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  • 1.
    Almquist, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Almquist, Viktor
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Vergara Alonso, Ekhiotz Jon
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Software and Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nadjm-Tehrani, Simin
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Software and Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Communication Energy Overhead of Mobiles Games2015In: MobiGames '15: Proceedings of the 2nd Workshop on Mobile Gaming, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2015, p. 1-6Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Although a significant proportion of the mobile apps are games there has been little attention paid to their specific characteristics with respect to communication energy. In this paper we select 20 mobile games among the top 100 free Android games, and study their data patterns and communication energy use over a total of 25 hours of playing. The analysis of the energy for communication over 3G networks indicates that there is a wide variation among the games, the largest footprint being 8 times higher than the lowest one. The results also indicates both app-specific and category-specific relations between data pattern and energy use, as well as variations in CPU utilisation.

  • 2.
    Asplund, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, RTSLAB - Real-Time Systems Laboratory. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Thomasson, Anton
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, RTSLAB - Real-Time Systems Laboratory. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Vergara Alonso, Ekhiotz Jon
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, RTSLAB - Real-Time Systems Laboratory. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nadjm-Tehrani, Simin
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, RTSLAB - Real-Time Systems Laboratory. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Software-related Energy Footprint of a Wireless Broadband Module2011In: The 9th ACM International Symposium on Mobility Management and Wireless Access (MobiWac), ACM , 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Energy economy in mobile devices is becoming an increasinglyimportant factor as the devices become more advancedand rich in features. A large part of the energy footprint of amobile device comes from the wireless communication module,and even more so as the amount of trac increases.In this paper we study the energy footprint of a mobilebroadband hardware module, and how it is aected by software,by performing systematic power consumption measurements.We show that there are several cases where thesoftware does not properly take into account the eect thatdata communication has on the power consumption. Thisopens up for potential energy savings by creating better applicationsthat are aware of the energy characteristics of thecommunication layer.

  • 3.
    Bianzino, Aruna Prem
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Software and Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Asplund, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Software and Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Vergara Alonso, Ekhiotz Jon
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Software and Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nadjm-Tehrani, Simin
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Software and Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Cooperative proxies: Optimally trading energy and quality of service in mobile devices2014In: Computer Networks, ISSN 1389-1286, E-ISSN 1872-7069, Vol. 75, no Part A, p. 297-312Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work studies the energy and quality of service (QoS) trade-off in the context of mobile devices with two communication interfaces (a high energy and a low energy interface). We propose an optimisation scheme during underload scenarios where proxy groups are dynamically formed exploiting both interfaces. The scheme integrates a reward mechanism that compensates a proxy while carrying other group members’ traffic, and deals with churn (joining and leaving of nodes) in a cell area. For traffic flows that approximate knowledge about current services we show that the scheme can achieve energy savings of 60% for all mobile nodes as whole. We also demonstrate the impact on disruption-sensitive flows as a function of the traffic mix, and that the use of rewards for selection of proxies is a fair mechanism in the long term.

  • 4.
    Vergara Alonso, Ekhiotz Jon
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Software and Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Energy Modelling and Fairness for Efficient Mobile Communication2016Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Energy consumption and its management have been clearly identified as a challenge in computing and communication system design, where energy economy is obviously of paramount importance for battery powered devices. This thesis addresses the energy efficiency of mobile communication at the user end in the context of cellular networks.

    We argue that energy efficiency starts by energy awareness and propose EnergyBox, a parametrised tool that enables accurate and repeatable energy quantification at the user end using real data traffic traces as input. EnergyBox offers an abstraction of the underlying states for operation of the wireless interfaces and allows to estimate the energy consumption for different operator settings and device characteristics. The tool is used throughout the thesis to quantify and reveal inefficient data communication patterns of widely used mobile applications.

    We consider two different perspectives in the search of energy-efficient solutions. From the application perspective, we show that systematically quantifying the energy consumption of design choices (e.g., communication patterns, protocols, and data formats) contributes to a significantly smaller energy footprint. From the system perspective, we devise a cross-layer solution that schedules packet transmissions based on the knowledge of the network parameters that impact the energy consumption of the handset. These attempts show that application level decisions require a better understanding of possible energy apportionment policies at system level.

    Finally, we study the generic problem of determining the contribution of an entity (e.g., application) to the total energy consumption of a given system (e.g., mobile device). We compare the state-of-the-art policies in terms of fairness leveraging cooperative game theory and analyse their required information and computational complexity. We show that providing incentives to reduce the total energy consumption of the system (as part of fairness) is tightly coupled to the policy selection. Our study provides guidelines to select an appropriate policy depending on the characteristics of the system. 

  • 5.
    Vergara Alonso, Ekhiotz Jon
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Software and Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Exploiting Energy Awareness in Mobile Communication2013Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Although evolving mobile technologies bring millions of users closer to the vision of information anywhere-anytime, device battery depletions hamper the quality of experience to a great extent. The massive explosion of mobile applications with the ensuing data exchange over the cellular infrastructure is not only a blessing to the mobile user, but also has a price in terms of rapid discharge of the device battery. Wireless communication is a large contributor to the energy consumption. Thus, the current call for energy economy in mobile devices poses the challenge of reducing the energy consumption of wireless data transmissions at the user end by developing energy-efficient communication.

    This thesis addresses the energy efficiency of data transmission at the user end in the context of cellular networks. We argue that the design of energy-efficient solutions starts by energy awareness and propose EnergyBox, a parametrised tool that enables accurate and repeatable energy quantification at the user end using real data traffic traces as input. EnergyBox abstracts the underlying states for operation of the wireless interfaces and allows to estimate the energy consumption for different operator settings and device characteristics.

    Next, we devise an energy-efficient algorithm that schedules the packet transmissions at the user end based on the knowledge of the network parameters that impact the handset energy consumption. The solution focuses on the characteristics of a given traffic class with the lowest quality of service requirements. The cost of running the solution itself is studied showing that the proposed cross-layer scheduler uses a small amount of energy to significantly extend the battery lifetime at the cost of some added latency. 

    Finally, the benefit of employing EnergyBox to systematically study the different design choices that developers face with respect to data transmissions of applications is shown in the context of location sharing services and instant messaging applications. The results show that quantifying energy consumption of communication patterns, protocols, and data formats can aid the design of tailor-made solutions with a significantly smaller energy footprint. 

  • 6.
    Vergara Alonso, Ekhiotz Jon
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Software and Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Software and Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nadjm-Tehrani, Simin
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Software and Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    When Mice Consume Like Elephants: Instant Messaging Applications2014In: e-Energy '14: Proceedings of the 5th international conference on Future energy systems, ACM Press, 2014, p. 97-107Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A recent surge in the usage of instant messaging (IM) applications on mobile devices has brought the energy efficiency of these applications into focus of attention. Although IM applications are changing the message communication landscape, this work illustrates that the current versions of IM applications differ vastly in energy consumption when using the third generation (3G) cellular communication. This paper shows the interdependency between energy consumption and IM data patterns in this context. We analyse the user interaction pattern using a IM dataset, consisting of 1043370 messages collected from 51 mobile users. Based on the usage characteristics, we propose a message bundling technique that aggregates consecutive messages over time, reducing the energy consumption with a trade-off against latency. The results show that message bundling can save up to 43% in energy consumption while still maintaining the conversation function. Finally, the energy cost of a common functionality used in IM applications that informs that the user is currently typing a response, so called typing notification, is evaluated showing an energy increase ranging from 40-104%.

  • 7.
    Vergara Alonso, Ekhiotz Jon
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Software and Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nadjm-Tehrani, Simin
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Software and Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    EnergyBox: A Trace-driven Tool for Data Transmission Energy Consumption Studies2013In: EE-LSDS 2013, Energy Efficiency in Large Scale Distributed Systems, Springer, 2013, p. 19-34Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although evolving mobile technologies bring millions of users closer to the vision of information anywhere-anytime, device battery depletions hamper the quality of experience to a great extent. We argue that the design of energy-efficient solutions starts by energy-awareness and propose EnergyBox, a tool that provides accurate and repeatable energy consumption studies for 3G and WiFi transmissions at the user end. We recognize that the energy consumption of data transmission is highly dependable on the traffic pattern, and provide the means for trace-based iterative packet-driven simulation to derive the operation states of wireless interfaces. The strength of EnergyBox is that it allows to modularly set the 3G network parameters specified at operator level, the adaptive power save mode mechanism for a WiFi device, and the different power levels of the operation states for different handheld devices. EnergyBox enables efficient energy consumption studies using real data, which complements the device-dependent laborious physical power measurements. Using real application transmission traces, we have validated EnergyBox showing an accuracy range of 94-99% for 3G and 93-99% for WiFi compared to the real measured energy consumption by a 3G modem and a smartphone with WiFi.

  • 8.
    Vergara Alonso, Ekhiotz Jon
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Software and Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nadjm-Tehrani, Simin
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Software and Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fairness and Incentive Considerations in Energy Apportionment Policies2016In: ACM Transactions on Modeling and Performance Evaluation of Computing Systems, ISSN 2376-3639, Vol. 2, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The energy consumption of a system is determined by the system component usage patterns and interactions between the coexisting entities and resources. Energy accounting plays an essential role to reveal the contribution of each entity to the total consumption and for energy management. Unfortunately, energy accounting inherits the apportionment problem of accounting in general, which does not have a general single best solution. In this paper we leverage cooperative game theory commonly used in cost allocation problems to study the energy apportionment problem, i.e., the problem of prescribing the actual energy consumption of a system to the consuming entities (e.g., applications, processes or users of the system).

    We identify five relevant fairness properties for energy apportionment and present a detailed categorisation and analysis of eight previously proposed energy apportionment policies from different fields in computer and communication systems. In addition, we propose two novel energy apportionment policies based on cooperative game theory which provide strong fairness notion and a rich incentive structure. Our comparative analysis in terms of the identified five fairness properties as well as information requirement and computational complexity shows that there is a trade-off between fairness and the other evaluation criteria. We provide guidelines to select an energy apportionment policy depending on the purpose of the apportionment and the characteristics of the system.

  • 9.
    Vergara Alonso, Ekhiotz Jon
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Software and Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nadjm-Tehrani, Simin
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Software and Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Watts2Share: Energy-Aware Traffic Consolidation2013In: Green Computing and Communications (GreenCom), 2013 IEEE and Internet of Things (iThings/CPSCom), IEEE International Conference on and IEEE Cyber, Physical and Social Computing, IEEE Computer Society, 2013, p. 14-22Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Energy consumption is becoming the Achilles' heel of the mobile user quality of experience partly due to undisciplined use of the cellular (3G) transmissions by applications. The operator infrastructure is typically configured for peak performance, whereas during periods of underutilisation the handsets pay the price by staying in high energy states even if each application only uses a fraction of the maximum available bandwidth. In this paper we promote a bi-radio scenario where instead of independently using own cellular connections, several users share a single cellular link offered by one member of a coalition (a rotating aggregator). We present Watts2Share, an architecture for energy-aware traffic consolidation whereby group members' data flows transmitted through a second radio (e.g., WiFi) are aggregated by the aggregator and retransmitted through the cellular link. Through careful and repeatable studies we demonstrate that this scheme saves up to 68% of the total transmission energy in handsets compared to a pure 3G scenario. The studies are based on a wide range of real traffic traces and real cellular operator settings, and further illustrate that this scheme reduces the overall energy by reducing the signalling overhead, as well as extending the lifetime of all handsets.

  • 10.
    Vergara Alonso, Ekhiotz Jon
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nadjm-Tehrani, Simin
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, RTSLAB - Real-Time Systems Laboratory. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Asplund, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, RTSLAB - Real-Time Systems Laboratory. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Zurutuza, Urko
    Mondragon University, Spain.
    Resource Footprint of a Manycast Protocol Implementation on Multiple Mobile Platforms2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wireless communication is becoming the dominant form of communication and ad hoc wireless connections are posed to play a role in disaster area networks. However, research efforts on wireless ad hoc communication protocols do not pay enough attention to measurable and reproducible indications of the mobile footprint including power consumption. Protocols and applications are initially designed and studied in a simulation environment and are hard to test in in-field experiments. In this work we report a multi-platform implementation of Random-Walk Gossip, a manycast protocol designed for message dissemination in disaster areas. Our work is focused in studying the resource footprint and its impact on performance on commercially available devices. We show both how different aspects of the protocol contributes to the footprint and how this in turn affects the performance. The methodologies used here can be applied to other protocols and applications, aiding in future optimisations.

  • 11.
    Vergara Alonso, Ekhiotz Jon
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Software and Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nadjm-Tehrani, Simin
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Software and Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Prihodko, Mihails
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Software and Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    EnergyBox: Disclosing the wireless transmission energy cost for mobile devices2014In: Sustainable Computing: Informatics and Systems, ISSN 2210-5379, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 118-135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While evolving mobile technologies bring millions of users closer to the vision of information anywhere-anytime, device battery depletions still hamper the quality of experience to a great extent. The energy consumption of data transmission is highly dependent on the traffic pattern, and we argue that designing energy efficient data transmissions starts by energy awareness. Our work proposes EnergyBox, a parametrised tool that facilitates accurate and repeatable energy consumption studies for 3G and WiFi transmissions at the user end using real traffic data.

    The tool takes as input the parameters of a network operator and the power draw for a given mobile device in the 3G and WiFi transmission states. It outputs an estimate of the consumed energy for a given packet trace, either synthetic or captured in a device using real applications. Using nine different applications with different data patterns the versatility and accuracy of the tool was evaluated. The evaluation was carried out for a modern and popular smartphone in the WiFi setting, a specific mobile broadband module for the 3G setting, and within the operating environment of a major mobile operator in Sweden. A comparison with real power traces indicates that EnergyBox is a valuable tool for repeatable and convenient studies. It exhibits an accuracy of 94–99% for 3G, and 95–99% for WiFi given the studied applications’ traces.

    Next the tool was deployed in a use case where a location sharing application was ran on top of two alternative application layer protocols (HTTP and MQTT) and with two different data exchange formats (JSON and Base64). The illustrative use case helped to identify the appropriateness of the pull and push strategies in sharing location data, and the benefit of EnergyBox in characterising where the breaking point lies for preferring one or the other protocol, under which network load, or exchange data format.

  • 12.
    Vergara Alonso, Ekhiotz Jon
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Software and Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Prihodko, Mihails
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Software and Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nadjm-Tehrani, Simin
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Software and Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Mobile Location Sharing: An Energy Consumption Study2013In: e-Energy '13 Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Future Energy Systems: Where Energy, Computing and Communication Meet, New York, NY, USA: ACM Press, 2013, p. 289-290Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of a mobile device's battery for frequent transmissions of position data in a location sharing application can be more expensive than the location retrieval itself. This is in part due to energy-agnostic application development and in part dependent on choice of protocols. This paper studies the lightweight Message Queuing Telemetry Transport protocol (MQTT) as an application layer protocol on top of the third generation cellular communication. The energy efficiency and amount of data generated by the publish/subscribe MQTT protocol is experimentally compared against the Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP), which is currently used in typical location sharing applications.

    The evaluation results indicate that MQTT is a good candidate as a protocol for location sharing. At comparable bandwidth and energy expenses MQTT offers better quality of user experience, since the subscribers are notified at once when the location of some interesting client has changed. Our measurements show that MQTT is more energy-efficient than HTTP in the idle state and when the number of other users with whom the client shares location is low. When the number of users increases beyond 3, HTTP becomes the preferred option in terms of energy efficiency at the cost of a higher notification delay.

  • 13.
    Vergara Alonso, Ekhiotz Jon
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Software and Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sanjuan, Joseba
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Software and Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nadjm-Tehrani, Simin
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Software and Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kernel Level Energy-Efficient 3G Background Traffic Shaper for Android Smartphones2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reducing the energy consumption of wireless devices is paramount to a wide spread adoption of mobile applications. Cellular communication imposes high energy consumption on the mobile devices due to the radio resource allocation, which differs from other networks such as WiFi. Most applications are unaware of the energy consumption characteristics of third generation cellular communication (3G). This makes the background small data transfers of undisciplined applications an energy burden due to inefficient utilisation of resources.

    While several approaches exist to reduce the energy consumption of this best-effort background traffic by means of traffic shaping, we find that they are mostly evaluated with simulations and the actual energy overhead for the traffic shaper itself has not been studied. In order to cover this gap, our work realises an existing energy saving algorithm as a Kernel Level Shaper (KLS) within the Android platform, and measures its energy footprint. The total energy savings of our implementation range from 8% to 58% for emulated real background traffic, that is categorised as best-effort traffic. We further show the implications of running the KLS during live operation of applications as an exploratory study.

  • 14.
    Vergara, Ekhiotz Jon
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Software and Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nadjm-Tehrani, Simin
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Software and Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Energy-aware Cross-layer Burst Buffering for Wireless Communication2012In: e-Energy '12 Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Future Energy Systems: Where Energy, Computing and Communication Meet, ACM , 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The massive explosion of mobile applications with the ensuing data exchange over the cellular infrastructure is not only a blessing to the mobile user but also has a price in terms of regular discharging of the device battery. A big contributor to this energy consumption is the power hungry wireless network interface. We leverage a measurement kit to perform accurate physical energy consumption measurements in a third generation (3G) telecommunication modem thus isolating the energy footprint of data transfers as opposed to other mobile phone-based measurement studies. Using the measurement kit we show how the statically configured network parameters, i.e., channel switch timers, and buffer thresholds, in addition to the transfer data pattern and the radio coverage, impact the communication energy footprint. We then demonstrate that being aware of static network parameters creates room for energy savings. This is done by devising a set of algorithms that (a) infer the network parameters efficiently, and (b) use the parameters in a new packet scheduler in the device. The combined regime is shown to transfer background uplink data, from real world traces of Facebook and Skype, with significant energy saving compared to the state-of-the-art.

  • 15.
    Vergara, Ekhiotz Jon
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Software and Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nadjm-Tehrani, Simin
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Software and Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Asplund, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Software and Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fairness and Incentive Considerations in Energy Apportionment Policies2016In: ACM Transactions on Modeling and Performance Evaluation of Computing Systems, ISSN 2376-3639, Vol. 2, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The energy consumption of a system is determined by the system component usage patterns and interactions between the coexisting entities and resources. Energy accounting plays an essential role in revealing the contribution of each entity to the total consumption and for energy management. Unfortunately, energy accounting inherits the apportionment problem of accounting in general, which does not have a general single best solution. In this article, we leverage cooperative game theory, which is commonly used in cost allocation problems to study the energy apportionment problem, that is, the problem of prescribing the actual energy consumption of a system to the consuming entities (e.g., applications, processes, or users of the system).

    We identify five relevant fairness properties for energy apportionment and present a detailed categorisation and analysis of eight previously proposed energy apportionment policies from different fields in computer and communication systems. In addition, we propose two novel energy apportionment policies based on cooperative game theory that provide strong fairness notion and a rich incentive structure. Our comparative analysis in terms of the identified five fairness properties as well as information requirement and computational complexity shows that there is a tradeoff between fairness and the other evaluation criteria. We provide guidelines to select an energy apportionment policy depending on the purpose of the apportionment and the characteristics of the system.

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