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  • 1.
    Bolic Baric, Vedrana
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy.
    Lidström, Helene
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Thelin, Nils
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Kjellberg, Anette
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy.
    Computer use in educational activities by students with ADHD2014In: 16th International Congress of the World Federation of Occupational Therapists: Sharing Traditions, Creating Futures, 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: One type of support in school that holds promise for students with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the use of information and communication technology (ICT) such as computers and Internet. Computer use in educational activities may be one promising tool to support academic performance of students with ADHD experiencing difficulties in school. However, students with ADHD may be overlooked regarding available support compared with students with physical disabilities.Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate computer use in educational activities by students with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in comparison with that of students with physical disabilities and students from the general population.Methods: The design of the study was cross-sectional with group comparison. Students with a primary diagnosis of ADHD and related disorders were recruited from habilitation centres (HCs). Students with ADHD (n=102) were pairmatched in terms of age and sex with students with physical disabilities and students from the general population (n = 940) were used as a reference group.Results: Students with ADHD reported significantly less frequent use of computers for almost all educational activities compared with students with physical disabilities and students from the general population. Students with ADHD reported low satisfaction with computer use in school. In addition, students with ADHD reported a desire to use computers more often and for more activities in school compared with students with physical disabilities. Conclusion: From an equality perspective, it is essential to enable students with ADHD to use computers in educational activities. Contribution to the practice/evidence base of occupational therapy: Focusing on promoting computer use in educational activities in school for students with physical disabilities as well as students with ADHD is an emerging field in occupational therapy.

  • 2.
    Bolic, Vedrana
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lidström, Helene
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Thelin, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kjellberg, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Computer use in educational activities by students with ADHD2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 357-364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate computer use in educational activities by students with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in comparison with that of students with physical disabilities and students from the general population.

    Methods: The design of the study was cross-sectional with group comparison. Students with ADHD (n = 102) were pair-matched in terms of age and sex with students with physical disabilities and students from the general population (n = 940) were used as a reference group.

    Results: The study showed that less than half of the students with ADHD had access to a computer in the classroom. Students with ADHD reported significantly less frequent use of computers for almost all educational activities compared with students with physical disabilities and students from the general population. Students with ADHD reported low satisfaction with computer use in school. In addition, students with ADHD reported a desire to use computers more often and for more activities in school compared with students with physical disabilities.

    Conclusions: These results indicate that occupational therapists should place more emphasize on how to enable students with ADHD to use computers in educational activities in school.

  • 3.
    Bolic, Vedrana
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lidström, Helene
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Thelin, Nils
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Kjellberg, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Computer use in school - a comparison between students with neuropsychiatric disabilities and motor disabilities2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Bolic, Vedrana
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lidström, Helene
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Thelin, Nils
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Kjellberg, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Datoranvändning i skolan – en jämförelse mellan barn och ungdomar med neuropsykiatriska funktionsnedsättningar och barn och ungdomar med rörelsehinder2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Bratteby Tollerz, L. U.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden; Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Forslund, A. H.
    Uppsala University, Sweden; Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Olsson, R. M.
    Uppsala University, Sweden; Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Lidström, Helene
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Holmback, U.
    Uppsala University, Sweden; Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Children with cerebral palsy do not achieve healthy physical activity levels2015In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 104, no 11, p. 1125-1129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimThis study compared daily activity energy expenditure (AEE) in children with cerebral palsy with a control group and investigated whether the children achieved healthy levels of physical activity. MethodsWe enrolled eight children with bilateral cerebral palsy, from eight to 10years of age, and a group of controls matched for age and gender. For three days, physical activity was simultaneously measured by accelerometers and self-reports using a diary. The daily AEE results were compared between groups and methods. The number of children that achieved healthy physical activity levels in each group was explored. ResultsChildren with cerebral palsy had significantly lower daily AEE, as measured by accelerometers, than the controls, and they did not achieve the healthy moderate to heavy physical activity level defined in the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations. Self-reports using the diaries resulted in an overestimation of physical activity compared with the ankle accelerometer measurements in both groups. ConclusionOur investigation of physical activity in children with cerebral palsy and controls using accelerometers and a diary found low levels of daily AEE and physical activity, and these results were most prominent in the group with cerebral palsy. The diaries overestimated physical activity in both groups.

  • 6.
    Ek, Ingalill
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Höglund, Anette
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Lidström, Helene
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    An experience-based treatment model for children unwilling to eat.2016In: Nursing children and young people, ISSN 2046-2344, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 22-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Guidance during Meals is a two-week inpatient intervention undertaken at the Folke Bernadotte Regional Habilitation Centre, Sweden, to help parents deal with children's eating problems. Parents are given advice about medical and/or behavioural reasons for food selectivity and possible treatment strategies. Aims To identify the way parents handle mealtimes and associated difficulties and investigate parents' opinion on children's progress using Guidance during Meals. Method A questionnaire, consisting of 30 statements and answered by 41 parents, was used to investigate parents' opinions regarding the success of the intervention in altering their child's eating habits at home. Findings Most parents thought that the intervention had helped them and their child, by teaching them how to guide their child during mealtimes, what made it easier for their child to eat, and how to communicate with their child in an encouraging way. Most children retained their increased interest in eating once back at home. These results were not dependent on time of onset of eating problems, number of intervention periods, length of time since the intervention, or gastrostomy. Conclusion The Guidance during Meals intervention helps parents develop knowledge about factors that hinder or facilitate eating in their child and tools that can help their child finish meals, and gives them a sense of hope that positive change can occur.

  • 7.
    Eliasson, Ann-Christin
    et al.
    Institutionen för kvinnor och barns hälsa, Karolinska institutet.
    Lidström, HeleneLinköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.Peny-Dahlstrand, MarieInstitutionen för neurovetenskap och fysiologi, Sahlgrenska akademien, Göteborgs universitet.
    Arbetsterapi för barn och ungdom2016Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I Arbetsterapi för barn och ungdom har 28 ledande experter inom arbetsterapi bidragit med gedigen kunskap och klinisk erfarenhet av barn och ungdom med funktionsnedsättningar.

    I boken finns ett tydligt fokus på aktiviteter i barnens vardag men även i förhållande till hälsa, samhälle och transition från barn till vuxenlivet. Arbetsterapi för barn och ungdom tar även upp aktiviteter kring lek, skola och fritid samt hur barn lär sig nya aktiviteter, och hur de kan träna och kompensera för nedsatt funktion. Kommunikation, kognitivt stöd och förmågan att använda sina händer behandlas också. 


    Boken representerar forskningsläget för svensk arbetsterapi inom området barn och ungdom. Den visar att det finns en bredd i den pågående forskningen men också att det behövs mer kunskap. 

    Arbetsterapi för barn och ungdom riktar sig till arbetsterapeuter inom grundutbildning och fortbildning samt till verksamma arbetsterapeuter och andra yrkesgrupper som möter funktionsnedsatta barn och ungdomar.

  • 8.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy.
    Bolic Baric, Vedrana
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy.
    Lidström, Helene
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    E-inclusion: Digital equality – young people with disabilities2015In: Studies in Health Technology and Informatics / [ed] Cecilia Sik-Lányi, Evert-Jan Hoogerwerf, Klaus Miesenberger, Peter Cudd, IOS Press, 2015, 217, Vol. 217, p. 685 - 688p. 685-688Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The United Nations' position is that digital access is a matter involving equality between groups of people, the securing of democratic rights, and equal opportunities for all citizens. This study investigates digital equality in school and leisure between young people with and without disabilities. A cross-sectional design with group comparisons was applied. Participants were young people (10–18 years of age) with disabilities (n=389) and a reference group in about the same ages. Data were collected by a survey focusing on access to and engagement in ICT activities in school and during leisure time. The results demonstrated young people with disabilities had restricted participation in computer use in educational activities, in comparison to young people in general. During leisure time young people with disabilities had a leading position compared to the reference group with respect to internet use in a variety of activities. Beneficial environmental conditions at home (and the reverse in schools) are discussed as parts of the explanation for the differing engagement levels at home and in school, and among young people with disabilities and young people in general.

    Conclusion: Schools need to prioritise use of ICT by young people with disabilities.

  • 9.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Egilson, Snaefridur
    School of Social Sciences, Faculty of Social and Human Sciences, University of Iceland.
    Lidström, Helene
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kielhofner, Gary
    University of Illinois at Chicago, USA.
    Bedömning av anpassningar i skolmiljön : BAS, version 3.12014Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Bedömning av anpassningar i skolmiljön (BAS) är ett bedömningsinstrument som utvecklats i Sverige för att användas inom skola. Det är avsett för barn från ungefär 7 år och äldre. Användare av instrumentet är arbetsterapeuter, speciallärare, specialpedagoger och andra professioner som fokuserar på elevens aktivitet och delaktighet i skolan.Instrumentet fokuserar på hur faktorer i omgivningen inverkar på elevens aktivitet och delaktighet i skolan. Instrumentet innehåller 16 frågeområden om vardagliga aktiviteter i skolan, där varje frågeområde bedöms utifrån en fyrgradig skala.

    De 16 frågeområdena är: 1. Skriva2. Läsa3. Tala4. Komma ihåg saker5. Räkna6. Göra läxor7. Göra prov8. Delta i sportaktiviteter9. Delta i praktiska/estetiska ämnen10. Delta i klassrummet11. Umgås/leka på rasten12. Delta i praktiska rastaktiviteter13. Åka på studiebesök14. Få assistans15. Ha tillgång till skolans lokaler16. Samarbeta med skolans personal

    Följande frågor ställs för varje frågeområde:

    • Hur ofta gör du/fungerar det när du ska ...........?
    • Har du några anpassningar? Vilka?
    • Är du nöjd med hur det fungerar nu?
    • Om inte, vad skulle kunna underlätta för dig?Efter diskussion med eleven avslutas varje frågeområde med skattning huruvida eleven
    • behöver nya anpassningar,
    • har vissa anpassningar men behöver kompletterande anpassningar,
    • har tillfredställande anpassningar, eller• inte behöver några anpassningar.

    Denna nya version av BAS har uppdaterats i de teoretiska avsnitten och kompletteras med en mappning av frågeområdena till ICF. Instrumentet innehåller nu även exempel på barn och ungdomar med neuropsykiatriska funktionsnedsättningar (såsom ADHD och Aspergers syndrom) och sociala begränsningar. Instrumentet har dessutom en ny grafisk form och är mer användarvänlig.

  • 10.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Egilson, Snaefridur
    School of Social Sciences - Faculty of Social and Human Sciences, University of Iceland.
    Lidström, Helene
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kielhofner, Gary
    University of Illinois at Chicago, USA.
    The school setting interview : SSI version 3.02014Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The SSI is a student-centred interview assessment intended for examing the level of student-environment fit of students from approx. 7 years of age and older. The assessment focus on how environmental factors influence students’ activity and participation in school. SSI includes 16 items, which are scored by using a four-step rating scale.

    The 16 items are:1. Write2. Read3. Speak4. Remember things5. Do mathematics6. Do homework7. Take exams8. Participate in sports activities9. Participate in practical subjects10. Participate in the classroom11. Participate in social activities during breaks12. Participate in practical activities during breaks13. Go on field trips14. Get assistance15. Access to school16. Interact with staffFor each item, the following questions are asked:

    • How do you act/manage in your class when you .......... (e.g. 1. Write)?
    • Do you have any supports or adjustments? If so, what type?
    • Are you satisfied with the present situation?
    • If not, what kind of change would help you the most?

    The theoretical foundation of SSI is MOHO (Kielhofner, 2008) and client-centred practice (Law, 1998).

    This new version now also includes examples of children with neuropsychiatric impairments and social limitations. It has been updated in the theoretical sections and supplemented with a linking/mapping of the SSI items to ICF concepts.

  • 11.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    et al.
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lidström, Helene
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nygård, Louise
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Use of Assistive Technology Devices in mainstream schools; students´ perspective2009In: American Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1943-7676, Vol. 63, no 4, p. 463-472Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE. The use and nonuse of assistive technology devices in school by students with physical disabilities was investigated, and the students’ experiences in using these devices is described.

    METHOD. We used a mixed-methods approach with predominantly qualitative methods to collect and analyze data, which included observations of and interviews with 20 students with physical disabilities and the number and type of assistive technology devices provided.

    RESULTS. It is vital that devices be integrated into educational practice and that students experience immediate benefits for their function in everyday school activities without detrimental effects on their social participation. The latter was often more important than being able to perform activities independently.

    CONCLUSION. The students adopted both a functional and a psychosocial perspective of their devices, and providers should neglect neither. Children and youth need both verbal information and practical experience using devices to be able to make informed decisions.

  • 12.
    Larsson Ranada, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lidström, Helene
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Satisfaction with assistive technology device in relation to the service delivery process: A systematic review2019In: Assistive technology, ISSN 1040-0435, E-ISSN 1949-3614, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 82-97Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The service delivery process (SDP) of assistive technology devices (ATDs) is attracting interest, as theprovision of ATDs is critical for the independence and participation in society of individuals withdisabilities. The purpose of the current study was to investigate what impact the SDP has on satisfactionwith ATDs in individuals with disabilities in relation to everyday activities. A systematic literature reviewwas conducted, which resulted in 53 articles included. The results showed that there are factors inalmost all the different steps of the SDP that affect the satisfaction with of the devices, which can lead tounderutilization and abandonment of ATDs. Only a few studies have been conducted with a designrobust enough to generalize the results; therefore, more research is needed. Therefore, the conclusion isthe SDP as a whole contributes to the satisfaction with and usability of ATDs in individuals with disabilityin relation to achieving the desired goals of participation in everyday activities, for the articles includedmust be deemed as moderate. A client-centred approach in the process is advocated, and was found tobe an important factor for an effective SDP and satisfied users.

  • 13.
    Lidström, Helene
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Att växa upp i en digital miljö2016In: Arbetsterapi för barn och ungdom / [ed] Ann-Christin Eliasson, Helene Lidström, Marie Peny-Dahlstrand, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2016, 1, p. 85-92Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Lidström, Helene
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Ahlsten, G
    Uppsala University Hospital.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The influence of ICT on the activity patterns of children with physical disabilities outside school2011In: CHILD CARE HEALTH AND DEVELOPMENT, ISSN 0305-1862, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 313-321Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To investigate the outside school activity patterns of children with physical disabilities, and specifically their information and communication technology (ICT) usage compared with that of non-disabled children. In addition, the aim was to investigate the childrens opinions on computer use and the associations between their use of the Internet and their interaction with peers. Methods Questionnaire on activities outside school, answered by 215 children and youths with physical disabilities, mean age 12 years 10 months, attending mainstream schools. For group comparisons with non-disabled children, data from the survey Kids and Media were used. Results In the analysis, two sets of activity patterns were identified, depending on whether the child was disabled or not and on the gender of the child. A higher proportion of children with physical disabilities were engaged in ICT activities, while non-disabled children tended to be engaged in a broader range of activities outside school. The activity pattern was more uniform for boys and girls with disabilities than for their non-disabled peers. Use of the Internet was positively associated with peer interaction. Conclusion Outside school, the activity patterns of children and youths with physical disabilities seem to be characterized by a focus on ICT activities, which enable children to compensate for their impairment because it suits all. In addition, digital skills developed outside school engage children with physical disabilities, giving them increased access to society and for educational purposes.

  • 15.
    Lidström, Helene
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm .
    Almqvist, Lena
    Mälardalen University, Västerås.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Computer-based assistive technology device for use by children with physical disabilities: a cross-sectional study2012In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 287-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate the prevalence of children with physical disabilities who used a computer-based ATD, and to examine characteristics differences in children and youths who do or do not use computer-based ATDs, as well as, investigate differences that might influence the satisfaction of those two groups of children and youths when computers are being used for in-school and outside school activities.Method: A cross-sectional survey about computer-based activities in and outside school (n = 287) and group comparisons.Results: The prevalence of using computer-based ATDs was about 44 % (n = 127) of the children in this sample. These children were less satisfied with their computer use in education and outside school activities than the children who did not use an ATD.Conclusion: Improved coordination of the usage of computer-based ATDs in school and in the home, including service and support, could increase the opportunities for children with physical disabilities who use computer-based ATDs to perform the computer activities they want, need and are expected to do in school and outside school. [Box: see text].

  • 16.
    Lidström, Helene
    et al.
    Division of Occupational Therapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm and Folke Bernadotte Regional Habilitation Centre, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala.
    Granlund, Mats
    CHILD Research Environment, Department of Behavioural Science and Social Work, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Use of ICT in school: a comparison between students with and without physical disabilities2011In: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591X, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 21-34Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to determine the information and communication technologies use in school activities of two groups of students with physical disabilities, comprised of those who did and those who did not use a computer-based assistive technology device (ATD) and to make a comparison with students from the general population. In addition, positive factors associated with in-school computer use are identified for students with physical disabilities. The method adopted was a cross-sectional survey about computer-based activities in school among students with physical disabilities (n = 287); including those who used (n = 127) and those who did not use (n  = 160) a computer-based ATD in school (mean age 13 years 6 months). Group comparisons were made with students from the general population (n  = 940). The results showed that the most frequent computer users were students with physical disabilities, who used a computer-based ATD daily. However, when considered as a group, students with physical disabilities used the computer for less varied educational activities than the reference group. Four factors had a positive association to ‘participation in computer activities in school’ for students with physical disabilities: attending a mainstream school, the students’ age (notably, being 16–18 years old), using a computer often in school, and the teachers using a computer frequently in teaching. The present study concludes that, regardless of whether they use a computer-based ATD or not, students with a physical disability have restricted participation in some computer-based educational activities in comparison to students from the general population. An individual plan could be beneficial for each student to: focus on the aim of the computer use; examine the students’ needs in terms of computer-based ATDs and their inclusion in education; and ensure that the students’ digital skills are fully utilised.

  • 17.
    Lidström, Helene
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Benefits of the use of ICT in school activities by students with motor, speech, visual, and hearing impairment: a literature review2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 251-266Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    Information and communication technology (ICT) has the potential to enhance participation in educational activities for students with physical disabilities. Even though incorporating ICTs into teaching and learning in education has become an important issue, it is unclear what evidence research has provided. The aim of this study was to investigate types of ICT items and how ICT is being used by students with physical disabilities, and describe the benefits of ICT use in school activities.

    METHODS:

    A systematic literature search, covering the period 2000-May 2012, was performed in the databases AMED, CINAHL, Eric, OTseeker, Psych Info, PubMed, and Scopus. Data analysis entailed extracting, editing, grouping, and abstracting findings.

    RESULTS:

    A total of 32 articles were included, 16 of which were intervention studies. More than half of the studies concerned students with motor impairments. Type of ICT used differed among impairment groups, and ICT seemed to be especially beneficial for writing, spelling, and communication.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Even though the review found heterogeneity across the studies students seemed to benefit from ICT use regardless of the type. For future research it is important to highlight intervention studies, especially for students with visual, hearing, and communication impairments.

  • 18.
    Lidström, Helene
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Children and youths with disabilities – a part of the digital generation2014In: World Federation of Occupational Therapists Bulletin, ISSN 1447-3828, Vol. 69, p. 19-23Article, review/survey (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this article is to report, compare and reflect on two studies as investigated ICT usage in children with physical disabilities compared with that of non-disabled children, and discuss the results in relation to occupational therapy. Method: A cross-sectional survey about ICT- activities in school and outside school among students with physical disabilities (n=287). Group comparisons were made with students from the general population. Results: Students with a physical disability used computers for less varied educational activities than students without disabilities. The environments; in school and outside school, provide different opportunities for developing and using the digital skills of children with physical disabilities. Conclusion: Digital skills developed outside school captivate children with physical disabilities, providing them with increased access to society and benefiting them educationally. The implications are that, in order to increase children's participation in computer activities in school, changes such as having access to their own

  • 19.
    Lidström, Helene
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lindskog-Wallander, Magnus
    Health and Habilitation Centre, Uppsala County Council, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Arnemo, Eva
    2Health and Habilitation Centre, Uppsala County Council, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Using a Participatory Action Research Design to Develop an Application Together with Young Adults with Spina Bifida2015In: Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, ISSN 0926-9630, E-ISSN 1879-8365, Vol. 217, p. 189-194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Young adults with spina bifida often have cognitive difficulties. As a result, young adults with disabilities are facing challenges with respect to housing, education, relationships and vocation which increases risk of unemployment.

    AIM: The aim is to describe a method to develop a smartphone application together with young adults with spina bifida as an assistive technology for cognition.

    METHOD: In a Participatory Action Research approach, young adults (n = 5) with spina bifida were individually interviewed with Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM). The participants' restrictions in everyday life activities, identified by COPM, were discussed in a focus group formed by the young adults and the result was analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Developing the application the principles of Human-Centered-Design and Universal Design was followed.

    RESULT: An application made for iOS with a focus on usability and worthiness, done by creating a clear and intuitive interface, with a calendar function useful for example to initiate and plan social activities was developed.

    CONCLUSION: The method seems useful when the outcome from the project, a beta version of an application for iOS Smartphone, was achieved in agreement with the participants. The study highlight the importance of involving individuals with disabilities when developing smartphone applications.

  • 20.
    Peny-Dahlstrand, Marie
    et al.
    Institutionen för neurovetenskap och fysiologi, Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet.
    Lidström, Helene
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Eliasson, Ann-Christin
    Institutionen för kvinnor och barns hälsa, Karolinska institutet.
    Framtidens arbetsterapi2016In: Arbetsterapi för barn och ungdom / [ed] Ann-Christin Eliasson, Helene Lidström, Marie Peny-Dahlstrand, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2016, 1, p. 333-336Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Widehammar, Cathrine
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lidström, Helene
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hermansson, Liselotte
    Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Environmental barriers to participation and facilitators for use of three types of assistive technology devices2019In: Assistive technology, ISSN 1040-0435, E-ISSN 1949-3614, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 82-97Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to compare the presence of environmental barriers to participation and facilitators for assistive technology (AT) use and study the relation between barriers and AT use in three different AT devices. A cross-sectional survey was conducted. Inclusion criteria were ≥one year of experience as a user of myoelectric prosthesis (MEP), powered mobility device (PMD), or assistive technology for cognition (ATC) and age 20-90 years. Overall, 156 participants answered the Swedish version of the Craig Hospital Inventory of Environmental Factors and a study-specific questionnaire on facilitating factors. Non-parametric tests were used for comparisons. Barriers to participation were lowest in MEP users (md=0.12; p>0.001), and highest in ATC users (md=1.56; p>0.001) with the least support for AT use (p>0.001 - p=0.048). A positive correlation between fewer barriers and higher use of MEP was seen (r=0.30, p=0.038). The greatest barriers to participation were Natural environment, Surroundings and Information, and the most support came from relatives and professionals. Support, training and education are vital in the use of AT. These factors may lead to a more sustained and prolonged use of AT and may enable increased participation. Future research should focus on interventions that meet the needs of people with cognitive disabilities.

  • 22.
    Winberg, Anette
    et al.
    Hälsa och habilitering, Landstinget i uppsala län, Uppsala.
    Lidström, Helene
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Anpassning och hjälpmedel för delaktighet2016In: Arbetsterapi för barn och ungdom / [ed] Ann-Christin Eliasson, Helene Lidström, Marie Peny-Dahlstrand, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2016, 1, p. 203-212Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Yngve, Moa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lidström, Helene
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ekbladh, Elin
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Which students need accommodations the most, and to what extent are their needs met by regular upper secondary school?: A cross-sectional study among students with special educational needs2018In: European Journal of Special Needs Education, ISSN 0885-6257, E-ISSN 1469-591XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was twofold: (1) to identify factors associated with a high level of accommodation needs in school activities among students with special educational needs (SEN) in regular upper secondary education; and (2) to investigate the extent to which schools have met students’ perceived accommodation needs. Accommodation needs and their provision in school activities were assessed with the School Setting Interview for 484 students with SEN. Students’ mean age was 17.3 years and 50% did not have a diagnosis. A logistic regression analysis revealed that a high level of school absence, studying a vocational programme, and a neuropsychiatric disorder were associated with a high level of accommodation needs. In the majority of school activities, about 50% of students had not received any accommodation despite an experienced need for support. About 30% of students perceived a need for support even though they had been provided with accommodations, and around 25% stated they were satisfied with received accommodations. Regular upper secondary school students with SEN are insufficiently provided with accommodations to satisfactorily participate in education. Specific student characteristics, e.g. high level of school absence, should receive special attention when investigating and accommodating students’ needs for support in school activities.

  • 24.
    Yngve, Moa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Munkholm, Michaela
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lidström, Helene
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ekbladh, Elin
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Validity of the school setting interview for students with special educational needs in regular high school - a Rasch analysis2018In: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, ISSN 1477-7525, E-ISSN 1477-7525, Vol. 16, article id 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Participation in education is a vital component of adolescents everyday life and a determinant of health and future opportunities in adult life. The School Setting Interview (SSI) is an instrument which assesses student-environment fit and reflects the potential needs for adjustments to enhance students participation in school activities. The aim of the study was to investigate the psychometric properties of the SSI for students with special educational needs in regular high school. Methods: A sample of 509 students with special educational needs was assessed with the SSI. The polytomous unrestricted Rasch model was used to analyze the psychometric properties of the SSI regarding targeting, model fit, differential item functioning (DIF), response category functioning and unidimensionality. Results: The SSI generally confirmed fit to assumptions of the Rasch model. Reliability was acceptable (0.73) and the SSI scale was able to separate students into three different levels of student-environment fit. DIF among gender was detected in item "Remember things" and in item "Homework" DIF was detected among students with or without diagnosis. All items had disordered thresholds. The SSI demonstrated unidimensionality and no response dependence was present among items. Conclusion: The results suggest that the SSI is valid for use among students with special educational needs in order to provide and evaluate environmental adjustments. However, the items with the detected DIF and the SSI rating scale with its disordered thresholds needs to be further scrutinized.

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