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  • 1.
    Abbey, Susan E.
    et al.
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    De Luca, Enza
    University Health Network, University of Toronto, Canada.
    Mauthner, Oliver E.
    University Health Network, University of Toronto, Canada.
    McKeever, Patricia
    Bloorview Research Institute, Bloorview Kids Rehab, Canada.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Queen's University, Belfast, Northern Ireland.
    Poole, Jennifer M.
    Ryerson University, Canada.
    Gewarges, Mena
    University Health Network, University of Toronto, Canada.
    Ross, Heather J.
    University Health Network, University of Toronto, Canada.
    Qualitative interviews versus standardised self-report questionnaires in assessing qualityb of life in heart transplant recipients2011In: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation, ISSN 1053-2498, E-ISSN 1557-3117, Vol. 30, no 8, p. 963-966Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quality of life (QoL) studies in heart transplant recipients (HTRs) using validated, quantitative, self-report questionnaires have reported poor QoL in approximately 20% of patients. This consecutive mixed methods study compared self-report questionnaires, the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short Form Health Survey (MOS SF-36) and the Atkinson Life Satisfaction Scale, with phenomenologically informed audiovisual (AV) qualitative interview data in 27 medically stable HTRs (70% male; age 53 ± 13.77 years; time since transplant 4.06 ± 2.42 years). Self-report questionnaire data reported poor QoL and more distress compared with previous studies and normative population samples; in contrast, 52% of HTRs displayed pervasive distress according to visual methodology. Using qualitative methods to assess QoL yields information that would otherwise remain unobserved by the exclusive use of quantitative QOL questionnaires.

  • 2.
    Gewarges, M.
    et al.
    Toronto Gen Hospital, Canada.
    Poole, J.
    Ryerson University, Canada.
    De Luca, E.
    Toronto Gen Hospital, Canada.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Abbey, S.
    Toronto Gen Hospital, Canada.
    Mauthner, O.
    Toronto Gen Hospital, Canada.
    Ross, H.
    Toronto Gen Hospital, Canada.
    Canadian Society of Transplantation Members Views on Anonymity in Organ Donation and Transplantation2015In: Transplantation Proceedings, ISSN 0041-1345, E-ISSN 1873-2623, Vol. 47, no 10, p. 2799-2804Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Anonymity has been central to medical, psychosocial, and societal practices in organ donation and transplantation. The purpose of this investigation was to explore transplant professionals views on anonymity in the context of organ transplantation. Methods. The study consisted of an electronic 18-item survey distributed to the Canadian Society of Transplantation membership, asking about anonymity vs open communication/contact between organ recipients and donor families. Results. Of the 541 members surveyed, 106 replied. Among respondents, 71% felt that organ recipients and donor families should only communicate anonymously, yet 47% felt that identifying information could be included in correspondence between consenting recipients and donor families. When asked whether organ recipients and donor families should be allowed to meet, 53% of respondents agreed, 27% disagreed, and 20% neither agreed nor disagreed. With social media facilitating communication and eliminating the ability to maintain donor/recipient anonymity, 38% of respondents felt that a reexamination of current policies and practices pertaining to anonymity was necessary. Conclusion. In conclusion, there was no dominant position on the issue of anonymity/communication between donor families and transplant recipients. Further research and discussion concerning the views of healthcare professionals, organ recipients, and donor families on the mandate of anonymity is needed and may influence future policy.

  • 3.
    Giffney, Noreen
    et al.
    University College Dublin.
    Shildrick, MargritLinköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Theory on the Edge: Irish Studies and the Politics of Sexual Difference2013Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Theory on the Edge brings together some of the foremost specialists working at the interdisciplinary interface between Irish Studies, feminist theory, queer theory, and gender and sexuality studies in order to trace the contemporary development of feminist thinking and activism in Ireland. The collection opens with a contribution from Ailbhe Smyth, the high-profile academic and public activist, whom many of the contributors acknowledge as a formative influence in their own feminist development. Essays utilize theory rooted in material issues, but always ask 'why' rather than just 'how' to draw interesting new conclusions on the depth and variety of Irish feminism.

  • 4.
    Howie, Gillian
    et al.
    University of Liverpool, UK.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Queens University, Belfast.
    Introduction: The Antinomies of a Phenomenal Woman2011In: Women - A Cultural Review, ISSN 0957-4042, E-ISSN 1470-1367, Vol. 22, no 2-3, p. 117-124Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Lundgren, Silje
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lawrence, David
    Linköping University, University Library.
    Rethinking bibliometric data concerning gender studies: A response to Söderlund and Madison2015In: Scientometrics, ISSN 0138-9130, E-ISSN 1588-2861, Vol. 105, no 3, p. 1389-1398Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Comment to the article ‘Characteristics of gender studies publications: Abibliometric analysis based on a Swedish population database’ by Therese So¨derlund andGuy Madison (Scientometrics, 2015). From the position of relevant expertise within genderstudies and bibliometrics, this text offers a critique of the present study and some suggestionsof alternative ways forward. It analyses (1) the object of study of the article (theterms used to denominate the field, keywords and methods to make sample selection), (2)technical issues and the question of language in relation to international citations andimpact factor, and (3) the views presented in the article regarding gender studies andpolitical ideology.

  • 6.
    Mauthner, Oliver
    et al.
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    De Luca, Enza
    University Hospital Network, Canada.
    Poole, Jennifer
    Ryerson University, Canada.
    Abbey, Susan
    University health network, Canada.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ross, Heather
    University health network, Canada.
    Heart transplants:: Identity disruption, bodily integrity and interconnectedness2015In: Health, ISSN 1363-4593, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 578-594Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Of heart transplant recipients, 30 per cent report ongoing or episodic emotional issues post-transplant, which are not attributable to medications or pathophysiological changes. To this end, our team theorized that cardiac transplantation introduces pressing new questions about how patients incorporate a transplanted heart into their sense of self and how this impacts their identity. The work of Merleau-Ponty provided the theoretical underpinning for this project as it rationalizes how corporeal changes  affect one’s self and offer an innovative framework to access these complex aspects of living with a transplanted heart. We  used visual methodology and recorded 25 semi-structured interviews videographically. Both visual and verbal data were analyzed  at the same time in an iterative process. The most common theme was that participants expressed a disruption to their own identity and bodily integrity. Additionally, participants reported interconnectedness with the donor, even when the transplanted  heart was perceived as an intruder or stranger. Finally, transplant recipients were very vivid in their descriptions and speculation of how they imagined the donor. Receiving an anonymous donor organ from a stranger often leaves the recipient with questions  about who they themselves are now. Our study provides a nuanced understanding of heart transplant recipients’ embodied experiences of self and identity. Insights gained are valuable to educate transplant professionals to develop new supportive interventions both pre- and post-transplant, and to improve the process of informed consent. Ultimately, such insights could be used to enable heart transplant recipients to incorporate the graft optimally over time, easing distress and improving recovery.

  • 7.
    Mauthner, Oliver
    et al.
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    De Luca, Enza
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    Poole, Jennifer
    Ryerson University, Canada.
    Gerwarges, Mena
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    Abbey, Susan
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ross, Heather
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    Preparation and support of patients through the transplant process: Understanding the recipients' perspectives2012In: Nursing Research and Practice, ISSN 2090-1429, E-ISSN 2090-1437, Vol. 2012Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Preparation for heart transplant commonly includes booklets, instructional videos, personalized teaching sessions, and mentorship. This paper explores heart transplant recipients' thoughts on their preparation and support through the transplant process. Twenty-five interviews were audio-/videotaped capturing voice and body language and transcribed verbatim. Coding addressed language, bodily gesture, volume, and tone in keeping with our visual methodology. Recipients reported that only someone who had a transplant truly understands the experience. As participants face illness and life-altering experiences, maintaining a positive attitude and hope is essential to coping well. Healthcare professionals provide ongoing care and reassurance about recipients' medical status. Mentors, family members, and close friends play vital roles in supporting recipients. Participants reported that only heart transplant recipients understood the experience, the hope, and ultimately the suffering associated with living with another persons' heart. Attention needs to be focused not solely on the use of teaching modalities, but also on the development of innovative support networks. This will promote patient and caregiver engagement in self-management. Enhancing clinicians' knowledge of the existential aspects of transplantation will provide them with a nuanced understanding of the patients' experience, which will ultimately enhance their ability to better prepare and support patients and their caregivers.

  • 8.
    Poole, Jennifer
    et al.
    Ryerson University, Toronto.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Queens University, Belfast.
    De Luca, Enza
    University Health Network, University of Toronto.
    Abbey, Susan E
    University Health Network, University of Toronto.
    Mauthner, Oliver E.
    University Health Network, University of Toronto.
    McKeever, Patricia
    Bloorview Research Institute, University of Toronto.
    Ross, Heather J.
    University Health Network, University of Toronto.
    On Heart Transplants and Distress: A Qualitative Response to Selves and Burroughs2010In: American Journal of Transplantation, ISSN 1600-6135, E-ISSN 1600-6143, Vol. 11, no 9, p. 1996-1997Article, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Poole, Jennifer
    et al.
    Ryerson University, Toronto.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Queens University, Belfast.
    De Luca, Enza
    University Health Network, University of Toronto.
    Abbey, Susan E.
    University Health Network, University of Toronto.
    Mauthner, Oliver E.
    University Health Network, University of Toronto.
    McKeever, Patricia
    Bloorview Research Institute, University of Toronto.
    Ross, Heather J.
    University Health Network, University of Toronto.
    The obligation to say 'thank you': Heart transplant recipients experience of writing to the donor family2010In: American Journal of Transplantation, ISSN 1600-6135, E-ISSN 1600-6143, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 619-622Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transplant recipients are encouraged to write anonymous thank-you letters to the donor family. We prospectively explored heart transplant recipients' embodied responses to the 'obligation' to write a thank-you letter using audio/video-taped open-ended interviews (N = 27). Fifteen of the 19 participants, who wrote letters to the donor family, expressed or visually revealed significant distress about issues such as the obligation to write anonymously and the inadequacy of the 'thank-you'. Writing the thank-you letter is not a neutral experience for heart transplant recipients. Rethinking the obligatory practice regarding the thank-you letter and developing the necessary support for the recipient through this process is necessary.

  • 10.
    Poole, Jennifer
    et al.
    School of Social Work, Faculty of Community Services, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    Ward, Jennifer
    School of Social Work, Faculty of Community Services, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    DeLuca, Enza
    Division of Cardiology and Transplant, University Health Network, 585 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Abbey, Susan
    Department of Psychiatry, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    Mauthner, Oliver
    Institute of Nursing Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
    Ross, Heather
    Division of Cardiology and Transplant, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    Grief and loss for patients before and after heart transplant2016In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 45, no 3, p. 193-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    The purpose of the study was to examine the loss and grief experiences of patients waiting for and living with new hearts.

    Background

    There is much scholarship on loss and grief. Less attention has been paid to these issues in clinical transplantation, and even less on the patient experience.

    Methods

    Part of a qualitative inquiry oriented to the work of Merleau-Ponty, a secondary analysis was carried out on audiovisual data from interviews with thirty participants.

    Results

    Patients experience loss and three forms of grief. Pre-transplant patients waiting for transplant experience loss and anticipatory grief related to their own death and the future death of their donor. Transplanted patients experience long-lasting complicated grief with respect to the donor and disenfranchised grief which may not be sanctioned.

    Conclusions

    Loss as well as anticipatory, complicated and disenfranchised grief may have been inadvertently disregarded or downplayed. More research and attention is needed.

  • 11.
    Ross, Heather
    et al.
    University Health Network, Toronto.
    Abbey, Susan
    University Health Network, Toronto.
    De Luca, Enza
    University Health Network, Toronto.
    Mauthner, Oliver
    University Health Network, Toronto.
    McKeever, Patricia
    Bloorview Research Institute, University of Toronto.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Queens University, Belfast.
    Poole, Jennifer
    Ryerson University, Toronto.
    What they say versus what we see: 'Hidden' distress and impaired quality of life in heart transplant recipients2010In: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation, ISSN 1053-2498, E-ISSN 1557-3117, Vol. 29, no 10, p. 1142-1149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Quality of life (QoL) studies in heart transplant recipients generally rely on quantifiable self-report questionnaires and have shown that approximately 20% of patients undergo distress and poor QoL not clearly related to medical variables.

    METHODS:

    Building on existing qualitative research, we used a phenomenologically informed audiovisual method to explore the nature of "distress" in heart transplant recipients. Focused open-ended interviews were conducted in non-clinical settings with 27 medically stable heart transplant recipients (70% male, mean age 53 ± 13 years, range 18 to 72 years; mean time since transplant 4.1 ± 2.4 years). Interviews were audio/videotaped and transcribed verbatim. A qualitative software program (NVIVO8) was used to code interview transcripts and videotaped bodily gestures and "expressive artifacts" as well as vocal tone and volume.

    RESULTS:

    Distress was displayed by 88% of patients during the interview, and 52% displayed a profound disjunct between the words they used to describe their quality of life (e.g., "wonderful") and their embodied expressions of the same (e.g., protective body posturing, distressed facial expression). Most also expressed significant distress when discussing issues such as the donor and their "gift of life," as well as a disrupted sense of bodily integrity and identity that they felt could only be appreciated by fellow heart recipients.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Increased awareness of this distress and disruption related to bodily integrity and identity after heart transplant may allow transplant professionals and researchers to see beyond "words" to more effectively reduce distress and improve quality of life.

  • 12.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Queens University, Belfast.
    Becoming-Maternal: Things to do with Deleuze2009In: Studies in the Maternal, ISSN 1759-0434, Vol. 2, no 1-2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Given that psychoanalysis is so often the privileged discourse in the relation to the maternal feminine, it makes good sense to ask whether a Deleuzian alternative should be heard. The difficulty is that the whole discourse of the maternal and motherhood is represented only by silence in Deleuze’s own work, and feminist scholarship has largely failed to remark that absence. Nonetheless I look to Deleuze for an approach that decisively contests any psychoanalytic model that bases itself around the concept of lack – however that might be twisted and transformed in relation to the maternal – and that incorporates a positivity that might critically revalue the feminine. Starting with a brief excursus through phenomenology, I consider two pertinent issues: first that the ‘event’ of giving life might be rethought in the mode of the impersonal; and second that the slide from encounter to connection, and from maternal-foetal embodiment to the notion of assemblage, might open up at very least a quasi-Deleuzian notion of positive flows, desire and energies. Could becoming-maternal figure more productive pathways that transform our understanding of the materiality of motherhood?

  • 13.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Queens University, Belfast.
    Bodies at the Limit: monsters, prostheses and bioethics2010In: Keynote public address, 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Border Crossings: the Technologies of Disability and Desire2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Celebrating crip pleasure: the somatechnics of disability and desire2012In: Keynote address, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Chimerism and immunitas :: the emergence of a posthuman phenomenology2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Chimerism and immunitas: the emergence of a posthumanist biophilosophy2015In: Resisting Biopolitics : Philosophical, Political and Performative Strategies / [ed] S. Wilmer and A. Zukauskaite, New York: Routledge , 2015, p. 95-109Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The chapter draws on biomedical research, including my own around organ transplantation,  to look specifically at how the event of (micro)chimerism contests the discourse of the self’s immunity to the other. In the face of a socio-cultural imaginary that insists on the singularity of the human, the authorised discourse remains, nevertheless, largely unchanged, stressing the importance of securing immunity not only in biomedicine - where the search is for a functional explanation of (micro)chimerism that will preserve the status quo - but also in biopolitics. I speculate on the problematic in a way that turns to Esposito's thinking of immunitas and to the Deleuzian concept of assemblage as a better model for organic life, including human life.

  • 18.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Chimerism and immunitas:: the emergence of a posthumanist bioscience2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Chimerism and the immune system: demythologising self/other distinctions2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    - ‘Continental Philosophy’2014In: Encyclopedia of Bioethics / [ed] Bruce Jennings, Farmington Hills, MI: Macmillan Publishers Ltd., 2014, 4thChapter in book (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Critical Disability Studies: rethinking the conventions for the age of postmodernity2012In: Routledge Handbook of Disability Studies / [ed] Nick Watson, Alan Roulstone, and Carol Thomas, London: Routledge, 2012, p. 452-Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    "The Routledge Handbook of Disability Studies takes a multidisciplinary approach to disability and provides an authoritative and up-to-date overview of the main issues in the field around the world today. Adopting an international perspective and consisting entirely of newly commissioned chapters arranged thematically, it surveys the state of the discipline, examining emerging and cutting edge areas as well as core areas of contention. Divided in five sections, this comprehensive handbook covers: Different models and approaches to disability How key impairment groups have engaged with disability studies and the writings within the discipline Policy and legislation responses to disability studies and to disability activism Disability studies and its interaction with other disciplines, such as history, philosophy and science and technology studies Disability studies and different life experiences, examining how disability and disability studies intersects with ethnicity, sexuality, gender, childhood and ageing. Containing chapters from an international selection of leading scholars, this authoritative handbook is an invaluable reference for all academics, researchers and more advanced students in disability studies and associated disciplines such as sociology, health studies and social work"--Provided by publisher

  • 22.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Dangerous Discourses: anomalous embodiment and the prosthetic imaginary2011In: Keynote address, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Dangerous Discourses: queering disability and desire2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Dangerous Discourses: Subjectivity, Sexuality and Disability 2012 (ed. 2)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This innovative and adventurous work uses broadly feminist and postmodernist modes of analysis toexplore what motivates damaging attitudes and practices towards disability. Margrit Shildrick argues for the significance of the psycho-social imaginary, and suggests a way forward in disability's queering of normative paradigms.

  • 25.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Death, debility and disability2015In: Feminism and Psychology, ISSN 0959-3535, E-ISSN 1461-7161, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 155-160Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Deciding on Death2012In: Plenary address: Deciding on Death, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Disability,Vulnerability and Becoming’2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Disabled bodies, citizenship and neoliberal politics2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 29. Shildrick, Margrit
    Embodied Discourses and Prosthetic Performativity2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the era of postmodernity, issues of the body, gender and power are increasingly raised by the non-normative performativity of the anomalous embodiment. I shall focus in particular on one aspect of such forms of embodiment that mobilises acute questions about the always ambivalent relationship between human subjects and biotechnology. Where in the past, the term prosthesis intended some material object that stood in for a lack that was seen as a negative but compensatable aspect of embodiment, the emphasis now is firmly on enhancement and supplement. For many disabled people, their interface with the world relies to a greater or lesser extent on the deployment of prostheses, no longer in the mode of rehabilitation to normative practices, but as a highly productive alternative that inevitably queers experience itself. Going further, the notion of prostheses can be transformed to encompass a Deleuzian understanding of embodiment as necessarily entailing assemblage -in both organic and non-organic forms – as a mode of existence that speaks to us all

  • 30.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Embodied discourses and prosthetic performativity2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Queens University, Belfast.
    Embodying the Monster: Encounters with the Vulnerable Self2002Book (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Emergent Strands or Theory on Edge2013In: Theory on the Edge: Irish studies and the Politics of Sexual Difference / [ed] Noreen Giffney and Margrit Shildrick, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013, 1, p. 1-9Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Theory on the Edge brings together some of the foremost specialists working at the interdisciplinary interface between Irish Studies, feminist theory, queer theory, and gender and sexuality studies in order to trace the contemporary development of feminist thinking and activism in Ireland.

  • 33.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Gut Feminism2016In: Contemporary Women's Writing, ISSN 1754-1476, E-ISSN 1754-1484, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 143-145Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 34.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hard Graft: Living on after Heart Transplantation2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hard graft: Living on after heart transplantation2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hard graft: Living on after heart transplantation2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hospitality and 'the gift of life': Reconfiguring the  the other in heart transplantation2012In: Embodied Selves / [ed] Stella Gonzalez-Arnal, Gill Jagger, Kathleen Lennon, Palgrave Macmillan, 2012, 1, p. 196-209Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This interdisciplinary collection explores the role the body plays in constituting our sense of self, signalling the interplay between material embodiment, social meaning, and material and social conditions. -- This interdisciplinary collection explores the role the body plays in constituting our sense of self, signalLing the interplay between material embodiment, social meaning, and material and social conditions. Collectively the papers draw attention to aspects of embodiment which are not always centre stage in other debates, particularly issues of bodily vulnerability. They make clear, in considering the relation of bodies and selves, that more is at stake than social identity categories; but that what is at stake is, nonetheless, an inter-subjective making of the self. Utilizing theoretical and biographical material, key strands of contemporary thought are brought into conversation: the new materialism, poststructuralism and, importantly, phenomenology. The consequences for an embodied ethics and a corporeal political theory are considered. There is a substantial and accessible introduction placing the papers in the context of contemporary debates. Collectively, the volume marks a major development in philosophical and critical accounts of embodiment.

  • 38.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hybrid bodies and bioethics: rethinking heart transplantation2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Queens University, Belfast.
    Hybrid Bodies and Prostheses: the Bioethics of Identity2010In: Invited paper, 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Queens University, Belfast.
    Hybrid bodies and prostheses: the bioethics of identity2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Queens University, Belfast.
    Imagining the heart: incorporations, intrusions and identity2011In: Keynote address, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Imagining the Heart: Incorporations, Intrusions and Identity2012In: Somatechnics, ISSN 2044-0138, E-ISSN 2044-0146, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 233-249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Surgical intervention into human corporeality relies on the Cartesian machine model of the body to justify such radical intrusion as the properly reasoned and informed actions and choices of essentially disembodied sovereign subjects. Both the surgical subject and the surgical team are engaged in a form of heroic, albeit supremely functional, medicine in which questions of self, embodiment, and intercorporeality are put to one side. This is especially evident in the field of heart transplantation. Nonetheless, of all the non-visible parts of the body, it is the heart that has been most clearly at the centre of both imagery and imagination in western culture. What is striking is the degree to which the heart is represented not as a merely functional part of the body that might be exchanged at will, but as an organ of immense personal significance. In socio-cultural terms the heart stands in for a range of inherently human attributes such as love, empathy, fear, guilt and so on that are at the core of selfhood. And as my current research on transplantation shows, both recipients and donors are troubled by not so much by biomedical risk, as by issues of identity and the vexed relation between self and other.

    How then does this cultural and personal understanding line up with the biomedical need to represent the organ as a mere pump, as an exchangeable depersonalised mass that can unproblematically take its place in ‘spare part surgery’? I shall review some contemporary representations of heart donation and transplantation that both re-enforce the supposed utility of the process while at the same time sliding away into the realm of psychic significance where the heart is figured as the gift of life. What are the implications for recipients of receiving such a gift that in the most substantive way crosses the boundary between self and other in a mode that leaves the categorical identity of both open to doubt. How can we reimagine the problematic in ways that would leave behind intimations of intrusion and acknowledge intercorporeality as a positive and desirable outcome?

  • 43.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. York University, Canada.
    living on; not getting better2015In: Feminist review (Print), ISSN 0141-7789, E-ISSN 1466-4380, no 111, p. 10-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The contemporary emergence of the concept debility, which pertains to a broad swathe of humanity whose ordinary lives simply persist without ever getting better, shares a time span with an acute critique of neo-liberal biopolitics. Where capital has historically relied on a population that through its labour necessarily becomes debilitated, the newer model of understanding references the intrinsic profitability of debility itself. The two dimensions overlap and co-exist, but what I shall pursue here are the implications of recognising that, at the most fundamental level, it is in the interests of neo-liberalism to produce and sustain bodies as debilitated and therefore susceptible to a range of market commodities that hold out the promise of therapeutic interventions into the relative failures of physical, cognitive and affective embodiment. In previous work, I have argued strongly for the inherent vulnerability of all bodies, but in considering here a more overtly politicised context, it becomes possible to readdress the questions posed by Jasbir Puar: which bodies are made to pay for "progress"? Which debilitated bodies can be reinvigorated for neoliberalism, and which cannot? And at the present moment, writing at a time of imposed austerity, I would add, what, if anything, is lost in the deployment of the term debility instead of disability?

  • 44.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    (Micro)chimerism and immunity: contesting the illusion of self/other distinction2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    On Longing for the Monstrous: some precautionary observations2012In: Keynote address, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Organ transplantation and hybrid bodies: Incorporations, intrusions and identity2014Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 47.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Queens University, Belfast.
    Organ Transplantation, Gender and Hybridity2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Queens University, Belfast.
    Organ Transplantation, Hybridity and Narrations of Identity2010In: Plenary paper, 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Queens University, Belfast.
    Out of Order: Danger, disability and desire2010In: Keynote address, 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Queens University, Belfast.
    Out of Order: Genealogy and the Monstrous2010In: Plenary paper, 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
12 1 - 50 of 86
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