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  • 1.
    Dahlqvist, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Alling, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ingason, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Magnus, F.
    2Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Thore, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Petruhins, Andrejs
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Mockute, Aurelija
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Meshkian, Rahele
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sahlberg, M.
    3Department of Chemistry, The Ångström Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Persson, Per O A
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hjörvarsson, B.
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Abrikosov, A.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Rosén, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Complex magnetism in nanolaminated Mn2GaC2014Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We have used first-principles calculations and Heisenberg Monte Carlo simulations to search for the magnetic ground state of Mn2GaC, a recently synthesized magnetic nanolaminate. We have, independent on method, identified a range of low energy collinear as well as non-collinear magnetic configurations, indicating a highly frustrated magnetic material with several nearly degenerate magnetic states. An experimentally obtained magnetization of only 0.29 per Mn atom in Mn2GaC may be explained by canted spins in an antiferromagnetic configuration of ferromagnetically ordered sub-layers with alternating spin orientation, denoted AFM[0001]. Furthermore, low temperature X-ray diffraction show a new basal plane peak appearing upon a magnetic transition, which is consistent with the here predicted change in inter-layer spacing for the AFM[0001] configuration.

  • 2.
    Dahlqvist, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ingason, Arni Sigurdur
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Alling, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Magnus, F.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Thore, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Petruhins, Andrejs
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mockuté, Aurelija
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Arnalds, U. B.
    University of Iceland, Iceland.
    Sahlberg, M.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Hjorvarsson, B.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Abrikosov, Igor
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. National University of Science and Technology MISIS, Russia; Tomsk State University, Russia.
    Rosén, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Magnetically driven anisotropic structural changes in the atomic laminate Mn2GaC2016In: Physical Review B, ISSN 2469-9950, E-ISSN 2469-9969, Vol. 93, no 1, p. 014410-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inherently layered magnetic materials, such as magnetic M(n+1)AX(n) (MAX) phases, offer an intriguing perspective for use in spintronics applications and as ideal model systems for fundamental studies of complex magnetic phenomena. The MAX phase composition M(n+1)AX(n) consists of M(n+1)AX(n) blocks separated by atomically thin A-layers where M is a transition metal, A an A-group element, X refers to carbon and/or nitrogen, and n is typically 1, 2, or 3. Here, we show that the recently discovered magnetic Mn2GaC MAX phase displays structural changes linked to the magnetic anisotropy, and a rich magnetic phase diagram which can be manipulated through temperature and magnetic field. Using first-principles calculations and Monte Carlo simulations, an essentially one-dimensional (1D) interlayer plethora of two-dimensioanl (2D) Mn-C-Mn trilayers with robust intralayer ferromagnetic spin coupling was revealed. The complex transitions between them were observed to induce magnetically driven anisotropic structural changes. The magnetic behavior as well as structural changes dependent on the temperature and applied magnetic field are explained by the large number of low energy, i.e., close to degenerate, collinear and noncollinear spin configurations that become accessible to the system with a change in volume. These results indicate that the magnetic state can be directly controlled by an applied pressure or through the introduction of stress and show promise for the use of Mn2GaC MAX phases in future magnetoelectric and magnetocaloric applications.

  • 3.
    Holmin, Susanne
    et al.
    Permascand AB, Sweden; Mid Sweden University, Sweden.
    Näslund, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sigurdur Ingason, Arni
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Rosén, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Zimmerman, Erik
    Permascand AB, Sweden.
    Corrosion of ruthenium dioxide based cathodes in alkaline medium caused by reverse currents2014In: Electrochimica Acta, ISSN 0013-4686, E-ISSN 1873-3859, Vol. 146, p. 30-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A reverse current obtained during power shutdowns in industrial processes, such as chlor-alkali production or alkaline water electrolysis, is deleterious for hydrogen evolving ruthenium dioxide (Ru02) based cathodes. It has been observed that RuO2 coatings after a power shutdown, necessary for e.g. maintenance, are severely damaged unless polarization rectifiers are employed. In this work we show why these types of cathodes are sensitive to reverse currents, i.e. anodic currents, after hydrogen evolution. RuO2 coatings deposited on nickel substrates were subjected to different electrochemical treatments such as hydrogen evolution, oxygen evolution, or reverse currents in 8 M NaOH at 90 degrees C. Polarity inversion was introduced after hydrogen evolution to simulate the effect of reverse currents. Because of chemical interaction with hydrogen, a significant amount of the RuO2 coating was transformed into hydroxylated species during cathodic polarization. Our study shows that these hydroxylated phases are highly sensitive to electrochemical corrosion during anodic polarization after extended hydrogen evolution.

  • 4.
    Ingason, Arni Sigurdur
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Mockute, Aurelija
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Dahlqvist, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Magnus, F.
    Science Institute, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Olafsson, S.
    Science Institute, University of Iceland, Dunhaga 3, IS-107 Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Arnalds, U.
    Department of Physics, Uppsala University, Box 530, S-751 21 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Alling, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Abrikosov, Igor
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hjorvarsson, B.
    Department of Physics, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Persson, Per O Å
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Rosén, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A Nanolaminated Magnetic Phase: Mn2GaC2014In: Materials Research Letters, ISSN 2166-3831, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 89-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Layered magnetic materials are fascinating from the point of view of fundamental science as well as applications. Discoveries such as giant magnetoresistance (GMR) in magnetic multilayers have revolutionized data storage and magnetic recording, and concurrently initiated the search for new layered magnetic materials. One group of inherently nanolaminated compounds are the so called Mn+1AXn (MAX) phases. Due to the large number of isostructural compositions, researchers are exploring the wide range of interesting properties, and not primarily functionalization through optimization of structural quality. Magnetic MAX phases have been discussed in the literature, though this is hitherto an unreported phenomenon. However, such materials would be highly interesting, based on the attractive and useful properties attained with layered magnetic materials to date. Here we present a new MAX phase, (Cr1–xMnx)2GeC, synthesized as thin film in heteroepitaxial form, showing single crystal material with unprecedented structural MAX phase quality. The material was identified using first-principles calculations to study stability of hypothetical MAX phases, in an eort to identify a potentially magnetic material. The theory predicts a variety of magnetic behavior depending on the Mn concentration and Cr/Mn atomic conguration within the sublattice. The analyzed thin films display a magnetic signal well above room temperature and with partly ferromagnetic ordering. These very promising results open up a field of new layered magnetic materials, with high potential for electronics and spintronics applications.

  • 5.
    Ingason, Arni Sigurdur
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Mockuté, Aurelija
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Dahlqvist, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Magnus, F.
    Science Institute, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Olafsson, S.
    Science Institute, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Arnalds, U. B.
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Alling, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Abrikosov, Igor A.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hjörvarsson, B.
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Persson, Per O A
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Rosén, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Magnetic Self-Organized Atomic Laminate from First Principles and Thin Film Synthesis2013In: Physical Review Letters, ISSN 0031-9007, E-ISSN 1079-7114, Vol. 110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    he first experimental realization of a magnetic Mn+1AXn (MAX) phase, (Cr0.75Mn0.25)2GeC, is presented, synthesized as a heteroepitaxial single crystal thin film, exhibiting excellent structural quality. This self-organized atomic laminate is based on the well-known Cr2GeC, with Mn, a new element in MAX phase research, substituting Cr. The compound was predicted using first-principles calculations, from which a variety of magnetic behavior is envisaged, depending on the Mn concentration and Cr/Mn atomic configuration within the sublattice. The analyzed thin films display a magnetic signal at room temperature.

  • 6.
    Ingason, Arni Sigurdur
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Pålsson, G. K.
    Uppsala University, Sweden; Institute Laue Langevin, France.
    Dahlqvist, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rosén, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Long-range antiferromagnetic order in epitaxial Mn2GaC thin films from neutron reflectometry2016In: PHYSICAL REVIEW B, ISSN 2469-9950, Vol. 94, no 2, p. 024416-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The nature of the magnetic structure in magnetic so-called MAX phases is a topic of some controversy. Here we present unpolarized neutron-diffraction data between 3.4 and 290.0 K and momentum transfer between Q = 0.0 and 1.1 angstrom(-1), as well as complementary x-ray-diffraction data on epitaxial thin films of the MAX phase material Mn2GaC. This inherently layered material exhibits neutron-diffraction peaks consistent with long-ranged antiferromagnetic order with a periodicity of two structural unit cells. The magnetic structure is present throughout the measured temperature range. The results are in agreement with first-principles calculations of antiferromagnetic structures for this material where the Mn-C-Mn atomic trilayers are found to be ferromagnetically coupled internally but spin flipped or rotated across the Ga layers. The present findings have significant bearing on the discussion regarding the nature of the magnetic structure in magnetic MAX phases.

  • 7.
    Karlsson, Linda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Birch, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mockuté, Aurelija
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sigurdur Ingason, Arni
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ta, Huy Q.
    Polish Academic Science, Poland; Sungkyunkwan University, South Korea; Soochow University, Peoples R China; Soochow University, Peoples R China.
    Rummeli, Mark H.
    Polish Academic Science, Poland; Soochow University, Peoples R China; Soochow University, Peoples R China; IFW Dresden, Germany.
    Rosén, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Persson, Per O. Å.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Residue reduction and intersurface interaction on single graphene sheets2016In: Carbon, ISSN 0008-6223, E-ISSN 1873-3891, Vol. 100, p. 345-350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Large regions of pristine graphene are essential to applications which rely on the ideal graphene properties. Common methods for transferring chemical vapour deposition grown graphene to suitable substrates leaves metal oxide particles and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) residues on opposing surfaces, which degrade the properties. A common method to reduce the residues include annealing in vacuum or in argon, however, residues remain on the graphene sheet. The present investigation reports on the metal oxide particle ripening and PMMA decomposition on a single graphene sheet during in-situ annealing up to 1300 degrees C in a transmission electron microscope. It is shown that the PMMA residues are increasingly reduced at elevated temperatures although the reduction is strongly correlated to the metal oxide particle coverage on the opposing graphene surface. This is shown to occur as a consequence of an electrostatic interaction between the residues and that this prevents the establishment of large clean areas. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 8.
    Leosson, Kristjan
    et al.
    University of Iceland.
    Ingason, Arni Sigurdur
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Agnarsson, Björn
    Chalmers, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kossoy, Anna
    University of Iceland.
    Olafsson, Sveinn
    University of Iceland.
    Gather, Malte C.
    Technical University of Dresden, Germany .
    Ultra-thin gold films on transparent polymers2013In: Nanophotonics, ISSN 2192-8606, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 0030-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fabrication of continuous ultra-thin gold films (less than10 nm) on the surface of optical polymers (CYCLOTENE and ORMOCLEAR) is reported. Using a range of electrical, optical and structural characterization techniques, we show that polymers can be superior to more conventional (inorganic) materials as optical substrates for realizing ultra-thin gold films. Using these transparent polymer substrates, smooth, patternable gold films can be fabricated with conventional deposition techniques at room temperature, without adhesion or seeding layers, facilitating new photonic and plasmonic nanostructures, including transparent electrical contacts, thin film waveguides, metamaterials, biosensors and high-contrast superlenses.

  • 9.
    Magnus, F
    et al.
    University of Iceland.
    Ingason, Arni Sigurdur
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sveinsson, O B
    University of Iceland.
    Olafsson, S
    University of Iceland.
    Gudmundsson, J T
    University of Iceland.
    Morphology of TiN thin films grown on SiO(2) by reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering2011In: Thin Solid Films, ISSN 0040-6090, E-ISSN 1879-2731, Vol. 520, no 5, p. 1621-1624Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thin TiN films were grown on SiO(2) by reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) at a range of temperatures from 45 to 600 degrees C. The film properties were compared to films grown by conventional dc magnetron sputtering (dcMS) at similar conditions. Structural characterization was carried out using X-ray diffraction and reflection methods. The HiPIMS process produces denser films at lower growth temperature than does dcMS. Furthermore, the surface is much smoother for films grown by the HiPIMS process. The [200] grain size increases monotonically with increased growth temperature, whereas the size of the [111] oriented grains decreases to a minimum for a growth temperature of 400 degrees C after which it starts to increase with growth temperature. The [200] crystallites are smaller than the [111] crystallites for all growth temperatures. The grain sizes of both orientations are smaller in HiPIMS grown films than in dcMS grown films.

  • 10.
    Magnus, Fridrik
    et al.
    University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland and Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Ingason, Arni Sigurdur
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Olafsson, Sveinn
    University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland .
    Gudmundsson, Jon T.
    University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland and Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Peoples R China .
    Nucleation and Resistivity of Ultrathin TiN Films Grown by High-Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering2012In: IEEE Electron Device Letters, ISSN 0741-3106, E-ISSN 1558-0563, Vol. 33, no 7, p. 1045-1047Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    TiN films have been grown on SiO2 by reactive high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) at temperatures of 22 degrees C-600 degrees C. The film resistance is monitored in situ to determine the coalescence and continuity thicknesses that decrease with increasing growth temperature with a minimum of 0.38 +/- 0.05 nm and 1.7 +/- 0.2 nm, respectively, at 400 degrees C. We find that HiPIMS-deposited films have significantly lower resistivity than dc magnetron sputtered (dcMS) films on SiO2 at all growth temperatures due to reduced grain boundary scattering. Thus, ultrathin continuous TiN films with superior electrical characteristics can be obtained with HiPIMS at reduced temperatures compared to dcMS.

  • 11.
    Meshkian, Rahele
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ingason, Arni Sigurdur
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Arnalds, U. B.
    University of Iceland, Iceland.
    Magnus, F.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rosén, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A magnetic atomic laminate from thin film synthesis: (Mo0.5Mn0.5)2GaC2015In: APL MATERIALS, ISSN 2166-532X, Vol. 3, no 7, article id 076102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present synthesis and characterization of a new magnetic atomic laminate: (Mo0.5Mn0.5)(2)GaC. High quality crystalline films were synthesized on MgO(111) substrates at a temperature of similar to 530 degrees C. The films display a magnetic response, evaluated by vibrating sample magnetometry, in a temperature range 3-300 K and in a field up to 5 T. The response ranges from ferromagnetic to paramagnetic with change in temperature, with an acquired 5T-moment and remanent moment at 3 K of 0.66 and 0.35 mu(B) per metal atom (Mo and Mn), respectively. The remanent moment and the coercive field (0.06 T) exceed all values reported to date for the family of magnetic laminates based on so called MAX phases.

  • 12.
    Meshkian, Rahele
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sigurdur Ingason, Arni
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Dahlqvist, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Petruhins, Andrejs
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Arnalds, Unnar B.
    University of Iceland, Iceland.
    Magnus, Fridrik
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Rosén, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Theoretical stability, thin film synthesis and transport properties of the Mon+1GaCn MAX phase2015In: Physica Status Solidi. Rapid Research Letters, ISSN 1862-6254, E-ISSN 1862-6270, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 197-201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The phase stability of Mon +1GaCn has been investigated using ab-initio calculations. The results indicate stability for the Mo2GaC phase only, with a formation enthalpy of 0.4 meV per atom. Subsequent thin film synthesis of Mo2GaC was performed through magnetron sputtering from elemental targets onto Al2O3 [0001], 6H-SiC [0001] and MgO [111] substrates within the temperature range of 500 degrees C and 750 degrees C. High structural quality films were obtained for synthesis on MgO [111] substrates at 590 degrees C. Evaluation of transport properties showed a superconducting behavior with a critical temperature of approximately 7 K, reducing upon the application of an external magnetic field. The results point towards the first superconducting MAX phase in thin film form.

  • 13.
    Mockuté, Aurelija
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Persson, Per O A
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ingason, Arni Sigurdur
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Magnus, F.
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Olafsson, S.
    University of Iceland, Iceland .
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Rosén, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Structural and magnetic properties of (Cr1-xMnx)(5)Al-8 solid solution and structural relation to hexagonal nanolaminates2014In: Journal of Materials Science, ISSN 0022-2461, E-ISSN 1573-4803, Vol. 49, no 20, p. 7099-7104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electron microscopy is used to reveal the competitive epitaxial growth of bcc structure (Cr1-x Mn (x) )(5)Al-8 and (Cr1-y Mn (y) )(2)AlC [M (n+1)AX (n) (MAX)] phase during both magnetron sputtering and arc deposition. X-ray diffraction theta-2 theta measurements display identical peak positions of (000n)-oriented MAX phase and (Cr1-x Mn (x) )(5)Al-8, due to the interplanar spacing of (Cr1-x Mn (x) )(5)Al-8 that matches exactly half a unit cell of (Cr1-y Mn (y) )(2)AlC. Vibrating sample magnetometry shows that a thin film exclusively consisting of (Cr1-x Mn (x) )(5)Al-8 exhibits a magnetic response, implying that the potential presence of this phase needs to be taken into consideration when evaluating the magnetic properties of (Cr, Mn)(2)AlC.

  • 14.
    Mockuté, Aurelija
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Persson, Per O A.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Magnus, F
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden/University of Iceland, Iceland .
    Ingason, Arni Sigurdur
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Olafsson, S.
    University of Iceland, Iceland .
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Rosén, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Synthesis and characterization of arc deposited magnetic (Cr,Mn)2AlC MAX phase films2014In: Physica Status Solidi. Rapid Research Letters, ISSN 1862-6254, E-ISSN 1862-6270, Vol. 8, no 5, p. 420-423Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    (Cr1-xMnx)2AlC MAX phase thin films were synthesized by cathodic arc deposition. Scanning transmission electron microscopy including local energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis of the as-deposited films reveals a Mn incorporation of 10 at.% in the structure, corresponding to x = 0.2. Magnetic properties were characterized with vibrating sample magnetometry, revealing a magnetic response up to at least room temperature, thus verifying previous theoretical predictions of an antiferromagnetic or ferromagnetic ground state for Cr2AlC upon alloying with Mn.

  • 15.
    Novoselova, Iuliia P.
    et al.
    Faculty of Physics and Center for Nanointegration (CENIDE), University of Duisburg-Essen, 47057, Duisburg, Germany..
    Petruhins, Andrejs
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wiedwald, Ulf
    Faculty of Physics and Center for Nanointegration (CENIDE), University of Duisburg-Essen, 47057, Duisburg, Germany.; National University of Science and Technology «MISIS», 119049, Moscow, Russian Federation..
    Ingason, Arni Sigurdur
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Grein Research ehf. Dunhaga 5, Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Hase, Thomas
    Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL, UK..
    Magnus, Fridrik
    Science Institute, University of Iceland, Dunhaga 3, IS-107, Reykjavik, Iceland.; Division of Materials Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-75121, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Kapaklis, Vassilios
    Division of Materials Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-75121, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Palisaitis, Justinas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Spasova, Marina
    Faculty of Physics and Center for Nanointegration (CENIDE), University of Duisburg-Essen, 47057, Duisburg, Germany..
    Farle, Michael
    Faculty of Physics and Center for Nanointegration (CENIDE), University of Duisburg-Essen, 47057, Duisburg, Germany.; Center for Functionalized Magnetic Materials (FunMagMa), Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University, Kaliningrad, Russian Federation..
    Rosén, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Salikhov, Ruslan
    Faculty of Physics and Center for Nanointegration (CENIDE), University of Duisburg-Essen, 47057, Duisburg, Germany. ruslan.salikhov@uni-due.de.; Zavoisky Physical-Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, 420029, Kazan, Russian Federation. ruslan.salikhov@uni-due.de..
    Large uniaxial magnetostriction with sign inversion at the first order phase transition in the nanolaminated Mn2GaC MAX phase2018In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 2637Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2013, a new class of inherently nanolaminated magnetic materials, the so called magnetic MAX phases, was discovered. Following predictive material stability calculations, the hexagonal Mn2GaC compound was synthesized as hetero-epitaxial films containing Mn as the exclusive M-element. Recent theoretical and experimental studies suggested a high magnetic ordering temperature and non-collinear antiferromagnetic (AFM) spin states as a result of competitive ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic exchange interactions. In order to assess the potential for practical applications of Mn2GaC, we have studied the temperature-dependent magnetization, and the magnetoresistive, magnetostrictive as well as magnetocaloric properties of the compound. The material exhibits two magnetic phase transitions. The Néel temperature is T N  ~ 507 K, at which the system changes from a collinear AFM state to the paramagnetic state. At T t  = 214 K the material undergoes a first order magnetic phase transition from AFM at higher temperature to a non-collinear AFM spin structure. Both states show large uniaxial c-axis magnetostriction of 450 ppm. Remarkably, the magnetostriction changes sign, being compressive (negative) above T t and tensile (positive) below the T t . The sign change of the magnetostriction is accompanied by a sign change in the magnetoresistance indicating a coupling among the spin, lattice and electrical transport properties.

  • 16.
    Näslund, Lars-Åke
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ingason, Arni Sigurdur
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Holmin, Susanne
    Permascand AB, Ljungaverk, Sweden; Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Rosén, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Formation of RuO(OH)(2) on RuO2-Based Electrodes for Hydrogen Production2014In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 118, no 28, p. 15315-15323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The catalytic and durable electrode coating of ruthenium dioxide (RuO2), applied on nickel (Ni) substrates, is today utilized as electrocatalytic cathodes for hydrogen production, e.g., in the chlor-alkali process and alkaline water electrolysis. The drawback is, however, the sensitivity to reverse currents obtained during power shutdowns, e.g., at maintenance, where the RuO2-based electrodes can be severely damaged unless polarization rectifiers are employed. Through the material characterization techniques X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we can now reveal that RuO2 coatings, when exposed to hydrogen evolution at industrially relevant conditions, transforms into ruthenium oxyhydroxide (RuO(OH)(2)). The study further shows that as the hydrogen evolution proceeds the formed RuO(OH)(2) reduces to metallic ruthenium (Ru).

  • 17.
    Näslund, Lars-Åke
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sánchez-Sánchez, Carlos M.
    University of Alicante, Spain .
    Ingason, Arni Sigurdur
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Bäckström, Joakim
    Permascand AB, Ljungaverk, Sweden.
    Herrero, Enrique
    University of Alicante, Spain .
    Rosén, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Holmin, Susanne
    Permascand AB, Ljungaverk, Sweden.
    The Role of TiO2 Doping on RuO2-Coated Electrodes for the Water Oxidation Reaction2013In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 117, no 12, p. 6126-6135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electrochemical water splitting into H-2 and O-2 presents a significant and challenging energy loss due to the high overpotential required at the anode. Today, in industrially relevant applications, dimensionally stable anodes (DSA) based on the electrocatalytic active RuO2 are conventionally utilized. To enhance the resistance against corrosion, incorporation of TiO2 in the RuO2-coated electrodes is widely employed. In the present work we have used scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) to demonstrate that TiO2-doped RuO2-coated electrodes, in addition to being more durable, also show an electrocatalytic activity that is, on average, 13% higher as compared to the pure RuO2-coated electrodes. We also demonstrate that cracks in the pure RuO2 coating are the most active zones, probably because Ti from the Ti support has diffused into the first applied layer of the RuO2 coating. To reveal the nature of this enhanced activity for water oxidation displayed on TiO2-doped RuO2 electrodes, we have employed X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) for material characterization. The results show that the electrocatalytic activity enhancement displayed on the mixed (Ru1-x:Ti-x)O-2 coating is promoted through a charge transfer from the RuO2 to the TiO2, which provides new and more reactive sites designated as activated RuO2 delta+.

  • 18.
    Petruhins, Andrejs
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ingason, Arni Sigurdur
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Dahlqvist, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Mockuté, Aurelija
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Junaid, Muhammad
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Birch, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Persson, Per O A
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Rosén, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Phase stability of Crn+1GaCn MAX phases from first principles and Cr2GaC thin-film synthesis using magnetron sputtering from elemental targets2013In: Physica Status Solidi. Rapid Research Letters, ISSN 1862-6254, E-ISSN 1862-6270, Vol. 7, no 11, p. 971-974Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ab-initio calculations have been used to investigate the phase stability and magnetic state of Crn+ 1GaCn MAX phase. Cr2GaC (n = 1) was predicted to be stable, with a ground state corresponding to an antiferromagnetic spin configuration. Thin-film synthesis by magnetron sputtering from elemental targets, including liquid Ga, shows the formation of Cr2GaC, previously only attained from bulk synthesis methods. The films were deposited at 650 degrees C on MgO(111) substrates. X-ray diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy show epitaxial growth of (000) MAX phase.

  • 19.
    Petruhins, Andrejs
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ingason, Arni Sigurdur
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Magnus, Fridrik
    Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Olafsson, Sveinn
    Science Institute, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Rosén, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Synthesis and characterization of magnetic (Cr0.5Mn0.5)2GaC thin films2015In: Journal of Materials Science, ISSN 0022-2461, E-ISSN 1573-4803, Vol. 50, no 13, p. 4495-4502Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Growth of (Cr0.5Mn0.5)2GaC thin films from C, Ga, and compound Cr0.5Mn0.5 targets is reported for depositions on MgO (111), 4H-SiC (0001), and Al2O3 (0001) with and without a NbN (111) seed layer. Structural quality is found to be highly dependent on the choice of substrate with MgO (111) giving the best results as confirmed by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Phase pure, high crystal quality MAX phase thin films are realized, with a Cr:Mn ratio of 1:1. Vibrating sample magnetometry shows a ferromagnetic component from 30 K up to 300 K, with a measured net magnetic moment of 0.67 μB per metal (Cr + Mn) atom at 30 K and 5 T. The temperature dependence of the magnetic response suggests competing magnetic interactions with a resulting non-collinear magnetic ordering.

  • 20.
    Salikhov, Ruslan
    et al.
    University of Duisburg Essen, Germany.
    Semisalova, Anna S.
    University of Duisburg Essen, Germany; Moscow MV Lomonosov State University, Russia; Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden Rossendorf, Germany.
    Petruhins, Andrejs
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ingason, Arni Sigurdur
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rosén, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wiedwald, Ulf
    University of Duisburg Essen, Germany.
    Farle, Michael
    University of Duisburg Essen, Germany.
    Magnetic Anisotropy in the (Cr0.5Mn0.5)(2)GaC MAX Phase2015In: MATERIALS RESEARCH LETTERS, ISSN 2166-3831, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 156-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Magnetic MAX phase (Cr0.5Mn0.5)(2)GaC thin films grown epitaxially on MgO(111) substrates were studied by ferromagnetic resonance at temperatures between 110 and 300 K. The spectroscopic splitting factor g = 2.00 +/- 0.01 measured at all temperatures indicates pure spin magnetism in the sample. At all temperatures we find the magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy to be negligible which is in agreement with the identified pure spin magnetism.

  • 21.
    Schroeder, Jeremy
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ingason, Arni Sigurdur
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Rosén, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Birch, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Beware of poor-quality MgO substrates: A study of MgO substrate quality and its effect on thin film quality2015In: Journal of Crystal Growth, ISSN 0022-0248, E-ISSN 1873-5002, Vol. 420, p. 22-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Magnesium oxide (MgO) substrates are widely used for fundamental research of a large variety of materials. Our motivation is to make the research community aware of poor-quality MgO substrates. We acquired thirty MgO substrates from six different vendors and demonstrate that single-crystal MgO substrates are not always single crystal, but can consist of multiple domains. These multiple-domain MgO substrates can have a significant impact on research results as demonstrated by a one-to-one correlation between the domain structure of MgO substrates and titanium nitride (TiN) thin films (i.e. poor-quality MgO substrates result in poor-quality TiN films). Poor-quality MgO substrates are shown to be a widespread problem with over 70% of the evaluated substrates exhibiting multiple domains, essentially disqualifying them as substrates for epitaxy. MgO substrate vendors and researchers are encouraged to work together to resolve the problem of inconsistent MgO substrate quality and the research community is encouraged to perform quality control of MgO substrates prior to thin film deposition. Quality control by vendors and/or researchers can be achieved by acquiring X-ray diffraction omega-phi maps in batch processes, as detailed in this paper. We also propose a simple quality grading system to differentiate MgO substrates of varying quality.

  • 22.
    Zhirkov, Igor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eriksson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Petruhins, Andrejs
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Dahlqvist, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ingason, Arni Sigurdur
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Rosén, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Effect of Ti-Al cathode composition on plasma generation and plasma transport in direct current vacuum arc2014In: Journal of Applied Physics, ISSN 0021-8979, E-ISSN 1089-7550, Vol. 115, no 12, p. 123301-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    DC arc plasma from Ti, Al, and Ti1-xAlx (x = 0.16, 0.25, 0.50, and 0.70) compound cathodes was characterized with respect to plasma chemistry and charge-state-resolved ion energy. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy of the deposited films and the cathode surfaces were used for exploring the correlation between cathode-, plasma-, and film composition. Experimental work was performed at a base pressure of 10(-6) Torr, to exclude plasma-gas interaction. The plasma ion composition showed a reduction of Al of approximately 5 at. % compared to the cathode composition, while deposited films were in accordance with the cathode stoichiometry. This may be explained by presence of neutrals in the plasma/vapour phase. The average ion charge states (Ti = 2.2, Al = 1.65) were consistent with reference data for elemental cathodes, and approximately independent on the cathode composition. On the contrary, the width of the ion energy distributions (IEDs) were drastically reduced when comparing the elemental Ti and Al cathodes with Ti0.5Al0.5, going from similar to 150 and similar to 175 eV to similar to 100 and similar to 75 eV for Ti and Al ions, respectively. This may be explained by a reduction in electron temperature, commonly associated with the high energy tail of the IED. The average Ti and Al ion energies ranged between similar to 50 and similar to 61 eV, and similar to 30 and similar to 50 eV, respectively, for different cathode compositions. The attained energy trends were explained by the velocity rule for compound cathodes, which states that the most likely velocities of ions of different mass are equal. Hence, compared to elemental cathodes, the faster Al ions will be decelerated, and the slower Ti ions will be accelerated when originating from compound cathodes. The intensity of the macroparticle generation and thickness of the deposited films were also found to be dependent on the cathode composition. The presented results may be of importance for choice of cathodes for thin film depositions involving compound cathodes.

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