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  • 1.
    Alling, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Steneget, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tholander, Christopher
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tasnádi, Ferenc
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Greene, Joseph E
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Configurational disorder effects on adatom mobilities on Ti1-xAlxN(001) surfaces from first principles2012In: Physical Review B. Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, ISSN 1098-0121, E-ISSN 1550-235X, Vol. 85, no 24, p. 245422-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We use metastable NaCl-structure Ti0.5Al0.5N alloys to probe effects of configurational disorder on adatom surface diffusion dynamics which control phase stability and nanostructural evolution during film growth. First-principles calculations were employed to obtain energy potential maps of Ti and Al adsorption on an ordered TiN(001) reference surface and a disordered Ti0.5Al0.5N(001) solid-solution surface. The energetics of adatom migration on these surfaces are determined and compared to isolate effects of configurational disorder. The results show that alloy surface disorder dramatically reduces Ti adatom mobilities. Al adatoms, in sharp contrast, experience only small disorder-induced differences in migration dynamics.

  • 2.
    Chirita, Valeriu
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Münger, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Greene, Joseph E
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sundgren, J E
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Reptation: a mechanism for cluster migration on (111) face-centered-cubic metal surfaces1999In: Surface Science, ISSN 0039-6028, E-ISSN 1879-2758, Vol. 436, no 1-3, p. L641-L647Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Embedded-atom molecular-dynamics simulations were used to follow the diffusion dynamics of compact platinum clusters with up to 19 atoms on Pt(lll). The results reveal a cluster diffusion mechanism on (111) face-centered-cubic (fcc) surfaces involving successive shear translations of adjacent subcluster regions giving rise to reptation, a snake-like gliding motion. We show that for compact clusters with <7 atoms, this mechanism competes energetically with that of island diffusion through concerted motion. However, for cluster sizes of between 8 and similar or equal to 20 atoms, reptation becomes energetically favorable, especially for elongated clusters. Reptation is also shown to be an important migration mechanism for fractal (randomly ramified) and dendritic (symmetrically branched) islands. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 3.
    Chirita, Valeriu
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Münger, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sundgren, Jan-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Greene, Joseph E
    University of Illinois, Urbana, USA.
    Enhanced cluster mobilities on Pt(111) during film growth from the vapor phase1998In: Applied Physics Letters, ISSN 0003-6951, E-ISSN 1077-3118, Vol. 72, no 1, p. 127-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to follow the dynamics of small two-dimensional Pt clusters on Pt(111) at 1000 K. While close-packed Pt-7 heptamers are extremely stable structures, the addition of a single cluster vacancy or an on-top adatom immediately results in intracluster bond breaking, reconfigurations, rotations, the introduction of stacking faults, and greatly enhanced cluster diffusion rates. Mapping center-of-mass motion for total simulation times >145 ns revealed increases in cluster velocities by more than an order of magnitude with cluster migration occurring primarily by concerted motion and a novel diffusion mechanism involving double shearing of dimers/trimers. Contrary to some previous reports, edge-atom diffusion plays only a minor role. (C) 1998 American Institute of Physics.

  • 4.
    Edström, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sangiovanni, Davide
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Chirita, Valeriu
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Department of Materials Science and the Fredrick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, USA.
    Greene, Joseph
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Department of Materials Science and the Fredrick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, USA.
    Ti and N adatom descent pathways to the terrace from atop two-dimensional TiN/TiN(001) islands2014In: Thin Solid Films, ISSN 0040-6090, E-ISSN 1879-2731, Vol. 558, p. 37-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We use classical molecular dynamics and the modified embedded atom method to determine residence times and descent pathways of Ti and N adatoms on square, single-atom-high, TiN islands on TiN(001). Simulations are carried out at 1000 K, which is within the optimal range for TiN(001) epitaxial growth. Results show that the frequency of descent events, and overall adatom residence times, depend strongly on both the TiN(001) diffusion barrier for each species as well as the adatom island-edge location immediately prior to descent. Ti adatoms, with a low diffusion barrier, rapidly move toward the island periphery, via funneling, where they diffuse along upper island edges. The primary descent mechanism for Ti adatoms is via push-out/exchange with Ti island-edge atoms, a process in which the adatom replaces an island edge atom by moving down while pushing the edge atom out onto the terrace to occupy an epitaxial position along the island edge. Double push-out events are also observed for Ti adatoms descending at N corner positions. N adatoms, with a considerably higher diffusion barrier on TiN(001), require much longer times to reach island edges and, consequently, have significantly longer residence times. N adatoms are found to descend onto the terrace by direct hopping over island edges and corner atoms, as well as by concerted push-out/exchange with N atoms adjacent to Ti corners. For both adspecies, we also observe several complex adatom/island interactions, before and after descent onto the terrace, including two instances of Ti islandatom ascent onto the island surface.

  • 5.
    Edström, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sangiovanni, Davide
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Department of Materials Science and the Fredrick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, USA.
    Greene, Joseph
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Department of Materials Science and the Fredrick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, USA.
    Chirita, Valeriu
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    The dynamics of TiNx (x = 1 – 3) admolecule interlayer and intralayer transport on TiN/TiN(001) islands2015In: Thin Solid Films, ISSN 0040-6090, E-ISSN 1879-2731, Vol. 589, p. 133-144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has been shown both experimentally and by density functional theory calculations that the primary diffusing species during the epitaxial growth of TiN/TiN(001) are Ti and N adatoms together with TiNx complexes (x = 1, 2, 3), in which the dominant N-containing admolecule species depends upon the incident N/Ti flux ratio. Here, we employ classical molecular dynamics (CMD) simulations to probe the dynamics of TiNx (x = 1–3) admolecules on 8 × 8 atom square, single-atom-high TiN islands on TiN(001), as well as pathways for descent over island edges. The simulations are carried out at 1000 K, a reasonable epitaxial growth temperature. We find that despite their lower mobility on infinite TiN(001) terraces, both TiN and TiN2 admolecules funnel toward descending steps and are incorporated into island edges more rapidly than Ti adatoms. On islands, TiN diffuses primarily via concerted translations, but rotation is the preferred diffusion mechanism on infinite terraces. TiN2 migration is initiated primarily by rotation about one of the N admolecule atoms anchored at an epitaxial site. TiN admolecules descend from islands by direct hopping over edges and by edge exchange reactions, while TiN2 trimers descend exclusively by hopping. In contrast, TiN3 admolecules are essentially stationary and serve as initiators for local island growth. Ti adatoms are the fastest diffusing species on infinite TiN(001) terraces, but on small TiN/TiN(001) islands, TiN dimers provide more efficient mass transport. The overall results reveal the effect of the N/Ti precursor flux ratio on TiN(001) surface morphological evolution and growth modes.

  • 6.
    Edström, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sangiovanni, Davide
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA; University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA.
    Greene, Joseph E
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Illinois, USA.
    Chirita, Valeriu
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of TiN/TiN(001) epitaxial film growth2016In: Journal of Vacuum Science & Technology. A. Vacuum, Surfaces, and Films, ISSN 0734-2101, E-ISSN 1520-8559, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 041509-1-041509-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Large-scale classical molecular dynamics simulations of epitaxial TiN/TiN(001) thin film growth at 1200K are carried out using incident flux ratios N/Ti -1, 2, and 4. The films are analyzed as a function of composition, island size distribution, island edge orientation, and vacancy formation. Results show that N/Ti-1 films are globally understoichiometric with dispersed Ti-rich surface regions which serve as traps to nucleate 111-oriented islands, leading to local epitaxial breakdown. Films grown with N/Ti=2 are approximately stoichiometric and the growth mode is closer to layer-by-layer, while N/Ti-4 films are stoichiometric with N-rich surfaces. As N/Ti is increased from 1 to 4, island edges are increasingly polar, i. e., 110-oriented, and N-terminated to accommodate the excess N flux, some of which is lost by reflection of incident N atoms. N vacancies are produced in the surface layer during film deposition with N/Ti-1 due to the formation and subsequent desorption of N-2 molecules composed of a N adatom and a N surface atom, as well as itinerant Ti adatoms pulling up N surface atoms. The N vacancy concentration is significantly reduced as N/Ti is increased to 2; with N/Ti-4, Ti vacancies dominate. Overall, our results show that an insufficient N/Ti ratio leads to surface roughening via nucleation of small dispersed 111 islands, whereas high N/Ti ratios result in surface roughening due to more rapid upper-layer nucleation and mound formation. The growth mode of N/Ti-2 films, which have smoother surfaces, is closer to layer-by-layer. (C) 2016 American Vacuum Society.

  • 7.
    Eriksson, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tengstrand, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Jensen, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eklund, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Rosén, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA.
    Greene, Joseph E
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Si incorporation in Ti1-xSixN films grown on TiN(001) and (001)-faceted TiN(111) columns2014In: Surface & Coatings Technology, ISSN 0257-8972, E-ISSN 1879-3347, Vol. 257, p. 121-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thin films consisting of TiN nanocrystallites encapsulated in a fully percolated SiNy tissue phase are archetypes for hard and superhard nanocomposites. Here, we investigate metastable SiNy solid solubility in TiN and probe the effects of surface segregation during the growth of TiSiN films onto substrates that are either flat TiN(001)/MgO(001) epitaxial buffer layers or TiN(001) facets of length 1-5 nm terminating epitaxial TiN(111) nanocolumns, separated by voids, deposited on epitaxial TiN(111)/MgO(111) buffer layers. Using reactive magnetron sputter deposition, the TiSiN layers were grown at 550 degrees C and the TiN buffer layers at 900 degrees C On TiN(001), the films are NaCl-structure single-phase metastable Ti1-xSixN(001) with N/(Ti + Si) = 1 and 0 less than= x less than= 0.19. These alloys remain single-crystalline to critical thicknesses h(c) ranging from 100 +/- 30 nm with x = 0.13 to 40 +/- 10 nm with x = 0.19. At thicknesses h greater than h(c), the epitaxial growth front breaks down locally to form V-shaped polycrystalline columns with an underdense feather-like nanostructure. In contrast, the voided epitaxial TiN(111) columnar surfaces, as well as the TiN(001) facets, act as sinks for SiNy. For Ti1-xSixN layers with global average composition values less than x greater than = 0.16, the local x value in the middle of Ti1-xSixN columns increases from 0.08 for columns with radius r similar or equal to 2 nm to x = 0.14 with r similar or equal to 4 nm. The average out-of-plane lattice parameter of epitaxial nanocolumns encapsulated in SiNy decreases monotonically with increasing Si fraction less than x greater than, indicating the formation of metastable (Ti,Si)N solid solutions under growth conditions similar to those of superhard nanocomposites for which the faceted surfaces of nanograins also provide sinks for SiNy.

  • 8.
    Fager, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, J. M.
    Seco Tools AB, SE-737 82 Fagersta, Sweden.
    Mei, A.R.B.
    Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory and Materials Science Department, University of Illinois, USA.
    Howe, B.M.
    Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio, USA.
    Greene, Joseph E
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Growth and Properties of Amorphous Hf1−x−yAlxSiyN (0≤x≤0.2; 0≤y≤0.2) and a-Hf0.6Al0.2Si0.2N/nc-HfN Multilayers by DC Reactive Magnetron Sputtering from a Single Hf0.60Al0.20Si0.20 TargetManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Amorphous (a) and nanocrystalline (nc) Hf1−x−yAlxSiyN and multilayer a-Hf0.6Al0.2Si0.2N/nc-HfN films are grown on Si(001) at temperatures Ts = 100-450 ◦C using ultrahigh vacuum magnetically-unbalanced reactive magnetron sputtering from a single Hf0.60Al0.20Si0.20 target in a 5%-N2/Ar atmosphere at a total pressure of 20 mTorr (2.67 Pa). The composition and nanostructure of Hf1−x−yAlxSiyN is controlled during growth by independently varying the ion energy (Ei) and the ion-to-metal flux ratio (Ji/JMe) incident at the film surface. With Ji/JMe = 8, the composition and nanostructure of the films ranges from x-ray amorphous with 1-x-y = 0.60 at Ei = 15 eV, to an amorphous matrix with encapsulated nanocrystals with 1-x-y = 0.66-0.84 at Ei = 25-35 eV, to nanocrystalline with 1-x-y = 0.96-1.00 at Ei = 45-65 eV. Varying Ji/JMe with Ei = 13 eV yields amorphous alloy films at Ts = 100 ◦C. a-Hf0.6Al0.6Si0.6N/nc-HfN multilayers with periods Λ = 2-20 nm exhibit enhanced fracture toughness compared to polycrystalline VN, TiN, and Ti0.5Al0.5N reference samples; multilayer hardness values increase monotonically from 20 GPa with Λ = 20 nm to 27 GPa with Λ = 2 nm.

  • 9.
    Fager, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Howe, B.M.
    Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio, USA.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Jensen, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Mei, A. R. B.
    Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory and Materials Science Department, University of Illinois, USA.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Greene, J.E.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hf-Al-Si-N multilayers deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering from a single Hf0.6Al0.2Si0.2 target using high-flux, low-energy modulated substrate bias: film growth and properties2014Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Hf1−x−yAlxSiyN (0≤x≤0.14, 0≤y≤0.13) single layers and multilayer films are grown on Si(001) at a substrate temperature Ts=250 °C using ultrahigh vacuum magnetically-unbalanced reactive magnetron sputtering from a single Hf0.6Al0.2Si0.2 target in a 5%-N2/Ar atmosphere at a total pressure of 20 mTorr (2.67 Pa). The composition and nanostructure of Hf1−x−yAlxSiyN is controlled during growth by varying the ion energy (Ei) of the ions incident at the film surface, keeping the ion-to-metal flux ratio (Ji/JMe) constant at 8. By sequentially switching Ei between 10 and 40 eV, Hf0.77Al0.10Si0.13N/Hf0.78Al0.14Si0.08N multilayers with bilayer periods Λ = 2-20 nm are grown, in which the Si2p bonding state changes from predominantly Si-Si bonds for films grown at Ei = 10 eV, to mainly Si-N bonds at Ei = 40 eV. Multilayer hardness values increase monotonically from 20 GPa with Λ = 20 nm to 27 GPa with Λ = 2 nm, while multilayer fracture toughness increases with increasing Λ. Multilayers with Λ = 10 nm have the optimized property combination of being bothrelatively hard, H∼24 GPa, and fracture tough.

  • 10.
    Fager, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Howe, Brandon M.
    US Air Force, OH 45433 USA.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jensen, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mei, A. B.
    University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA; University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Greene, Joseph E
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA; University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA; University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA.
    Novel hard, tough HfAlSiN multilayers, defined by alternating Si bond structure, deposited using modulated high-flux, low-energy ion irradiation of the growing film2015In: Journal of Vacuum Science & Technology. A. Vacuum, Surfaces, and Films, ISSN 0734-2101, E-ISSN 1520-8559, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 05E103-1-05E103-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hf1-x-yAlxSiyN (0 less than= x less than= 0.14, 0 less than= y less than= 0.12) single layer and multilayer films are grown on Si(001) at 250 degrees C using ultrahigh vacuum magnetically unbalanced reactive magnetron sputtering from a single Hf0.6Al0.2Si0.2 target in mixed 5%-N-2/Ar atmospheres at a total pressure of 20 mTorr (2.67 Pa). The composition and nanostructure of Hf1-x-yAlxSiyN films are controlled by varying the energy Ei of the ions incident at the film growth surface while maintaining the ion-to-metal flux ratio constant at eight. Switching E-i between 10 and 40 eV allows the growth of Hf0.78Al0.10Si0.12N/Hf0.78Al0.14Si0.08N multilayers with similar layer compositions, but in which the Si bonding state changes from predominantly Si-Si/Si-Hf for films grown with E-i = 10 eV, to primarily Si-N with E-i = 40 eV. Multilayer hardness values, which vary inversely with bilayer period Lambda, range from 20 GPa with Lambda = 20 nm to 27 GPa with Lambda = 2 nm, while fracture toughness increases directly with Lambda. Multilayers with Lambda = 10nm combine relatively high hardness, H similar to 24GPa, with good fracture toughness. (C) 2015 American Vacuum Society.

  • 11.
    Ghafoor, Naureen
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA; University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA.
    Klenov, Dmitri O.
    FEI Co, Netherlands.
    Freitag, Bert
    FEI Co, Netherlands.
    Jensen, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Greene, Joseph E
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA; University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Odén, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Self-organized anisotropic (Zr1-xSix)N-y nanocomposites grown by reactive sputter deposition2015In: Acta Materialia, ISSN 1359-6454, E-ISSN 1873-2453, Vol. 82, p. 179-189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The physical properties of hard and superhard nanocomposite thin films are strongly dependent on their nanostructure. Here, we present the results of an investigation of nanostructural evolution and the resulting mechanical properties of (Zr1-xSix)N-y films, with 0 less than= x less than= 1 and 1 less than= y less than= 1.27, grown on MgO(0 0 1) and Al2O3(0 0 0 1) substrates at temperatures T-s = 500-900 degrees C by reactive magnetron sputter deposition from Zr and Si targets. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results show that there is a T-s/composition window in which stoichiometric Zr-Si-N and amorphous a-Si3N4 phases mutually segregate and self-organize into encapsulated 3-5 um wide ZrN-rich (Zr1-xSix)N columns which extend along the growth direction with a strong (002) texture. Lattice-resolved scanning TEM and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy reveal that the (Zr1-xSix)N-y nanocolumns are separated by a bilayer tissue phase consisting of a thin crystalline SiNy-rich (Zr1-xSix)N-y layer with an a-Si3N4 overlayer. Incorporation of metastable SiN into NaCl-structure ZrN leads to an enhanced nanoindentation hardness H which is a function of T-s and film composition. For nanocomposites with composition (Zr(0.8)Sio(0.2))N-1.14 (10 at.% Si) H, increases from 26 GPa at 500 degrees C to 37 GPa at 900 degrees C. For comparison, the hardness of epitaxial ZrN/MgO(0 0 1) layers grown at T-s = 800 degrees C is 24 GPa. (C) 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 12.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jensen, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Greene, Joseph E
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses of the electronic structure of polycrystalline Ti1-xAlxN thin films with 0 < x < 0.962014In: Surface Science Spectra, ISSN 1055-5269, E-ISSN 1520-8575, Vol. 21, p. 35-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metastable Ti1-xAlxN (0 <  x <  0.96) alloy thin films are grown by reactive magnetron sputter deposition using a combination of high-power pulsed magnetron (HIPIMS) and dc magnetron sputtering (DCMS). Layers are deposited from elemental Ti and Al targets onto Si(001) substrates at 500 °C. All Ti1 xAlxN film surfaces are analyzed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) employing monochromatic Al Ka radiation (hn = 1486.6 eV). Prior to spectra acquisition, TiAlN surfaces are sputter-cleaned in-situ with 4 keV Ar+ ions incident at an angle of 70° with respect to the surface normal. XPS results reveal satellite structures on the high binding energy side of the Ti2p, Ti3s, and Ti3p core-level signals. The intensities of the primary Ti features (Ti2p, Ti3s, and Ti3p) decrease with increasing AlN concentration such that the satellite peaks dominate spectra from films with x < 0.67. The density-of-states at the Fermi level also decrease with increasing x indicating that the satellite peaks are due to screening of core holes created by the photoionization event. Film compositions, obtained using XPS sensitivity factors, agree to within ±3% with values determined by time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analyses.

  • 13.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kindlund, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Petrov, Ivan
    University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois, USA.
    Greene, Joseph E
    University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sputter-cleaned Epitaxial VxMo(1-x)Ny/MgO(001) Thin Films Analyzed by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy: 2. Single-crystal V0.47Mo0.53N0.922013In: Surface Science Spectra, ISSN 1055-5269, E-ISSN 1520-8575, Vol. 20, p. 74-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Epitaxial Vx Mo (1-x)Ny thin films grown by ultrahigh vacuum reactive magnetron sputter deposition on MgO(001) substrates are analyzed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). This contribution presents analytical results for 300-nm-thick single-crystal V0.47 Mo 0.53N0.92/MgO(001) films deposited by reactive cosputtering from V (99.95% purity) and Mo (99.95% purity) targets. Film growth is carried out in a UHV chamber with base pressure 2 × 10−9 Torr at 700 °C in mixed Ar/N2 atmospheres at a total pressure of 5 mTorr, with a N2 partial pressure of 3.2 mTorr; a bias of −30 V is applied to the substrate. Films composition is determined by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS). XPS measurements employ monochromatic Al K α radiation (hν = 1486.6 eV) to analyze V0.47 Mo 0.53N0.92(001) surfaces sputter-cleaned in-situ with 4 keV Ar+ ions incident at an angle of 70° with respect to the surface normal. XPS results show that the ion-etched sample surfaces have no measurable oxygen or carbon contamination; film composition, obtained using XPS sensitivity factors, is V0.34 Mo 0.66N0.81. All core level peaks, including the nearby Mo 3p3/2 (binding energy of 394.1 eV) and N 1s (at 397.5 eV) peaks, are well-resolved. Comparison to the V0.48 Mo 0.52N0.64 single-crystal film, submitted separately to Surface Science Spectra, indicates that with decreasing growth temperature from 900 to 700 °C (and increasing nitrogen concentration in Vx Mo (1-x)Ny from y = 0.64 to 0.81) the N 1s core level peak shifts towards lower binding energy by 0.1 eV while all metal atom peaks move in the opposite direction by the same amount.

  • 14.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kindlund, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Petrov, Ivan
    University of Illinois, Materials Science Department and Frederick Seitz Materials Research.
    Greene, Joseph E
    University of Illinois, Materials Science Department and Frederick Seitz Materials Research.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sputter-cleaned Epitaxial VxMo(1-x)Ny/MgO(001)Thin Films Analyzed by X-ray PhotoelectronSpectroscopy: 3. Polycrystalline V0.49Mo0.51N1.022013In: Surface Science Spectra, ISSN 1055-5269, E-ISSN 1520-8575, Vol. 20, p. 80-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vx Mo (1-x)Ny thin films grown by ultrahigh vacuum reactive magnetron sputter deposition on MgO(001) substrates are analyzed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). This contribution presents analytical results for 300-nm-thick 002-textured polycrystalline V0.49 Mo 0.51N1.02 films deposited by reactive cosputtering from V (99.95 % purity) and Mo (99.95 % purity) targets. Film growth is carried out at 500 °C in mixed Ar/N2 atmospheres at a total pressure of 5 mTorr, with a N2 partial pressure of 3.2 mTorr; a bias of −30 V is applied to the substrate. Films composition is determined by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS). XPS measurements employ monochromatic Al K α radiation (hν = 1486.6 eV) to analyze V0.49 Mo 0.51N1.02 surface sputter-cleaned in-situ with 4 keV Ar+ ions incident at an angle of 70° with respect to the surface normal. XPS results show that the ion-etched sample surfaces have no measurable oxygen or carbon contamination; film composition, obtained using XPS sensitivity factors, is V0.34 Mo 0.66N1.00. All core level peaks, including the nearby Mo 3p3/2 (binding energy of 394.3 eV) and N 1s (at 397.4 eV) peaks, are well-resolved. Comparison to V0.33 Mo 0.67N0.64 and V0.34 Mo 0.66N0.81 single-crystal film surfaces, submitted separately to Surface Science Spectra, indicates that with decreasing growth temperature from 900 to 700 and 500 °C (and increasing nitrogen concentration in Vx Mo (1-x)Ny from y = 0.64 to 0.81 and 1.00) the N 1s core level peak shifts from 397.6 eV to 397.5 eV to 397.4 eV while metal atom peaks move towards higher binding energy by 0.2-0.4 eV.

  • 15.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kindlund, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Department of Materials Science and the Fredrick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, USA.
    Greene, Joseph
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Department of Materials Science and the Fredrick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, USA.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sputter-cleaned Epitaxial VxMo(1-x)Ny/MgO(001)Thin Films Analyzed by X-ray PhotoelectronSpectroscopy: 1. Single-crystal V0.48Mo0.52N0.642013In: Surface Science Spectra, ISSN 1055-5269, E-ISSN 1520-8575, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 68-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Epitaxial VxMo(1-x)Ny thin films grown by ultrahigh vacuum reactive magnetron sputter deposition on Mg(001) substrates are analyzed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). This contribution presents analytical results for 300-nm-thick single-crystal V0.48Mo0.52N0.64 films deposited by reactive cosputtering from V (99.95 % purity) and Mo (99.95 % purity) targets. Film growth is carried out at 900 °C in mixed Ar/N2 atmospheres at a total pressure of 5 mTorr, with a N2 partial pressure of 3.2 mTorr; a bias of −30 V is applied to the substrate. Films composition is determined by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS). XPS measurements employ monochromatic Al K α radiation (hν = 1486.6 eV) to analyze V0.48Mo0.52N0.64(001) surfaces sputter-cleaned in-situ with 4 keV Ar+ ions incident at an angle of 70° with respect to the surface normal. XPS results show that the ion-etched sample surfaces have no measurable oxygen or carbon contamination; film composition, obtained using XPS sensitivity factors, is V0.33Mo0.67N0.64. All core level peaks, including the nearby Mo 3p3/2 (binding energy of 394.0 eV) and N 1s (at 397.6 eV) peaks, are well-resolved.

  • 16.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Bolz, Stephan
    CemeCon AG, Wűrselen, Germany.
    Koelker, Werner
    CemeCon AG, Wűrselen, Germany.
    Schiffers, Christoph
    CemeCon AG, Wűrselen, Germany.
    Lemmer, Oliver
    CemeCon AG, Wűrselen, Germany.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. University of Illinois, Urbana, USA .
    Greene, Joseph E
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. University of Illinois, Urbana, USA .
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Novel strategy for low-temperature, high-rate growth of dense, hard, and stress-free refractory ceramic thin films2014In: Journal of Vacuum Science & Technology. A. Vacuum, Surfaces, and Films, ISSN 0734-2101, E-ISSN 1520-8559, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 041515-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Growth of fully dense refractory thin films by means of physical vapor deposition (PVD) requires elevated temperatures T-s to ensure sufficient adatom mobilities. Films grown with no external heating are underdense, as demonstrated by the open voids visible in cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy images and by x-ray reflectivity results; thus, the layers exhibit low nanoindentation hardness and elastic modulus values. Ion bombardment of the growing film surface is often used to enhance densification; however, the required ion energies typically extract a steep price in the form of residual rare-gas-ion-induced compressive stress. Here, the authors propose a PVD strategy for the growth of dense, hard, and stress-free refractory thin films at low temperatures; that is, with no external heating. The authors use TiN as a model ceramic materials system and employ hybrid high-power pulsed and dc magnetron co-sputtering (HIPIMS and DCMS) in Ar/N-2 mixtures to grow dilute Ti1-xTaxN alloys on Si(001) substrates. The Ta target driven by HIPIMS serves as a pulsed source of energetic Ta+/Ta2+ metal-ions, characterized by in-situ mass and energy spectroscopy, while the Ti target operates in DCMS mode (Ta-HIPIMS/Ti-DCMS) providing a continuous flux of metal atoms to sustain a high deposition rate. Substrate bias V-s is applied in synchronous with the Ta-ion portion of each HIPIMS pulse in order to provide film densification by heavy-ion irradiation (m(Ta) = 180.95 amu versus m(Ti) = 47.88 amu) while minimizing Ar+ bombardment and subsequent trapping in interstitial sites. Since Ta is a film constituent, primarily residing on cation sublattice sites, film stress remains low. Dense Ti0.92Ta0.08N alloy films, 1.8 mu m thick, grown with T-s less than= 120 degrees C (due to plasma heating) and synchronized bias, V-s = 160 V, exhibit nanoindentation hardness H = 25.9 GPa and elastic modulus E = 497 GPa compared to 13.8 and 318 GPa for underdense Ti-HIPIMS/Ti-DCMS TiN reference layers (T-s less than 120 degrees C) grown with the same V-s, and 7.8 and 248 GPa for DCMS TiN films grown with no applied bias (T-s less than 120 degrees C). Ti0.92Ta0.08N residual stress is low, sigma = -0.7 GPa, and essentially equal to that of Ti-HIPIMS/Ti-DCMS TiN films grown with the same substrate bias.

  • 17.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Jensen, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Bolz, S.
    CemeCon AG, Germany.
    Koelker, W.
    CemeCon AG, Germany.
    Schiffers, Ch.
    CemeCon AG, Germany.
    Lemmer, O.
    CemeCon AG, Germany.
    Greene, Joseph E
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA; University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A review of metal-ion-flux-controlled growth of metastable TiAlN by HIPIMS/DCMS co-sputtering2014In: Surface & Coatings Technology, ISSN 0257-8972, E-ISSN 1879-3347, Vol. 257, p. 15-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We review results on the growth of metastable Ti1-xAlxN alloy films by hybrid high-power pulsed and dc magnetron co-sputtering (HIPIMS/DCMS) using the time domain to apply substrate bias either in synchronous with the entire HIPIMS pulse or just the metal-rich portion of the pulse in mixed Ar/N-2 discharges. Depending upon which elemental target, Ti or Al, is powered by HIPIMS, distinctly different film-growth kinetic pathways are observed due to charge and mass differences in the metal-ion fluxes incident at the growth surface. Al+ ion irradiation during Al-HIPIMS/Ti-DCMS at 500 degrees C, with a negative substrate bias V-s = 60 V synchronized to the HIPIMS pulse (thus suppressing Ar+ ion irradiation due to DCMS), leads to single-phase NaCl-structure Ti1-xAlxN films (x less than= 0.60) with high hardness (greater than30 GPa with x greater than 0.55) and low stress (0.2-0.8 GPa compressive). Ar+ ion bombardment can be further suppressed in favor of predominantly Al+ ion irradiation by synchronizing the substrate bias to only the metal-ion-rich portion of the Al-HIPIMS pulse. In distinct contrast Ti-HIPIMS/Al-DCMSTi1-xAlxN layers grown with Ti+/Ti2+ metal ion irradiation and the same HIPIMS-synchronized V-s value, are two-phase mixtures, NaCl-structure Ti1-xAlxN plus wurtzite AlN, exhibiting low hardness (similar or equal to 18 GPa) with high compressive stresses, up to -3.5 GPa. In both cases, film properties are controlled by the average metal-ion momentum per deposited atom less thanp(d)greater than transferred to the film surface. During Ti-HIPIMS, the growing film is subjected to an intense flux of doubly-ionized Ti2+, while Al2+ irradiation is insignificant during Al-HIPIMS. This asymmetry is decisive since the critical less thanp(d)greater than limit for precipitation of w-AlN, 135 [eV-amu](1/2), is easily exceeded during Ti-HIPIMS, even with no intentional bias. The high Ti2+ ion flux is primarily due to the second ionization potential (IP2) of Ti being lower than the first IP (IP1) of Ar. New results involving the HIPIMS growth of metastable Ti1-xAlxN alloy films from segmented TiAl targets are consistent with the above conclusions.

  • 18.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Jensen, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Greene, Joseph E
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Bolz, S.
    CemeCon AG, Germany .
    Koelker, W.
    CemeCon AG, Germany .
    Schiffers, Ch.
    CemeCon AG, Germany .
    Lemmer, O.
    CemeCon AG, Germany .
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Strain-free, single-phase metastable Ti0.38Al0.62N alloys with high hardness: metal-ion energy vs. momentum effects during film growth by hybrid high-power pulsed/dc magnetron cosputtering2014In: Thin Solid Films, ISSN 0040-6090, E-ISSN 1879-2731, Vol. 556, p. 87-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A hybrid deposition process consisting of reactive high-power pulsed and dc magnetron cosputtering (HIPIMS and DCMS) from Ti and Al targets is used to grow Ti1-xAlxN alloys, with x similar to 0.6, on Si(001) at 500 degrees C. Two series of films are deposited in which the energy and momentum of metal ions incident at the growing film are individually varied. In both sets of experiments, a negative bias V-s ranging from 20 to 280 V is applied to the substrate in synchronous, as determined by in-situ mass spectrometry, with the metal-ion-rich part of the HIPIMS pulse. Ion momentum is varied by switching the HIPIMS and dc power supplies to change the mass m and average charge of the primary metal ion. Al-HIPIMS/Ti-DCMS layers grown under Al+ (m(Al) = 26.98 amu) bombardment with 20 less than= V-s less than= 160 V are single-phase NaCl-structure alloys, while films deposited with V-s greater than 160 V are two-phase, cubic plus wurtzite. The corresponding critical average metal-ion momentum transfer per deposited atom for phase separation is less than p(d)*greater than greater than= 135 [eV-amu](1/2). In distinct contrast, layers deposited in the Ti-HIPIMS/Al-DCMS configuration with Ti+/Ti2+ (m(Ti) = 47.88 amu) ion irradiation are two-phase even with the lowest bias, V-s = 20 V, for which less than p(d)*greater than greater than 135 [eV-amu](1/2). Precipitation of wurtzite-structure AlN is primarily determined by the average metal-ion momentum transfer to the growing film, rather than by the deposited metal-ion energy. Ti-HIPIMS/Al-DCMS layers grown with V-s= 20 V are two-phase with compressive stress sigma= -2 GPa which increases to -6.2 GPa at V-s= 120 V; hardness H values range from 17.5 to 27 GPa and are directly correlated with sigma. However, for Al-HIPIMS/Ti-DCMS, the relatively low mass and single charge of the Al+ ion permits tuning properties of metastable cubic Ti0.38Al0.62 N by adjusting V-s to vary, for example, the hardness from 12 to 31 GPa while maintaining sigma similar to 0.

  • 19.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Jensen, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Greene, Joseph E.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Bolz, Stephan
    CemeCon AG, Germany .
    Koelker, Werner
    CemeCon AG, Germany .
    Schiffers, Christoph
    CemeCon AG, Germany .
    Lemmer, Oliver
    CemeCon AG, Germany .
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Metal versus rare-gas ion irradiation during Ti1-xAlxN film growth by hybrid high power pulsed magnetron/dc magnetron co-sputtering using synchronized pulsed substrate bias2012In: Journal of Vacuum Science & Technology. A. Vacuum, Surfaces, and Films, ISSN 0734-2101, E-ISSN 1520-8559, Vol. 30, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metastable NaCl-structure Ti1-xAlxN is employed as a model system to probe the effects of metal versus rare-gas ion irradiation during film growth using reactive high-power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) of Al and dc magnetron sputtering of Ti. The alloy film composition is chosen to be x = 0.61, near the kinetic solubility limit at the growth temperature of 500 degrees C. Three sets of experiments are carried out: a -60V substrate bias is applied either continuously, in synchronous with the full HIPIMS pulse, or in synchronous only with the metal-rich-plasma portion of the HIPIMS pulse. Alloy films grown under continuous dc bias exhibit a thickness-invariant small-grain, two-phase nanostructure (wurtzite AlN and cubic Ti1-xAlxN) with random orientation, due primarily to intense Ar+ irradiation leading to Ar incorporation (0.2 at. %), high compressive stress (-4.6 GPa), and material loss by resputtering. Synchronizing the bias with the full HIPIMS pulse results in films that exhibit much lower stress levels (-1.8GPa) with no measureable Ar incorporation, larger grains elongated in the growth direction, a very small volume fraction of wurtzite AlN, and random orientation. By synchronizing the bias with the metal-plasma phase of the HIPIMS pulses, energetic Ar+ ion bombardment is greatly reduced in favor of irradiation predominantly by Al+ ions. The resulting films are single phase with a dense competitive columnar structure, strong 111 orientation, no measureable trapped Ar concentration, and even lower stress (-0.9 GPa). Thus, switching from Ar+ to Al+ bombardment, while maintaining the same integrated incident ion/metal ratio, eliminates phase separation, minimizes renucleation during growth, and reduces the high concentration of residual point defects, which give rise to compressive stress.

  • 20.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Johansson, M
    Seco Tools AB.
    Jensen, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Greene, Joseph E
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Selection of metal ion irradiation for controlling Ti1-xAlxN alloy growth via hybrid HIPIMS/magnetron co-sputtering2012In: Vacuum, ISSN 0042-207X, E-ISSN 1879-2715, Vol. 86, no 8, p. 1036-1040Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We demonstrate, for the first time, the growth of metastable single-phase NaCl-structure high-AlN-content Ti1-xAlxN alloys (x andlt;= 0.64) which simultaneously possess high hardness and low residual stress. The films are grown using a hybrid approach combining high-power pulsed magnetron (HPPMS/HIPIMS) and dc magnetron sputtering of opposing metal targets. With HIPIMS applied to the Al target, Aln+ ion irradiation (dominated by Aln+) of the growing film results in alloys 0.55 andlt;= x andlt;= 0.60 which exhibit hardness H similar to 30 GPa and low stress sigma = 0.2-0.7 GPa, tensile. In sharp contrast, films with corresponding AlN concentrations grown with HIPIMS applied to the Ti target, giving rise to Tin+ ion irradiation (with a significant Ti2+ component), are two-phase - cubic (Ti,Al)N and hexagonal AlN - with low hardness, H = 18-19 GPa, and high compressive stress ranging up to 2.7 GPa. Annealing alloys grown with HIPIMS applied to the Al target results in age hardening due to spinodal decomposition; the hardness of Ti0.41Al0.59N increases from 30 to 33 GPa following a 900 degrees C anneal.

  • 21.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Johansson, M.P.
    Sweden Seco Tools AB, Sweden .
    Jensen, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Greene, Joseph E
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Role of Tin+ and Aln+ ion irradiation (n=1, 2) during Ti1-xAlxN alloy film growth in a hybrid HIPIMS/magnetron mode2012In: Surface & Coatings Technology, ISSN 0257-8972, E-ISSN 1879-3347, Vol. 206, no 19-20, p. 4202-4211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metastable Ti1-xAlxN (0.4 less than= x less than= 0.76) films are grown using a hybrid approach in which high-power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) is combined with dc magnetron sputtering (DCMS). Elemental Al and Ti metal targets are co-sputtered with one operated in HIPIMS mode and the other target in DCMS; the positions of the targets are then switched for the next set of experiments. In both cases, the AlN concentration in the co-sputtered films, deposited at T-s = 500 degrees C with R = 1.5-5.3 angstrom/s, is controlled by adjusting the average DCMS target power. Resulting films are analyzed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, elastic recoil detection analysis, and nanoindentation. Mass spectroscopy is used to determine ion energy distribution functions at the substrate. The distinctly different flux distributions obtained from targets driven in HIPIMS vs. DCMS modes allow the effects of Aln+ and Tin+ (n = 1, 2) ion irradiation on film growth kinetics, and resulting properties, to be investigated separately. Bombardment with Aln+ ions (primarily Al+ in the Al-HIPIMS/Ti-DCMS configuration) during film growth leads to NaCl-structure Ti1-xAlxN (0.53 less than= x less than= 0.60) films which exhibit high hardness (greater than30 GPa) with low stress (0.2-0.7 GPa tensile). In contrast, films with corresponding AlN concentrations grown under Tin+ metal ion irradiation (with a significant Ti2+ component) in the Ti-HIPIMS/Al-DCMS mode have much lower hardness, 18-19 GPa, and high compressive stress ranging up to 2.7 GPa. The surprisingly large variation in mechanical properties results from the fact that the kinetic AlN solubility limit x(max) in Ti1-xAlxN depends strongly on, in addition to T-s and R, the target power configuration during growth and hence the composition of the ion flux. AlN with x(max)similar to 64 mol% can be accommodated in the NaCl structure under Aln+ ion flux, compared with similar to 40 mol% for growth with Tin+ flux. The strong asymmetry in film growth reaction paths is due primarily to the fact that the doubly-ionized metal ion flux is approximately two orders of magnitude higher from the Ti target, than from Al, powered with HIPIMS. This asymmetry becomes decisive upon application of a moderate substrate bias voltage, -60 V, applied synchronously with HIPIMS pulses, during growth.

  • 22.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tengstrand, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Materials Science and Physics Departments, Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of of Illinois, Urbana, IL, United States.
    Greene, Joseph E.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Materials Science and Physics Departments, Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of of Illinois, Urbana, IL, United States.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nitrogen-doped bcc-Cr films: Combining ceramic hardness with metallic toughness and conductivity2016In: Scripta Materialia, ISSN 1359-6462, E-ISSN 1872-8456, Vol. 122, p. 40-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report the first results on nanostructured N-doped bcc-Cr films exhibiting the unique combination of ceramic hardness with metallic toughness and electrical conductivity at unexpectedly low N concentrations, ~ 5 at.%. The Cr:N films are deposited at 200 C in N2/Ar mixtures by high-power pulsed magnetron sputtering using tunable time-domain control of Cr+ and Cr2+ ion fluxes incident at the film growth surface. Subplanted N atoms impede annealing of metal-ion induced point defects and hinder bcc-Cr grain growth, resulting in a material with a nearly isotropic nanostructure and atomically smooth surface, rather than typical Cr:N solid solutions consisting of faceted microcolumns. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd.

  • 23.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Patscheider, J.
    Empa, Switzerland.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Alling, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Max Planck Institute Eisenforsch GmbH, Germany.
    Ektarawong, Annop
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jensen, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA; University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA; University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA.
    Greene, Joseph E
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA; University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA; University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Control of Ti1-xSixN nanostructure via tunable metal-ion momentum transfer during HIPIMS/DCMS co-deposition2015In: Surface & Coatings Technology, ISSN 0257-8972, E-ISSN 1879-3347, Vol. 280, p. 174-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ti1-xSixN (0 less than= x less than= 0.26) thin films are grown in mixed Ar/N-2 discharges using hybrid high-power pulsed and dc magnetron co-sputtering (HIPIMS/DCMS). In the first set of experiments, the Si target is powered in HIPIMS mode and the Ti target in DCMS; the positions of the targets are then switched for the second set. In both cases, the Si concentration in co-sputtered films, deposited at T-s = 500 degrees C, is controlled by adjusting the average DCMS target power. A pulsed substrate bias of -60 V is applied in synchronous with the HIPIMS pulse. Depending on the type of pulsed metal-ion irradiation incident at the growing film, Ti+/Ti2+ vs. Si+/Si2+, completely different nanostructures are obtained. Ti+/Ti2+ irradiation during Ti-HIPIMS/Si-DCMS deposition leads to a phase-segregated nanocolumnar structure with TiN-rich grains encapsulated in a SiNz tissue phase, while Si+/Si2+ ion irradiation in the Si-HIPIMS/Ti-DCMS mode results in the formation of Ti1-xSixN solid solutions with x less than= 024. Film properties, including hardness, modulus of elasticity, and residual stress exhibit a dramatic dependence on the choice of target powered by HIPIMS. Ti-HIPIMS/Si-DCMS TiSiN nanocomposite films are superhard over a composition range of 0.04 less than= x less than= 0.26, which is significantly wider than previously reported. The hardness H of films with 0.13 less than= x less than= 0.26 is similar to 42 GPa; however, the compressive stress is also high, ranging from -6.7 to -8.5 GPa. Si-HIPIMS/Ti-DCMS films are softer at H similar to 14 GPa with 0.03 less than= x less than= 0.24, and essentially stress-free (sigma similar to 0.5 GPa). Mass spectroscopy analyses at the substrate position reveal that the doubly-to-singly ionized metal-ion flux ratio during HIPIMS pulses is 0.05 for Si and 029 for Ti due to the difference between the second ionization potentials of Si and Ti vs. the first ionization potential of the sputtering gas. The average momentum transfer to the film growth surface per deposited atom per pulse less than p(d)greater than is similar to 20 x higher during Ti-HIPIMS/Si-DCMS, which results in significantly higher adatom mean-free paths (mfps) leading, in turn, to a phase-segregated nanocolumnar structure. In contrast, relatively low less than p(d)greater than values during Si-HIPIMS/Ti-DCMS provide near-surface mixing with lower adatom mfps to form Ti1-xSixN solid solutions over a very wide composition range with x up to 0.24. Relaxed lattice constants decrease linearly, in agreement with ab-initio calculations for random Ti1-xSixN alloys, with increasing x. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 24.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Greene, Joseph E
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Al capping layers for non-destructive x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses of transition-metal nitride thin films2015In: Journal of Vacuum Science & Technology. A. Vacuum, Surfaces, and Films, ISSN 0734-2101, E-ISSN 1520-8559, Vol. 33, p. 05E101-1-05E101-9, article id 05E101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) compositional analyses of materials that have been air exposed typically require ion etching in order to remove contaminated surface layers. However, the etching step can lead to changes in sample surface and near-surface compositions due to preferential elemental sputter ejection and forward recoil implantation; this is a particular problem for metal/gas compounds and alloys such as nitrides and oxides. Here, we use TiN as a model system and compare XPS analysis results from three sets of polycrystalline TiN/Si(001) films deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering in a separate vacuum chamber. The films are either (a) air-exposed for ? 10 min prior to insertion into the ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) XPS system; (b) air-exposed and subject to ion etching, using different ion energies and beam incidence angles, in the XPS chamber prior to analysis; or (c) Al-capped in-situ in the deposition system prior to air-exposure and loading into the XPS instrument.We show that thin, 1.5-6.0 nm, Al capping layers provide effective barriers to oxidation and contamination of TiN surfaces, thus allowing non-destructive acquisition of high-resolution core-level spectra representative of clean samples, and, hence, correct bonding assignments. The Ti 2p and N 1s satellite features, which are sensitive to ion bombardment, exhibit high intensities comparable to those obtained from single-crystal TiN/MgO(001) films grown and analyzed in-situ in a UHV XPS system and there is no indication of Al/TiN interfacial reactions. XPS-determined N/Ti concentrations acquired from Al/TiN samples agree very well with Rutherford backscattering and elastic recoil analysis results while ion-etched air-exposed samples exhibit strong N loss due to preferential resputtering. The intensities and shapes of the Ti 2p and N 1s core level signals from Al/TiN/Si(001) samples do not change following long-term (up to 70 days) exposure to ambient conditions indicating that the thin Al capping layers provide stable surface passivation without spallation.

  • 25.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Materials Science Department and Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, USA.
    Greene, Joseph E
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Materials Science Department and Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, USA; Department of Physics, University of Illinois, Urbana, USA.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Strategy for tuning the average charge state of metal ions incident at the growing film during HIPIMS deposition2015In: Vacuum, ISSN 0042-207X, E-ISSN 1879-2715, Vol. 116, p. 36-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Energy and time-dependent mass spectrometry is used to determine the relative number density of singly- and multiply-charged metal-ion fluxes incident at the substrate during high-power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) as a function of the average noble-gas ionization potential. Ti is selected as the sputtering target since the microstructure, phase composition, properties, and stress-state of Ti-based ceramic thin films grown by HIPIMS are known to be strongly dependent on the charge state of Tin+ (n = 1, 2, …) ions incident at the film growth surface. We find that the flux of Tin+ with n > 2 is insignificant; thus, we measure the Ti2+/Ti+ integrated flux ratio JTi2+ =JTi+ at the substrate position as a function of the choice of noble gase Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, as well as Ne/Ar, Kr/Ar, and Xe/Ar mixtures – supporting the plasma. We demonstrate that by changing noble-gas mixtures, JTi2+ varies by more than two orders of magnitude with only a small change in JTi+ . This allows the ratio JTi2+ =JTi+ to be continuously tuned from less than 0.01 with Xe, which has a low first-ionization potential IP1, to 0.62 with Ne which has a high IP1. The value for Xe, IP1Xe= 12.16 eV, is larger than the first ionization potential of Ti, IP1Ti= 6.85 eV, but less than the second Ti ionization potential, IP2Ti= 13.62 eV. For Ne, however, IP1Ne= 21.63 eV is greater than both IP1Ti and IP2Ti. Therefore, the high-energy tail of the plasma-electron energy distribution can be systematically adjusted, allowing JTi2+/JTi+ to be controllably varied over a very wide range.

  • 26.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zhirkov, Igor
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA; University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA.
    Greene, Joseph E
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA; University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA; University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA.
    Rosén, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gas rarefaction effects during high power pulsed magnetron sputtering of groups IVb and VIb transition metals in Ar2017In: Journal of Vacuum Science & Technology. A. Vacuum, Surfaces, and Films, ISSN 0734-2101, E-ISSN 1520-8559, Vol. 35, no 6, article id 060601Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors use energy- and time-dependent mass spectrometry to analyze the evolution of metal- and gas-ion fluxes incident at the substrate during high-power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) of groups IVb and VIb transition-metal (TM) targets in Ar. For all TMs, the time-and energy-integrated metal/gas-ion ratio at the substrate plane NMe+/NAr+ increases with increasing peak target current density J(T,peak) due to rarefaction. In addition, NMe+/NAr+ exhibits a strong dependence on metal/gas-atom mass ratio m(Me)/m(g) and varies from similar to 1 for Ti (m(Ti)/m(Ar) = 1.20) to similar to 100 for W (m(W)/m(Ar) = 4.60), with J(T,peak) maintained constant at 1 A/cm(2). Time-resolved ion-energy distribution functions confirm that the degree of rarefaction scales with m(Me)/m(g): for heavier TMs, the original sputtered-atom Sigmund-Thompson energy distributions are preserved long after the HiPIMS pulse, which is in distinct contrast to lighter metals for which the energy distributions collapse into a narrow thermalized peak. Hence, precise timing of synchronous substrate-bias pulses, applied in order to reduce film stress while increasing densification, is critical for metal/gas combinations with m(Me)/m(g) near unity, while with m(Me)/m(g) amp;gt;amp;gt; 1, the width of the synchronous bias pulse is essentially controlled by the metal-ion time of flight. The good agreement between results obtained in an industrial system employing 440 cm(2) cathodes and a laboratory-scale system with a 20 cm(2) target is indicative of the fundamental nature of the phenomena. 

  • 27.
    Greene, Joseph E
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. University of Illinois, USA; National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei,Taiwan.
    Organic thin films: From monolayers on liquids to multilayers on solids2014In: Physics today, ISSN 0031-9228, E-ISSN 1945-0699, Vol. 67, no 6, p. 43-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What began as curious ritual in the ancient world led to studies of surface tension, interface properties, phase transitions, and, eventually, sophisticated deposition techniques and a wealth of devices.

  • 28.
    Greene, Joseph E
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA; National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taiwan.
    Tracing the 4000 year history of organic thin films: From monolayers on liquids to multilayers on solids2015In: APPLIED PHYSICS REVIEWS, ISSN 1931-9401, Vol. 2, no 1, article id 011101Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recorded history of organic monolayer and multilayer thin films spans approximately 4000 years. Fatty-acid-based monolayers were deposited on water by the ancients for applications ranging from fortune telling in King Hammurabis time (similar to 1800 BC, Mesopotamia) to stilling choppy waters for sailors and divers as reported by the Roman philosopher Pliny the Elder in similar to 78 AD, and then much later (1774) by the peripatetic American statesman and natural philosopher Benjamin Franklin, to Japanese "floating-ink" art (suminagashi) developed similar to 1000 years ago. The modern science of organic monolayers began in the late-1800s/early-1900s with experiments by Lord Rayleigh and the important development by Agnes Pockels, followed two decades later by Irving Langmuir, of the tools and technology to measure the surface tension of liquids, the surface pressure of organic monolayers deposited on water, interfacial properties, molecular conformation of the organic layers, and phase transitions which occur upon compressing the monolayers. In 1935, Katherine Blodgett published a landmark paper showing that multilayers can be synthesized on solid substrates, with controlled thickness and composition, using an apparatus now known as the Langmuir-Blodgett (L-B) trough. A disadvantage of LB films for some applications is that they form weak physisorbed bonds to the substrate. In 1946, Bigelow, Pickett, and Zisman demonstrated, in another seminal paper, the growth of organic self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) via spontaneous adsorption from solution, rather than from the water/air interface, onto SiO2 and metal substrates. SAMs are close-packed two-dimensional organic crystals which exhibit strong covalent bonding to the substrate. The first multicomponent adsorbed monolayers and multilayer SAMs were produced in the early 1980s. Langmuir monolayers, L-B multilayers, and self-assembled mono- and multilayers have found an extraordinarily broad range of applications including controlled wetting, adhesion, electrochemistry, biocompatibility, molecular recognition, biosensing, cell biology, non-linear optics, molecular electronics, solar cells, read/write/erase memory, and magnetism. (C) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC.

  • 29.
    Greene, Joseph E
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA; National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taiwan.
    Tracing the 5000-year recorded history of inorganic thin films from similar to 3000 BC to the early 1900s AD2014In: APPLIED PHYSICS REVIEWS, ISSN 1931-9401, Vol. 1, no 4, p. 041302-Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gold is very likely the first metal discovered by man, more than 11 000 years ago. However, unlike copper (similar to 9000 BC), bronze (similar to 3500 BC), and wrought iron (similar to 2500-3000 BC), gold is too soft for fabrication of tools and weapons. Instead, it was used for decoration, religious artifacts, and commerce. The earliest documented inorganic thin films were gold layers, some less than 3000 angstrom thick, produced chemi-mechanically by Egyptians approximately 5000 years ago. Examples, gilded on statues and artifacts (requiring interfacial adhesion layers), were found in early stone pyramids dating to similar to 2650 BC in Saqqara, Egypt. Spectacular samples of embossed Au sheets date to at least 2600 BC. The Moche Indians of northern Peru developed electroless gold plating (an auto-catalytic reaction) in similar to 100 BC and applied it to intricate Cu masks. The earliest published electroplating experiments were similar to 1800 AD, immediately following the invention of the dc electrochemical battery by Volta. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of metal films was reported in 1649, atmospheric arc deposition of oxides (Priestley) in the mid-1760s, and atmospheric plasmas (Siemens) in 1857. Sols were produced in the mid-1850s (Faraday) and sol-gel films synthesized in 1885. Vapor phase film growth including sputter deposition (Grove, 1852), vacuum arc deposition ("deflagration," Faraday, 1857), plasma-enhanced CVD (Barthelot, 1869) and evaporation (Stefan, Hertz, and Knudsen, 1873-1915) all had to wait for the invention of vacuum pumps whose history ranges from similar to 1650 for mechanical pumps, through similar to 1865 for mercury pumps that produce ballistic pressures in small systems. The development of crystallography, beginning with Plato in 360 BC, Kepler in 1611, and leading to Miller indices (1839) for describing orientation and epitaxial relationships in modern thin film technology, was already well advanced by the 1780s (Hauy). The starting point for the development of heterogeneous thin film nucleation theory was provided by Young in 1805. While an historical timeline tracing the progress of thin film technology is interesting of itself, the stories behind these developments are even more fascinating and provide insight into the evolution of scientific reasoning. (C) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.

  • 30.
    Kindlund, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Broitman, Esteban
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Martínez-de-Olcoz, L.
    Grupo de Capas Finas e Ingeniería de Superficies, Facultad de Física. Universidad de Barcelona. Dep. Física Aplicada y Óptica, Barcelona, Spain.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Jensen, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Department of Materials Science and the Fredrick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, USA.
    Greene, Joseph
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Department of Materials Science and the Fredrick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, USA.
    Birch, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    V0.5Mo0.5Nx/MgO(001) layers grown at 100-900 °C: composition, nanostructure, and mechanical properties2014Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    V0.5Mo0.5Nx/MgO(001) alloys with the B1-NaCl structure are grown by ultra-highvacuum reactive magnetron sputter deposition in 5 mTorr mixed Ar/N2 atmospheres at temperatures Ts which are varied from 100 and 900 °C. Alloy films grown at Ts ≤ 500 °C are polycrystalline with a strong 002 texture; layers grown at Ts ≤ 700 °C are epitaxial single-crystals. The N/Me ratio x ranges from 0.64±0.05 with Ts = 900 °C to 0.94±0.05 at 700 °C to 1.02±0.05 with Ts = 500 to 100 °C. The N loss at higher growth temperatures leads to a corresponding decrease in the relaxed lattice parameter ao from 4.212 Å with x = 1.02 to 4.175 Å with x = 0.94 to 4.121 Å with x = 0.64. V0.5Mo0.5Nx nanoindentation hardnesses H and elastic moduli E increase with increasing Ts from 17±3 GPa and 274±31 GPa at 100 °C to 26±1 GPa and 303±10 GPa at 900 °C. Films deposited at higher Ts also exhibit enhanced wear resistance. Scanning electron micrographs of nanoindents performed in single-crystal V0.5Mo0.5Nx films and films deposited at 100 and 300 °C reveal no evidence of cracking; instead they exhibit material pile-up around the indents characteristic of plastic flow in ductile materials. Valence band x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses show an enhanced volume density of the shear sensitive d-t2g – d-t2g metallic states in V0.5Mo0.5Nx compared to VN and the density of these orbitals increases with increasing deposition temperature, i.e., the metallic  states become more populated with the introduction of N vacancies.

  • 31.
    Kindlund, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Broitman, Esteban
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Martínez-de-Olcoz, L.
    Grupo de Capas Finas e Ingeniería de Superficies, Facultad de Física. Universidad de Barcelona. Dep. Física Aplicada y Óptica, Barcelona, Spain.
    Jensen, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Department of Materials Science and the Fredrick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, USA.
    Greene, Joseph
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Department of Materials Science and the Fredrick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, USA.
    Birch, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Microstructure and mechanical properties of: V0.5Mo0.5Nx(111)/Al2O3(0001) thin films2014Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We report results of growth, microstructure, and mechanical properties of V0.5Mo0.5Nx thin films deposited on Al2O3(0001) substrates by reactive magnetron sputtering. Sputtering is carried out in 5 mTorr Ar/N2 atmospheres and the growth temperatures Ts are varied between 100 and 900 °C. We find that the V0.5Mo0.5Nx/Al2O3(0001) alloy films are 111-oriented NaCl-structure. In-plane and out-of plane lattice parameters are found to decrease with increasing Ts and indicate that all alloy films are strained. V0.5Mo0.5Nx hardnesses and reduced elastic moduli increase with increasing Ts, and vary between 15-23 GPa, and 220-318 GPa, respectively. The wear resistance of the alloy films is also found to increase with increasing Ts. In addition, scanning electron micrographs of indents performed on V0.5Mo0.5Nx films show material pile-up around the indent edges and no evidence of crack arising from nanoindentation experiments. Coefficients of friction acquired at normal forces of 1000 μN are found to be of the order of 0.09.

  • 32.
    Kindlund, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Jensen, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Greene, Joseph E.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Epitaxial V0.6W0.4N/MgO(001): Evidence for ordering on the cation sublattice2013In: Journal of Vacuum Science & Technology. A. Vacuum, Surfaces, and Films, ISSN 0734-2101, E-ISSN 1520-8559, Vol. 31, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    V0.6W0.4N alloys are grown on MgO(001) by ultrahigh vacuum reactive magnetron sputtering from V and W targets in 10 mTorr pure-N-2 atmospheres at temperatures T-s ranging from 600 to 900 degrees C. Based on x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy results, all films have the B1-NaCl crystal structure and grow with a cube-on-cube epitaxial relationship to the substrate, (001)(VWN)parallel to(001)(MgO) and [100](VWN parallel to)[100](MgO). Rutherford backscattering spectrometry analyses show that the N content in V0.6W0.4Nx alloys decreases with increasing T-s from overstoichiometric with x = 1.13 at 600 degrees C, to approximately stoichiometric with x = 1.08 at 700 degrees C, to understoichiometric at 800 degrees C (x = 0.80) and 900 degrees C (x = 0.75). High-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy, Z-contrast, and selected-area electron diffraction investigations of V0.6W0.4N(001) alloys grown at 600 and 700 degrees C reveal the onset of W ordering on adjacent 111 planes of the metal sublattice; no ordering is observed for understoichiometric films grown at higher temperatures.

  • 33.
    Kindlund, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sangiovanni, Davide
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Jensen, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Chirita, Valeriu
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Department of Materials Science and the Fredrick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, USA.
    Greene, Joseph
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Department of Materials Science and the Fredrick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, USA.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Effect of WN content on toughness enhancement in V1–xWxN/MgO(001) thin films2014In: Journal of Vacuum Science & Technology. A. Vacuum, Surfaces, and Films, ISSN 0734-2101, E-ISSN 1520-8559, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 030603-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors report the growth and mechanical properties of epitaxial B1 NaCl-structure V1-xWxN/MgO(001) thin films with 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.60. The Gibbs free energy of mixing, calculated using density functional theory (DFT), reveals that cubic V1-xWxN solid solutions with 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.7 are stable against spinodal decomposition and separation into the equilibrium cubic-VN and hexagonal-WN binary phases. The authors show experimentally that alloying VN with WN leads to a monotonic increase in relaxed lattice parameters, enhanced nanoindentation hardnesses, and reduced elastic moduli. Calculated V1-xWxN lattice parameters and elastic moduli  (obtained from calculated C11, C12, and C44 elastic constants) are in good agreement with experimental results. The observed increase in alloy hardness, with a corresponding decrease in the elastic modulus at higher x values, combined with DFT-calculated decreases in shear to bulk moduli ratios, and increased Cauchy pressures (C12–C44) with increasing x reveal a trend toward increased toughness.

  • 34.
    Kindlund, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sangiovanni, Davide
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Jensen, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Chirita, Valeriu
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Birch, Jens
    Department of Materials Science, Fredrick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of of Illinois, Urbana, USA.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Department of Materials Science and the Fredrick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, USA.
    Greene, Joseph
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Department of Materials Science and the Fredrick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, USA.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Vacancy-induced toughening in hard single-crystal V0.5Mo0.5Nx/MgO(001) thin films2014In: Acta Materialia, ISSN 1359-6454, E-ISSN 1873-2453, Vol. 77, p. 394-400Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using a combination of experiments and density functional theory (DFT), we demonstrate the first example of vacancy-induced  toughening, in this case for epitaxial pseudobinary NaCl-structure substoichiometric V0.5Mo0.5Nx alloys, with N concentrations 0.55 ≤ x ≤ 1.03, grown by reactive magnetron sputter deposition. The nanoindentation hardness H(x) increases with increasing vacancy concentration from 17 GPa with x = 1.03 to 26 GPa with x = 0.55, while the elastic modulus E(x) remains essentially constant at 370 GPa. Scanning electron micrographs of indented regions show ductile plastic flow giving rise to material pile-up, rather than cracks as commonly observed for hard, but brittle, transition-metal nitrides. The increase in alloy hardness with an elastic  modulus which remains constant with decreasing x, combined with the observed material pile-up around nanoindents, DFT-calculated decrease in shear to bulk moduli ratios, and increased Cauchy pressures (C12-C44), reveals a trend toward vacancy-induced toughening. Moreover, DFT crystal orbital overlap population analyses are consistent with the above results.

  • 35.
    Kindlund, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sangiovanni, Davide
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Martínez-de-Olcoz, L.
    Grupo de Capas Finas e Ingeniería de Superficies, Facultad de Física, Dep. Física Aplicada y Óptica, Universidad de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Jensen, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Birch, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Department of Materials Science and the Fredrick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, USA.
    Greene, Joseph
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Department of Materials Science and the Fredrick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, USA.
    Chirita, Valeriu
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Toughness Enhancement in Hard Ceramic Thin Films by Alloy Design2013In: APL MATERIALS, ISSN 2166-532X, Vol. 1, no 4, p. 042104-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hardness is an essential property for a wide range of applications. However, hardness alone, typically accompanied by brittleness, is not sufficient to prevent failure in ceramic films exposed to high stresses. Using VN as a model system, we demonstrate with experiment and density functional theory (DFT) that refractory VMoN alloys exhibit not only enhanced hardness, but dramatically increased ductility. V0.5Mo0.5N hardness is 25% higher than that of VN. In addition, while nanoindented VN, as well as TiN reference samples, suffer from severe cracking typical of brittle ceramics, V0.5Mo0.5N films do not crack. Instead, they exhibit material pile-up around nanoindents, characteristic of plastic flow in ductile materials. Moreover, the wear resistance of V0.5Mo0.5N is considerably higher than that of VN. DFT results show that tuning the occupancy of d-t2g metallic bonding states in VMoN facilitates dislocation glide, and hence enhances toughness, via the formation of stronger metal/metal bonds along the slip direction and weaker metal/N bonds across the slip plane.

  • 36.
    Mei, A. B.
    et al.
    University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA; University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA.
    Hellman, O.
    CALTECH, CA 91125 USA.
    Schlepuetz, C. M.
    Argonne National Lab, IL 60439 USA; Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland.
    Rockett, A.
    University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA; University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA.
    Chiang, T. -C.
    University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA; University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA; University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA.
    Greene, Joseph E
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA; University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA.
    Reflection thermal diffuse x-ray scattering for quantitative determination of phonon dispersion relations2015In: Physical Review B. Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, ISSN 1098-0121, E-ISSN 1550-235X, Vol. 92, no 17, p. 174301-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Synchrotron reflection x-ray thermal diffuse scattering (TDS) measurements, rather than previously reported transmission TDS, are carried out at room temperature and analyzed using a formalism based upon second-order interatomic force constants and long-range Coulomb interactions to obtain quantitative determinations of MgO phonon dispersion relations (h) over bar omega(j) (q), phonon densities of states g((h) over bar omega), and isochoric temperature-dependent vibrational heat capacities c(v) (T). We use MgO as a model system for investigating reflection TDS due to its harmonic behavior as well as its mechanical and dynamic stability. Resulting phonon dispersion relations and densities of states are found to be in good agreement with independent reports from inelastic neutron and x-ray scattering experiments. Temperature-dependent isochoric heat capacities cv (T), computed within the harmonic approximation from (h) over bar omega(j) (q) values, increase with temperature from 0.4 x 10(-4) eV/atom K at 100 K to 1.4 x 10(-4) eV/atom K at 200 K and 1.9 x 10(-4) eV/atom K at 300 K, in excellent agreement with isobaric heat capacity values c(p) (T) between 4 and 300 K. We anticipate that the experimental approach developed here will be valuable for determining vibrational properties of heteroepitaxial thin films since the use of grazing-incidence (theta less than or similar to theta(c), where theta(c) is the density-dependent critical angle) allows selective tuning of x-ray penetration depths to less than or similar to 10 nm.

  • 37.
    Mei, A. B.
    et al.
    University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA; University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA.
    Hellman, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. CALTECH, CA 91125 USA.
    Wireklint, N.
    Chalmers, Sweden.
    Schlepuetz, C. M.
    Argonne National Lab, IL 60439 USA.
    Sangiovanni, Davide
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Alling, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Rockett, A.
    University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA; University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA; University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA.
    Greene, Joseph E
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA; University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA.
    Dynamic and structural stability of cubic vanadium nitride2015In: Physical Review B. Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, ISSN 1098-0121, E-ISSN 1550-235X, Vol. 91, no 5, p. 054101-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Structural phase transitions in epitaxial stoichiometric VN/MgO(011) thin films are investigated using temperature-dependent synchrotron x-ray diffraction (XRD), selected-area electron diffraction (SAED), resistivity measurements, high-resolution cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, and ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD). At room temperature, VN has the B1 NaCl structure. However, below T-c = 250 K, XRD and SAED results reveal forbidden (00l) reflections of mixed parity associated with a noncentrosymmetric tetragonal structure. The intensities of the forbidden reflections increase with decreasing temperature following the scaling behavior I proportional to (T-c - T)(1/2). Resistivity measurements between 300 and 4 K consist of two linear regimes resulting from different electron/phonon coupling strengths in the cubic and tetragonal-VN phases. The VN transport Eliashberg spectral function alpha F-2(tr)(h omega), the product of the phonon density of states F(h omega) and the transport electron/phonon coupling strength alpha(2)(tr)(h omega), is determined and used in combination with AIMD renormalized phonon dispersion relations to show that anharmonic vibrations stabilize the NaCl structure at T greater than T-c. Free-energy contributions due to vibrational entropy, often neglected in theoretical modeling, are essential for understanding the room-temperature stability of NaCl-structure VN, and of strongly anharmonic systems in general.

  • 38.
    Mei, A.B.
    et al.
    University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA .
    Wilson, R.B.
    University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA .
    Li, D.
    University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA .
    Cahill, David G.
    University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA .
    Rockett, A.
    University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA .
    Birch, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Greene, Joseph E
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Elastic constants, Poisson ratios, and the elastic anisotropy of VN(001), (011), and (111) epitaxial layers grown by reactive magnetron sputter deposition2014In: Journal of Applied Physics, ISSN 0021-8979, E-ISSN 1089-7550, Vol. 115, no 21, p. 214908-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Elastic constants are determined for single-crystal stoichiometric NaCl-structure VN(001), VN(011), and VN(111) epitaxial layers grown by magnetically unbalanced reactive magnetron sputter deposition on 001-, 011-, and 111-oriented MgO substrates at 430 degrees C. The relaxed lattice parameter a(o) = 0.4134 +/- 0.0004 nm, obtained from high-resolution reciprocal space maps, and the mass density rho = 6.1 g/cm(3), determined from the combination of Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and film thickness measurements, of the VN layers are both in good agreement with reported values for bulk crystals. Sub-picosecond ultrasonic optical pump/probe techniques are used to generate and detect VN longitudinal sound waves with measured velocities v(001) = 9.8 +/- 0.3, v(011) = 9.1 +/- 0.3, and v(111) = 9.1 +/- 0.3 km/s. The VN c(11) elastic constant is determined from the sound wave velocity measurements as 585 +/- 30 GPa; the c(44) elastic constant, 126 +/- 3 GPa, is obtained from surface acoustic wave measurements. From the combination of c(11), c(44), v(hkl), and rho we obtain the VN c(12) elastic constant 178 +/- 33 GPa, the VN elastic anisotropy A = 0.62, the isotropic Poisson ratio nu = 0.29, and the anisotropic Poisson ratios nu(001) = 0.23, nu(011) = 0.30, and nu(111) = 0.29.

  • 39.
    Münger, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Chirita, Valeriu
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Greene, Joseph E
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sundgren, J E
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Adatom-induced diffusion of two-dimensional close-packed Pt-7 clusters on Pt(111)1996In: Surface Science, ISSN 0039-6028, E-ISSN 1879-2758, Vol. 355, no 1-3, p. L325-L330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Molecular dynamics simulations were used to follow the dynamics of the motion of hexagonal Pt heptamers on Pt(111). Close packed Pt-7 clusters on fee sites were found to be very stable structures with reconfiguration or translation events occurring only rarely over simulation times >30 ns at 1000 K. The adsorption of a single adatom on the cluster surface, however, induced rapid intracluster bond breaking, reconfiguration, the introduction of stacking faults, and greatly enhanced cluster diffusion rates. Cluster migration occurred primarily through sequences of individual atom and concerted dimer jumps, but concerted cluster motion was also observed. The adatoms eventually descended to the terrace, predominantly through push-out/exchange reactions with cluster atoms at B edges.

  • 40.
    Münger, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Chirita, Valeriu
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sundgren, J E
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Greene, Joseph E
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Destabilization and diffusion of two-dimensional close-packed Pt clusters on Pt(111) during film growth from the vapor phase1998In: Thin Solid Films, ISSN 0040-6090, E-ISSN 1879-2731, Vol. 318, no 1-2, p. 57-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cluster migration is known to be an important process during film growth at elevated temperatures, but relatively little quantitative data is available. We have used molecular dynamics simulations to follow the dynamics of small two-dimensional Pt clusters on Pt(lll) at 1000 K. While close-packed Pt-7 heptamers are extremely stable structures, the addition of a single-cluster vacancy or an on-top adatom immediately results in intracluster bond breaking, reconfigurations, rotations, the introduction of stacking faults, and greatly enhanced cluster-diffusion rates. Mapping center-of-mass motion for total simulation times > 145 ns revealed increases in cluster velocities by more than an order of magnitude with cluster migration occurring primarily by concerted motion and a novel diffusion mechanism involving double shearing of dimers/trimers. Contrary to some previous reports, edge-atom diffusion plays only a minor role. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science S.A.

  • 41.
    Samuelsson, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Plasma and Coating Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sarakinos, Kostas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Plasma and Coating Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lewin, Erik
    Laboratory of Nanoscale Materials Science Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Dübendorf, Switzerland.
    Greene, Joseph
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Helmersson, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Plasma and Coating Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    The effect of plasma-surface interactions on the structure formation of vapour deposited TiC/a-C:H nanocomposite filmsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Fundamental mechanisms determining the structure formation of nanocomposite TiC-/a-C:H thin films synthesised by reactive magnetron sputtering techniques have been studied. The investigation entailed varying the plasma density, composition, and substrate bias, thus altering ion-film interaction conditions. Moreover, by changing the vacuum pumping speed the influence of process stability was studied. The results show that the structure formation is predominantly controlled by energetic ion irradiation of the films, which, depending on the ion energies, provide increased adatom surface mobility and/or causes physical sputtering. No influence on the film structure formation due to process stability was seen, while influence of chemical sputtering could not be inferred. The present study explains previous results (Samuelsson et al., Surf. Coat. Technol. 206, 2396 (2012)), where the use of a high plasma density reactive sputtering technique resulted in film growth conditions favouring low presence of a-C:H and high stoichiometry of the TiC phase.

  • 42.
    Sangiovanni, Davide
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Edström, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Chirita, Valeriu
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Greene, Joseph E
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Dynamics of Ti, N, and TiNx (x=1-3) admolecule transport on TiN(001) surfaces2012In: Physical Review B. Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, ISSN 1098-0121, E-ISSN 1550-235X, Vol. 86, no 15, p. 155443-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We use classical molecular dynamics and the modified embedded atom method formalism to investigate the dynamics of atomic-scale transport on a low-index model compound surface, TiN(001). Our simulations, totaling 0.25 mu s for each case study, follow the pathways and migration kinetics of Ti and N adatoms, as well as TiNx complexes with x = 1-3, which are known to contribute to the growth of TiN thin films by reactive deposition from Ti, N-2, and N precursors. The simulations are carried out at 1000 K, within the optimal range for TiN(001) epitaxial growth. We find Ti adatoms to be the highest-mobility species on TiN(001), with the primary migration path involving jumps of one nearest-neighbor distance d(NN) between adjacent fourfold hollow sites along in-plane andlt; 100 andgt; channels. Long jumps, 2d(NN), are also observed, but at much lower frequency. N adatoms, which exhibit significantly lower migration rates than Ti, diffuse along in-plane andlt; 110 andgt; directions and, when they intersect other N atoms, associatively form N-2 molecules, which desorb at kinetic rates. As expected, TiN and TiN3 complexes migrate at even lower rates with complex diffusion pathways involving rotations, translations, and rototranslations. TiN2 trimers, however, are shown to have surprisingly high diffusion rates, above that of N adatoms and almost half that of Ti adatoms. TiN3 motion is dominated by in-place rotation with negligible diffusion.

  • 43.
    Sangiovanni, Davide
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Edström, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. University of Illinois, Urbana, USA.
    Greene, Joseph E
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. University of Illinois, Urbana, USA.
    Chirita, Valeriu
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ab-initio and classical molecular dynamics simulations of N2 desorption from TiN(001) surfaces2014In: Surface Science, ISSN 0039-6028, E-ISSN 1879-2758, Vol. 624, p. 25-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations based on density functional theory show that N adatoms are chemisorbed in threefold sites close to a N surface atom and between the two diagonally opposed neighboring Ti surface atoms on TiN(001). The most probable N adatom reaction pathway, even in the presence of nearby N adatoms, is for the N adatom and N surface atom pair to first undergo several exchange reactions and then desorb as a N2 molecule, resulting in a surface anion vacancy, with an activation barrier Edes of 1.37 eV and an attempt frequency Ades = 3.4 × 1013 s− 1. Edes is essentially equal to the N adatom surface diffusion barrier, Es = 1.39 eV, while As is only three to four times larger than Ades, indicating that isolated N adatoms migrate for only short distances prior to N2 desorption. The probability of N2 desorption via recombination of N adatoms on TiN(001) is much lower due to repulsive adatom/adatom interactions at separations less than ~ 3 Å which rapidly increase to ~ 2 eV at a separation of 1.5 Å. We obtain good qualitative and quantitative agreement with the above results using the modified embedded atom method potential to perform classical molecular dynamics simulations.

  • 44.
    Sangiovanni, Davide
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Edström, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. University of Illinois, Urbana, USA.
    Greene, Joseph E
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. University of Illinois, Urbana, USA.
    Chirita, Valeriu
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ti adatom diffusion on TiN(001): Ab initio and classical molecular dynamics simulations2014In: Surface Science, ISSN 0039-6028, E-ISSN 1879-2758, Vol. 627, p. 34-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ab initio and classical molecular dynamics (AIMD and CMD) simulations reveal that Ti adatoms on TiN(001) surfaces migrate between neighboring fourfold hollow sites primarily along in-plane less than100greater than channels. less than100greater than and less than110greater than single jumps, as well as less than100greater than double jump rates, obtained directly from MD runs as a function of temperature, are used to determine diffusion activation energies Ea, and attempt frequencies A, for the three preferred Ti adatom migration pathways on TiN(001). From transition rates Aexp[-Ea / (k(B)T)], we determine adatom surface distribution probabilities as a function of time, which are used to calculate adatom diffusion coefficients D(T). AIMD and CMD predictions are consistent and complementary. Using CMD, we investigate the effect on the adatom jump rate of varying the phonon wavelength degrees of freedom by progressively increasing the supercell size. We find that long-wavelength phonons significantly contribute to increasing adatom mobilities at temperatures less than= 600 K, but not at higher temperatures. Finally, by directly tracking the Ti adatom mean-square displacement during CMD runs, we find that Ti adatom jumps are highly correlated on TiN(001), an effect that yields lower D-s values (D-s(corr)) than those estimated from uncorrelated transition probabilities. The temperature-dependent diffusion coefficient is D-s(corr) (T) = (4.5 x 10(-4) Cm-2 s(-1)) exp[-0.55 eV / (k(B)T)].

  • 45.
    Sangiovanni, Davide
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Chirita, Valeriu
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Illinois, USA.
    Greene, Joseph E
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Illinois, USA.
    Effects of phase stability, lattice ordering, and electron density on plastic deformation in cubic TiWN pseudobinary transition-metal nitride alloys2016In: Acta Materialia, ISSN 1359-6454, E-ISSN 1873-2453, Vol. 103, p. 823-835Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We carry out density functional theory calculations to compare the energetics of layer glide, as well as stress vs. strain curves, for cubic Ti0.5W0.5N pseudobinary alloys and reference B1-structure TiN. Irrespective of the degree of ordering on the metal sublattice, the hardness and stiffness of Ti0.5W0.5, as estimated by stress strain results and resistance to layer glide, are comparable to that of the parent binary TiN, while ductility is considerably enhanced. After an initial elastic response to an applied load, the pseudobinary alloy deforms plastically, thus releasing accumulated mechanical stress. In contrast, stress continues to increase linearly with strain in TiN. Layer glide in Ti0.5W0.5N is promoted by a high valence-electron concentration which enables the formation of strong metallic bonds within the slip direction upon deformation. [1111-oriented Ti0.5W0.5N layers characterized by high local metal-sublattice ordering exhibit low resistance to slip along &lt; 110 &gt; directions due to energetically favored formation of (111) hexagonal stacking faults. This is consistent with the positive formation energy of &lt; 111 &gt;-ordered Tio.5W0.5N with respect to mixing of cubic-BI TiN and hexagonal WC-structure WN. In the cubic pseudobinary alloy, slip occurs parallel, as well as orthogonal, to the resolved applied stress at the interface between layers with the lowest friction. We suggest that analogous structural metastability (mixing cubic and hexagonal TM nitride binary phases) and electronic (high valence electron concentration) effects are responsible for the enhanced toughness recently demonstrated experimentally for cubic single-crystal pseudobinary V0.5W0.5N and V0.5MocoN epitaxial layers. (c) 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 46.
    Sangiovanni, Davide
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mei, A. B.
    University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Chirita, Valeriu
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA.
    Greene, Joseph E
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA; University of Illinois, IL 61801 USA.
    Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Nitrogen/VN(001) Surface Reactions: Vacancy-Catalyzed N-2 Dissociative Chemisorption, N Adatom Migration, and N-2 Desorption2016In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 120, no 23, p. 12503-12516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We use density-functional ab initio molecular dynamics to investigate the kinetics of N/VN(001) surface reactions at temperatures ranging from 1600 to 2300 K. N adatoms (N-ad) on VN(001) favor epitaxial atop-V positions and diffuse among them by transiting through 4-fold hollow (FFH) sites, at which they are surrounded by two V and two N surface atoms. After several atop-V -amp;gt; FFH -amp;gt; atop-V jumps, isolated N adatoms bond strongly with an underlying N surface (N-surf) atom. Frequent N-ad/N-surf pair exchange reactions lead to N-2 desorption, which results in the formation of an anion surface vacancy. N vacancies rapidly migrate via in-plane (110) jumps and act as efficient catalysts for the dissociative chemisorption of incident N-2 molecules. During exposure of VN(001) to incident atomic N gas atoms, N-ad/N-ad recombination and desorption is never observed, despite a continuously high N monomer surface coverage. Instead, N-2 desorption is always initiated by a N adatom removing a N surface atom or by energetic N gas atoms colliding with N-ad or N-surf atoms. Similarities and differences between: N/VN(001) vs. previous N/TiN(001) results, discussed on the basis of temperature-dependent ab initio electronic structures and chemical bonding, provide insights for controlling the reactivity of NaCl-structure transition-metal nitride (001) surfaces via electron-concentration tuning.

  • 47.
    Sangiovanni, Davide
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tasnadi, Ferenc
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Illinois, USA.
    Greene, Joseph E
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Illinois, USA.
    Chirita, Valeriu
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    N and Ti adatom dynamics on stoichiometric polar TiN(111) surfaces2016In: Surface Science, ISSN 0039-6028, E-ISSN 1879-2758, Vol. 649, p. 72-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We use molecular dynamics (MD) based on the modified embedded atom method (MEAM) to determine diffusion coefficients and migration pathways for Ti and N adatoms (Ti-ad and N-ad) on TiN(111). The reliability of the classical model-potential is verified by comparison with density functional theory (DFT) results at 0 K. MD simulations carried out at temperatures between 600 and 1800 K show that both Ti-ad and N-ad favor fcc surface sites and migrate among them by passing through metastable hcp positions. We find that N-ad species are considerably more mobile than Ti-ad on TiN(111); contrary to our previous results on TiN(001). In addition, we show that lattice vibrations at finite temperatures strongly modify the potential energy landscape and result in smaller adatom migration energies, E-a = 1.03 for Ti-ad and 0.61 eV for N-ad, compared to 0 K values E-aOK = 1.55 (Ti-ad) and 0.79 eV (N-ad). We also demonstrate that the inclusion of dipole corrections, neglected in previous DFT calculations, is necessary in order to obtain the correct formation energies for polar surfaces such as TiN(111). (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 48.
    Tholander, Christopher
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Alling, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tasnádi, Ferenc
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Greene, Joseph E.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Effect of Al substitution on Ti, Al, and N adatom dynamics on TiN(001), (011), and (111) surfaces2014In: Surface Science, ISSN 0039-6028, E-ISSN 1879-2758, Vol. 630, p. 28-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Substituting Al for Ti in TiN(001), TiN(011), and N- and Ti-terminated TiN(111) surfaces has significant effects on adatom surface energetics which vary strongly with the adatom species and surface orientation. Here, we investigate Ti, Al, and N adatom surface dynamics using density functional methods. We calculate adatom binding and diffusion energies with both a nudged elastic band and grid-probing techniques. The adatom diffusivities are analyzed within a transition-state theory approximation. We determine the stable and metastable Ti, Al, and N binding sites on all three surfaces as well as the lowest energy migration paths. In general, adatom mobilities are fastest on TiN(001), slower on TiN(111), and slowest on TiN(011). The introduction of Al has two major effects on the surface diffusivity of Ti and Al adatoms. First, Ti adatom diffusivity on TiN(001) is significantly reduced near substituted Al surface atoms; we observe a 200% increase in Ti adatom diffusion barriers out of fourfold hollow sites adjacent to Al surface atoms, while Al adatom diffusivity between bulk sites is largely unaffected. Secondly, on TiN(111), the effect is opposite; Al adatoms are slowed near the substituted Al surface atom, while Ti adatom diffusivity is largely unaffected. In addition, we note the importance of magnetic spin polarization on Ti adatom binding energies and diffusion path. These results are of relevance for the atomistic understanding of Ti1-xAlxN alloy and Ti1-xAlxN/TiN multilayer thin-film growth processes.

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