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  • 1.
    Alarcon, Emilio I
    et al.
    University of Ottawa.
    Udekwu, Klas
    Karolinska Institute.
    Skog, Mårten
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Pacioni, NataliL
    University of Ottawa.
    Stamplecoskie, Kevin G
    University of Ottawa.
    Gonzalez-Bejar, Maria
    University of Ottawa.
    Polisetti, Naresh
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wickham, Abeni
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Richter-Dahlfors, Agneta
    Karolinska Institute.
    Griffith, May
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Ophthalmology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Scaiano, Juan C
    University of Ottawa.
    The biocompatibility and antibacterial properties of collagen-stabilized, photochemically prepared silver nanoparticles2012In: Biomaterials, ISSN 0142-9612, E-ISSN 1878-5905, Vol. 33, no 19, p. 4947-4956Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Spherical 3.5 nm diameter silver nanoparticles (AgNP) stabilized in type I collagen (AgNP@collagen) were prepared in minutes (5-15 min) at room temperature by a photochemical method initiated by UVA irradiation of a water-soluble non-toxic benzoin. This biocomposite was examined to evaluate its biocompatibility and its anti-bacterial properties and showed remarkable properties. Thus, while keratinocytes and fibroblasts were not affected by AgNP@collagen, it was bactericidal against Bacillus megaterium and E. coli but only bacteriostatic against S. epidermidis. In particular, the bactericidal properties displayed by AgNP@collagen were proven to be due to AgNP in AgNP@collagen, rather than to released silver ions, since equimolar concentrations of Ag are about four times less active than AgNP@collagen based on total Ag content. This new biocomposite was stable over a remarkable range of NaCl, phosphate, and 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid concentrations and for over one month at 4 degrees C. Circular dichroism studies show that the conformation of collagen in AgNP@collagen remains intact. Finally, we have compared the properties of AgNP@collagen with a similar biocomposite prepared using alpha-poly-L-Lysine and also with citrate stabilized AgNP; neither of these materials showed comparable biocompatibility, stability, or anti-bacterial activity.

  • 2.
    Griffith, May
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Ophthalmology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Polisetti, Naresh
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kuffova, Lucia
    University of Aberdeen, Scotland .
    Gallar, Juana
    University of Miguel Hernandez, Spain .
    Forrester, John
    University of Aberdeen, Scotland .
    Vemuganti, Geeta K
    University of Hyderabad, India .
    Armin Fuchsluger, Thomas
    University of Hyderabad, India University of Dusseldorf, Germany .
    Regenerative Approaches as Alternatives to Donor Allografting for Restoration of Corneal Function2012In: The Ocular Surface, ISSN 1542-0124, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 170-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A range of alternatives to human donor tissue for corneal transplantation are being developed to address the shortfall of good quality tissues as well as the clinical conditions for which allografting is contraindicated. Classical keratoprostheses, commonly referred to as artificial corneas, are being used clinically to replace minimal corneal function. However, they are used only as last resorts, as they are associated with significant complications, such as extrusion/rejection, glaucoma, and retinal detachment. The past few years have seen significant developments in technologies designed to replace part or the full thickness of damaged or diseased corneas with materials that encourage regeneration to different extents. This review describes selected examples of these corneal substitutes, which range from cell-based regenerative strategies to keratoprostheses with regenerative capabilities via tissue-engineered scaffolds pre-seeded with stem cells. It is unlikely that one corneal substitute will be best for all indications, but taken together, the various approaches may soon be able to supplement the supply of human donor corneas for transplantation or allow restoration of diseased or damaged corneas that cannot be treated by currently available techniques.

  • 3.
    Polisetti, Naresh
    et al.
    University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany.
    McLaughlin, Christopher R.
    Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
    Vemuganti, Geeta K.
    School of Medical Sciences, University of Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India.
    Griffith, May
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Biomaterials-Enabled Regenerative Medicine in Corneal Applications2013In: Regenerative Medicine: From Protocol to Patient / [ed] Steinhoff, Gustav, Springer Netherlands, 2013, 2, p. 557-580Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book details the latest scientific and clinical knowledge in regenerative medicine. Coverage includes biology of tissue regeneration, stem cell science and technology, tissue engineering, biomaterials and nanotechnology, and regulation and ethics.

  • 4.
    Qian, Hong
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Hematology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Badaloni, Aurora
    Ist Science San Raffaele, Italy .
    Chiara, Francesca
    Ist Science San Raffaele, Italy .
    Stjernberg, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Polisetti, Naresh
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nihlberg, Kristian
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Giacomo Consalez, G
    Ist Science San Raffaele, Italy .
    Sigvardsson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Hematology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Molecular Characterization of Prospectively Isolated Multipotent Mesenchymal Progenitors Provides New Insight into the Cellular Identity of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Mouse Bone Marrow2013In: Molecular and Cellular Biology, ISSN 0270-7306, E-ISSN 1098-5549, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 661-677Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite great progress in the identification of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from bone marrow (BM), our knowledge of their in vivo cellular identity remains limited. We report here that cells expressing the transcription factor Ebf2 in adult BM display characteristics of MSCs. The Ebf2(+) cells are highly clonal and physiologically quiescent. In vivo lineage-tracing experiments, single cell clone transplantations, and in vitro differentiation assays revealed their self-renewal and multilineage differentiation capacity. Gene expression analysis of the freshly sorted Ebf2(+) cells demonstrated the expression of genes previously reported to be associated with MSCs and the coexpression of multiple lineage-associated genes at the single-cell level. Thus, Ebf2 expression is not restricted to committed osteoblast progenitor cells but rather marks a multipotent mesenchymal progenitor cell population in adult mouse BM. These cells do not appear to completely overlap the previously reported MSC populations. These findings provide new insights into the in vivo cellular identity and molecular properties of BM mesenchymal stem and progenitor cells.

  • 5.
    Wickham, Abeni M.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Islam, Mohammad Mirazul
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mondal, Debasish
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Phopase, Jaywant
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sadhu, Veera
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tamás, Éva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Polisetti, Naresh
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Richter-Dahlfors, Agneta
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.
    Griffith, May
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Polycaprolactone–thiophene-conjugated carbon nanotube meshes as scaffolds for cardiac progenitor cells2014In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part B - Applied biomaterials, ISSN 1552-4973, E-ISSN 1552-4981, Vol. 102, no 7, p. 1553-1561Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The myocardium is unable to regenerate itself after infarct, resulting in scarring and thinning of the heart wall. Our objective was to develop a patch to buttress and bypass the scarred area, while allowing regeneration by incorporated cardiac stem/progenitor cells (CPCs). Polycaprolactone (PCL) was fabricated as both sheets by solvent casting, and fibrous meshes by electrospinning, as potential patches, to determine the role of topology in proliferation and phenotypic changes to the CPCs. Thiophene-conjugated carbon nanotubes (T-CNTs) were incorporated to enhance the mechanical strength. We showed that freshly isolated CPCs from murine hearts neither attached nor spread on the PCL sheets, both with and without T-CNT. As electrospun meshes, however, both PCL and PCL/T-CNT supported CPC adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. The incorporation of T-CNT into PCL resulted in a significant increase in mechanical strength but no morphological changes to the meshes. In turn, proliferation, but not differentiation, of CPCs into cardiomyocytes was enhanced in T-CNT containing meshes. We have shown that changing the topology of PCL, a known hydrophobic material, dramatically altered its properties, in this case, allowing CPCs to survive and differentiate. With further development, PCL/T-CNT meshes or similar patches may become a viable strategy to aid restoration of the postmyocardial infarction myocardium.

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