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  • 1.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Fransson, Peter
    Karolinska institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Deaf signers are less reliant than hearing non-signers on fact retrieval from verbal long term memory during arithmetic processing: fMRI evidence2015Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 2.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Fransson, Peter
    Karolinska institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Greater reliance on magnitude manipulation during mental arithmetic in deaf signers compared to hearing non-signers: fMRI evidence2015Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Evidence suggests that the lag reported in mathematics for deaf signers derives from difficulties related to verbal processing of numbers, whereas magnitude processing seems unaffected by deafness. Neuroimaging evidence from hearing individuals suggests that verbal processing of numbers engages primarily left angular gyrus (lAG), whereas magnitude processing engages primarily the horizontal portion of the right intraparietal sulcus (rHIP). In a ROI analysis of brain imaging data from 16 adult deaf signers and 16 adult hearing non-signers, who did not differ on sex, age or education, we examined if activity in lAG and rHIP changed as a result of task (multiplication vs subtraction) and group (deaf signers and hearing non-signers). We found a significant main effect of brain region (F(1,30) = 117.00, p < .001, η_p^2 = .80) and an interaction effect between region and group (F(1,30) = 20.70, p < .001, η_p^2 = .41). Further analyses showed that there were no significant differences in average activation between groups in lAG (F(1,30) = 0.16, p = .70). However, in rHIP deaf signers showed significantly greater average activation compared to non-signers (F(1,30) = 15.20, p < .001, η_p^2 = .34). There were no significant differences in activation between subtraction and multiplication (F(1,30) = 0.66, p = .42) and no behavioural differences between groups (F(1,30) = 1.70, p = .20). These results suggest that when engaging in arithmetic tasks deaf signers successfully make use of qualitatively difference processes, compared to hearing non-signers, with stronger emphasis on brain regions relating to magnitude manipulation.

  • 3.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Fransson, Peter
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Deaf signers and hearing non-signers recruit similar networks for arithmetic and phonological tasks2013Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Profoundly deaf individuals sometimes have difficulty with arithmetic and phonological tasks. In the present study we investigate if these differences can be attributed to differences in recruitment of neurobiological networks. Seventeen hearing non-signers (HN) and sixteen deaf signers (DS) matched on age, gender and non-verbal intelligence took part in an fMRI study. In the scanner three digit/letter pairs were visually presented and the participants performed six different blocked tasks tapping processing of digit and letter order, multiplication, subtraction and phonological ability. Data were analysed using two 2x2x2 ANOVAs; process (arithmetic, language) x level (high, low) x group (DS, HN). A main effect of process revealed language networks in the left inferior frontal gryus, supramarginal gyrus, fusiform gyrus and insula. Arithmetic networks included left middle orbital gyrus and superior medial gyrus. A main effect of level revealed low level processing (digit/letter order) in the right middle occipital gyrus and the right precuneus and high level processing (subtraction/multiplication/phonological ability) in left inferior frontal gyrus. There was no main effect of group but a significant task x group interaction in the right temporal pole which in DS (but not HN) was activated more for arithmetic than language processing (pfwe = .022) when multiplication was included in the analysis. This region is implicated in conceptual representation. These results suggest that both arithmetic and language are processed similarly by DS and HN with possible between-group differences in the use of conceptual representation in arithmetic and language tasks.

  • 4.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Fransson, Peter
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Deaf signers use magnitude manipulatioin strategies for mulitplication: fMRI evidence2014Manuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Evidence suggests that the lag reported in mathematics for deaf signers derives from difficulties related to the verbal system of number processing as described in the triple code model. For hearing individuals the verbal system has been shown to be recruited for both arithmetic and language tasks. In the present study we investigate for the first time neuronal representations of arithmetic in deaf signers. We examine if the neural network supporting arithmetic and language, including the horizontal portion of the intraparietal sulcus (HIPS), the superior parietal lobule (SPL) bilaterally, the left angular gyrus (AG), pars opercularis (POPE) and pars triangularis (PTRI) of the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), is differently recruited for deaf and hearing individuals. Imaging data were collected from 16 deaf signers and 16 well-matched hearing nonsigners, using the same stimulus material for all tasks, but with different cues. During multiplication, deaf signers recruited rHIPS more than hearing non-signers, suggesting greater involvement of magnitude manipulation processes related to the quantity system, whereas there was no evidence that the verbal system was recruited. Further, there was no support for the notion of a common representation of phonology for sign and speech as previously suggested.

  • 5.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Fransson, Peter
    Karolinska institutet, Stockholm.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Multiplication engages phonological networks in Broca's area differently for deaf signers and hearing non-signers2012Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    In hearing individuals, multiplication relies mainly on the phonological loop while subtraction relies on the visuo-spatial sketchpad (VSSP; Lee & Kang, 2002). Little is known about arithmetic neural networks in deaf signers (DS). Since DS often perform worse than hearing non-signers (NH) on arithmetic in general and multiplication in particular (Traxler, 2000), we hypothesized that there are strategic differences between how groups recruit the phonological loop in multiplication, but not in subtraction, leading to differential activation of phonological processing areas in left inferior frontal gyrus (Broca’s area). We investigated this using a blocked fMRI-design in which nine DS and 17 HN matched on age, gender, education and non-verbal intelligence (Raven & Raven, 1998) were tested on tasks of multiplication, subtraction and phonology (rhyme). The contrasts rhyme versus multiplication and rhyme versus subtraction were examined across groups within the region of interest defined by a probability map of Broca’s area (Amunts, 1999). We observed a significant interaction between task (multiplication and rhyme) and group (F = 12.64, p = .034, FWE-corrected), where the HN showed higher activation for rhyme than for multiplication (T = 4.55, p = .001, FWE-corrected) whereas there were no differences in activations between tasks for DS. For subtraction versus rhyme no interaction with group was found. These results suggest that there are differences between DS and HN in the phonology dependent neural networks in Broca’s area used during multiplication, which may be part of the explanation for poorer performance in DS.

  • 6.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Fransson, Peter
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ingvar, Martin
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Phonological processing during arithmetic processing across language modalities2011Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 7.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Fransson, Peter
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Ingvar, Martin
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Phonological recruitment during arithmetic processing across language modalities2011Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 8.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Fransson, Peter
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Phonology and arithmetic in the language-calculation network2015Ingår i: Brain and Language, ISSN 0093-934X, E-ISSN 1090-2155, Vol. 143, s. 97-105Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Arithmetic and language processing involve similar neural networks, but the relative engagement remains unclear. In the present study we used fMRI to compare activation for phonological, multiplication and subtraction tasks, keeping the stimulus material constant, within a predefined language-calculation network including left inferior frontal gyrus and angular gyrus (AG) as well as superior parietal lobule and the intraparietal sulcus bilaterally. Results revealed a generally left lateralized activation pattern within the language-calculation network for phonology and a bilateral activation pattern for arithmetic, and suggested regional differences between tasks. In particular, we found a more prominent role for phonology than arithmetic in pars opercularis of the left inferior frontal gyrus but domain generality in pars triangularis. Parietal activation patterns demonstrated greater engagement of the visual and quantity systems for calculation than language. This set of findings supports the notion of a common, but regionally differentiated, language-calculation network. (C) 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc.

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  • 9.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Holmer, Emil
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Krister, Schönström
    Department of Linguistics, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Centrum för medicinsk bildvetenskap och visualisering, CMIV. Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Sweden.
    Working Memory for Signs with Poor Visual Resolution: fMRI Evidence of Reorganizationof Auditory Cortex in Deaf Signers2021Ingår i: Cerebral Cortex, ISSN 1047-3211, E-ISSN 1460-2199, Vol. 31, nr 7, s. 3165-3176Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Stimulus degradation adds to working memory load during speech processing.We investigated whether this applies to signprocessing and, if so, whether the mechanism implicates secondary auditory cortex.We conducted an fMRI experimentwhere 16 deaf early signers (DES) and 22 hearing non-signers performed a sign-based n-back task with three load levels andstimuli presented at high and low resolution.We found decreased behavioral performance with increasing load anddecreasing visual resolution, but the neurobiological mechanisms involved differed between the two manipulations and didso for both groups. Importantly, while the load manipulation was, as predicted, accompanied by activation in thefrontoparietal working memory network, the resolution manipulation resulted in temporal and occipital activation.Furthermore, we found evidence of cross-modal reorganization in the secondary auditory cortex: DES had strongeractivation and stronger connectivity between this and several other regions.We conclude that load and stimulus resolutionhave different neural underpinnings in the visual–verbal domain, which has consequences for current working memorymodels, and that for DES the secondary auditory cortex is involved in the binding of representations when task demandsare low.

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  • 10.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Orfanidou, Eleni
    University of Crete, Rethymnon, Greece.
    Cardin, Velia
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. University College London, UK.
    Holmer, Emil
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Capek, Cheryl M.
    School of Psychological Science, University of Manchester, UK.
    Woll, Bencie
    University College London, UK.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Similar digit-based working memory in deaf signers and hearing non-signers despite digit span differences2013Ingår i: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 4, nr 942Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Similar working memory (WM) for lexical items has been demonstrated for signers and non-signers while short-term memory (STM) is regularly poorer in deaf than hearing individuals. In the present study, we investigated digit-based WM and STM in Swedish and British deaf signers and hearing non-signers. To maintain good experimental control we used printed stimuli throughout and held response mode constant across groups. We showed that deaf signers have similar digit-based WM performance, despite shorter digit spans, compared to well-matched hearing non-signers. We found no difference between signers and non-signers on STM span for letters chosen to minimize phonological similarity or in the effects of recall direction. This set of findings indicates that similar WM for signers and non-signers can be generalized from lexical items to digits and suggests that poorer STM in deaf signers compared to hearing non-signers may be due to differences in phonological similarity across the language modalities of sign and speech.

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  • 11.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Avdelningen för kognition, utveckling och handikapp (CDD).
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Avdelningen för kognition, utveckling och handikapp (CDD).
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap.
    Arithmetic and phonological processes in deaf native signers2008Ingår i: The first meeting of the federation of the European societies of neuropsychology,2008, 2008Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 12.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Arithmetic and phonological processes in deaf signers and hearing non-signers - a cognitive study2008Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 13.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Avdelningen för kognition, utveckling och handikapp (CDD).
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Avdelningen för kognition, utveckling och handikapp (CDD).
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap.
    Arithmetic and phonological processing in deaf native signers and hearing non-signers2008Ingår i: First European Congress of Neuropsychology,2008, 2008Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 14.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Complex symbol precessing in deaf native signers and hearing non-signers2009Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 15.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Deaf signers use phonology to do arithmetic2014Ingår i: Learning and individual differences, ISSN 1041-6080, E-ISSN 1873-3425, Vol. 32, s. 246-253Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Deaf students generally lag several years behind hearing peers in arithmetic, but little is known about the mechanisms behind this. In the present study we investigated how phonological skills interact with arithmetic. Eighteen deaf signers and eighteen hearing non-signers took part in an experiment that manipulated arithmetic and phonological knowledge in the language modalities of sign and speech. Independent tests of alphabetical and native language phonological skills were also administered. There was no difference in performance between groups on subtraction, but hearing non-signers performed better than deaf signers on multiplication. For the deaf signers but not the hearing non-signers, multiplicative reasoning was associated with both alphabetical and phonological skills. This indicates that deaf signing adults rely on language processes to solve multiplication tasks, possibly because automatization of multiplication is less well established in deaf adults.

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  • 16.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Dealing with digits: short-term memory differences in deaf signers and hearing non-signers2011Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 17.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Language modality specific affects on simple spans in deaf signers and hearing non-signers2010Ingår i: Second European Congress of Neuropsychology, September, Amsterdam, 2010Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 18.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Language modality specific effects on simple spans in deaf signers and hearing non-signers2010Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 19.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Phonological similarity and sensory memory traces modulate span size in deaf signers and hearing non-signers2010Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 20.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rhyme and Reason - do deaf signers use phonology to do arithmetic?2010Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 21.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Avdelningen för kognition, utveckling och handikapp (CDD). Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Avdelningen för kognition, utveckling och handikapp (CDD). Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Simple spans in deaf signers and hearing non-signers2010Ingår i: BEHAVIOURAL NEUROLOGY, ISSN 0953-4180, Vol. 23, nr 4, s. 207-208Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 22.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Simple spans in deaf signers and hearing nonsigners2010Ingår i: Behavioural Neurology, ISSN 0953-4180, E-ISSN 1875-8584, Vol. 23, nr 4, s. 207-208Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 23.
    Arlinger, Stig
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Teknisk audiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Sternäng, Ola
    Stockholm University.
    Wahlin, Åke
    Psykologiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet.
    Nilsson, L-G
    Auditory deficits are related to episodic long-term memory deficits2009Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 24.
    Campbell, Ruth
    et al.
    University College London.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Cognitive Hearing Science: The view from hearing impairment and deafness.: Editorial in Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, vol 50, issue 5, pp 367-3692009Ingår i: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 50, nr 5, s. 367-369Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 25. Cardin, V
    et al.
    Lynnes, R
    Orfanidou, E
    Capek, C
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Woll, B
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Heschl's gyrus responses to visual language in deaf individuals are driven by auditory deprivation, and not by language modality2014Ingår i: Society for the Neurobiology of Language, 2014Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 26.
    Cardin, Velia
    et al.
    Univerity College London, Faculty of Brain Sciences.
    Campbell, Ruth
    University College of London.
    MacSweeney, Mairéad
    University College London, Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience.
    Holmer, Emil
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Centrum för medicinsk bildvetenskap och visualisering, CMIV.
    Neurobiological insights from the study of deafness and sign language2019Ingår i: Understanding deafness, language, and cognitive development: essays in honour of Bencie Woll / [ed] Gary Morgan, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2019, s. 159-181Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The study of deafness and sign language has provided a means of dissociating modality specificity from higher level abstract processes in the brain. Differentiating these is fundamental for establishing the relationship between sensorimotor representations and functional specialisation in the brain. Early deafness in humans provides a unique insight into this problem, because the reorganisation observed in the adult deaf brain is not only due to neural development in the absence of auditory inputs, but also due to the acquisition of visual communication strategies such as sign language and speechreading. Here we report research by scholars who have collaborated with Bencie Woll in understanding the neural reorganisation that occurs as a consequence of early deafness, and its relation to the use of different visual strategies for language. We concentrate on three main topics: functional specialisation of sensory cortices, language and working memory.

  • 27.
    Cardin, Velia
    et al.
    University College London.
    Orfanidou, E
    University College London, University of Crete.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Capek, C
    University of Manchester.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Woll, B
    University College London.
    Dissociating linguistic and sensory neural plasticity in human superior temporal cortex2012Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The study of brain function in deaf individuals provides a unique opportunity not only to understand language independently of speech and hearing, but also to dissociate plastic changes related to adaptive sensory mechanisms from those associated with cognitive processes.In congenitally deaf individuals, sign language[1] and simple visual stimuli[2] reliably elicit activation in the superior temporal cortex (STC), a region usually associated with the processing of auditory input, including speech. However, it is not clear if this plasticity is driven by perceptual or cognitive mechanisms, and disentangling these effects is fundamental for establishing the relationship between the function of cortical regions, and the type of plastic changes that this functional specialisation allows.Here, we show that plastic effects in the STC have a sensory origin, whereas differential activations due to sign language experience are specific to the processing of linguistic stimuli. We dissociated between these two components by characterising the fMRI BOLD response to sign language stimuli in individuals deaf from infancy who were either early and proficient users of a sign language or had no knowledge of a sign language. There was no difference in the level of activation across groups in the right STC, indicating that plasticity in this region is mainly due to sensory deprivation. In contrast, further activations were observed in the group of signers in the left ventral STC, underpinning the role of this region in processing language. None of these activations were observed in a control group of hearing non-signers.These results show that linguistic and sensory factors cause plasticity in anatomically and functionally distinguishable substrates. Furthermore, they demonstrate that functionally distinct cortical areas preserve their perceptual and cognitive roles, but adapt their processing to deal with input from a different modality.1. Nishimura, H. et al. Sign language ‘heard’ in the auditory cortex. Nature 397, 116 (1999).2. Finney, E. M., Fine, I. & Dobkins, K.R. Visual stimuli activate auditory cortex in the deaf. Nature Neurosci 4, 1171-1173 (2001).

  • 28.
    Cardin, Velia
    et al.
    University College London, Department of Cognitive, Perceptual and Brain Sciences.
    Orfanidou, Eleni
    University of Crete, Department of Psychology.
    Kästner, Lena
    Ruhr-University, Bochum.
    Capek, Sheryl M.
    University of Manchester.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Woll, Benice
    University College London, Cognitive, Perceptual and Brain Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Non-signs compared to signs from an unknown sign language differentially engage the parietal cortex of deaf native signers2011Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 29.
    Cardin, Velia
    et al.
    University College London, Department of Cognitive, Perceptual and Brain Sciences.
    Orfanidou, Eleni
    University of Crete, Department of Psychology.
    Kästner, Lena
    Ruhr-University, Bochum.
    Capek, Sheryl M.
    University of Manchester.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Woll, Benice
    University College London, Cognitive, Perceptual and Brain Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Signs that violate phonological rules differentitally activate parietal areas in deaf native signers2011Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 30.
    Cardin, Velia
    et al.
    University College London.
    Orfanidou, Eleni
    University of Crete.
    Kästner, Lena
    Ruhr-University, Bochum.
    Capek, Sheryl M
    University of Manchester.
    Woll, Benice
    University College London.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Neural mechanisms supporting the extraction of different sublexical components of sign language2011Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 31.
    Cardin, Velia
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. University College London, Division of Psychology and Language Sciences, UK.
    Orfanidou, Eleni
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. University of Crete, Greece.
    Kästner, Lena
    Humboldt Universität zu Berlin, Institute of Philosophy, Germany.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Woll, Bencie
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. University College London, Division of Psychology and Language Sciences, UK.
    Capek, Cheryl
    University of Manchester, UK.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Monitoring Different Phonological Parameters of Sign Language Engages the Same Cortical Language Network but Distinctive Perceptual Ones2016Ingår i: Journal of cognitive neuroscience, ISSN 0898-929X, E-ISSN 1530-8898, Vol. 28, nr 1, s. 20-40Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The study of signed languages allows the dissociation of sensorimotor and cognitive neural components of the language signal. Here we investigated the neurocognitive processes underlying the monitoring of two phonological parameters of sign languages: handshape and location. Our goal was to determine if brain regions processing sensorimotor characteristics of different phonological parameters of sign languages were also involved in phonological processing, with their activity being modulated by the linguistic content of manual actions. We conducted an fMRI experiment using manual actions varying in phonological structure and semantics: (1) signs of a familiar sign language (British Sign Language), (2) signs of an unfamiliar sign language (Swedish Sign Language), and (3) invented nonsigns that violate the phonological rules of British Sign Language and Swedish Sign Language or consist of nonoccurring combinations of phonological parameters. Three groups of participants were tested: deaf native signers, deaf nonsigners, and hearing nonsigners. Results show that the linguistic processing of different phonological parameters of sign language is independent of the sensorimotor characteristics of the language signal. Handshape and location were processed by different perceptual and task-related brain networks but recruited the same language areas. The semantic content of the stimuli did not influence this process, but phonological structure did, with nonsigns being associated with longer RTs and stronger activations in an action observation network in all participants and in the supramarginal gyrus exclusively in deaf signers. These results suggest higher processing demands for stimuli that contravene the phonological rules of a signed language, independently of previous knowledge of signed languages. We suggest that the phonological characteristics of a language may arise as a consequence of more efficient neural processing for its perception and production.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 32.
    Cardin, Velia
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Orfanidou, Eleni
    University College London, UK and University of Crete, Greece.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Capek, Cheryl M.
    University of Manchester, UK.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Woll, Bencie
    University College London, UK.
    Dissociating cognitive and sensory neural plasticity in human superior temporal cortex2013Ingår i: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 4, nr 2Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Disentangling the effects of sensory and cognitive factors on neural reorganization is fundamental for establishing the relationship between plasticity and functional specialization. Auditory deprivation in humans provides a unique insight into this problem, because the origin of the anatomical and functional changes observed in deaf individuals is not only sensory, but also cognitive, owing to the implementation of visual communication strategies such as sign language and speechreading. Here, we describe a functional magnetic resonance imaging study of individuals with different auditory deprivation and sign language experience. We find that sensory and cognitive experience cause plasticity in anatomically and functionally distinguishable substrates. This suggests that after plastic reorganization, cortical regions adapt to process a different type of input signal, but preserve the nature of the computation they perform, both at a sensory and cognitive level.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 33.
    Cardin, Velia
    et al.
    University College London, Division of Psychology and Language Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    De Oliveira, Rita
    London South Bank University.
    Andin, Josefine
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Beese, Lilli
    University College London, Deafness Cognition and Language Research Centre.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Working memory and crossmodal plasticity in congenitally deaf individuals2015Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 34.
    Cardin, Velia
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande. University College London, Division of Psychology and Language Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Ferraz De Oliveira, Rita
    London South Bank University, School of Applied Science.
    Andin, Josefine
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Beese, Lilli
    University College London, Deafness Cognition and Language Research Centre.
    Woll, Bencie
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande. University College London, Division of Psychology and Language Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    A working memory role for superior temporal cortex in deaf individuals independently of linguistic content2015Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies of sign languages have been used to test traditional cognitive models of working memory (WM) that distinguish between verbal and visuospatial WM (e.g. Baddeley, 2003), without considering that sign languages operate in the visuospatial domain. Previous studies have shown that WM mental representations and processes are largely similar for signed and spoken languages (e.g. Rönnberg et al., 2004). However, it is not clear to what extent visual WM processes aid and support sign language WM.

    Here we characterise the neural substrates supporting sign language and visual WM, and the mechanisms that subserve differential processing for signers and for deaf individuals. We conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment with three groups of participants: deaf native signers, hearing native signers and hearing non-signers. Participants performed a 2-back WM task and a control task on two sets of stimuli: signs from British Sign Language or non-sense objects. Stimuli were composed of point-lights to control for differences in visual features.

    Our results show activation in a fronto-parietal network for WM processing in all groups, independently of stimulus type, in agreement with previous literature. We also replicate previous findings in deaf signers showing a stronger right posterior superior temporal cortex (STC) activation for visuospatial processing, and stronger bilateral STC activation for sign language stimuli.

    Group comparisons further reveal stronger activations in STC for WM in deaf signers, but not for the groups of hearing individuals. This activation is independent of the linguistic content of the stimuli, being observed in both WM conditions: signs and objects. These results suggest a cognitive role for STC in deaf signers, beyond sign language processing.

  • 35.
    Cardin, Velia
    et al.
    University College London, Division of Psychology and Language Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Ferraz de Oliveira, Rita
    London South Bank University, School of Applied Science.
    Su, Merina
    London South Bank University, Institute of Child Health.
    Andin, Josefine
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Beese, Lilli
    University College London, Deafness Cognition and Language Research Centre.
    Woll, Bencie
    University College London, Division of Psychology and Language Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Does the superior temporal cortex have a role in cognitive control as a consequence of cross-modal reorganization?2015Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 36.
    Cardin, Velia
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande. University College London, Division of Psychology and Language Sciences, UK.
    Smittenaar, Rebecca C.
    University College London, Experimental Psychology, UK.
    Orfanidou, Eleni
    University of Crete, Greece.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Capek, Cheryl M.
    University of Manchester, School of Psychological Sciences, UK.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Woll, Bencie
    University College London, Division of Psychology and Language Sciences, UK.
    Differential activity in Heschl's gyrus between deaf and hearing individuals is due to auditory deprivation rather than language modality2016Ingår i: NeuroImage, ISSN 1053-8119, E-ISSN 1095-9572, Vol. 124, s. 96-106Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Sensory cortices undergo crossmodal reorganisation as a consequence of sensory deprivation. Congenital deafness in humans represents a particular case with respect to other types of sensory deprivation, because cortical reorganisation is not only a consequence of auditory deprivation, but also of language-driven mechanisms. Visual crossmodal plasticity has been found in secondary auditory cortices of deaf individuals, but it is still unclear if reorganisation also takes place in primary auditory areas, and how this relates to language modality and auditory deprivation.

    Here, we dissociated the effects of language modality and auditory deprivation on crossmodal plasticity in Heschl's gyrus as a whole, and in cytoarchitectonic region Te1.0 (likely to contain the core auditory cortex). Using fMRI, we measured the BOLD response to viewing sign language in congenitally or early deaf individuals with and without sign language knowledge, and in hearing controls.

    Results show that differences between hearing and deaf individuals are due to a reduction in activation caused by visual stimulation in the hearing group, which is more significant in Te1.0 than in Heschl's gyrus as a whole. Furthermore, differences between deaf and hearing groups are due to auditory deprivation, and there is no evidence that the modality of language used by deaf individuals contributes to crossmodal plasticity in Heschl's gyrus.

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  • 37.
    Carlie, Johanna
    et al.
    Logopedics, Phoniatrics and Audiology, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund, Lund University, Sweden.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Logopedics, Phoniatrics and Audiology, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund, Lund University, Sweden.
    Nirme, Jens
    Cognitive Science, Department of Philosophy, Lund University, Sweden.
    Andersson, Ketty
    Logopedics, Phoniatrics and Audiology, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund, Lund University, Sweden.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi.
    Johansson, Roger
    Department of Psychology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Gulz, Agneta
    Cognitive Science, Department of Philosophy, Lund University, Sweden.
    Brännström, K Jonas
    Logopedics, Phoniatrics and Audiology, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund, Lund University, Sweden.
    Development of an Auditory Passage Comprehension Task for Swedish Primary School Children of Cultural and Linguistic Diversity2021Ingår i: Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research, ISSN 1092-4388, E-ISSN 1558-9102, Vol. 64, nr 10, s. 3883-3893Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose This study reports on the development of an auditory passage comprehension task for Swedish primary school children of cultural and linguistic diversity. It also reports on their performance on the task in quiet and in noise. Method Eighty-eight children aged 7-9 years and showing normal hearing participated. The children were divided into three groups based on presumed language exposure: 13 children were categorized as Swedish-speaking monolinguals, 19 children were categorized as simultaneous bilinguals, and 56 children were categorized as sequential bilinguals. No significant difference in working memory capacity was seen between the three language groups. Two passages and associated multiple-choice questions were developed. During development of the passage comprehension task, steps were taken to reduce the impact of culture-specific prior experience and knowledge on performance. This was achieved by using the story grammar principles, universal topics and plots, and simple language that avoided complex or unusual grammatical structures and words. Results The findings indicate no significant difference between the two passages and similar response distributions. Passage comprehension performance was significantly better in quiet than in noise, regardless of language exposure group. The monolinguals outperformed both simultaneous and sequential bilinguals in both listening conditions. Conclusions Because the task was designed to minimize the effect of cultural knowledge on auditory passage comprehension, this suggests that compared with monolinguals, both simultaneous and sequential bilinguals have a disadvantage in auditory passage comprehension. As expected, the findings demonstrate that noise has a negative effect on auditory passage comprehension. The magnitude of this effect does not relate to language exposure. The developed auditory passage comprehension task seems suitable for assessing auditory passage comprehension in primary school children of linguistic and cultural diversity.

  • 38.
    Classon, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Löfkvist, Ulrika
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Verbal fluency in adults with postlingually acquired hearing impairment2013Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 39.
    Classon, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Löfkvist, Ulrika
    Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Linköping University, Sweden/Department of Speech and Language Pathology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Verbal fluency in adults with postlingually acquired hearing impairment2013Ingår i: Speech, Language and Hearing, ISSN 2050-571X, Vol. 17, nr 2, s. 88-100Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined verbal retrieval in participants with acquired moderate-to-severe sensorineural hearing impairment (M age = 63, M education level = 13 years) compared to participants with normal hearing thresholds (M age = 62, M education level = 14 years) using the letter and category fluency tasks. Analyses of number of words produced, clustering, and switching, were conducted. There was no significant difference between the groups in category fluency performance. In letter fluency, however, the participants with hearing impairment produced significantly fewer words than the normal hearing participants and their production was characterized by fewer switches. Regression analyses were conducted to examine the relationship between demographic, auditory, and cognitive variables and letter fluency performance in the two groups. Phonological skills and auditory acuity predicted letter fluency output only in participants with hearing impairment and a hearing-related link between phonological skills, working memory capacity, and letter fluency switching was found.

  • 40.
    Classon, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Ng, Hoi Ning Elaine
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Kilman, Lisa
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Öron- näsa- och halskliniken US. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Mishra, Sushmit
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Reading span performance in 339 Swedish 50-89 year old individuals with hearing impairment: Effects of test version and age, and relation to speech recognition in noise2013Manuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish reading span test (Rönnberg, Lyxell, Arlinger, & Kinnefors, 1989) is often used to assess working memory capacity (WMC) in the field of cognitive hearing science. The test has proven useful as a predictor of speech recognition in noise in adverse conditions. It has been used in a wide range of experimental studies and has been translated to several languages. The purpose of this paper was to provide reference data for the Swedish reading span test (Rönnberg et al., 1989) in a large sample of adults with hearing impairment aged 50-89 years that are representative of patients seeking rehabilitation at audiological clinics. Data from finished and ongoing projects were collated and reanalyzed for this purpose. The original full version and a shortened version of the test were compared, in terms of percentage correct. In addition, performance on the full version was compared across two different age-cohorts, 50-69 year olds and 70-89 year olds. Frequency distributions and percentile scores are reported, as well as relations with demographic variables, and speech recognition in noise. Results showed that reading span performance was related to age, but not sex, with lower scores in older participants. Pure tone hearing thresholds accounted for a small but significant amount of the variance such that higher reading span scores were related to better hearing. The frequency distributions of scores did not differ across the two versions of the test, but the long version seemed to be more sensitive to age. Performance in both versions was significantly correlated with speech recognition in noise. Regression analyses however showed that reading span explained additional variance in speech in noise recognition, after the effects of age and pure tone hearing thresholds were accounted for, only in the 50-69 year olds. These findings are discussed in relation to  age-related differences in the ability to recruit cognitive resources in the service of speech communication.

  • 41.
    Classon, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Johansson, Mikael
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Early ERP signature of hearing impairment in visual rhyme judgment2013Ingår i: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 4, nr 241Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Postlingually acquired hearing impairment (HI) is associated with changes in the representation of sound in semantic long-term memory. An indication of this is the lower performance on visual rhyme judgment tasks in conditions where phonological and orthographic cues mismatch, requiring high reliance on phonological representations. In this study, event-related potentials (ERPs) were used for the first time to investigate the neural correlates of phonological processing in visual rhyme judgments in participants with acquired HI and normal hearing (NH). Rhyme task word pairs rhymed or not and had matching or mismatching orthography. In addition, the inter-stimulus interval (ISI) was manipulated to be either long (800 ms) or short (50 ms). Long ISIs allow for engagement of explicit, top-down processes, while short ISIs limit the involvement of such mechanisms. We hypothesized lower behavioral performance and N400 and N2 deviations in HI in the mismatching rhyme judgment conditions, particularly in short ISI. However, the results showed a different pattern. As expected, behavioral performance in the mismatch conditions was lower in HI than in NH in short ISI, but ERPs did not differ across groups. In contrast, HI performed on a par with NH in long ISI. Further, HI, but not NH, showed an amplified N2-like response in the non-rhyming, orthographically mismatching condition in long ISI. This was also the rhyme condition in which participants in both groups benefited the most from the possibility to engage top-down processes afforded with the longer ISI. Taken together, these results indicate an early ERP signature of HI in this challenging phonological task, likely reflecting use of a compensatory strategy. This strategy is suggested to involve increased reliance on explicit mechanisms such as articulatory recoding and grapheme-to-phoneme conversion.

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  • 42.
    Classon, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Johansson, Mikael
    Lunds universitet, Psykologiska institutionen.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Electrophysiological indices of hearing related phonological processing deficit2011Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 43.
    Classon, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Johansson, Mikael
    Lunds universitet, Psykologiska institutionen.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Electrophysiological indices of hearing related phonological processing deficit2011Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 44.
    Classon, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    On the role of working memory in hearing related phonological processing deficit2011Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 45.
    Classon, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Working memory capacity compensates for hearing related phonological processing deficit2013Ingår i: Journal of Communication Disorders, ISSN 0021-9924, E-ISSN 1873-7994, Vol. 46, nr 1, s. 17-29Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Acquired hearing impairment is associated with gradually declining phonological representations. According to the Ease of Language Understanding (ELU) model, poorly defined representations lead to mismatch in phonologically challenging tasks. To resolve the mismatch, reliance on working memory capacity (WMC) increases. This study investigated whether WMC modulated performance in a phonological task in individuals with hearing impairment. A visual rhyme judgment task with congruous or incongruous orthography, followed by an incidental episodic recognition memory task, was used. In participants with hearing impairment, WMC modulated both rhyme judgment performance and recognition memory in the orthographically similar non-rhyming condition; those with high WMC performed exceptionally well in the judgment task, but later recognized few of the words. For participants with hearing impairment and low WMC the pattern was reversed; they performed poorly in the judgment task but later recognized a surprisingly large proportion of the words. Results indicate that good WMC can compensate for the negative impact of auditory deprivation on phonological processing abilities by allowing for efficient use of phonological processing skills. They also suggest that individuals with hearing impairment and low WMC may use a non-phonological approach to written words, which can have the beneficial side effect of improving memory encoding. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanLearning outcomes: Readers will be able to: (1) describe cognitive processes involved in rhyme judgment, (2) explain how acquired hearing impairment affects phonological processing and (3) discuss how reading strategies at encoding impact memory performance.

    Ladda ner fulltext (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 46.
    Classon, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Johansson, Mikael
    Lunds universitet, Psykologiska institutionen.
    Hearing impairment, linguistic prcessing and access to verbal long-term memory: In search of behavioral and electrophysiological indices2010Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 47.
    Classon, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap, Institutet för handikappvetenskap, IHV. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Hearing impairment, linguistic processing and access to verbal long-term memory: An ERP-study.2009Ingår i: The HEAD Graduate School Second Summer Workshop, Båsenberga, Sweden. June 15-16 2009., 2009Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 48.
    Classon, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Johansson, Mikael
    Lunds universitet, Psykologiska institutionen.
    Hearing impariment, linguistic processing and access to verbal long-term memory:  an ERP-study2010Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 49.
    Classon, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Working memory compensates for hearing related phonological processing deficit2013Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Acquired hearing impairment is associated with gradually declining phonological representations. According to the Ease of Language Understanding (ELU) model, poorly defined representations lead to mismatch in phonologically challenging tasks. To resolve the mismatch, reliance on working memory capacity (WMC) increases. This study investigated whether WMC modulated performance in a phonological task in individuals with hearing impairment. A visual rhyme judgment task with congruous or incongruous orthography, followed by an incidental episodic recognition memory task, was used. In participants with hearing impairment, WMC modulated both rhyme judgment performance and recognition memory in the orthographically similar non-rhyming condition; those with high WMC performed exceptionally well in the judgment task, but later recognized few of the words. For participants with hearing impairment and low WMC the pattern was reversed; they performed poorly in the judgment task but later recognized a surprisingly large proportion of the words. Results indicate that good WMC can compensate for the negative impact of auditory deprivation on phonological processing abilities by allowing for efficient use of phonological processing skills. They also suggest that individuals with hearing impairment and low WMC may use a non-phonological approach to written words, which can have the beneficial side effect of improving memory encoding.

    LEARNING OUTCOMES:

    Readers will be able to: (1) describe cognitive processes involved in rhyme judgment, (2) explain how acquired hearing impairment affects phonological processing and (3) discuss how reading strategies at encoding impact memory performance.

  • 50.
    Classon, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Johansson, M
    Hearing impairment, Linguistic processing and access to verbal long-term memory:: In search of electrophysiological indices2011Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
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