liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Fors, Egil A
    et al.
    St Olavs University Hospital.
    Bertheussen, Gro F
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
    Thune, Inger
    Oslo University Hospital.
    Juvet, Lene K
    Norwegian Knowledge Centre for Health Service.
    Elvsaas, Ida-Kristin O
    Norwegian Knowledge Centre for Health Service.
    Oldervoll, Line
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
    Anker, Gun
    Haukeland Hospital.
    Falkmer, Ursula
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundgren, Steinar
    St Olavs University Hospital.
    Leivseth, Gunnar
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
    Psychosocial interventions as part of breast cancer rehabilitation programs? Results from a systematic review2011In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 20, no 9, p. 909-918Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This systematic review aimed to determine the effectiveness of psychoeducation, cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and social support interventions used in the rehabilitation of breast cancer (BC) patients. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods: We conducted a systematic literature search to identify randomised controlled trials of female BC patients who underwent different psychosocial interventions during or after primary cancer treatment. The methodological quality of all studies was independently assessed by two reviewers. Studies with low quality, less than 20 participants in each group, patients with metastatic cancer, data not presented separately for BC and studies that included other cancer types were excluded. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: Among 9617 identified studies, only 18 RCTs published between 1999 and 2008, including 3272 patients were finally included in this systematic evaluation. Outcome measures were categorised into quality of life (QoL), fatigue, mood, health behaviour and social function. Six trials examined psychoeducation had inconsistent results, both during and after the primary treatment. Seven trials examined the effect of CBT, four of which given after primary treatment (range 6-12 weeks) demonstrated improvements in QoL; the other three CBT studies given during primary treatment (range 9-20 weeks) had inconsistencies. Five studies addressed social support and showed no conclusive impacts of this intervention. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions: Limited documentation exists on the efficacy of psychosocial rehabilitation interventions among BC patients. However, we found that patients might have QoL benefits from CBT given after primary BC treatment. More documentation is needed regarding the effects of CBT during primary treatment and the effects of psychoeducation and social support.

  • 2.
    Karlsson, Jan Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Adolfsson, Karin
    County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden .
    Thelin, Bo
    County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden .
    Jynge, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Falkmer, Ursula G
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    First Clinical Experience with the Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agent and Superoxide Dismutase Mimetic Mangafodipir as an Adjunct in Cancer Chemotherapy-A Translational Study2012In: Translational Oncology, ISSN 1944-7124, E-ISSN 1936-5233, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 32-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Preclinical research suggests that the clinically approved magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent mangafodipir may protect against adverse events (AEs) caused by chemotherapy, without interfering negatively with the anticancer efficacy. The present translational study tested if pretreatment with mangafodipir lowers AEs during curative (adjuvant) FOLFOX6 chemotherapy in stage III colon cancer (Dukes C). The study was originally scheduled to include 20 patients, but because of the unforeseen withdrawal of mangafodipir from the market, the study had to be closed after 14 patients had been included. The withdrawal of mangafodipir was purely based on commercial considerations from the producer and not on any safety concerns. The patients were treated throughout the first 3 of 12 scheduled cycles. Patients were randomized to a 5-minute infusion of either mangafodipir or placebo (7 in each group). AEs were evaluated according to the National Cancer Institutes (NCI) Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events and the Sanofi-NCI criteria. The primary end points were neutropenia and neurosensory toxicity. There were four AEs of grade 3 (severe) and one AE of grade 4 (life threatening) in four patients in the placebo group, whereas there were none in the mangafodipir group (P andlt; .05). Of the grade 3 and 4 events, two were neutropenia and one was neurosensory toxicity. Furthermore, white blood cell count was statistically, significantly higher in the mangafodipir group than in the placebo group (P andlt; .01) after treatment with FOLFOX. This small feasibility study seems to confirm what has been demonstrated preclinically, namely, that pretreatment with mangafodipir lowers AEs during adjuvant 5-fluorouracil plus oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy in colon cancer patients.

  • 3.
    Thoresen, L.
    et al.
    St Olavs University Hospital, Norway Norwegian University of Science and Technology NTNU, Norway .
    Frykholm, G.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden University Hospital, Sweden .
    Lydersen, S.
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology NTNU, Norway .
    Ulveland, H.
    Atlantis Medical Coll, Norway .
    Baracos, V.
    University of Alberta, Canada .
    Birdsell, L.
    University of Alberta, Canada .
    Falkmer, Ursula
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The association of nutritional assessment criteria with health-related quality of life in patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma2012In: European Journal of Cancer Care, ISSN 0961-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2354, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 505-516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Health-related quality of life (QoL) is a goal in nutritional oncology but the association between nutritional status and QoL is rarely explored. The aim of the study was to investigate the association of nutritional assessment criteria with QoL in 50 patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma. A second aim was to investigate changes in body weight and QoL during a 3-month follow-up. Muscle mass, nutritional risk, malnutrition and cachexia according to three different criteria were assessed, as well as health-related QoL. At inclusion, 36 patients experienced weight loss, 10 patients sarcopenia, 25 were at nutritional risk, 16 were malnourished and 11, 14 and 31 patients had cachexia according to different criteria. All nutritional assessment criteria discriminated between groups of patients with worse or better QoL to varying degrees. Malnutrition and cachexia defined by the European Palliative Care Research Collaborative and adjusted for recent gain or stabilisation of body weight discriminated on most QoL scores. Weight loss at follow-up was associated with a decrease in several QoL scores. Recognition of weight loss as well as diagnosing malnutrition and cachexia should be the first steps in an interventional pathway to enhance nutritional status and QoL in patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma.

  • 4.
    Thoresen, Lene
    et al.
    St Olavs University Hospital, Norway Norwegian University of Science and Technology NTNU, Norway .
    Frykholm, Gunilla
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden .
    Lydersen, Stian
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway .
    Ulveland, Hege
    Atlantis Medical Coll, Norway .
    Baracos, Vickie
    University of Alberta, Canada .
    Prado, Carla M. M.
    University of Alberta, Canada .
    Birdsell, Laura
    University of Alberta, Canada .
    Falkmer, Ursula
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nutritional status, cachexia and survival in patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma. Different assessment criteria for nutritional status provide unequal results2013In: Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0261-5614, E-ISSN 1532-1983, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 65-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aims: Different nutrition assessment tools and definitions are proposed for cancer-associated malnutrition and wasting (cachexia). We studied the associations between these assessments and overall survival in stage IV colorectal carcinoma patients. Methods: Anthropometric measures, energy intake, biochemical variables, nutritional risk screening, assessment of malnutrition, cachexia and body composition from computed tomography images were analysed, in 77 patients from Norway and Canada. Results were dichotomized into presence or absence of nutritional risk, malnutrition, cachexia and sarcopenia (low muscle mass) and associated with survival. Results: Overall, 22% up to 55% of the patients had cachexia according to different cachexia criteria: 34% were malnourished, 42% were at nutritional risk, and 39% were sarcopenic. Forty-four percent of the patients did not meet criteria for any of these conditions. Patients with cachexia defined by Cancer Cachexia Study Group (CCSG) had shorter survival in an unadjusted analysis, [Hazard ratio (HR) = 2.43; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.32-4.47; P = 0.005]. After adjusting for nation, age and gender, cachexia (HR = 2.26; CI 1.18-432; P = 0.014) and malnutrition (HR = 1.83; CI 1.06-3.13; P = 0.029) remained significant predictors of survival. Conclusions: Nutritional depletion in up to 55% of the patients was found. The lack of concordance between the results obtained by different assessment criteria was obvious. CCSGs cachexia score was the best prognostic factor for overall survival.

1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf