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  • 1.
    Hassan, Kahin Akram
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liu, Yu
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics, Electronics and Mathematics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Besançon, Lonni
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Johansson, Jimmy
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Rönnberg, Niklas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A Study on Visual Representations for Active Plant Wall Data Analysis2019In: DATA, E-ISSN 2306-5729, Vol. 4, no 2, article id 74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The indoor climate is closely related to human health, well-being, and comfort. Thus, an understanding of the indoor climate is vital. One way to improve the indoor climates is to place an aesthetically pleasing active plant wall in the environment. By collecting data using sensors placed in and around the plant wall both the indoor climate and the status of the plant wall can be monitored and analyzed. This manuscript presents a user study with domain experts in this field with a focus on the representation of such data. The experts explored this data with a Line graph, a Horizon graph, and a Stacked area graph to better understand the status of the active plant wall and the indoor climate. Qualitative measures were collected with Think-aloud protocol and semi-structured interviews. The study resulted in four categories of analysis tasks: Overview, Detail, Perception, and Complexity. The Line graph was found to be preferred for use in providing an overview, and the Horizon graph for detailed analysis, revealing patterns and showing discernible trends, while the Stacked area graph was generally not preferred. Based on these findings, directions for future research are discussed and formulated. The results and future directions of this research can facilitate the analysis of multivariate temporal data, both for domain users and visualization researchers.

  • 2.
    Hassan, Kahin Akram
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rönnberg, Niklas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Forsell, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Cooper, Matthew
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Johansson, Jimmy
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    A Study on 2D and 3D Parallel Coordinates for Pattern Identification in Temporal Multivariate Data2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Parallel coordinates are commonly used for non-temporal multivariate data, but there is little support for their usability for displaying temporal multivariate data. In this paper, we introduce a study evaluating the usability of 2D and 3D parallel coordinates for pattern identification in temporal multivariate data. The results indicate that 3D parallel coordinates have higher usability, as measured with higher accuracy and faster response time as well as subjective ratings, compared to 2D.

  • 3.
    Hassan, Kahin Akram
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rönnberg, Niklas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Forsell, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Cooper, Matthew
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Johansson, Jimmy
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    A Study on 2D and 3D Parallel Coordinates for Pattern Identification in Temporal Multivariate Data2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Parallel coordinates are commonly used for non-temporal multivariate data, but there is little support for their usability for displaying temporal multivariate data. In this paper, we introduce a study evaluating the usability of 2D and 3D parallel coordinates for pattern identification in temporal multivariate data. The results indicate that 3D parallel coordinates have higher usability, as measured with higher accuracy and faster response time as well as subjective ratings, compared to 2D.

  • 4.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Niklas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    STAF-dagar i Uppsala: Mycket om kopplingen audiologi och otokirurgi2011In: Audionytt, ISSN 0347-6308, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 31-33Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Niklas, Rönnberg
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sonification Enhances Perception of Color Intensity2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This poster presents an interactive sonification experiment, designed to evaluate possible benefits of sonification in information visual- ization. The aim of the present study was to explore the use of composed and deliberately designed musical sounds to enhance perception of color intensity in visual representations. It was hypoth- esized, that by using musical sounds for sonification perception of color intensity would be improved. In this evaluation, sonification was mapped to color intensity in visual representations, and the par- ticipants had to identify and mark the highest color intensity, as well as answer a questionnaire about their experience. Both quantitative and qualitative preliminary results suggest a benefit of sonification, and indicate that sonification is useful in data exploration. 

  • 6.
    Niklas, Rönnberg
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Löwgren, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Photone: Exploring modal synergy in photographic images and music2018In: International Conference on Auditory Display, 2018 [30], Georgia Institute of Technology , 2018, p. 73-79Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present Photone, an interactive installation combining photographic images and musical sonification. An image is displayed, and a dynamic musical score is generated based on the overall color properties of the image and the color value of the pixel under the cursor. Hence, the music changes as the user moves the cursor. This simple approach turns out to have interesting experiential qualities in use. The composition of images and music invites the user to explore the combination of hues and textures, and musical sounds. We characterize the resulting experience in Photone as one of modal synergy where visual and auditory output combine holistically with the chosen interaction technique. This tentative finding is potentially relevant to further research in auditory displays and multimodal interaction.

  • 7.
    Niklas, Rönnberg
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Testing effort for speech comprehension using the individuals’ cognitive spare capacity – the Auditory Inference Span Test2010In: Adult Hearing Screening 2010, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Rudner, Mary
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Ng, EH
    Rönnberg, Niklas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mishra, Sushmit
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cognitive spare capacity as a measure of listening effort2011In: Journal of Hearing Science, ISSN 2083-389X, Vol. 1, no 2, p. EA47-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been a recent interest in listening effort as a factor to be taken into account in the audiological clinic. However, the term “listening effort” is poorly determined and needs to be defined before it can be used as a clinical or research tool. One way of understanding listening effort is in terms of the cognitive resources expended during listening. Cognitive capacity is finite and thus if cognitive capacity is used up during the act of listening to speech there will be fewer cognitive resources left to process the content of the message conveyed. We have introduced the term Cognitive Spare Capacity (CSC) to refer to residual cognitive capacity once successful listening has taken place. This extended abstract described the work we have carried out to date on measures of CSC for research and clinical use. In the course of this work we have developed tests to assess the role of memory load, executive function and audiovisual integration in CSC under challenging conditions. When these tests are fully developed, our aim is that they should allow objective individual assessment of listening effort in cognitive terms. Results to date indicate that under challenging conditions, CSC is an arena for executive processing of temporarily stored information; it is related to individual working memory capacity and can be enhanced by hearing aid signal processing.

  • 9.
    Rudner, Mary
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ng, Hoi Ning, Elaine
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Niklas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Mishra, Sushmit
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cognitive spare capacity as a measure of listening effort2011In: Journal of Hearing Science, ISSN 2083-389X, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 47-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been a recent interest in listening effort as a factor to be taken into account in the audiological clinic. However, the term “listening effort” is poorly determined and needs to be defined before it can be used as a clinical or research tool. One way of understanding listening effort is in terms of the cognitive resources expended during listening. Cognitive capacity is finite and thus if cognitive capacity is used up during the act of listening to speech there will be fewer cognitive resources left to process the content of the message conveyed. We have introduced the term Cognitive Spare Capacity (CSC) to refer to residual cognitive capacity once successful listening has taken place. This extended abstract described the work we have carried out to date on measures of CSC for research and clinical use. In the course of this work we have developed tests to assess the role of memory load, executive function and audiovisual integration in CSC under challenging conditions. When these tests are fully developed, our aim is that they should allow objective individual assessment of listening effort in cognitive terms. Results to date indicate that under challenging conditions, CSC is an arena for executive processing of temporarily stored information; it is related to individual working memory capacity and can be enhanced by hearing aid signal processing.

  • 10.
    Rudner, Mary
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ng, Hoi Ning, Elaine
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Niklas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mishra, Sushmit
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Understanding auditory effort by measuring cognitive spare capacity2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Rönnberg, Niklas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Assessing cognitive spare capacity as a measure of listening effort using the Auditory Inference Span Test2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Hearing loss has a negative effect on the daily life of 10-15% of the world’s population. One of the most common ways to treat a hearing loss is to fit hearing aids which increases audibility by providing amplification. Hearing aids thus improve speech reception in quiet, but listening in noise is nevertheless often difficult and stressful. Individual differences in cognitive capacity have been shown to be linked to differences in speech recognition performance in noise. An individual’s cognitive capacity is limited and is gradually consumed by increasing demands when listening in noise. Thus, fewer cognitive resources are left to interpret and process the information conveyed by the speech. Listening effort can therefore be explained by the amount of cognitive resources occupied with speech recognition. A well fitted hearing aid improves speech reception and leads to less listening effort, therefore an objective measure of listening effort would be a useful tool in the hearing aid fitting process.

    In this thesis the Auditory Inference Span Test (AIST) was developed to assess listening effort by measuring an individual’s cognitive spare capacity, the remaining cognitive resources available to interpret and encode linguistic content of incoming speech input while speech understanding takes place. The AIST is a dual-task hearing-innoise test, combining auditory and memory processing, and requires executive processing of speech at different memory load levels. The AIST was administered to young adults with normal hearing and older adults with hearing impairment. The aims were 1) to develop the AIST; 2) to investigate how different signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) affect memory performance for perceived speech; 3) to explore if this performance would interact with cognitive capacity; 4) to test if different background noise types would interact differently with memory performance for young adults with normal hearing; and 5) to examine if these relationships would generalize to older adults with hearing impairment.

    The AIST is a new test of cognitive spare capacity which uses existing speech material that is available in several countries, and manipulates simultaneously cognitive load and SNR. Thus, the design of AIST pinpoints potential interactions between auditory and cognitive factors. The main finding of this thesis was the interaction between noise type and SNR showing that decreased SNR reduced cognitive spare capacity more in speech-like noise compared to speech-shaped noise, even though speech intelligibility levels were similar between noise types. This finding applied to young adults with normal hearing but there was a similar effect for older adults with hearing impairment with the addition of background noise compared to no background noise. Task demands, MLLs, interacted with cognitive capacity, thus, individuals with less cognitive capacity were more sensitive to increased cognitive load. However, MLLs did not interact with noise type or with SNR, which shows that different memory load levels were not affected differently in different noise types or in different SNRs. This suggests that different cognitive mechanisms come into play for storage and processing of speech information in AIST and for listening to speech in noise. Thus, the results suggested that a test of cognitive spare capacity seems to be a useful way to assess listening effort, even though the AIST, in the design used in this thesis, might be too cognitively demanding to provide reliable results for all individuals.

    List of papers
    1. Testing listening effort for speech comprehension using the individuals’ cognitive spare capacity
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Testing listening effort for speech comprehension using the individuals’ cognitive spare capacity
    2011 (English)In: Audiology Research, ISSN 2039-4330, E-ISSN 2039-4349, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 82-85Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Most hearing aid fittings today are almost solely based on the patient’s audiogram. Although the loss of gain in the cochlea is important, for a more optimal fitting, more individual parameters of the patient’s cochlear loss together with the patient's cognitive abilities to process the auditory signal are required (Stenfelt & Rönnberg, 2009; Edwards, 2007). Moreover, the evaluation of the fitting is often based on a speech in noise task and the aim is to improve the individual patient’s signal to noise ratio (SNR) thresholds. As a consequence, hearing aid fitting may be seen as a process aimed to improve the patient’s SNR threshold rather than to improve communication ability. However, subsequent to a hearing aid fitting, there can be great differences in SNR improvement between patients that have identical hearing impairment in terms of threshold data (the audiogram). The reasons are certainly complex but one contributing factor may be the individual differences in cognitive capacity and associated listening effort. Another way to think about amplified hearing is to ease a subject’s listening effort (Sarampalis, et al., 2009). When the speech signal is degraded by noise or by a hearing impairment, more high-order cognitive or top-down processes are required to perceive and understand the signal, and listening is therefore more effortful. It is assumed that a hearing aid would ease the listening effort for a hearing impaired person. However, it is not clear how to measure the listening effort. We here present a test that will tap into the different cognitive aspects of listening effort, the Auditory Inference Span Test (AIST). The AIST is a dual task hearing in noise test, that combines auditory and memory processing and is well suited as a clinical test for listening effort.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Pavia, Italy: PAGEPress, 2011
    National Category
    Otorhinolaryngology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-68318 (URN)10.4081/audiores.2011.e22 (DOI)
    Available from: 2011-05-18 Created: 2011-05-18 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
    2. Assessing listening effort by measuring short-term memory storage and processing of speech in noise
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessing listening effort by measuring short-term memory storage and processing of speech in noise
    2014 (English)In: Speech, Language and Hearing, ISSN 2050-5728, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 123-132Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of working memory capacity (WMC) and updating ability (UA) on listening effort measured using a new test, the Auditory Inference Span Test (AIST), as an objective measure of listening effort.

    Design

    The AIST is based on Swedish five-word sentences and taps into three memory load levels (MLLs). It was administered in stationary speech-shaped noise at −2, −4, and −6 dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). WMC was assessed using the reading span test, and UA was assessed using the letter memory test. We also collected data on speech-in-noise performance and subjectively rated listening effort at the three SNRs.

    Study sample

    Thirty-nine participants with normal hearing thresholds (≤20 dB HL for 250 to 4000 Hz) took part in the study.

    Results

    AIST performance decreased with increasing MLL and was related to WMC and UA. Participants with high WMC performed better than those with low WMC at more favorable SNRs. Participants with high UA performed better than participants with low UA at the intermediate MLL, which made particular demands on the UA. Neither speech recognition scores nor subjectively rated listening effort was associated with AIST performance or either of the cognitive variables.

    Conclusion

    AIST taps into cognitive functions necessary for understanding speech in noise. However, in its current form AIST may be too cognitively taxing to successfully measure graded listening effort in participants with lower cognitive capacity.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    W Yorks, United Kingdom: Maney Publishing, 2014
    Keywords
    Listening effort, Speech-in-noise, Cognition, Working memory, Updating
    National Category
    Social Sciences Otorhinolaryngology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-108763 (URN)10.1179/2050572813Y.0000000033 (DOI)
    Available from: 2014-07-03 Created: 2014-07-03 Last updated: 2017-11-06Bibliographically approved
    3.
    The record could not be found. The reason may be that the record is no longer available or you may have typed in a wrong id in the address field.
    4. Adverse listening conditions affect short-term memory storage and processing of speech for older adults with hearing impairment
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adverse listening conditions affect short-term memory storage and processing of speech for older adults with hearing impairment
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Previous work has shown an effect of noise type on memory for intelligible speech. The aim ofthis study was to investigate the effect of background noise on memory performance of intelligible speech for older adults with hearing impairment using the Auditory Inference Span Test (AIST).

    Method: Twenty participants with ages between 67 and 80 years with symmetrical hearing loss (29 to 47dB HL) performed the AIST, which requires processing of five-word sentences at three memoryload levels (MLLs) in three listening conditions: Quiet, steady-state noise (SSN), and backgroundvoices (ISTS). Individualized SNRs targeted 90% speech intelligibility. AIST performance reflects the amount of cognitive capacity occupied in listening, and consequently indicates the amount of listening effort. Working memory capacity (WMC) was assessed using the reading span test, and updating ability (UA) was assessed using the letter memory test.

    Results: AIST performance decreased in background noise and with increasing MLL. It was related to UA and age but not to WMC. Response times on questions designed to probe sentence recognition increased with the addition of background noise.

    Conclusions: The results demonstrate that the addition of background noise requires more cognitive resourcesto maintain speech recognition performance, leading to higher demands on the cognitive capacity,higher listening effort as measured by poorer memory performance, and longer AIST responsetimes. However, the type of background noise, SSN or ISTS, affected memory performance similarly.

    Keywords
    Speech-in-noise, Cognition, Working memory, Updating, Hearing impairment, Listening effort, Cognitive spare capacity
    National Category
    Clinical Medicine Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-109680 (URN)
    Available from: 2014-08-25 Created: 2014-08-25 Last updated: 2017-11-06Bibliographically approved
  • 12.
    Rönnberg, Niklas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Musical Elements in Sonification Support Visual Perception2019In: Proceedings of the 31st European Conference on Cognitive Ergonomics (ECCE 2019), New York, NY, USA: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2019, p. 114-117Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Visual representations of data are commonly used to communicate research results. However, such representations might introduce several possible challenges for the human visual perception system, for example in perceiving brightness levels. Sonification, adding sound to the visual representation, might be used to overcome these challenges. As sonification provides additional information, sonification could be useful in supporting interpretations of a visual perception. In the present study, usefulness in terms of accuracy of sonification was investigated with an interactive sonification test. In the experiment, participants were asked to identify the highest brightness level in a monochrome visual representation. The task was performed in four conditions, one with no sonification and three with different sonification settings. The results show that sonification is useful, as measured by higher task accuracy.

  • 13.
    Rönnberg, Niklas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Musical sonification supports visual discrimination of color intensity2019In: Behaviour & Information Technology, ISSN 0144-929X, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Visual representations of data introduce several possible challenges for the human visual perception system in perceiving brightness levels. Overcoming these challenges might be simplified by adding sound to the representation. This is called sonification. As sonification provides additional information to the visual information, sonification could be useful in supporting the visual perception. In the present study, usefulness (in terms of accuracy and response time) of sonification was investigated with an interactive sonification test. In the test, participants were asked to identify the highest brightness level in a monochrome visual representation. The task was performed in four conditions, one with no sonification and three with different sonification settings. The results show that sonification is useful, as measured by higher task accuracy, and that the participant's musicality facilitates the use of sonification with better performance when sonification was used. The results were also supported by subjective measurements, where participants reported an experienced benefit of sonification.

  • 14.
    Rönnberg, Niklas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sonification supports perception of brightness contrast2019In: Journal on Multimodal User Interfaces, ISSN 1783-7677, E-ISSN 1783-8738, Vol. 13, no 13, p. 373-381, article id 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In complex visual representations, there are several possible challenges for the visual perception that might be eased by adding sound as a second modality (i.e. sonification). It was hypothesized that sonification would support visual perception when facing challenges such as simultaneous brightness contrast or the Mach band phenomena. This hypothesis was investigated with an interactive sonification test, yielding objective measures (accuracy and response time) as well as subjective measures of sonification benefit. In the test, the participant’s task was to mark the vertical pixel line having the highest intensity level. This was done in a condition without sonification and in three conditions where the intensity level was mapped to different musical elements. The results showed that there was a benefit of sonification, with higher accuracy when sonification was used compared to no sonification. This result was also supported by the subjective measurement. The results also showed longer response times when sonification was used. This suggests that the use and processing of the additional information took more time, leading to longer response times but also higher accuracy. There were no differences between the three sonification conditions.

  • 15.
    Rönnberg, Niklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Löwgren, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    The Sound Challenge to Visualization Design Research2016In: Proceedings of EmoVis 2016, ACM IUI 2016 Workshop on Emotion and Visualization, Sonoma, CA, USA, March 10, 2016 / [ed] Andreas Kerren, Daniel Cernea, Margit Pohl, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2016, p. 31-34Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is an introduction to the emotional qualities of sound and music, and we suggest that the visual and the aural modalities should be combined in the design of visualizations involving emotional expressions. We therefore propose that visualization design should incorporate sonic interaction design drawing on musicology, cognitive neuroscience of music, and psychology of music, and identify what we see as key research challenges for such an approach.

  • 16.
    Rönnberg, Niklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Löwgren, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Traces Of Modal Synergy: Studying Interactive Musical Sonificationof Images in General-Audience Use2019In: The 25th International Conference on Auditory Display (ICAD 2019) / [ed] Vickers, Paul and Gröhn, Matti and Stockman, Tony, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Photone is an interactive installation combining color images with musical sonification. The musical expression is generated based on the syntactic (as opposed to semantic) features of an image as it is explored by the userメs pointing device, intending to catalyze a holistic user experience we refer to as modal synergy where visual and auditory modalities multiply rather than add. We collected and analyzed two months' worth of data from visitorsメ interactions with Photone in a public exhibition at a science center. Our results show that a small proportion of visitors engaged in sustained interaction with Photone, as indicated by session times. Among the most deeply engaged visitors, a majority of the interaction was devoted to visually salient objects, i.e., semantic features of the images. However, the data also contains instances of interactive behavior that are best explained by exploration of the syntactic features of an image, and thus may suggest the emergence of modal synergy.

  • 17.
    Rönnberg, Niklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Adverse listening conditions affect short-term memory storage and processing of speech for older adults with hearing impairmentManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Previous work has shown an effect of noise type on memory for intelligible speech. The aim ofthis study was to investigate the effect of background noise on memory performance of intelligible speech for older adults with hearing impairment using the Auditory Inference Span Test (AIST).

    Method: Twenty participants with ages between 67 and 80 years with symmetrical hearing loss (29 to 47dB HL) performed the AIST, which requires processing of five-word sentences at three memoryload levels (MLLs) in three listening conditions: Quiet, steady-state noise (SSN), and backgroundvoices (ISTS). Individualized SNRs targeted 90% speech intelligibility. AIST performance reflects the amount of cognitive capacity occupied in listening, and consequently indicates the amount of listening effort. Working memory capacity (WMC) was assessed using the reading span test, and updating ability (UA) was assessed using the letter memory test.

    Results: AIST performance decreased in background noise and with increasing MLL. It was related to UA and age but not to WMC. Response times on questions designed to probe sentence recognition increased with the addition of background noise.

    Conclusions: The results demonstrate that the addition of background noise requires more cognitive resourcesto maintain speech recognition performance, leading to higher demands on the cognitive capacity,higher listening effort as measured by poorer memory performance, and longer AIST responsetimes. However, the type of background noise, SSN or ISTS, affected memory performance similarly.

  • 18.
    Rönnberg, Niklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Assessing listening effort by measuring short-term memory storage and processing of speech in noise2014In: Speech, Language and Hearing, ISSN 2050-5728, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 123-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of working memory capacity (WMC) and updating ability (UA) on listening effort measured using a new test, the Auditory Inference Span Test (AIST), as an objective measure of listening effort.

    Design

    The AIST is based on Swedish five-word sentences and taps into three memory load levels (MLLs). It was administered in stationary speech-shaped noise at −2, −4, and −6 dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). WMC was assessed using the reading span test, and UA was assessed using the letter memory test. We also collected data on speech-in-noise performance and subjectively rated listening effort at the three SNRs.

    Study sample

    Thirty-nine participants with normal hearing thresholds (≤20 dB HL for 250 to 4000 Hz) took part in the study.

    Results

    AIST performance decreased with increasing MLL and was related to WMC and UA. Participants with high WMC performed better than those with low WMC at more favorable SNRs. Participants with high UA performed better than participants with low UA at the intermediate MLL, which made particular demands on the UA. Neither speech recognition scores nor subjectively rated listening effort was associated with AIST performance or either of the cognitive variables.

    Conclusion

    AIST taps into cognitive functions necessary for understanding speech in noise. However, in its current form AIST may be too cognitively taxing to successfully measure graded listening effort in participants with lower cognitive capacity.

  • 19.
    Rönnberg, Niklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Oticon Research Centre Eriksholm, Denmark.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Memory performance on the Auditory Inference Span Test is independent of background noise type for young adults with normal hearing at high speech intelligibility2014In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 5, no 1490Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Listening in noise is often perceived to be effortful. This is partly because cognitive resources are engaged in separating the target signal from background noise, leaving fewer resources for storage and processing of the content of the message in working memory. The Auditory Inference Span Test (AIST) is designed to assess listening effort by measuring the ability to maintain and process heard information. The aim of this study was to use AIST to investigate the effect of background noise types and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) on listening effort, as a function of working memory capacity (WMC) and updating ability (UA). The AIST was administered in three types of background noise: steady-state speech-shaped noise, amplitude modulated speech-shaped noise, and unintelligible speech. Three SNRs targeting 90% speech intelligibility or better were used in each of the three noise types, giving nine different conditions. The reading span test assessed VVMC, while UA was assessed with the letter memory test. Twenty young adults with normal hearing participated in the study. Results showed that AIST performance was not influenced by noise type at the same intelligibility level, but became worse with worse SNR when background noise was speech-like. Performance on AIST also decreased with increasing memory load level. Correlations between AIST performance and the cognitive measurements suggested that WMC is of more importance for listening when SNRs are worse, while UA is of more importance for listening in easier SNRs. The results indicated that in young adults with normal hearing, the effort involved in listening in noise at high intelligibility levels is independent of the noise type. However, when noise is speech-like and intelligibility decreases, listening effort increases, probably due to extra demands on cognitive resources added by the informational masking created by the speech fragments and vocal sounds in the background noise.

  • 20.
    Rönnberg, Niklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research.
    AIST - Ett test av lyssningsansträngning2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Hörapparatsanpassning kan ses som en process för att minska en persons lyssningsansträngning, men det är oklart hur man bäst mäter lyssningsansträngning på ett objektivt sätt. Auditory Inference Span Test (AIST) syftar därför till att utvecklas till ett kliniskt instrument att använda vid hörapparatsanpassning för att mäta en patients ansträngning att uppfatta tal.

    AIST är ett kombinerat hörsel-, minnes- och bearbetningstest. Testet bygger på idén att ju mer kognitiva resurser som går åt för att bearbeta och förstå tal, desto mindre kognitiva resurser finns kvar för att minnas och lagra talinformation. Testet använder Hagermans meningar i brus, och försökspersonen behöver minnas och bearbeta informationen i talmaterialet för att kunna besvara frågor om innehållet. Poäng på frågorna samt reaktionstid mäts som mått på lyssningsansträngning. Data från pilottester visar på att AIST kan bli ett väl anpassat test för kliniskt bruk för att mäta lyssningsansträngning.

     

  • 21.
    Rönnberg, Niklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research.
    Testing effort for speech comprehension using the individuals’ cognitive spare capacity - the Auditory Inference Span test2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Modern hearing aids use a multitude of parameters to give the user an optimal speech signal. Fitting of the hearing aid becomes a handiwork due to the limited data of the patients hearing status (primarily an audiogram). A hearing in noise test (SNR threshold) is often used to evaluate the fitting. However, testing the SNR threshold as done in clinical use today is not ecological valid. Another way to think about hearing aid fitting is to ease the listening effort.

    Therefore, we propose the Auditory Inference Span Test (AIST) as a clinical tool during hearing aid fitting to assess the patient’s effort to understand speech. AIST is a combined auditory, memory, and processing test. It relies on the idea that the more cognitive resources that are required to process and understand speech, less cognitive resources are available for storage of the speech information. In AIST, sentences are presented in noise and afterwards the patient is required to recall and process the information from the sentences. Correctness and answering speed is measured and scores correlate to the effort required to understand the speech.

    Data from piloting tests indicate that the AIST is well suited as a clinical test for listening effort.

  • 22.
    Rönnberg, Niklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Testing listening effort for speech comprehension using the individuals’ cognitive spare capacity2011In: Audiology Research, ISSN 2039-4330, E-ISSN 2039-4349, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 82-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most hearing aid fittings today are almost solely based on the patient’s audiogram. Although the loss of gain in the cochlea is important, for a more optimal fitting, more individual parameters of the patient’s cochlear loss together with the patient's cognitive abilities to process the auditory signal are required (Stenfelt & Rönnberg, 2009; Edwards, 2007). Moreover, the evaluation of the fitting is often based on a speech in noise task and the aim is to improve the individual patient’s signal to noise ratio (SNR) thresholds. As a consequence, hearing aid fitting may be seen as a process aimed to improve the patient’s SNR threshold rather than to improve communication ability. However, subsequent to a hearing aid fitting, there can be great differences in SNR improvement between patients that have identical hearing impairment in terms of threshold data (the audiogram). The reasons are certainly complex but one contributing factor may be the individual differences in cognitive capacity and associated listening effort. Another way to think about amplified hearing is to ease a subject’s listening effort (Sarampalis, et al., 2009). When the speech signal is degraded by noise or by a hearing impairment, more high-order cognitive or top-down processes are required to perceive and understand the signal, and listening is therefore more effortful. It is assumed that a hearing aid would ease the listening effort for a hearing impaired person. However, it is not clear how to measure the listening effort. We here present a test that will tap into the different cognitive aspects of listening effort, the Auditory Inference Span Test (AIST). The AIST is a dual task hearing in noise test, that combines auditory and memory processing and is well suited as a clinical test for listening effort.

  • 23.
    Rönnberg, Niklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research.
    The Auditory Inference Span Test – Developing a test for cognitive aspects of listening effort for speech comprehension2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Most hearing aid fittings today are almost solely based on the patient’s audiogram. However, more individual parameters of the patient’s hearing thresholds together with the patient’s cognitive abilities to process the auditory signal are required. Hearing aid fitting may be seen as a process aimed to improve the patient’s hearing thresholds rather than to improve communication ability. Another way to think about hearing aid fitting is to ease the patient’s listening effort. However, it is not clear how to measure the listening effort.

    Therefore, we propose the Auditory Inference Span Test (AIST) as a clinical tool during hearing aid fitting to assess the patient’s effort to understand speech. AIST is a combined auditory, memory, and processing test. It relies on the idea that the more cognitive resources that are required to process and understand speech, less cognitive resources are available for storage of the speech information. In AIST, sentences are presented in noise and afterwards the patient is required to recall and process the information from the sentences. Correctness and reaction time is recorded as measurements of perceived listening effort.

    Data from piloting tests indicate that the AIST is well suited as a clinical test for listening effort. In a future study to verify that the AIST is sensitive to cognitive capacity, the test will be evaluated with measurements of the subject's cognitive capacity as well as the subject's hearing thresholds. For a clinical test the requirement is that it is fast and easily facilitated. The AIST takes no more than fifteen minutes to complete, and the aim is to further shorten the time and adapt the test for clinical use. This ensures the AIST to be a useable instrument for testing listening effort using the individuals' cognitive spare capacity.

     

  • 24.
    Rönnberg, Niklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research.
    An objective measure of listening effort: The Auditory Inference Span Test2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One aim of hearing aid fitting is to ease the patient’s effort in understanding speech, i.e. the listening effort needed to perceive speech in different sound environments. To obtain a good hearing aid fitting, knowledge about the patient’s auditory as well as cognitive abilities seems to be important. However, listening effort is usually not included as a fitting criterion, partly as it is not clear how to measure listening effort objectively.

    The Auditory Inference Span Test (AIST) is a dual-task hearing-in-noise test, that combines auditory and memory processing. The basis for the test is that when more cognitive resources are required for understanding speech, less cognitive resources are available for storage and processing of the speech information. In AIST, Hagerman sentences are presented in noise and the subject is required to recall and process the sentence information. Recall ability is tested with different cognitive loads. Button-press responses are recorded and used as an estimate of listening effort. In a pilot study, listeners showed decreasing accuracy with increasing cognitive load and longer reaction time at maximum cognitive load, suggesting that the test may be suited as a clinical test for listening effort.

    In an ongoing study, the AIST is being evaluated in relation to other auditory and cognitive measures: baseline audiometry (audiogram) and speech in noise test (Hagerman sentences) as well as text based dual processing and storage test (reading span) and updating (letter memory test), as well as subjective rating of listening effort. Data from this study will be presented.

  • 25.
    Rönnberg, Niklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Frequency discrimination and human communication2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The voice is the most common means of communication and tends to change, sliding up and down the pitch scale when forming phonemes and words, as different emotions and thoughts are expressed. Therefore the ability to discriminate frequencies is of importance for speech intelligibility in a communication situation. Furthermore, this ability is also of importance in speech recognition in noise, by separating the target and noise by spectral and temporal differences of the sources. The choice of rehabilitation is crucial for the frequency discrimination ability. Cochlear implants, for example, lack the ability to pass the temporal fine structure of acoustic waves to the auditory nerve, which in turn lead to reduced precision of phase locking, inferior frequency discrimination ability, and a relatively poor ability to understand speech when background sounds are present.The aim of the study is to investigate how frequency discrimination and temporal resolution abilities interact with performance in speech recognition in noise using a psychoacoustic, speech, and cognitive test battery. These tests will give insight to interactions between performance and hearing status, type of rehabilitation(hearing aid, cochlear implant, and electro-acoustic stimulation), cognitive capacity, and language ability. It is hypothesized that normal hearing participants have a better frequency discrimination ability than hearing impaired participants and by that, better understanding of speech. It is also hypothesized that type of rehabilitation effects performance on frequency discrimination, and that this performance correlates with speech recognition in noise. Finally, it is hypothesized that cognitive capacity and language ability can, to some extent, compensate for loss of frequency resolution in the peripheral auditory system. Preliminary results from the study will be presented and discussed.

  • 26.
    Rönnberg, Niklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Testing listening effort for speech comprehension2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    One aim of hearing aid fitting is to reduce the effort of understanding speech, especially in noisy environments. For a good hearing aid fitting, knowledge about the patient’s auditory abilities is necessary, but knowledge about cognitive abilities may also be important.

     

    The Auditory Inference Span Test (AIST) is a dual-task hearing-in-noise test, that combines auditory and memory processing. In AIST, Hagerman sentences are presented in steady state speech-shaped noise at -2dB, -4dB or -6dB SNR and the subject is required to recall and process the information from the sentences by giving button-press responses to multiple-choice questions thereby assessing what the subject could infer from what was heard.

     

    AIST will be administered to 40 normal hearing subjects (29 to date) and performance related to speech reception threshold, working memory capacity and updating ability, as well as subjective rating of listening effort. Preliminary results show a greater SNR-related improvement in AIST scores at low SNRs than can be explained by improved audibility alone, consistent with release of memory resources due to reduced listening effort. There is also a trend towards a positive relationship between AIST scores and individual working memory capacity and updating ability.

  • 27.
    Rönnberg, Niklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Testing listening effort for speech comprehension2012In: Speech Perception and Auditory Disorders, Danavox Jubilee Foundation , 2012, p. 73-80Chapter in book (Other academic)
1 - 27 of 27
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