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  • 1.
    Dahlbäck, Nils
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, NLPLAB - Natural Language Processing Laboratory. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Jonsson, Ing-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Impact of Voice Variation in Speech-Based In-Vehicle Systems on Attitutde and Driving Behavior2001In: Human factors: A system view of human, technology and organisation / [ed] de Waard, Dick; Axelsson, Arne; Berglund, Martina; Peters, Björn, Weikert, Clemens, 2001, p. 395-408Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Jonsson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Dahlbäck, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Driving with a Speech Interaction System: Effect of Personality on Performance and Attitude of Driver2014In: HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERACTION: ADVANCED INTERACTION MODALITIES AND TECHNIQUES, PT II, SPRINGER-VERLAG BERLIN , 2014, Vol. 8511, p. 417-428Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Personality has a huge effect on how we communicate and interact with others. This study is one in a series of three that investigates how a speech based in-car system matched with dominant and submissive drivers affects performance and attitude drivers. The study was conducted with 30 participants at Linkoping University in Sweden. Data show that using a voice that combines feature from submissive and dominant speech patterns work well for both dominant and submissive drivers. The voice showed the same performance gain as when matching car voice personality with personality of driver, without the negative attitude ratings associated with the submissive car voice found in previous studies. Drivers assessment of the car system show that even though both dominant and submissive drivers find the system helpful, dominant drivers find the system more annoying and more likely to turn the system off. Design implications of in-vehicle systems are discussed.

  • 3.
    Jonsson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Dahlbäck, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, NLPLAB - Natural Language Processing Laboratory. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    I Can’t Hear You? Driver’s Interacting with Male or Female Voices in Native or Non-Native Language2011In: Universal Access in Human-Computer Interaction. Context Diversity, Part III, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2011, p. 298-305Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many vehicles today are equipped with navigation systems, and all of these systems use speech or a combination of speech and graphics to provide drivers with directions to their destinations. This study investigates the effect of gender of voice when providing driving instructions in English to drivers that are non-native speakers of English. In a 2(native/non-native) by 2(gender of voice) between participant study, 40 participants in age group 18-25 drove in a driving simulator for 25 minutes with navigation information system that gave drivers directions to a set destination. Results show that gender of voice did not affect native English speaking drivers. For non-native speakers, however, a female voice worked better for both female and male drivers. Non-native speakers consistently missed to act on navigational information give by the male voice. Design implications for voice systems are discussed.

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