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  • 1.
    Lyxell, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Ibertsson, Tina
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Asker-Árnason, Lena
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Karolinska institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Henricson, Cecilia
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elena
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Hearing and cognitive development in deaf and hearing-impaired children: effects of intervention2013In: Disorders of Peripheral and Central Auditory Processing / [ed] Gastone Celesia, Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2013, p. 71-80Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Lyxell, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Uhlén, Inger
    CLINTEC, Karolinska institutet, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Henricson, Cecilia
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Cognitive and communicative development in deaf and hearing-impaired children with cochlear implants and/or hearing-aids2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the study was to examine neurophysiological, cognitive and linguistic development in deaf and hearing-impaired children (5–7 years of age) with CI and/or hearingaids and how a phonological intervention programme may influence this development. The deaf and hearing-impaired children were compared with age-matched hearing children. The results reveal that deaf and hearing-impaired children had equivalent or close to equivalent performance levels compared to hearing children for cognitive and linguistic tasks with relatively low demands on phonological processing, whereas there was a substantial and significant difference between the groups for cognitive tasks involving explicit phonological processing. The results indicate that there is a relationship between age at implant and neurophysiological, cognitive and linguistic development, where early implantation promotes faster development. The childrens´ cognitive performance increased as a function of phonological intervention.

  • 3.
    Lyxell, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Linneaus Centre; Cognition, Communication & Learning, Lund University, Sweden.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Henricson, Cecilia
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Cognitive and communicative development in deaf and hearing-impaired children with cochlear implants and/or hearing-aids2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the study was to examine neurophysiological, cognitive and linguistic development in deaf and hearing-impaired children (5–7 years of age) with CI and/or hearingaids and how a phonological intervention programme may influence this development. The deaf and hearing-impaired children were compared with age-matched hearing children. The results reveal that deaf and hearing-impaired children had equivalent or close to equivalent performance levels compared to hearing children for cognitive and linguistic tasks with relatively low demands on phonological processing, whereas there was a substantial and significant difference between the groups for cognitive tasks involving explicit phonological processing. The results indicate that there is a relationship between age at implant and neurophysiological, cognitive and linguistic development, where early implantation promotes faster development. The childrens´ cognitive performance increased as a function of phonological intervention.

  • 4.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Computer-assisted intervention for Deaf and Hard of hearing (D/HH) children with cochlear implants or hearing aids: Effects on phonological processing skills, Cognitve factors and phonological change, Reading and cognitive factors, Multiple case study of children with cochlear implants2013Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Interventionsstudie med fokus att förbättra fonologiska färdigheter2012In: Barnplantabladet, ISSN 1401-8543, no September, p. 34-35p. 34-35Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Genomförandet av den här interventionsstudien får anses framgångsrik på flera sätt, även om man bör vara försiktig med vilka allmänna slutsatser som kan dras,med tanke på det lilla antalet undersökta barn. Dels innebar studien signifikanta träningseffekter på alla barns förmåga att matcha ljud/bokstav, och dels utvecklade de fonologiskt mindre säkra barnen sina fonologiska färdigheter. Likaså är den datorbaserade interventionsstudien ett exempel på metodutveckling då den underlättar att viktig träning av avgörande betydelse för barnens utveckling såväl i skola och i det kommande arbetslivet, kan åstadkommas hemma på ett relativt enkelt sätt.

  • 6.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rethinking Sound: Computer-assisted reading intervention with a phonics approach for deaf and hard of hearing children using cochlear implants or hearing aids2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present thesis, computer-assisted reading intervention with a phonics approach was examined in deaf and hard of hearing children (DHH) aged 5, 6 or 7 years old using cochlear implants, hearing aids or a combination of both. Children with normal hearing (NH), matched for non-verbal intelligence and age, served as a reference group. Deaf and hard of hearing children constitute a heterogenetic population regarding cognitive and academic achievement. Many of them do not reach age appropriate levels in language and reading ability during their school years, with negative consequences for later training facilities and job opportunities. Finding relevant intervention methods to promote early language learning and literacy development that are easy to implement is therefore of great importance. In this thesis three aspects of cognitive ability (phonological processing skills, lexical access and working memory capacity), and reading ability was examined at three points in time; baseline 1, pre intervention and post intervention. Additionally, computer-assisted training delivered by  means of the Internet in the children’s homes was explored in order to determine whether it would be a useful and efficient method for the DHH population. Overall, the results from the present thesis support the notion that offering a computer-assisted intervention program delivered at home, is an alternative way to support not only NH children with reading difficulties but also to support DHH children’s phonological development and decoding proficiency.

    List of papers
    1. Computer-assisted training of phoneme–grapheme correspondence for children who are deaf and hard of hearing: Effects on phonological processing skills
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Computer-assisted training of phoneme–grapheme correspondence for children who are deaf and hard of hearing: Effects on phonological processing skills
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    2013 (English)In: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, ISSN 0165-5876, E-ISSN 1872-8464, Vol. 77, no 12, p. 2049-2057Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    Examine deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) children's phonological processing skills in relation to a reference group of children with normal hearing (NH) at two baselines pre intervention. Study the effects of computer-assisted phoneme–grapheme correspondence training in the children. Specifically analyze possible effects on DHH children's phonological processing skills.

    Methods

    The study included 48 children who participated in a computer-assisted intervention study, which focuses on phoneme–grapheme correspondence. Children were 5, 6, and 7 years of age. There were 32 DHH children using cochlear implants (CI) or hearing aids (HA), or both in combination, and 16 children with NH. The study had a quasi-experimental design with three test occasions separated in time by four weeks; baseline 1 and 2 pre intervention, and 3 post intervention. Children performed tasks measuring lexical access, phonological processing, and letter knowledge. All children were asked to practice ten minutes per day at home supported by their parents.

    Results

    NH children outperformed DHH children on the majority of tasks. All children improved their accuracy in phoneme–grapheme correspondence and output phonology as a function of the computer-assisted intervention. For the whole group of children, and specifically for children with CI, a lower initial phonological composite score was associated with a larger phonological change between baseline 2 and post intervention. Finally, 18 DHH children, whereof 11 children with CI, showed specific intervention effects on their phonological processing skills, and strong effect sizes for their improved accuracy of phoneme–grapheme correspondence.

    Conclusion

    For some DHH children phonological processing skills are boosted relatively more by phoneme–grapheme correspondence training. This reflects the reciprocal relationship between phonological change and exposure to and manipulations of letters.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2013
    Keywords
    Deaf and hard of hearing; Children; Cochlear implants; Hearing aids; Phonological processing skills; Computer-assisted intervention
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-100465 (URN)10.1016/j.ijporl.2013.10.007 (DOI)000328870800027 ()
    Projects
    Neurofysiologiska aspekter på hörande
    Available from: 2013-11-08 Created: 2013-11-08 Last updated: 2017-12-06
    2. Predictors of phonological change in deaf and hard of hearing children who use cochlear implants or hearing aids
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Predictors of phonological change in deaf and hard of hearing children who use cochlear implants or hearing aids
    Show others...
    2014 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The purpose of the present study was to examine cognitive abilities (i.e., working memory (WM), lexical access, phonological processing skills (PhPS), and letter knowledge) in deaf and hard of hearing (D/HH) children in relation to a reference group with normal hearing (NH) children pre intervention with a computer-assisted program that focused on phonological coding. A more specific purpose was to explore how cognitive abilities were associated to PhPS pre intervention and to phonological change post intervention in D/HH children in general, and specifically in D/HH children with weak initial PhPS.

    Methods: Participants were thirty-two children using cochlear implants or hearing aids, or both in combination, and sixteen children with NH 5, 6 and 7 years of age. Children practiced with phonological coding 10 min per day for 4 weeks with support by their parents. Cognitive abilities were examined pre and post intervention.

    Results: NH and D/HH children displayed a similar performance level on the majority of cognitive tasks, but the D/HH children demonstrated weaker lexical access and PhPS. A significant correlation between complex WM and PhPS pre intervention was only observed in D/HH children. Weak initial performance on one phonological processing task capturing both lower level and higher level auditory processing was the main significant predictor of phonological change in all D/HH children. In D/HH children with weak initial PhPS letter naming was associated with phonological change.

    Conclusions: The associations between complex working memory and PhPS in D/HH children and the lack of such associations in children with NH may indicate that phonological processing skills require more cognitive resources in the D/HH children. Letter knowledge can act as a driving force for phonological change following intervention in D/HH children with weak PhPS.

    Keywords
    Deaf and hard of hearing, children, cochlear implants, hearing aids, phonological change, cognitive abilities
    National Category
    Other Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-108899 (URN)
    Available from: 2014-07-11 Created: 2014-07-11 Last updated: 2018-04-07Bibliographically approved
    3. Computer-assisted reading intervention with a phonics approach for children using cochlear implants or hearing aids
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Computer-assisted reading intervention with a phonics approach for children using cochlear implants or hearing aids
    Show others...
    2014 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 55, no 5, p. 448-455Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examines computer-assisted reading intervention with a phonics approach for deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) children in Sweden using cochlear implants or hearing aids, or a combination of both. The study included forty-eight children, 5, 6 and 7 years of age. Sixteen children with normal hearing (NH) served as a reference group. The first purpose of the study was to compare NH and DHH children’s reading ability at pre and post intervention. The second purpose was to investigate effects of the intervention. Cognitive and demographic factors were analyzed in relation to reading improvement. Results showed no statistically significant difference for reading ability at the group level, although NH children showed overall higher reading scores at both test points. Age comparisons revealed a statistically significant higher reading ability in the NH 7-year olds compared to the DHH 7-year olds. The intervention proved successful for word decoding accuracy, passage comprehension and as a reduction of nonword decoding errors in both NH and DHH children. Reading improvement was associated with complex working memory and phonological processing skills in NH children. Correspondent associations were observed with visual working memory and letter knowledge in the DHH children. Age was the only demographic factor that was significantly correlated with reading improvement. The results suggest that DHH children’s beginning reading may be influenced by visual strategies that might explain the reading delay in the older children.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley: 24 months, 2014
    Keywords
    Children, deaf and hard of hearing, cochlear implants, hearing aids, computer-assisted reading intervention, phonics approach
    National Category
    Other Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-108900 (URN)10.1111/sjop.12149 (DOI)000341908300007 ()25078707 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2014-07-11 Created: 2014-07-11 Last updated: 2018-04-07Bibliographically approved
    4. Segmental and suprasegmental properties in nonword repetition: An explorative study of the associations with nonword decoding in children with normal hearing and children with bilateral cochlear implants
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Segmental and suprasegmental properties in nonword repetition: An explorative study of the associations with nonword decoding in children with normal hearing and children with bilateral cochlear implants
    Show others...
    2015 (English)In: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 216-235Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The present study explored nonword repetition (NWR) and nonword decoding in normalhearing (NH) children and in children with cochlear implants (CIs). Participants were 11 children with bilateral CIs, 5:0-7:11 years (M = 6.5 yrs.), and 11 NH children, individually age-matched to the children with CIs. The purpose was twofold; to thoroughly describe aspects of repetition and decoding of novel words and to study possible associations between them. All children were assessed after having practiced with a computer-assisted reading intervention with a phonics approach during four weeks. Results showed that NH children outperformed children with CIs on the majority of aspects of NWR. The analysis of syllable length in NWR revealed that children with CIs made more syllable omissions than did the NH children, and predominantly in prestressed positions. Additionally, the consonant cluster analysis showed significantly more consonant omissions and substitutions in children with CIs suggesting that reaching fine- grained levels of phonological processing was particularly difficult for these children. No significant difference was found for decoding accuracy between the groups, as measured by percent nonwords and percent phonemes correctly decoded, but differences were observed regarding error patterns. Further, phoneme deletions and lexicalizing of nonwords occurred more often in children with CIs than in those with NH. The correlation analysis revealed that the ability to repeat consonant clusters in NWR had the strongest associations to nonword decoding in both groups.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Informa Healthcare, 2015
    Keywords
    Nonword repetition, nonword decoding, children, normal hearing, cochlear implants
    National Category
    Other Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-108901 (URN)10.3109/02699206.2014.987926 (DOI)000349619700004 ()
    Note

    This research was funded by The Swedish Research Council for Working Life and Social Sciences, the Linneaus Centers HEAD at Linkoping University, and CCL - Cognition, Communication and Learning at Lund University.

    Available from: 2014-07-11 Created: 2014-07-11 Last updated: 2018-04-07
  • 7.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Engström, Elisabeth
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ors, Marianne
    Lennaeus Centre, Lund University.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Phonological intervention in children with cochlear implants and/or hearing aids2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lindgren, Magnus
    Department of Linguistics, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Linneaus centre, Lund University, Lund, Sweden;.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ors, Marianne
    Linneaus centre, Lund University, Lund, Sweden;.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Engström, Elina
    Linneaus centre, Lund University, Lund, Sweden;.
    Compute based phonological intervention: Effects on phonological processing2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lindgren, Magnus
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Ors, Marianne
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Engström, Elisabet
    Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Computer-assisted intervention for children with hearing impairment: Cognitive factors and phonological change2013In: CHSCOM2013, Linköping University Electronic Press, 2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Thirty-two children with hearing impairment (HI) using cochlear implants (CI) and/or hearing aids (HA), and sixteen with normal hearing (NH) participated in a computer-assisted intervention study that focused on perceiving and memorizing phonemic sounds. The first purpose was to study cognitive abilities in NH and HI children, how they related to phonological processing skills (PhPS) pre intervention and to phonological growth post intervention. The second purpose was to analyze children’s performance at different fine-grained levels of phonological processing, i.e. how they manipulated, stored and produced phonological entities of different size with or without semantic content. This was put in relation to children’s type of auditory stimulation (electrical; bilateral CI, bimodal: CI + HA and acoustical; bilateral HA). Results showed significant correlations between complex working memory and PhPS in children with HI but not in children with NH. This suggests different cognitive strategies in the children when dealing with phonological processing tasks. Poor phoneme discrimination was the strongest predictor of phonological growth in the children with HI as a function of training. Thus, the computer-assisted program was beneficial for HI children with weak initial phoneme discrimination skills. Children with CI showed reduced performance at fine-grained levels of receptive phonological processing but not on expressive phonological lexical tasks.

  • 10.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Humanities laboratory, Cognition, Communication & Learning, Lund University.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lindgren, Magnus
    Humanities laboratory, Cognition, Communication & Learning, Lund University.
    Ors, Marianne
    Humanities laboratory, Cognition, Communication & Learning, Lund University.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Department of Linguistics, Stockholm University.
    Engström, Elisabet
    Karolinska Institutet (CLINTEC), Dept of Audiology and Neurootology, Karolinska University Hospital.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institutet, Rosenlunds sjukhus, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Predictors of phonological change in deaf and hard of hearing children who use cochlear implants or hearing aids2014Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The purpose of the present study was to examine cognitive abilities (i.e., working memory (WM), lexical access, phonological processing skills (PhPS), and letter knowledge) in deaf and hard of hearing (D/HH) children in relation to a reference group with normal hearing (NH) children pre intervention with a computer-assisted program that focused on phonological coding. A more specific purpose was to explore how cognitive abilities were associated to PhPS pre intervention and to phonological change post intervention in D/HH children in general, and specifically in D/HH children with weak initial PhPS.

    Methods: Participants were thirty-two children using cochlear implants or hearing aids, or both in combination, and sixteen children with NH 5, 6 and 7 years of age. Children practiced with phonological coding 10 min per day for 4 weeks with support by their parents. Cognitive abilities were examined pre and post intervention.

    Results: NH and D/HH children displayed a similar performance level on the majority of cognitive tasks, but the D/HH children demonstrated weaker lexical access and PhPS. A significant correlation between complex WM and PhPS pre intervention was only observed in D/HH children. Weak initial performance on one phonological processing task capturing both lower level and higher level auditory processing was the main significant predictor of phonological change in all D/HH children. In D/HH children with weak initial PhPS letter naming was associated with phonological change.

    Conclusions: The associations between complex working memory and PhPS in D/HH children and the lack of such associations in children with NH may indicate that phonological processing skills require more cognitive resources in the D/HH children. Letter knowledge can act as a driving force for phonological change following intervention in D/HH children with weak PhPS.

  • 11.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Humanities laboratory, Cognition, Communication & Learning, Lund University.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lindgren, Magnus
    Humanities laboratory, Cognition, Communication & Learning, Lund University.
    Ors, Marianne
    Humanities laboratory, Cognition, Communication & Learning, Lund University.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Department of Linguistics, Stockholm University.
    Engström, Elisabet
    Karolinska Institutet (CLINTEC), Dept of Audiology and Neurootology, Karolinska University Hospital.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institutet, Rosenlunds sjukhus, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Segmental and suprasegmental properties in nonword repetition: An explorative study of the associations with nonword decoding in children with normal hearing and children with bilateral cochlear implants2015In: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 216-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study explored nonword repetition (NWR) and nonword decoding in normalhearing (NH) children and in children with cochlear implants (CIs). Participants were 11 children with bilateral CIs, 5:0-7:11 years (M = 6.5 yrs.), and 11 NH children, individually age-matched to the children with CIs. The purpose was twofold; to thoroughly describe aspects of repetition and decoding of novel words and to study possible associations between them. All children were assessed after having practiced with a computer-assisted reading intervention with a phonics approach during four weeks. Results showed that NH children outperformed children with CIs on the majority of aspects of NWR. The analysis of syllable length in NWR revealed that children with CIs made more syllable omissions than did the NH children, and predominantly in prestressed positions. Additionally, the consonant cluster analysis showed significantly more consonant omissions and substitutions in children with CIs suggesting that reaching fine- grained levels of phonological processing was particularly difficult for these children. No significant difference was found for decoding accuracy between the groups, as measured by percent nonwords and percent phonemes correctly decoded, but differences were observed regarding error patterns. Further, phoneme deletions and lexicalizing of nonwords occurred more often in children with CIs than in those with NH. The correlation analysis revealed that the ability to repeat consonant clusters in NWR had the strongest associations to nonword decoding in both groups.

  • 12.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lindgren, Magnus
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Ors, Marianne
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institutet, Rosenlunds sjukhus, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Computer-assisted intervention for Deaf and Hard of hearing (D/HH) children with cochlear implants or hearing aids: Cognitive factors and phonological change2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Study cognitive abilities; specifically working memory and lexical access in NH and DHH children, and their correlations to phonological processing skills (PhPS) pre intervention. Analyze how cognitive abilities related to phonological change post intervention. 

    Material and Method: Tasks for lexical access, complex and visual working memory and Phpr were assessed pre and post intervention.

    Conclusion: DHH children performed at a lower level than NH children on lexical access but equally on complex and visual working memory. Significant correlations between complex working memory and PhPS were evident in DHH children but not in NH. This suggests that DHH children recruit more cognitive resources when performing PhPr tasks. Weak initial performance on a task for phonological representations (Phrep) was the only significant predictor of phonological change in DHH children. Weak PhRep was associated with a higher age at diagnosis, higher age at implant, and shorter usage-time with CI. 

  • 13.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Humanities laboratory, Cognition, Communication & Learning, Lund University.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lindgren, Magnus
    Humanities laboratory, Cognition, Communication & Learning, Lund University.
    Ors, Marianne
    Humanities laboratory, Cognition, Communication & Learning, Lund University.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Department of Linguistics, Stockholm University.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institutet, Rosenlunds sjukhus, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Computer-assisted reading intervention with a phonics approach for children using cochlear implants or hearing aids2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 55, no 5, p. 448-455Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examines computer-assisted reading intervention with a phonics approach for deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) children in Sweden using cochlear implants or hearing aids, or a combination of both. The study included forty-eight children, 5, 6 and 7 years of age. Sixteen children with normal hearing (NH) served as a reference group. The first purpose of the study was to compare NH and DHH children’s reading ability at pre and post intervention. The second purpose was to investigate effects of the intervention. Cognitive and demographic factors were analyzed in relation to reading improvement. Results showed no statistically significant difference for reading ability at the group level, although NH children showed overall higher reading scores at both test points. Age comparisons revealed a statistically significant higher reading ability in the NH 7-year olds compared to the DHH 7-year olds. The intervention proved successful for word decoding accuracy, passage comprehension and as a reduction of nonword decoding errors in both NH and DHH children. Reading improvement was associated with complex working memory and phonological processing skills in NH children. Correspondent associations were observed with visual working memory and letter knowledge in the DHH children. Age was the only demographic factor that was significantly correlated with reading improvement. The results suggest that DHH children’s beginning reading may be influenced by visual strategies that might explain the reading delay in the older children.

  • 14.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Linneaus Centre: Cognition, Communication & Learning, Lund University, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lindgren, Magnus
    Linneaus Centre: Cognition, Communication & Learning, Lund University, Sweden.
    Ors, Marianne
    Linneaus Centre: Cognition, Communication & Learning, Lund University, Sweden.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Department of Linguistics, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institutet, Rosenlunds sjukhus, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The Phonics Approach in Swedish Children using Cochlear Implants or Hearing Aids: Inspecting Phonological Gain2014In: Journal of Communication Disorders, Deaf Studies & Hearing Aids, ISSN 2375-4427, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 117-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigated cognitive abilities (i.e. Phonological Processing Skills (PhPS), lexical access, complex and visual Working Memory (WM), and letter knowledge) in Deaf and Hard of Hearing children (DHH) 5, 6 and 7 years of age using cochlear implants or hearing aids. Children with Normal Hearing (NH) served as a reference group. All children took part of a computer-assisted intervention with a phonics approach for 4 weeks aimed to support PhPS. The first aim of the study was to examine associations between cognitive abilities and Phonological Processing Skills (PhPS) pre intervention in DHH and NH children respectively. The second aim was to examine cognitive predictors of phonological gain post intervention. Finally, the influence of background variables on phonological gain was examined in NH and DHH respectively and in DHH children with weak PhPS particularly. Results showed comparable performance level in NH and DHH children on the majority of cognitive tasks, but weaker PhPS and lexical access in the DHH children. A significant association between PhPS and complex WM was only evident in DHH children. This finding suggests that DHH recruit more cognitive resources in phonological processing. A phonological representation task was the single predictor of phonological gain in DHH children. Children with initial weak performance on this task but had letter-naming skills, displayed relatively more phonological gain from the phonics training. Children with difficulties with the phonological representation task were older when diagnosed and had an older age at amplification. Further, these children displayed broader cognitive difficulties, suggesting that reduced access to auditory stimulation may have wide ranging effects on cognitive development.

  • 15.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Engström, Elisabet
    Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Phonological intervention in children with cochlear implants and/or hearing aid. Effects on cognition, language and reading, neurophysiological findings2010Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 16.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Linnécentrum Cognition, Communication and Learning, Lunds universitet.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lindgren, Magnus
    Linnécentrum Cognition, Communication and Learning, Lunds universitet.
    Ors, Marianne
    Linnécentrum Cognition, Communication and Learning, Lunds universitet.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholms Universitet.
    Engström, Elisabet
    Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset och Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset och Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Datorbaserad fonologisk intervention för barn med cochleaimplantat (CI) och/eller hörapparat (HA) – effekter på fonologiska färdigheter2012In: Logopednytt, ISSN 1102-500X, no 3, p. 18-23p. 18-23Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Children with mild to profound hearing impairment 5, 6 and 7 years of age, thirty-two using cochlear implants and/or hearing aids, and sixteen normal hearing children participated in a computer based phonological intervention study.The main design was a quasi-experimental design with three test sessions separated in time with four weeks. Each test session included tasks for phonological skills and letter knowledge. All children were asked to practice 10 minutes per day.Results showed that children with HI displayed a heterogeneous pattern of results with respect to phonological skills. Only 20 percent performed within the range of NH children; these were children with HA, except one child with CI/HA.Group comparisons at the first and last test session revealed that children with CI displayed difficulty with phonological working memory whereas children with HA showed less letter knowledge. Intervention revealed positive effects on accuracy of phoneme-grapheme correspondence for all children and a significant positive change on phonological processing skills for children with weak initial phonological skills.

  • 17.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lindgren, Magnus
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Ors, Marianne
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Engström, Elisabet
    Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Phonological intervention for children with hearing aids and/or cochlear implants- effects on phonological processing2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lindgren, Magnus
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Ors, Marianne
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Engström, Elisabet
    Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Phonological intervention for children with hearing aids and/or cochlear implants- effects on phonological processing2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lindgren, Magnus
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Ors, Marianne
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Engström, Elisabet
    Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Phonological intervention for children with hearing aids and/or cochlear implants- effects on phonological processing2011Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 20.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lindgren, Magnus
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Ors, Marianne
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Computer assisted intervention for children who use cochlear implants or hearing aids: Effects on phonological processing skills. Cognitive factors and phonological change2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lindgren, Magnus
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Ors, Marianne
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institutet, Rosenlunds sjukhus, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Computer-assisted training of phoneme–grapheme correspondence for children who are deaf and hard of hearing: Effects on phonological processing skills2013In: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, ISSN 0165-5876, E-ISSN 1872-8464, Vol. 77, no 12, p. 2049-2057Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    Examine deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) children's phonological processing skills in relation to a reference group of children with normal hearing (NH) at two baselines pre intervention. Study the effects of computer-assisted phoneme–grapheme correspondence training in the children. Specifically analyze possible effects on DHH children's phonological processing skills.

    Methods

    The study included 48 children who participated in a computer-assisted intervention study, which focuses on phoneme–grapheme correspondence. Children were 5, 6, and 7 years of age. There were 32 DHH children using cochlear implants (CI) or hearing aids (HA), or both in combination, and 16 children with NH. The study had a quasi-experimental design with three test occasions separated in time by four weeks; baseline 1 and 2 pre intervention, and 3 post intervention. Children performed tasks measuring lexical access, phonological processing, and letter knowledge. All children were asked to practice ten minutes per day at home supported by their parents.

    Results

    NH children outperformed DHH children on the majority of tasks. All children improved their accuracy in phoneme–grapheme correspondence and output phonology as a function of the computer-assisted intervention. For the whole group of children, and specifically for children with CI, a lower initial phonological composite score was associated with a larger phonological change between baseline 2 and post intervention. Finally, 18 DHH children, whereof 11 children with CI, showed specific intervention effects on their phonological processing skills, and strong effect sizes for their improved accuracy of phoneme–grapheme correspondence.

    Conclusion

    For some DHH children phonological processing skills are boosted relatively more by phoneme–grapheme correspondence training. This reflects the reciprocal relationship between phonological change and exposure to and manipulations of letters.

  • 22.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Linneaus centre HEAD, Lund University, Lund, Sweden;.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lindgren, Magnus
    Department of Psychology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Ors, Marianne
    Lennaeus Centre, Lund University.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fonologisk intervention för barn med cochleaimplantat och /eller hörapparat2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 23.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Linneaus centre HEAD, Lund University, Lund, Sweden;.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lindgren, Magnus
    Department of Psychology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Ors, Marianne
    Lennaeus Centre, Lund University.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fonologisk intervention för barn med måttlig till grav hörselnedsättning som använder hörapparat och/eller cochleaimplantat2012Other (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Linneaus centre HEAD, Lund University, Lund, Sweden;.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lindgren, Magnus
    Department of Psychology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Ors, Marianne
    Lennaeus Centre, Lund University.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fonologisk intervention för barn med måttlig till grav hörselnedsättning som använder hörapparat och/eller cochleaimplantat2012Other (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Linneaus centre HEAD, Lund University, Lund, Sweden;.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lindgren, Magnus
    Department of Psychology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Ors, Marianne
    Lennaeus Centre, Lund University.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fonologisk intervention för barn med måttlig till grav hörselnedsättning som använder hörapparat och/eller cohleaimplantat: Effekter på fonologisk bearbetning2012Other (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Linneaus centre HEAD, Lund University, Lund, Sweden;.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lindgren, Magnus
    Department of Psychology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Ors, Marianne
    Lennaeus Centre, Lund University.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Phological intervention for children with hearing aids and/or cochlear implants- effects on phonological processing2011Other (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Linneaus centre HEAD, Lund University, Lund, Sweden;.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lindgren, Magnus
    Department of Psychology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Ors, Marianne
    Lennaeus Centre, Lund University.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Phonological intervention for children with hearing aids and/or cochlear implants- effects on phonological processing2011Other (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Linneaus centre HEAD, Lund University, Lund, Sweden;.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lindgren, Magnus
    Department of Psychology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Ors, Marianne
    Lennaeus Centre, Lund University.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Phonological intervention for children with hearing aids and/or cochlear implants- effects on phonological processing2011Other (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Linneaus centre HEAD, Lund University, Lund, Sweden;.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lindgren, Magnus
    Department of Psychology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Ors, Marianne
    Lennaeus Centre, Lund University.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Phonological intervention for children with hearing aids and/or cochlear implants effects on phonological processing2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 30.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Department of Logopedics, Phoniatrics and Audiology, Lund University.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lindgren, Magnus
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Ors, Marianne
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Phonological intervention for children with hearing aids and/or cochlear implants-effects on phonological processing2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Linneaus centre HEAD, Lund University, Lund, Sweden;.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institute, Rosenlunds sjukhus, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Magnus
    Department of Psychology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Ors, Marianne
    Linneaus centre HEAD, Lund University, Lund, Sweden;.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Department of Linguistics, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Engström, Elina
    Linneaus centre HEAD, Lund University, Lund, Sweden;.
    Coputer based phonological intervention: Effects on phonological processing2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children with mild to profound hearing impairment (HI) using cochlear implants (CI) and/or hearingaids (HA), and children with normal hearing (NH) participated in a phonological intervention study, bymeans of a computer‐based intervention program (Graphogame, Lyytinen et al., 2009). Children were 5,6 and 7 years of age. Thirty‐two of the children used CI and/or HA. 16 children with NH served as thecontrol group. The main design was a quasi‐experimental 3 x 3 design. Each test session was separatedin time with four weeks. All children were asked to practice 10 minutes per day at home supported bytheir parents, with an intervention program primarily developed to enhance phonemic differentiation.Results showed that the children with HI displayed a heterogeneous pattern of results, specifically withrespect to their performance on the phonological tasks. Approximately 20 percent performed within therange of NH children; these were all children with HA except one child with CI/HA. Children with CIdisplayed considerable difficulty with phonological working memory whereas children with HAshowed less knowledge in letter tasks. Intervention revealed positive effects on accuracy of phonemegraphemecorrespondence for all children and a significant positive change on phonological processingskills for children with weak initial phonological skills. Enhanced phoneme‐grapheme connections maybuild associations between the phonological lexicon and the sub‐lexical phonological representations,thereby improving underlying skills essential for word learning and the development of literacy. Implicationsof this are discussed within theoretical models of phonological and lexical processing (Goswami,2000; Ramus, 2001).

  • 32.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Engström, Elisabet
    Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Ors, Marianne
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Magnus
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Computer based Phonological Intervention for children with CI and/or HA: Effects on phonological processing2012Conference paper (Other academic)
1 - 32 of 32
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