
    Oregon State University, OR 97331 USA.
    Colacci, Annamaria
    Environm Protect and Health Prevent Agency, Italy.
    Hamid, Roslida A.
    University of Putra Malaysia, Malaysia.
    Mondello, Chiara
    CNR, Italy.
    Raju, Jayadev
    Health Canada, Canada.
    Ryan, Elizabeth P.
    Colorado State University, CO 80523 USA.
    Woodrick, Jordan
    Georgetown University, DC 20057 USA.
    Scovassi, A. Ivana
    CNR, Italy.
    Singh, Neetu
    King Georges Medical University, India.
    Vaccari, Monica
    Environm Protect and Health Prevent Agency, Italy.
    Roy, Rabindra
    Georgetown University, DC 20057 USA.
    Forte, Stefano
    Mediterranean Institute Oncol, Italy.
    Memeo, Lorenzo
    Mediterranean Institute Oncol, Italy.
    Salem, Hosni K.
    Cairo University, Egypt.
    Lowe, Leroy
    Getting Know Canc, Canada.
    Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bisson, William H.
    Oregon State University, OR 97331 USA.
    Kleinstreuer, Nicole
    Integrated Lab Syst Inc, NC 27709 USA.
    Assessing the carcinogenic potential of low-dose exposures to chemical mixtures in the environment: focus on the cancer hallmark of tumor angiogenesis2015In: Carcinogenesis, ISSN 0143-3334, E-ISSN 1460-2180, Vol. 36, p. S184-S202Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Angiogenesis is an important hallmark of cancer. We reviewed the various pathways controlling angiogenesis, summarized the possible role of specific environmental chemicals disrupting these pathways and listed assays for assessing the effects of low-dose exposures to chemicals in promoting tumor angiogenesis.One of the important hallmarks of cancer is angiogenesis, which is the process of formation of new blood vessels that are necessary for tumor expansion, invasion and metastasis. Under normal physiological conditions, angiogenesis is well balanced and controlled by endogenous proangiogenic factors and antiangiogenic factors. However, factors produced by cancer cells, cancer stem cells and other cell types in the tumor stroma can disrupt the balance so that the tumor microenvironment favors tumor angiogenesis. These factors include vascular endothelial growth factor, endothelial tissue factor and other membrane bound receptors that mediate multiple intracellular signaling pathways that contribute to tumor angiogenesis. Though environmental exposures to certain chemicals have been found to initiate and promote tumor development, the role of these exposures (particularly to low doses of multiple substances), is largely unknown in relation to tumor angiogenesis. This review summarizes the evidence of the role of environmental chemical bioactivity and exposure in tumor angiogenesis and carcinogenesis. We identify a number of ubiquitous (prototypical) chemicals with disruptive potential that may warrant further investigation given their selectivity for high-throughput screening assay targets associated with proangiogenic pathways. We also consider the cross-hallmark relationships of a number of important angiogenic pathway targets with other cancer hallmarks and we make recommendations for future research. Understanding of the role of low-dose exposure of chemicals with disruptive potential could help us refine our approach to cancer risk assessment, and may ultimately aid in preventing cancer by reducing or eliminating exposures to synergistic mixtures of chemicals with carcinogenic potential.

  • 16.
    Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Editorial Material: A circadian prelude to regulation of angiogenesis and thrombosis by prolactin and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in TRANSLATIONAL CANCER RESEARCH, vol 5, issue 1, pp 79-822016In: TRANSLATIONAL CANCER RESEARCH, ISSN 2218-676X, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 79-82Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 17.
    Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    The circadian clock and hypoxia in tumor cell de-differentiation and metastasis2015In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - General Subjects, ISSN 0304-4165, E-ISSN 1872-8006, Vol. 1850, no 8, p. 1633-1641Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Cancer is considered to develop due to disruptions in the tissue microenvironment in addition to genetic disruptions in the tumor cells themselves. The two most important microenvironmental disruptions in cancer are arguably tissue hypoxia and disrupted circadian rhythmicity. Endothelial cells, which line the luminal side of all blood vessels transport oxygen or endocrine circadian regulators to the tissue and are therefore of key importance for circadian disruption and hypoxia in tumors. Scope of review: Here I review recent findings on the role of circadian rhythms and hypoxia in cancer and metastasis, with particular emphasis on how these pathways link tumor metastasis to pathological functions of blood vessels. The involvement of disrupted cell metabolism and redox homeostasis in this context and the use of novel zebrafish models for such studies will be discussed. Major conclusions: Circadian rhythms and hypoxia are involved in tumor metastasis on all levels from pathological deregulation of the cell to the tissue and the whole organism. Pathological tumor blood vessels cause hypoxia and disruption in circadian rhythmicity which in turn drives tumor metastasis. Zebrafish models may be used to increase our understanding of the mechanisms behind hypoxia and circadian regulation of metastasis. General significance: Disrupted blood flow in tumors is currently seen as a therapeutic goal in cancer treatment but may drive invasion and metastasis via pathological hypoxia and circadian clock signaling. Understanding the molecular details behind such regulation is important to optimize treatment for patients with solid tumors in the future. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Redox regulation of differentiation and de-differentiation. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 18.
    Jensen, Lasse Dahl
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cao, Renhai
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cao, Yihai
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    In vivo angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis models2009In: Current molecular medicine, ISSN 1566-5240, E-ISSN 1875-5666, Vol. 9, no 8, p. 982-991Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Angiogenesis research has become one of the most important areas in biomedical research. At the time of writing this review, there were approximately 3536 articles published in the year of 2008 alone on the topic of angiogenesis. The fast expansion of this research field demands development of rigorous, reliable, stable, convenient, and clinically relevant assay systems for disease diagnosis, prognosis, therapeutic evaluation, drug discovery, and mechanistic studies at the molecular level. Here, we discuss several commonly used in vivo angiogenesis models by systematically analyzing and pointing out pitfalls of each assay. Owing to existence of numerous assays and the limitation of text, it is impossible to discuss all these assays in this article. Here we select several most commonly used angiogenesis assays performed in various species including mice, chicks and zebrafish for further in-depth discussion. We hope this information will be valuable for improving current angiogenesis research.

  • 19.
    Jensen, Lasse Dahl
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cao, Renhai
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hedlund, Eva-Maria
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Söll, Iris
    Södertörn University and BioNut, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Jon O.
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hauptmann, Giselbert
    Södertörn University and BioNut, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Steffensen, John Fleng
    University of Copenhagen, Helsingor, Denmark .
    Cao, Yihai
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nitric oxide permits hypoxia-induced lymphatic perfusion by controlling arterial-lymphatic conduits in zebrafish and glass catfish2009In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 106, no 43, p. 18408-18413Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The blood and lymphatic vasculatures are structurally and functionally coupled in controlling tissue perfusion, extracellular interstitial fluids, and immune surveillance. Little is known, however, about the molecular mechanisms that underlie the regulation of bloodlymphatic vessel connections and lymphatic perfusion. Here we show in the adult zebrafish and glass catfish (Kryptopterus bicirrhis) that blood-lymphatic conduits directly connect arterial vessels to the lymphatic system. Under hypoxic conditions, arterial-lymphatic conduits (ALCs) became highly dilated and linearized by NO-induced vascular relaxation, which led to blood perfusion into the lymphatic system. NO blockage almost completely abrogated hypoxia-induced ALC relaxation and lymphatic perfusion. These findings uncover mechanisms underlying hypoxia-induced oxygen compensation by perfusion of existing lymphatics in fish. Our results might also imply that the hypoxia-induced NO pathway contributes to development of progression of pathologies, including promotion of lymphatic metastasis by modulating arterial-lymphatic conduits, in the mammalian system.

  • 20.
    Jensen, Lasse Dahl
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cao, Yihai
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Clock controls angiogenesis2013In: Cell Cycle, ISSN 1538-4101, E-ISSN 1551-4005, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 405-408Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Circadian rhythms control multiple physiological and pathological processes, including embryonic development in mammals and development of various human diseases. We have recently, in a developing zebrafish embryonic model, discovered that the circadian oscillation controls developmental angiogenesis. Disruption of crucial circadian regulatory genes, including Bmal1 and Period2, results in marked impairment or enhancement of vascular development in zebrafish. At the molecular level, we show that the circadian regulator Bmal1 directly targets the promoter region of the vegf gene in zebrafish, leading to an elevated expression of VEGF. These findings can reasonably be extended to developmental angiogenesis in mammals and even pathological angiogenesis in humans. Thus, our findings, for the first time, shed new light on mechanisms that underlie circadian clock-regulated angiogenesis.

  • 21.
    Jensen, Lasse Dahl
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology. Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, The Karolinska Institute, tockholm, Sweden.
    Gyllenhaal, Charlotte
    The Block Center for Integrative Cancer Treatment, 60077 Skokie, IL, USA.
    Block, Keith
    The Block Center for Integrative Cancer Treatment, 60077 Skokie, IL, USA.
    Circadian angiogenesis2014In: Biomolecular concepts, ISSN 1868-503X, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 245-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Daily rhythms of light/darkness, activity/rest and feeding/fasting are important in human physiology and their disruption (for example by frequent changes between day and night shifts) increases the risk of disease. Many of the diseases found to be associated with such disrupted circadian lifestyles, including cancer, cardiovascular diseases, metabolic disorders and neurological diseases, depend on pathological de-regulation of angiogenesis, suggesting that disrupting the circadian clock will impair the physiological regulation of angiogenesis leading to development and progression of these diseases. Today there is little known regarding circadian regulation of pathological angiogenesis but there is some evidence that supports both direct and indirect regulation of angiogenic factors by the cellular circadian clock machinery, as well as by circulating circadian factors, important for coordinating circadian rhythms in the organism. Through highlighting recent advances both in pre-clinical and clinical research on various diseases including cancer, cardiovascular disorders and obesity, we will here present an overview of the available knowledge on the importance of circadian regulation of angiogenesis and discuss how the circadian clock may provide alternative targets for pro- or anti-angiogenic therapy in the future.

  • 22.
    Jensen, Lasse Dahl
    et al.
    Novo Nordisk A/S, Måløv, Denmark .
    Hansen, Anker J.
    Novo Nordisk A/S, Måløv, Denmark .
    Lundbaek, Jens A.
    Novo Nordisk A/S, Måløv, Denmark .
    Regulation of endothelial cell migration by amphiphiles - are changes in cell membrane physical properties involved?2007In: Angiogenesis, ISSN 0969-6970, E-ISSN 1573-7209, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 13-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Endothelial cell (EC) migration is an integral part of angiogenesis and a prerequisite for malignant tumor growth. Recent studies suggest that amphiphilic compounds can regulate migration of bovine aortic ECs by altering the physical properties of the cell membrane lipid bilayers. A number of structurally different amphiphiles thus regulate the migration in quantitative correlation with their effects on the plasma membrane microviscosity. Many amphiphiles that affect EC migration and angiogenesis alter the physical properties of lipid bilayers, suggesting that such a regulatory mechanism may be of general importance. To investigate this notion, we studied the effects of lysophospholipids that inhibit migration of bovine aortic ECs and decrease cell membrane microviscosity, and of other amphiphiles that decrease membrane microviscosity (Triton X-100, octyl-beta-glucoside, arachidonic acid, docosahexaenoic acid, ETYA, capsaicin) on the migration of porcine aortic ECs. We further studied whether the enzyme secretory phospholipase A(2) (sPLA(2)) would affect migration in accordance with the changes in membrane microviscosity induced by its hydrolysis products lysophospholipids and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Arachidonic acid, at low concentrations, promoted cell migration by a mechanism involving metabolic products of this compound. Apart from this effect, all the amphiphiles, as well as sPLA(2), inhibited cell migration. A semi-quantitative analysis found a similar correlation between the effects on migration and on lipid bilayer stiffness measured using gramicidin channels as molecular force transducers. These results suggest that changes in cell membrane physical properties may generally contribute to the effects of amphiphiles on EC migration.

  • 23.
    Jensen, Lasse
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Nakamura, Masaki
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Brautigam, Lars
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Li, Xuri
    Sun Yat Sen University, Peoples R China.
    Liu, Yizhi
    Sun Yat Sen University, Peoples R China.
    Samani, Nilesh J.
    University of Leicester, England; Glenfield Hospital, England.
    Cao, Yihai
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden; University of Leicester, England; Glenfield Hospital, England.
    VEGF-B-Neuropilin-1 signaling is spatiotemporally indispensable for vascular and neuronal development in zebrafish2015In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 112, no 44, p. E5944-E5953Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Physiological functions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-B remain an enigma, and deletion of the Vegfb gene in mice lacks an overt phenotype. Here we show that knockdown of Vegfba, but not Vegfbb, in zebrafish embryos by specific morpholinos produced a lethal phenotype owing to vascular and neuronal defects in the brain. Vegfba morpholinos also markedly prevented development of hyaloid vasculatures in the retina, but had little effects on peripheral vascular development. Consistent with phenotypic defects, Vegfba, but not Vegfaa, mRNA was primarily expressed in the brain of developing zebrafish embryos. Interestingly, in situ detection of Neuropilin1 (Nrp1) mRNA showed an overlapping expression pattern with Vegfba, and knockdown of Nrp1 produced a nearly identically lethal phenotype as Vegfba knockdown. Furthermore, zebrafish VEGF-Ba protein directly bound to NRP1. Importantly, gain-of-function by exogenous delivery of mRNAs coding for NRP1-binding ligands VEGF-B or VEGF-A to the zebrafish embryos rescued the lethal phenotype by normalizing vascular development. Similarly, exposure of zebrafish embryos to hypoxia also rescued the Vegfba morpholino-induced vascular defects in the brain by increasing VEGF-A expression. Independent evidence of VEGF-A gain-of-function was provided by using a functionally defective Vhl-mutant zebrafish strain, which again rescued the Vegfba morpholino-induced vascular defects. These findings show that VEGF-B is spatiotemporally required for vascular development in zebrafish embryos and that NRP1, but not VEGFR1, mediates the essential signaling.

  • 24.
    Lee, Samantha Lin Chiou
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rouhi, Pegah
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jensen, Lasse Dahl
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Zhang, Danfang
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ji, Hong
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hauptmann, Giselbert
    Södertörns University College, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Ingham, Philip
    Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, A*STAR, Singapore.
    Cao, Yihai
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hypoxia-induced pathological angiogenesis mediates tumor cell dissemination, invasion, and metastasis in a zebrafish tumor model2009In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 106, no 46, p. 19485-19490Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mechanisms underlying pathological angiogenesis in relation to hypoxia in tumor invasion and metastasis remain elusive. Here, we have developed a zebrafish tumor model that allows us to study the role of pathological angiogenesis under normoxia and hypoxia in arbitrating early events of the metastatic cascade at the single cell level. Under normoxia, implantation of a murine T241 fibrosarcoma into the perivitelline cavity of developing embryos of transgenic fli1:EGFP zebrafish did not result in significant dissemination, invasion, and metastasis. In marked contrast, under hypoxia substantial tumor cells disseminated from primary sites, invaded into neighboring tissues, and metastasized to distal parts of the fish body. Similarly, expression of the hypoxia-regulated angiogenic factor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to a high level resulted in tumor cell dissemination and metastasis, which correlated with increased tumor neovascularization. Inhibition of VEGF receptor signaling pathways by sunitinib or VEGFR2 morpholinos virtually completely ablated VEGF-induced tumor cell dissemination and metastasis. To the best of our knowledge, hypoxia- and VEGF-induced pathological angiogenesis in promoting tumor dissemination, invasion, and metastasis has not been described perviously at the single cell level. Our findings also shed light on molecular mechanisms of beneficial effects of clinically available anti-VEGF drugs for cancer therapy.

  • 25.
    Mushtaq, Muhammad
    et al.
    Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology (MTC), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, 17177, Sweden. Muhammad.Mushtaq@ki.se.
    Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Davidsson, Sabina
    Department of Urology, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, 70182, Sweden.
    Grygoruk, Oleksandr V
    Clinic Boris, 12AM. Bazhana ave, Kyiv, 02140, Ukraine.
    Andrén, Ove
    Department of Urology, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, 70182, Sweden.
    Kashuba, Vladimir
    Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology (MTC), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, 17177, Sweden; Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, NASU, 150 Zabolotnog str, Kyiv, 03143, Ukraine.
    Kashuba, Elena
    Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology (MTC), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, 17177, Sweden. elena.kashuba@ki.se; R.E. Kavetsky Institute of Experimental Pathology, Oncology and Radiobiology, NASU, 45 Vasylkivska str, Kyiv, 03022, Ukraine. elena.kashuba@ki.se.
    The MRPS18-2 protein levels correlate with prostate tumor progression and it induces CXCR4-dependent migration of cancer cells2018In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 2268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have earlier found abnormal expression of the mitochondrial ribosomal protein S18-2 (MRPS18-2, S18-2) in endometrial cancer, compared to the expression in hyperplasia and in normal endometrium. Here we report that expression of S18-2 was increased with disease progression in clinical specimens of prostate cancer (PCa). The level of induction of epithelial to mesenchymal cell transition (EMT) correlated with the expression level of S18-2 in PCa cell lines. Moreover, cells acquired increased ability of migration upon S18-2 overexpression, as was evaluated in zebrafish embryo model and in trans-well assay. We found that this is due to increased CXCR4 cell surface expression. Neutralizing CXCR4 protein or abrogating S18-2 expression in cells significantly reduced their migratory ability directed toward CXCL12. The mRNA expression of TWIST2, encoding one of transcription factors that induce EMT upon CXCR4 increase, positively correlated with the S18-2 protein level. Together, these data suggest that the S18-2 protein induces EMT through the TWIST2/E-cadherin signalling and, consequently, CXCR4-mediated migration of PCa cells.

  • 26.
    Ochoa-Alvarez, Jhon A.
    et al.
    Rowan University, NJ 08084 USA; Rowan University, NJ USA; Rowan University, NJ USA.
    Krishnan, Harini
    Rowan University, NJ 08084 USA; Rowan University, NJ USA; Rowan University, NJ USA.
    Pastorino, John G.
    Rowan University, NJ 08084 USA; Rowan University, NJ USA; Rowan University, NJ USA.
    Nevel, Evan
    Rowan University, NJ 08084 USA; Rowan University, NJ USA; Rowan University, NJ USA.
    Kephart, David
    Rowan University, NJ 08084 USA; Rowan University, NJ USA; Rowan University, NJ USA.
    Lee, Joseph J.
    Rowan University, NJ 08084 USA; Rowan University, NJ USA; Rowan University, NJ USA.
    Retzbach, Edward P.
    Rowan University, NJ 08084 USA; Rowan University, NJ USA; Rowan University, NJ USA.
    Shen, Yongquan
    Rowan University, NJ 08084 USA; Rowan University, NJ USA; Rowan University, NJ USA.
    Fatahzadeh, Mahnaz
    Rutgers School Dent Med, NJ USA.
    Baredes, Soly
    Rutgers New Jersey Medical Sch, NJ USA.
    Kalyoussef, Evelyne
    Rutgers New Jersey Medical Sch, NJ USA.
    Honma, Masaru
    Asahikawa Medical University, Japan.
    Adelson, Martin E.
    Medical Diagnost Labs, NJ USA.
    Kaneko, Mika K.
    Tohoku University, Japan.
    Kato, Yukinari
    Tohoku University, Japan.
    Ann Young, Mary
    Rowan University, NJ 08084 USA; Rowan University, NJ USA; Rowan University, NJ USA.
    Deluca-Rapone, Lisa
    Rowan University, NJ 08084 USA; Rowan University, NJ USA; Rowan University, NJ USA.
    Shienbaum, Alan J.
    Rowan University, NJ 08084 USA; Rowan University, NJ USA; Rowan University, NJ USA.
    Yin, Kingsley
    Rowan University, NJ 08084 USA; Rowan University, NJ USA; Rowan University, NJ USA.
    Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Goldberg, Gary S.
    Rowan University, NJ 08084 USA; Rowan University, NJ USA; Rowan University, NJ USA.
    Antibody and lectin target podoplanin to inhibit oral squamous carcinoma cell migration and viability by distinct mechanisms2015In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 6, no 11, p. 9045-9060Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Podoplanin (PDPN) is a unique transmembrane receptor that promotes tumor cell motility. Indeed, PDPN may serve as a chemotherapeutic target for primary and metastatic cancer cells, particularly oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells that cause most oral cancers. Here, we studied how a monoclonal antibody (NZ-1) and lectin (MASL) that target PDPN affect human OSCC cell motility and viability. Both reagents inhibited the migration of PDPN expressing OSCC cells at nanomolar concentrations before inhibiting cell viability at micromolar concentrations. In addition, both reagents induced mitochondrial membrane permeability transition to kill OSCC cells that express PDPN by caspase independent nonapoptotic necrosis. Furthermore, MASL displayed a surprisingly robust ability to target PDPN on OSCC cells within minutes of exposure, and significantly inhibited human OSCC dissemination in zebrafish embryos. Moreover, we report that human OSCC cells formed tumors that expressed PDPN in mice, and induced PDPN expression in infiltrating host murine cancer associated fibroblasts. Taken together, these data suggest that antibodies and lectins may be utilized to combat OSCC and other cancers that express PDPN.

  • 27.
    Rouhi, Pegah
    et al.
    Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jensen, Lasse D
    Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cao, Ziquan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hosaka, Kayoko
    Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Wahlberg, Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Vascular surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Fleng Steffensen, John
    Marine Biological Laboratory, Biological Institute, University of Copenhagen, Helsingor, Denmark.
    Cao, Yihai
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hypoxia-induced metastasis model in embryonic zebrafish2010In: Nature Protocols, ISSN 1754-2189, E-ISSN 1750-2799, Vol. 5, no 12, p. 1911-1918Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hypoxia facilitates tumor invasion and metastasis by promoting neovascularization and co-option of tumor cells in the peritumoral vasculature, leading to dissemination of tumor cells into the circulation. However, until recently, animal models and imaging technology did not enable monitoring of the early events of tumor cell invasion and dissemination in living animals. We recently developed a zebrafish metastasis model to dissect the detailed events of hypoxia-induced tumor cell invasion and metastasis in association with angiogenesis at the single-cell level. In this model, fluorescent DiI-labeled human or mouse tumor cells are implanted into the perivitelline cavity of 48-h-old zebrafish embryos, which are subsequently placed in hypoxic water for 3 d. Tumor cell invasion, metastasis and pathological angiogenesis are detected under fluorescent microscopy in the living fish. The average experimental time for this model is 7 d. Our protocol offers a remarkable opportunity to study molecular mechanisms of hypoxia-induced cancer metastasis.

  • 28.
    Rouhi, Pegah
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Lee, Samantha Lin Chiou
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Cao, Ziquan
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Hedlund, Eva-Maria
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Jensen, Lasse Dahl
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Cao, Yihai
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Pathological angiogenesis facilitates tumor cell dissemination and metastasis2010In: Cell Cycle, ISSN 1538-4101, E-ISSN 1551-4005, Vol. 9, no 5, p. 913-917Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clinically detectable metastases represent an ultimate consequence of the metastatic cascade that consists of distinct processes including tumor cell invasion, dissemination, metastatic niche formation, and re-growth into a detectable metastatic mass. Although angiogenesis is known to promote tumor growth, its role in facilitating early events of the metastatic cascade remains poorly understood. We have recently developed a zebrafish tumor model that enables us to study involvement of pathological angiogenesis in tumor invasion, dissemination and metastasis. This non-invasive in vivo model allows detection of single malignant cell dissemination under both normoxia and hypoxia. Further, hypoxia-induced VEGF significantly facilitates tumor cell invasion and dissemination. These findings demonstrate that VEGF-induced pathological angiogenesis is essential for tumor dissemination and further corroborates potentially beneficial effects of clinically ongoing anti-VEGF drugs for the treatment of various malignancies.

  • 29.
    Savio, Monica
    et al.
    University of Pavia, Italy.
    Ferraro, Daniela
    University of Pavia, Italy.
    Maccario, Cristina
    University of Pavia, Italy.
    Vaccarone, Rita
    University of Pavia, Italy.
    Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Corana, Federica
    University of Pavia, Italy.
    Mannucci, Barbara
    University of Pavia, Italy.
    Bianchi, Livia
    University of Pavia, Italy.
    Cao, Yihai
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Anna Stivala, Lucia
    University of Pavia, Italy.
    Resveratrol analogue 4,4 -dihydroxy-trans-stilbene potently inhibits cancer invasion and metastasis2016In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, no 19973Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated the preventive effects of resveratrol analogue 4,4-dihydroxy-trans-stilbene (DHS) on cancer invasion and metastasis. Two different in vivo approaches of mouse and zebrafish lung cancer invasion models were employed in our study. The in vitro results showed that DHS displays potent inhibition on anchorage-dependent or -independent cell growth of LLC cells, leading to impairment of the cell cycle progression with reduction of cell numbers arresting at the G1 phase, an evident accumulation of pre-G1 events correlated with apoptotic behaviour. In addition, DHS induces a marked inhibition of LLC cell migration and matrigel invasion. In a murine lung cancer model, tumour volume, cell proliferation, and tumour angiogenesis were significantly inhibited by DHS. Importantly, liver metastatic lesions were significantly reduced in DHS-treated mice. Similarly, DHS significantly inhibits lung cancer cell dissemination, invasion and metastasis in a zebrafish tumour model. These findings demonstrate that DHS could potentially be developed as a novel therapeutic agent for treatment of cancer and metastasis.

  • 30.
    Shahul Hameed, L.
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Berg, Daniel A.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Belnoue, Laure
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Cao, Yihai
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden; University of Leicester, England.
    Simon, Andras
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Environmental changes in oxygen tension reveal ROS-dependent neurogenesis and regeneration in the adult newt brain2015In: eLIFE, E-ISSN 2050-084X, ELIFE SCIENCES PUBLICATIONS LTD, SHERATON HOUSE, CASTLE PARK, CAMBRIDGE, CB3 0AX, ENGLAND, ISSN 2050-084X, Vol. 4, no e08422Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organisms need to adapt to the ecological constraints in their habitat. How specific processes reflect such adaptations are difficult to model experimentally. We tested whether environmental shifts in oxygen tension lead to events in the adult newt brain that share features with processes occurring during neuronal regeneration under normoxia. By experimental simulation of varying oxygen concentrations, we show that hypoxia followed by re-oxygenation lead to neuronal death and hallmarks of an injury response, including activation of neural stem cells ultimately leading to neurogenesis. Neural stem cells accumulate reactive oxygen species (ROS) during re-oxygenation and inhibition of ROS biosynthesis counteracts their proliferation as well as neurogenesis. Importantly, regeneration of dopamine neurons under normoxia also depends on ROS-production. These data demonstrate a role for ROS-production in neurogenesis in newts and suggest that this role may have been recruited to the capacity to replace lost neurons in the brain of an adult vertebrate.

  • 31.
    Svensson, Susanne
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Abrahamsson, Annelie
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Vazquez Rodriguez, Gabriela
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Olsson, Anna-Karin
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Cao, Yihai
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden; University of Leicester, England; Glenfield Hospital, England.
    Dabrosin, Charlotta
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    CCL2 and CCL5 Are Novel Therapeutic Targets for Estrogen-Dependent Breast Cancer2015In: Clinical Cancer Research, ISSN 1078-0432, E-ISSN 1557-3265, Vol. 21, no 16, p. 3794-3805Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Novel therapeutic targets of estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancers are urgently needed because current antiestrogen therapy causes severe adverse effects, nearly 50% of patients are intrinsically resistant, and the majority of recurrences have maintained ER expression. We investigated the role of estrogen-dependent chemokine expression and subsequent cancer growth in human tissues and experimental breast cancer models. Experimental Design: For in vivo sampling of human chemokines, microdialysis was used in breast cancers of women or normal human breast tissue before and after tamoxifen therapy. Estrogen exposure and targeted therapies were assessed in immune competent PyMT murine breast cancer, orthotopic human breast cancers in nude mice, cell culture of cancer cells, and freshly isolated human macrophages. Cancer cell dissemination was investigated using zebrafish. Results: ER+ cancers in women produced high levels of extracellular CCL2 and CCL5 in vivo, which was associated with infiltration of tumor-associated macrophages. In experimental breast cancer, estradiol enhanced macrophage influx and angiogenesis through increased release of CCL2, CCL5, and vascular endothelial growth factor. These effects were inhibited by anti-CCL2 or anti-CCL5 therapy, which resulted in potent inhibition of cancer growth. In addition, estradiol induced a protumorigenic activation of the macrophages. In a zebrafish model, macrophages increased cancer cell dissemination via CCL2 and CCL5 in the presence of estradiol, which was inhibited with anti-CCL2 and anti-CCL5 treatment. Conclusions: Our findings shed new light on the mechanisms underlying the progression of ER+ breast cancer and indicate the potential of novel therapies targeting CCL2 and CCL5 pathways. (C)2015 AACR.

  • 32.
    Vazquez Rodriguez, Gabriela
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Abrahamsson, Annelie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Jensen, Lasse D
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Dabrosin, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Adipocytes Promote Early Steps of Breast Cancer Cell Dissemination via Interleukin-82018In: Frontiers in Immunology, ISSN 1664-3224, E-ISSN 1664-3224, Vol. 9, p. 1-17, article id 1767Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fat is a major tissue component in human breast cancer (BC). Whether breast adipocytes (BAd) affect early stages of BC metastasis is yet unknown. BC progression is dependent on angiogenesis and inflammation, and interleukin-8 (IL-8) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) are key regulators of these events. Here, we show that BAd increased the dissemination of estrogen receptor positive BC cells (BCC) in vivo in the zebrafish model of metastasis, while dissemination of the more aggressive and metastatic BCC such as estrogen receptor negative was unaffected. While anti-VEGF and anti-IL-8 exhibited equal inhibition of angiogenesis at the primary tumor site, anti-IL-8 reduced BCC dissemination whereas anti-VEGF had minor effects on this early metastatic event. Mechanistically, overexpression of cell-adhesion molecules in BCC and neutrophils via IL-8 increased the dissemination of BCC. Importantly, the extracellular in vivo levels of IL-8 were 40-fold higher than those of VEGF in human BC. Our results suggest that IL-8 is a clinical relevant and promising therapeutic target for human BC.

  • 33.
    Wang, Zongwei
    et al.
    Department of Urology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
    Dabrosin, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Yin, Xin
    Medicine and Research Services, Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System & University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA, USA.
    Fuster, Mark M
    Medicine and Research Services, Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System & University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA, USA.
    Arreola, Alexandra
    Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
    Rathmell, W Kimryn
    Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
    Generali, Daniele
    Molecular Therapy and Pharmacogenomics Unit, AO Isituti Ospitalieri di Cremona, Cremona, Italy.
    Nagaraju, Ganji P
    Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA.
    El-Rayes, Bassel
    Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA.
    Ribatti, Domenico
    Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Neurosciences and Sensory Organs, University of Bari Medical School, Bari, Italy, National Cancer Institute Giovanni Paolo II, Bari, Italy.
    Chen, Yi Charlie
    Department of Biology, Alderson Broaddus University, Philippi, WV, USA.
    Honoki, Kanya
    Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Arthroplasty and Regenerative Medicine, Nara Medical University, Nara, Japan.
    Fujii, Hiromasa
    Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Arthroplasty and Regenerative Medicine, Nara Medical University, Nara, Japan.
    Georgakilas, Alexandros G
    Physics Department, School of Applied Mathematics and Physical Sciences, National Technical University of Athens, Athens, Greece.
    Nowsheen, Somaira
    Mayo Graduate School, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, USA.
    Amedei, Amedeo
    Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, University of Florence, Florence, Italy.
    Niccolai, Elena
    Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, University of Florence, Florence, Italy.
    Amin, Amr
    Department of Biology, College of Science, United Arab Emirate University, United Arab EmiratesFaculty of Science, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt.
    Ashraf, S Salman
    Department of Chemistry, College of Science, United Arab Emirate University, United Arab Emirates.
    Helferich, Bill
    University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA.
    Yang, Xujuan
    University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA.
    Guha, Gunjan
    School of Chemical and Bio Technology, SASTRA University, Thanjavur, India.
    Bhakta, Dipita
    School of Chemical and Bio Technology, SASTRA University, Thanjavur, India.
    Ciriolo, Maria Rosa
    Department of Biology, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Rome, Italy.
    Aquilano, Katia
    Department of Biology, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Rome, Italy.
    Chen, Sophie
    Ovarian and Prostate Cancer Research Trust Laboratory, Guilford, Surrey, UK.
    Halicka, Dorota
    New York Medical College, New York City, NY, USA.
    Mohammed, Sulma I
    Department of Comparative Pathobiology, Purdue University Center for Cancer Research, West Lafayette, IN, USA.
    Azmi, Asfar S
    School of Medicine, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, USA.
    Bilsland, Alan
    Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK.
    Keith, W Nicol
    Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK.
    Jensen, Lasse D
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Broad targeting of angiogenesis for cancer prevention and therapy2015In: Seminars in Cancer Biology, ISSN 1044-579X, E-ISSN 1096-3650, Vol. S1044-579X, no 15, p. 00002-00004Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Deregulation of angiogenesis - the growth of new blood vessels from an existing vasculature - is a main driving force in many severe human diseases including cancer. As such, tumor angiogenesis is important for delivering oxygen and nutrients to growing tumors, and therefore considered an essential pathologic feature of cancer, while also playing a key role in enabling other aspects of tumor pathology such as metabolic deregulation and tumor dissemination/metastasis. Recently, inhibition of tumor angiogenesis has become a clinical anti-cancer strategy in line with chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery, which underscore the critical importance of the angiogenic switch during early tumor development. Unfortunately the clinically approved anti-angiogenic drugs in use today are only effective in a subset of the patients, and many who initially respond develop resistance over time. Also, some of the anti-angiogenic drugs are toxic and it would be of great importance to identify alternative compounds, which could overcome these drawbacks and limitations of the currently available therapy. Finding "the most important target" may, however, prove a very challenging approach as the tumor environment is highly diverse, consisting of many different cell types, all of which may contribute to tumor angiogenesis. Furthermore, the tumor cells themselves are genetically unstable, leading to a progressive increase in the number of different angiogenic factors produced as the cancer progresses to advanced stages. As an alternative approach to targeted therapy, options to broadly interfere with angiogenic signals by a mixture of non-toxic natural compound with pleiotropic actions were viewed by this team as an opportunity to develop a complementary anti-angiogenesis treatment option. As a part of the "Halifax Project" within the "Getting to know cancer" framework, we have here, based on a thorough review of the literature, identified 10 important aspects of tumor angiogenesis and the pathological tumor vasculature which would be well suited as targets for anti-angiogenic therapy: (1) endothelial cell migration/tip cell formation, (2) structural abnormalities of tumor vessels, (3) hypoxia, (4) lymphangiogenesis, (5) elevated interstitial fluid pressure, (6) poor perfusion, (7) disrupted circadian rhythms, (8) tumor promoting inflammation, (9) tumor promoting fibroblasts and (10) tumor cell metabolism/acidosis. Following this analysis, we scrutinized the available literature on broadly acting anti-angiogenic natural products, with a focus on finding qualitative information on phytochemicals which could inhibit these targets and came up with 10 prototypical phytochemical compounds: (1) oleic acid, (2) tripterine, (3) silibinin, (4) curcumin, (5) epigallocatechin-gallate, (6) kaempferol, (7) melatonin, (8) enterolactone, (9) withaferin A and (10) resveratrol. We suggest that these plant-derived compounds could be combined to constitute a broader acting and more effective inhibitory cocktail at doses that would not be likely to cause excessive toxicity. All the targets and phytochemical approaches were further cross-validated against their effects on other essential tumorigenic pathways (based on the "hallmarks" of cancer) in order to discover possible synergies or potentially harmful interactions, and were found to generally also have positive involvement in/effects on these other aspects of tumor biology. The aim is that this discussion could lead to the selection of combinations of such anti-angiogenic compounds which could be used in potent anti-tumor cocktails, for enhanced therapeutic efficacy, reduced toxicity and circumvention of single-agent anti-angiogenic resistance, as well as for possible use in primary or secondary cancer prevention strategies.

  • 34.
    Xue, Yuan
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute.
    Lim, Sharon
    Karolinska Institute.
    Yang, Yunlong
    Karolinska Institute.
    Wang, Zongwei
    Karolinska Institute.
    Dahl Ejby Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hedlund, Eva-Maria
    Karolinska Institute.
    Andersson, Patrik
    Karolinska Institute.
    Sasahara, Masakiyo
    Toyama University.
    Larsson, Ola
    Karolinska Institute.
    Galter, Dagmar
    Karolinska Institute.
    Gao, Renhai
    Karolinska Institute.
    Hosaka, Kayoko
    Karolinska Institute.
    Cao, Yihai
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    PDGF-BB modulates hematopoiesis and tumor angiogenesis by inducing erythropoietin production in stromal cells2012In: Nature Medicine, ISSN 1078-8956, E-ISSN 1546-170X, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 100-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) signaling system contributes to tumor angiogenesis and vascular remodeling. Here we show in mouse tumor models that PDGF-BB induces erythropoietin (EPO) mRNA and protein expression by targeting stromal and perivascular cells that express PDGF receptor-beta (PDGFR-beta). Tumor-derived PDGF-BB promoted tumor growth, angiogenesis and extramedullary hematopoiesis at least in part through modulation of EPO expression. Moreover, adenoviral delivery of PDGF-BB to tumor-free mice increased both EPO production and erythropoiesis, as well as protecting from irradiation-induced anemia. At the molecular level, we show that the PDGF-BB PDGFR-beta signaling system activates the EPO promoter, acting in part through transcriptional regulation by the transcription factor Atf3, possibly through its association with two additional transcription factors, c-Jun and Sp1. Our findings suggest that PDGF-BB-induced EPO promotes tumor growth through two mechanisms: first, paracrine stimulation of tumor angiogenesis by direct induction of endothelial cell proliferation, migration, sprouting and tube formation, and second, endocrine stimulation of extramedullary hematopoiesis leading to increased oxygen perfusion and protection against tumor-associated anemia.

  • 35.
    Zhang, Fan
    et al.
    NEI, MD USA .
    Li, Yang
    NEI, MD USA .
    Tang, Zhongshu
    NEI, MD USA .
    Kumar, Anil
    NEI, MD USA .
    Lee, Chunsik
    NEI, MD USA .
    Zhang, Liping
    National Institute Dent and Craniofacial Research, MD 20892 USA .
    Zhu, Chaoyong
    NanTong University, Peoples R China .
    Klotzsche-von Ameln, Anne
    University of Dresden, Germany .
    Wang, Bin
    Binzhou Medical University, Peoples R China .
    Gao, Zhiqin
    Weifang Medical University, Peoples R China .
    Zhang, Shizhuang
    Weifang Medical University, Peoples R China .
    Langer, Harald F.
    University of Tubingen, Germany .
    Hou, Xu
    Fourth Mil Medical University, Peoples R China .
    Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ma, Wenxin
    NEI, MD 20852 USA .
    Wong, Wai
    NEI, MD 20852 USA .
    Chavakis, Triantafyllos
    University of Dresden, Germany .
    Liu, Yizhi
    Sun Yat Sen University, Peoples R China .
    Cao, Yihai
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Li, Xuri
    NEI, MD 20852 USA .
    Proliferative and Survival Effects of PUMA Promote Angiogenesis2012In: CELL REPORTS, ISSN 2211-1247, Vol. 2, no 5, p. 1272-1285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) is known as an essential apoptosis inducer. Here, we report the seemingly paradoxical finding that PUMA is a proangiogenic factor critically required for the proliferation and survival of vascular and microglia cells. Strikingly, Puma deficiency by genetic deletion or small hairpin RNA knockdown inhibited developmental and pathological angiogenesis and reduced microglia numbers in vivo, whereas Puma gene delivery increased angiogenesis and cell survival. Mechanistically, we revealed that PUMA plays a critical role in regulating autophagy by modulating Erk activation and intracellular calcium level. Our findings revealed an unexpected function of PUMA in promoting angiogenesis and warrant more careful investigations into the therapeutic potential of PUMA in treating cancer and degenerative diseases.

1 - 35 of 35
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