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  • 1.
    Lykke, Nina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Jonsson, Annika
    Karlstad University.
    Radomska, Marietta
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies.
    Mehrabi, Tara
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies.
    Henriksen, Line
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies.
    Alasuutari, Varpu
    University of Turku.
    Queer Death: Challenging Conventional Ontologies, Norms, and Images of Death, Dying and Mourning2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Embodied and institutionalized discourses and practices related to death,dying and mourning are pervaded by normativities and regulations,framed by intersecting power differentials related to gender, sexuality,race, class, religion, but also to the life/death binary and to materialagencies not so commonly included in discussions of intersectionality suchas liminality, killability, uncontainability, and vibrancy. These norms andregulations have often been left unproblematized by otherwise criticalintellectuals, including academic feminists, perhaps because the situationswhere these issues materialize as crucial on personal levels also oftenare situations, where people are most vulnerable and literally pushed tothe borders of ‘the Real’, and where well known symbolic grounds do notcount anymore.The panel aims to generate new discussions around these issues, criticallyand (self) reflexively scrutinizing and challenging conventionalnormativities, assumptions, expectations and regimes of truths that arebrought to life or made evident by death, dying and mourning.The panel will among others problematize grief-related normativityas well as the anti-grief and sadness norm carried by goal-oriented,neoliberal rationality. This includes examining how sadness, memorializationand non-acceptance can be performed and articulated asresistance against prescribed ways of mourning and being a mourner.Moreover, the panel will explore how boundaries between life/theliving and death/the dead are drawn, conceptualized and imagined, andwhat these boundary-shaping practices reveal about the role of religion,tradition, science, economy, and so on. Often sharp dichotomies areutilized to make sense of the relationship between life/death, the living/the dead, animate/inanimate, and of ethical distinctions bound to normsrelated human exceptionalism, contrasted by the precarious status oflives not counted within such norms. However, in some contexts suchdichotomies are nuanced and deconstructed. Concepts like absencepresence,liminality and social death, have, for example, been used indeath studies to address the false simplicity of the pre/post-mortem divide, while some bioart practices have created artworks on the boundariesbetween living and non-living meant to prompt new reflections on these.

  • 2.
    Radomska, Marietta
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies.
    Archives of Lichenology or 100 Vignettes: Storying the Non/Living in a More-than-human World: Paper forming part of the workshop “Becoming with Alien Encounters” (by Nina Lykke, Katja Aglert, Line Henriksen and Marietta Radomska)2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Radomska, Marietta
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    As the Non/Living Twitches: Bioart, Movement, and the Question of Life2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Radomska, Marietta
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies.
    Between the Posthumanities and Bioart: Imagining the Futures in a More-than-human World: invited speaker and panellist at the annual KVIT Conference: Extend our limits (organised by Cognitive Science students at LiU), 27-28 April 2017.2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The posthumanities is a transdisciplinary research area that combines critical and creative engagement with arts, sciences, technologies, cultural research and critique in order to explore, attend to, and problematise dynamic human/nonhuman relationalities and entanglements of bodies, technologies and environments in a more-than-human world. Thinking with and through bioart opens up an onto-epistemological and ethical enquiry in such a posthumanist manner.

  • 5.
    Radomska, Marietta
    Utrecht University, Netherlands.
    Biopolityka: Od Michela Foucaulta do Giorgio Agambena2010In: Estetyka i Krytyka, ISSN 1643-1243, Vol. 2, no Suppl. 2, p. 147-155Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to examine the concept of biopolitics - a form of power/politics the object of which is the very biological life (Aristotle's zoe ) of the human species. Although the term of biopolitics was employed for the first time at the beginning of the 20th century by a Swedish theorist, Rudolf Kjellén, it is Michel Foucault who thoroughly discussed it and conducted its genealogy. Taking Foucault's analyses as my point of departure, I will examine Giorgio Agamben's negative idea of biopolitics (tanathopolitics) that sets a threshold below which life can be annihilated with impunity. Finally, I will raise the question of the possibility of an affirmative biopolitics.

  • 6.
    Radomska, Marietta
    Adam Mickiewicz University, Netherlands.
    Braidotti/Haraway: Perspektywa Posthumanizmu2010In: Nowa Krytyka, ISSN 0867-647X, no 24-25, p. 57-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article analyses philosophical premises of the feminist posthumanist ethical project, while drawing on the theories of Rosi Braidotti and Donna Haraway.

  • 7.
    Radomska, Marietta
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies.
    Deterritorialising Death: On Feminist Biophilosophy as a Queer(ing) Methodology2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper stems from a larger project, set against the backdrop of contemporary discursive and material unfoldings of the environmental crises as well as their accompanying cultural and scientific imaginaries.

    In the project, I ask what happens when contemporary art (especially body, eco- and bioart) – in a dialogue with feminist materialist philosophies – is mobilised in order to challenge the conventional (i.e. anchored in the Western tradition of the autonomous (exclusively) human subject) understandings of death, and assess multiple vulnerabilities and power differentials that form part of the materialisations of ecologies of death in the context of the Anthropocene.

    In other words, the project examines how contemporary art read through the lens of feminist materialist philosophies (e.g. Colebrook, MacCormack, Grosz) may – and do – queer, that is, unsettle, subvert and exceed binaries, given norms, normativities, and conventions that frame and govern the bodies and processes constitutive of death, extinction and annihilation, especially in the given environmental context.

    In order to do so, we need an adequate set of tools. In the present paper, I argue for a tripartite methodology that queers the traditional human-exceptionalist concept of death: (1) feminist biophilosophy as an examination that does not search for an ‘essence’ of life, but instead focuses on the processes that take life beyond itself; (2) ‘the non/living’ (Radomska 2016) as a way to conceptualise death/life entanglement; and (3) queer vitalism as a ground for aesthetics (Colebrook 2014). By discussing each of these components and employing them in the analysis of select artworks (e.g. by Australian artist Svenja Kratz), I hope to open up a space for discussion on this queer(ing) methodology’s potential for mobilising a novel feminist-materialist understanding of both ontology and ethics of death.

  • 8.
    Radomska, Marietta
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies.
    Doing Away with Life: Paper presented at the official opening of SOLU Space by the Bioart Society, 9 November 2018, Helsinki, FI.2018Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 9.
    Radomska, Marietta
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies.
    Ecologies of Death: On the Non/Living and Bioart2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    While the contemporary context of environmental crises and the accompanying degradation of food and water resources render certain habitats unliveable, leading to the death of individual organisms, populations and species extinction, Western cultural imaginaries tend to draw a thick dividing line between the human and nonhuman others. It is in death specifically that the human (of the humanities and social sciences, in particular) fences himself off from other forms of life: it is essentially human death that deserves individual attention and respect, which, for example, substantially differ from the usual treatment of dead animal bodies. Simultaneously, bioscience and biotechnologies emphasise interdependency and relationality as key characteristics of life shared by all organisms. In this paper I focus on the ways select examples of contemporary bioart may allow us to reinvent our approach to death and think its ethico-ontology as multiplex ecologies of the non/living

  • 10.
    Radomska, Marietta
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Entanglements of the Victimless Leather Jacket: Waste, Death, and the Uncontainability of the Living”2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the context of bioscience (as much as in the field of bioart) that engages with tissue bioengineering, the life of the cultured cells is closely intertwined with the issues of biohazardous waste, contagion, death, and control (over the manipulated ‘living’). While looking at one of the exhibitions during which Australian bioartists The Tissue Culture & Art Project showed their ‘semi-living’ sculpture the Victimless Leather Jacket, which unexpectedly became contaminated with fungi, I will examine the material-discursive entanglements of the ideas of death, life, and the uncontainability of the latter that are enacted through the bioartwork as well as bioartistic practices in a broader sense.

  • 11.
    Radomska, Marietta
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies.
    Ethics, Politics and the Art World: Commentary on the presentation by artist Pilvi Takala “Negotiating Expectations: Making compromises without compromising your work in the context of projects in non-art environments”2018Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 12.
    Radomska, Marietta
    Faculty of Social Sciences, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznan, Poland.
    Etyka Nomadyczna a Bioart2008In: Dzieło sztuki z perspektywy kulturowej: Metody, dyskursy, narracje / [ed] Sebastian Antkowiak and Alicja Rubczak, Torun, Poland: Nicolaus Copernicus UniversityPress, Torun, Poland , 2008, p. 157-169Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Radomska, Marietta
    Utrecht University, Netherlands.
    Feminist Lines of Flight and the Thought of Novelty2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14. Radomska, Marietta
    From Discipline to Control: Analysis of the Society in M. Foucault’s and G. Deleuze’s Writings2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Radomska, Marietta
    Utrecht University, Netherlands.
    From Feminism to Speciesism and Back Again or How We Are Becoming and How We Collaborate...2010In: Artmix, Vol. 33, no 13Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims to discuss and challenge speciesism and anthropocentrism that structure Western philosophy and culture. By looking at new directions in both contemporary feminist theory and art, the text asks about possibilities of thinking a non-anthropocentric and non-speciesist ethics of care.

  • 16.
    Radomska, Marietta
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    How does life come to matter through bioart?: On ethico-zoonto-epistemology of transspecies relations2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17. Radomska, Marietta
    How to think affirmative biopolitics?2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Radomska, Marietta
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Imagining Extinction: The Cultural Meanings of Endangered Species2017In: Angelaki, ISSN 0969-725X, E-ISSN 1469-2899, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 257-261Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 19.
    Radomska, Marietta
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies.
    Living and Dying in the Anthropocene: Thinking with Lichens2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Lichens are holobionts consisting of fungi and algae or cyanobacteria (and possibly other microorganisms), living in a symbiotic relationship. They are resilient “pioneer organisms” that are among the first species to grow in previously uninhabited areas, able to survive in extreme temperatures and harsh environments. In the Nordic context, they are crucial players in the biodiversity of especially boreal and arctic region, where they significantly contribute to biomass and are a primary source of food for reindeer. Simultaneously, lichens are sensitive to air pollution and climate changes, which render them critical in the study of human-induced changes in ecosystems.

    In this paper (forming part of the very early stages of a transdisciplinary project focused on ecologies of death in the context of contemporary environmental crises), I take lichens as both a figuration and a case study. By thinking with lichens inhabiting the Nordic region, I will try to explore the ethico-ontological questions of living and dying in the Anthropocene.

  • 20.
    Radomska, Marietta
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    MacCormack, Patricia (ed.), The Animal Catalyst: Towards Ahuman Theory, Bloomsbury, London and New York, 2014. ISBN: 9781472534446 (Paperback) / 9781472526847 (Cloth), 224 pp., US$ 34.95 (Paperback) / US$ 104 (Cloth).2015In: Somatechnics, ISSN 2044-0138, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 255-258Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Radomska, Marietta
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Machinic Assemblages of the Non/Living: Bioart and Uncontainable Life2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bioart is an increasingly popular current of contemporary art which involves the use of biological (”living”) materials and employment of bioscientific procedures, protocols, and tools. This also means that bioartworks often result from the collaboration between artists and scientists. As any other form of tinkering with life in the frames of wet biology laboratory, bioartistic practices generate waste on a daily basis. It is not only laboratory materials, rubber gloves, or chemical substances that need to be disposed in accordance with lab protocols; the very life itself, the organisms, cells, tissues, bacteria, and all other forms of the living – once they “fulfil the ascribed role” – are to be disposed as well. In the latter case, yet, the “disposal” may also be understood as neutralisation or killing as the organisms cannot be sustained in the lab anymore (“are no longer useful”?), nor can they leave the lab. As the bioartists, Ionat Zurr and Oron Catts (Tissue Culture & Art Project) put it, “when life leaves the lab it is almost always waste”. In their own projects, which do not only consist in growing semi-living sculptures out of tissue cultures seeded on biopolymer scaffoldings of different shapes, but also include the involvement of the audience, TC&A draw attention to this very instrumental position which life itself occupies in the context of contemporary bioscience and technology. At the same time, both their artworks and narratives challenge the popular (transhumanist) discourse on manageability and control over life In this paper I will look at how the concept of the disposable/waste, which is increasingly problematised not only within environmental science, but also philosophy, sociology and cultural studies, may allow for a problematisation of life and the living entwined in the procedures constitutive of a bioartistic laboratory. Furthermore, whilst concentrating on the intertwinement between human and nonhuman, organic and inorganic, living and non-living that all fall into the category of “life”, I will introduce the concept of the non/living as a more adequate and fruitful way of approaching this dynamic assemblage. Finally, I will inquire about possible ways in which the assemblage of the non/living may enable a rethinking of ethics in a non-anthropocentric manner.

  • 22.
    Radomska, Marietta
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies.
    Non/Living Archives: Deterritorialising Death2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The processes and imaginaries of what is commonly framed as ‘the Anthropocene’ combine and expose the erasure, consumption, oppression, colonisation, and exploitation of different kinds of bodies: human and nonhuman, organic and inorganic, individual and multiplicitous. Some of them are always already rendered ‘bare life’ or commodities to be consumed. While death as both an event and a process underpins the questions of the current environmental crisis and the accompanying cultural imaginaries, its understanding remains fashioned and arranged very much according to the conventional Western idea of the autonomous human subject. By bringing select philosophical perspectives and new-media/bioartworks into dialogue, this paper aims to focus on the possibilities of moving beyond the hegemony of the human, ‘deterritorialising’ death, and exploring ethical potentials such a deterritorialisation may open up.

  • 23.
    Radomska, Marietta
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies.
    Non/living Assemblages: Uncontainable Life, Waste and Biomedical Imaginaries2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Radomska, Marietta
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Non/living Matter, Bioscientific Imaginaries and Feminist Technoecologies of Bioart2017In: Australian feminist studies (Print), ISSN 0816-4649, E-ISSN 1465-3303, Vol. 32, no 94, p. 377-394Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bioart is a form of hybrid artistico-scientific practices in contemporary art that involve the use of bio-materials (such as living cells, tissues, organisms) and scientific techniques, protocols, and tools. Bioart-works embody vulnerability (intrinsic to all beings) and depend on (bio)technologies that allow these creations to come into being, endure and flourish but also discipline them. This article focuses on ‘semi-living’ sculptures by The Tissue Culture and Art Project (TC&A). TC&A’s artworks consist of bioengineered mammal tissues grown over biopolymer scaffoldings of different shapes and require sterile conditions of a bioreactor and constant care in order to survive. The article explores how bioart-works are always already intertwined with multiple (bio)technologies and techniques of care and labour, forming specific feminist technoecologies that challenge conventional bioscientific and cultural imaginaries of embodiment and the relation between physis and techné. TC&A’s sculptures expose life as the non/living: the processual enmeshment of the organic and inorganic, living and non-living, and growth and decay. The article argues that thinking with and through the feminist technoecologies of bioart mobilises philosophical inventiveness: not only does it problematise the entwinement of technology and biomatter and of culture and nature, but it also prompts us to rethink the ontology of life.

  • 25.
    Radomska, Marietta
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    On the Monstrosity of the Semi-Living: Embodiment, Subjecthood and Ethics in the Context of Bioart2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Radomska, Marietta
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies.
    POSTHUMAN ECOLOGIES OF THE CORPSE.: Book review of: Erin E. Edwards: The Modernist Corpse:Posthumanism and the Posthumous. University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis,2018, 240 pages. Price: $27.2019In: Kvinder, Køn og Forskning, ISSN 0907-6182, E-ISSN 2245-6937, no 3-4, p. 124-126Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Radomska, Marietta
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Posthumanist Pedagogies: Toward an Ethics of the Non/Living2013In: Journal of Curriculum and Pedagogy, ISSN 1550-5170, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 28-31Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Radomska, Marietta
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. University of Helsinki, Department of Cultures.
    Promises of Non/Living Monsters and Uncontainable Life2018In: Somatechnics, ISSN 2044-0138, E-ISSN 2044-0146, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 215-231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the Western cultural imaginaries the monstrous is defined – following Aristotelian categorisations – by its excess, deficiency or displacement of organic matter. These characteristics come to the fore in the field of bioart: a current in contemporary art that involves the use of biological materials (various kinds of soma: cells, tissues, organisms), and scientific procedures, technologies, protocols, and tools. Bioartistic projects and objects not only challenge the conventional ideas of embodiment and bodily boundaries, but also explore the relation between the living and non-living, organic and inorganic, human and nonhuman, as well as various thresholds of the living.

    By looking at select bioartworks, this paper argues that the analysed projects offer a different ontology of life. More specifically, they expose life as uncontainable, that is, as a power of differentiation that traverses the divide between the living and non-living, organic and inorganic, human and nonhuman, and, ultimately, life and death. In this way, they draw attention to excess, processuality and multiplicity at the very core of life itself. Thus understood, life always already surpasses preconceived material and conceptual limits.

    Finally, while taking Deleuzian feminisms and new materialism as its theoretical ground, the paper suggests that such a revision of the ontology of life may mobilise future conceptualisations of ethics that evade the anthropocentric logic dominant in the humanities and social sciences.

  • 29.
    Radomska, Marietta
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies.
    Queering Boundaries: On Biophilosophy, the Non/living and Death: Paper formed part of the two-session panel “Queering Ecologies of Death”, proposed by Marietta Radomska and Patricia MacCormack.2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    paper asks about the ways to rethink death in its multiplicitous ecosophical relationality, processuality and materiality, beyond the structures of human exceptionalism that govern Western ontological, ethico-political and cultural renderings of both life and death. One of the avenues to do so is to engage with practices of eco-, bio- and body art, which themselves challenge the hegemonic position of the human subject and seek to unpack the life/death binary in the context of contemporary technoscience and environmental crises. Yet, in order to explore death as post-anthropocentric ecologies we need tools that may queer its conventional understandings. To paraphrase Noreen Giffney and Myra Hird, to ‘queer’ means to unhinge certainties and systematically disturb the familiar, ‘to undo normative entanglements and fashion alternative imaginaries’ beyond the exclusive concern with gender and sexuality (2008, 6). The task of queer theorising is a task of continuous self-reflection, of critique and the rendering visible of the ‘norm’.

  • 30.
    Radomska, Marietta
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies.
    Queering Boundaries: On Death, the Non/Human and the Environment2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is set against the backdrop of the ways in which Western philosophy and cultural imaginaries comprehend death: either – following religious (yet often secularised) tradition – as a step towards afterlife, or – in a biomedical perspective – as something to be eliminated/worked against. Such a dual thinking about death is paralleled and simultaneously fortified by a strong division and hierarchy between the human subject and its nonhuman others characteristic of Western thought. These dualisms are, nonetheless, challenged by both theory and art emergent in the context of contemporary environmental crises, global climate change and ‘the sixth great extinction’. While employing feminist Deleuzian philosophy/queer vitalism and queer eco-criticism as my theoretical ground, I focus on the following questions: how do contemporary practices of bio/eco-art that deal with death and dying influence our understanding of death? What kind of conceptual/material queering do they mobilise? And finally, what does it mean to Death Studies?

  • 31.
    Radomska, Marietta
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies.
    Queering Un/Common Ecologies of Death2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ecological crises – often seen as a key component of the Anthropocene - render certain habitats unliveable, leading to the death of individuals and populations. While some indicate that the notion of the Anthropocene reinforces the hegemonic position and exceptionalism of the human subject, it also becomes evident that, in this context, the stories of species extinction and nonhuman death are profoundly entangled with the histories of colonial violence and elimination of the non-normative human other.

    Whilst bioscience emphasises interdependency, commonality and relationality as crucial characteristics of life shared by all organisms, Western cultural imaginaries tend to draw a thick dividing line between human and nonhuman animals, particularly evident in the context of death. On the one hand, death appears as a process common to all forms of life; on the other, as an event that distinguishes human from other organisms. This split is paralleled by a dualistic approach to the human corpse itself: ‘dead’ matter is predominantly framed by either the secularised discourse on the sanctity and uniqueness of the dead body, or the narratives on its ‘abject’ character.

    There is a lack of sufficient theorising of the messy intimacies between materialities of human and nonhuman kind that form part of the processes of death and dying. Our cultural understandings require narratives attentive to relationalities and entanglements of the living and non-living, and human and nonhuman, which I call ‘ecologies of death’.

    By reading select contemporary eco-artworks and philosophical and scientific accounts on death in a more-than-human world through one another, this paper aims to explore and queer the ecologies and ontologies of death in the un/common world of the Anthropocene.

  • 32.
    Radomska, Marietta
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The Anthropocene, Practices of Storytelling and Environmental Justice2017In: Angelaki, ISSN 0969-725X, E-ISSN 1469-2899, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 257-261Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Radomska, Marietta
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The Lesson of Tissue Cultures: Thinking the Radical Immanence of Life Through Bioart"2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Radomska, Marietta
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies.
    The Promises of Non/Living Monsters and Uncontainable Life2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper I argue that engaging with bioart mobilises philosophical inventiveness: it contributes to the creation of concepts that attend to the problem of life and work through the binary of the living/non-living, organic/inorganic, and human/nonhuman. More specifically, I propose here the concept of uncontainable life, which refers to dynamic, non-teleological, multiplicitous forces and processes of transformation, and intensities that are constitutive of matter and always carry the potential for surplus. These excessive material forces that are exposed in the analysed bioartworks, traverse the divide between the living and non-living, organic and inorganic, human and nonhuman, growth and decay, and life and death, as they are traditionally comprehended. In other words, uncontainable life can be described by three factors: 1) the processual enmeshment of living and non-living, organic and inorganic, and life and death, that I call the non/living; 2) life’s multiplicitous character: life expresses itself in assemblages of components and forces that are modulated through their connections and interactions with each other; and 3) the potential for excess, carried by forces of the non/living that enable them to surpass prescribed material and conceptual boundaries.

  • 35.
    Radomska, Marietta
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The twitching of life: Somatechnics of the non-living2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Radomska, Marietta
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies.
    Thinking with Bioart: Towards a Biophilosophy of the Non/Living2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biophilosophy – in contrast to the philosophy of biology – does not focus on the philosophical principles of biosciences, or on the essence and basic criteria of life. Instead, biophilosophy asks about relations and potentials carried by life: about that which takes life beyond itself, with both its onto-epistemological and ethical implications. Bioart is a current in contemporary art which involves the use of biological materials (cells, tissues, organisms) along with scientific procedures, protocols, and tools.

    While looking at select artworks, this paper argues that thinking with and through the hybrid artistico-scientific practices of bioart is a biophilosophical, material-discursive strategy that exposes the ways in which bioartworks explore and enact life as processual, multiplicitous, and characterised by a potential for excess. Thus, it mobilises a transdisciplinary mode of attending to changing human/nonhuman ecologies and imagining possible futures.

  • 37.
    Radomska, Marietta
    Utrecht University, Netherlands.
    Time, Space, Matter: On Cartography of Gilles Deleuze and Karen Barad2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The monist philosophy of Gilles Deleuze appears to be a great inspiration for new materialist philosophers like Rosi Braidotti or Manuel DeLanda, as van der Tuin and Dolphijn suggest. Although Karen Barad (another representaive of New Materialism) almost does not refer to Deleuze, it is tempting to point out the moments in her new materialist account that converge with Deleuzian immanent thought. In this paper I will attempt to investigate the resonances and convergences between Barad’s andDeleuze’s thought, while focusing on several concepts, which appear constantly in both authors (such as matter, time, space, and their methods).

  • 38.
    Radomska, Marietta
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies.
    Tinkering with Cells: Towards an Ontology of the Non/Living2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Taking its departure from a direct engagement with a bioartistic project conducted by Dr Ionat Zurr (which partly consists in growing mouse skeletal muscle tissue that expresses itself by twitching), this paper aims to examine the critical and creative potential of the concept of life redefined as the non/living, its entanglement with movement, as well as the related understanding of ethics.

  • 39.
    Radomska, Marietta
    Utrecht University, Netherlands.
    Towards a Posthuman Collective: Ontology, Epistemology and Ethics2010In: Praktyka Teoretyczna, ISSN 2081-8130, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 94-115Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The article aims at reconstructing ontological, epistemological, and ethical frames of the posthumanist project, while drawing on the philosophies of Karen Barad, Deleuze and Guattari, and Donna Haraway. Only by defining such theoretical premises of the project one may be able to ask about and think a posthumanist collective and posthumanist politics

  • 40.
    Radomska, Marietta
    Utrecht University, Netherlands.
    Towards an Ecology of the Affective: Between Pain, Pleasure and Radical Body Modifications2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditionally psychoanalysis has perceived sexuality as always related to genitality and desire as the one connected with lack.The issue of desire has often been associated with the Freudian pain-and-pleasure principle that may be traced back to Aristotle’s claim that one always seeks pleasure and avoids pain.

    E.Grosz’s extensive analysis of (animal)sex with its relation to desire and sensibility (influenced by G.Callois and A.Lingis),and G.Deleuze’s concepts of affectivity and desire challenge the idea of the organisation of erogenous zones (around the genital centre),the unity of the organic body and its stabilised image.

     In this way,the “carnal experience is uncertain, non-teleological,undirected” and a body that experiences such undirectedness may be acknowledged as the Deleuzian BwO.This leads to the radical redefinition and reconfiguration of traditional understandings of pleasure and pain.Following this path,I will investigate contemporary practices of one of the forms of radical body modification, namely flesh hook suspension. The questions of pain, pleasure and erotic (sexual)desire often follow from the discussion on BM.Groszian and Deleuzian concepts of desire, affect and becoming will enable me to offer an innovative,philosophical,affirmative,yet critical reading of contemporary rituals of suspension,and thus to open up a new site for the production of knowledge and creation of the new.

  • 41.
    Radomska, Marietta
    Utrecht University, Netherlands.
    Towards Politics of A Life2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Radomska, Marietta
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Uncontainable Life: A Biophilosophy of Bioart2016Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Uncontainable Life: A Biophilosophy of Bioart investigates the ways in which thinking through the contemporary hybrid artistico-scientific practices of bioart is a biophilosophical practice, one that contributes to a more nuanced understanding of life than we encounter in mainstream academic discourse. When examined from a Deleuzian feminist perspective and in dialogue with contemporary bioscience, bioartistic projects reveal the inadequacy of asking about life’s essence. They expose the enmeshment between the living and non-living, organic and inorganic, and, ultimately, life and death. Instead of examining the defining criteria of life, bioartistic practices explore and enact life as processual, differential, and always already uncontainable, thus transcending preconceived material and conceptual boundaries.

    In this way, this doctoral thesis concentrates on the ontology of life as it emerges through the selected bioartworks: “semi-living” sculptures created by The Tissue Culture and Art Project and the performance May the Horse Live in Me (2011) by L’Art Orienté Objet. The hope is that such an ontology can enable future conceptualisations of an ethico-politics that avoids the anthropocentric logic dominant in the humanities and social sciences.

  • 43.
    Radomska, Marietta
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies.
    Vitalism without Life: a response paper to J. Wamberg’s presentation “Deconstructing Vitalism: Approaching Bioart Through a dark Ecology Paradigm2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Radomska, Marietta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies.
    Wasting Life: An Ethico-Aesthetics of the Non/Living2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 45. Radomska, Marietta
    Zoosemiotics as a new perspective2006In: Homo Communicativus, ISSN 1896-3099, no 1, p. 71-77Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Radomska, Marietta
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Zylinska, Joanna, Minimal Ethics for the Anthropocene, Ann Arbor: Michigan Press/Open Humanities Press, 2014, 152 pp. ISBN 97816078532992015In: philoSOPHIA, ISSN 2155-0891, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 315-317Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In both its form and composition , Minimal Ethics for the Anthropocene (2014) by Joanna Zylinska is a short, original, and elegant book, the aim of which, as the author emphasizes, is to “tell a different story about the world and our human positioning in and with it, while taking seriously what science has to say about life and death” (Zylinska 2014, 11). The book consists of ten chapters, each of which can be seen as an independent essay representing one element of the overall argument and thus constituting a possible entry point.

  • 47.
    Radomska, Marietta
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Glosowitz, Monika
    NOWE RELACJE, POŁĄCZENIA ORAZ TRANSFORMACJE: interview with Marietta Radomska2012Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 48.
    Radomska, Marietta
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Henriksen, Line
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Missing Links and Non/Human Queerings: an Introduction2015In: Somatechnics, ISSN 2044-0138, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 113-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, questions regarding the ontological status of the human have been raised with renewed interest and imagination within various fields of critical thought. In the face of biotechnological findings and increasingly advanced technologies that connect as well as disturb settled boundaries, whether geographical or bodily, not to mention philosophical questionings of traditional western humanism, the boundaries of the human subject have been contested. The human body, traditionally imagined as closed and autonomous, has been opened up to a world of forces and agencies that are strange, other and often deeply disturbing when viewed from an anthropocentric standpoint.

  • 49.
    Radomska, Marietta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. University of Helsinki.
    Mehrabi, Tara
    Karlstad University.
    Lykke, Nina
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Queer Death Studies: Coming to Terms with Death, Dying and Mourning Differently. An Introduction2019In: Kvinder, Køn og Forskning, ISSN 0907-6182, E-ISSN 2245-6937, no 3-4, p. 3-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The conventional engagements with the questions of death, dying and mourning are insufficient and reductive: they are often governed by the normative notions of the subject; interhuman and human/nonhuman bonds; family relations and communities; rituals; and finally, experiences of grief, mourning, and  bereavement.  Moreover, these engagements are often embedded in constraining beliefs in life/death divides, constructed along the lines of conventional religious and/or scientific mind/body dualisms.

    Against this background, Queer Death Studies serves as a site for ‘queering’ traditional ways of approaching death both as a subject of study and philosophical reflection, and as a phenomenon to articulate in artistic work or practices of mourning. Here, the notion of ‘queer’ conveys many meanings. It refers to researching and narrating death, dying and mourning in the context of queer bonds and communities, where the subjects involved/studied/interviewed and the relations they are involved in are recognised as ‘queer’. Simultaneously, the term ‘queer’ can also function as an adverb and a verb, referring thus to the processes of going beyond and unsettling (subverting, exceeding) binaries and given norms, normativities, and constraining conventions. In other words, ‘queer’ becomes both a process and a methodology that is applicable and exceeds the focus on gender and sexuality as its exclusive concerns.

  • 50.
    Åsberg, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Radomska, Marietta
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Why we need feminist posthumanities for a more-than-human world2019In: Transformative Humanities KTH Blog,, Vol. 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, the environment is in us, and we humans are fully in the environment. That much is clear in this new planetary era of uncertainty some call the Anthropocene. Postdisciplinary practices and situated knowledges (Haraway again!) are of course especially salient in this regard: a brute necessity. The planet knows no disciplinary borders, it does not separate between nature and culture. Our planetary issues can not be solved by demarcations where sciences do nature and humanities do culture. In truth, our Anthropocene predicament belies the whole classical distinction between nature and culture! The needed efficacy of such postdisciplinary work is evidenced in many new, old and déja vu fields like feminist science studies and networked new materialisms, in bio-art and eco-art, in somatechnics, new media studies, post-continental philosophy, in anthropocene studies or transcorporeal theory, in multispecies- and medical humanities, in transgender studies, xenofeminism, cyborg- or techno-humanities, ecological or environmental humanities, queer death studies, critical veganism, and a mounting range of posthumanisms, inhumanisms and ahumanisms. Yes, critical and creative scholars in and around the humanities have not been lazy in the face of the many issues that face us today. Feminist posthumanities cover or converse with such postdisciplinary practices. It labels a wide-spread, multi-sited, evolving and growing effort to rework the role of the humanities and their relation to science, technology, art and contemporary society on the basis that our idea of the human is fundamentally reaching its limits, and changing. Feminist posthumanities thus responds to the need for more-than-human humanities.

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