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  • 1.
    Aoun, E. G.
    et al.
    Brown Univ, RI 02912 USA.
    Jimenez, V. A.
    Oregon Hlth and Sci Univ, OR 97201 USA.
    Vendruscolo, L. F.
    Scripps Res Inst, CA 92037 USA; NIDA, MD 20892 USA.
    Walter, N. A. R.
    Oregon Hlth and Sci Univ, OR 97201 USA.
    Barbier, Estelle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ferrulli, A.
    Univ Cattolica Sacro Cuore, Italy.
    Haass-Koffler, C. L.
    Brown Univ, RI 02912 USA; NIAAA, MD 20892 USA; NIDA, MD 20892 USA.
    Darakjian, P.
    Oregon Hlth and Sci Univ, OR 97201 USA.
    Lee, M. R.
    NIAAA, MD 20892 USA; NIDA, MD 20892 USA.
    Addolorato, G.
    Univ Cattolica Sacro Cuore, Italy.
    Heilig, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Hitzemann, R.
    Oregon Hlth and Sci Univ, OR 97201 USA.
    Koob, G. F.
    Scripps Res Inst, CA 92037 USA; NIAAA, MD 20852 USA.
    Grant, K. A.
    Oregon Hlth and Sci Univ, OR 97201 USA.
    Leggio, L.
    Brown Univ, RI 02912 USA; NIAAA, MD 20892 USA; NIDA, MD 20892 USA.
    A relationship between the aldosterone-mineralocorticoid receptor pathway and alcohol drinking: preliminary translational findings across rats, monkeys and humans2018In: Molecular Psychiatry, ISSN 1359-4184, E-ISSN 1476-5578, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 1466-1473Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aldosterone regulates electrolyte and fluid homeostasis through binding to the mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs). Previous work provides evidence for a role of aldosterone in alcohol use disorders (AUDs). We tested the hypothesis that high functional activity of the mineralocorticoid endocrine pathway contributes to vulnerability for AUDs. In Study 1, we investigated the relationship between plasma aldosterone levels, ethanol self-administration and the expression of CYP11B2 and MR (NR3C2) genes in the prefrontal cortex area (PFC) and central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) in monkeys. Aldosterone significantly increased after 6- and 12-month ethanol self-administration. NR3C2 expression in the CeA was negatively correlated to average ethanol intake during the 12 months. In Study 2, we measured Nr3c2 mRNA levels in the PFC and CeA of dependent and nondependent rats and the correlates with ethanol drinking during acute withdrawal. Low Nr3c2 expression levels in the CeA were significantly associated with increased anxiety-like behavior and compulsive-like drinking in dependent rats. In Study 3, the relationship between plasma aldosterone levels, alcohol drinking and craving was investigated in alcohol-dependent patients. Non-abstinent patients had significantly higher aldosterone levels than abstinent patients. Aldosterone levels positively correlated with the number of drinks consumed, craving and anxiety scores. These findings support a relationship between ethanol drinking and the aldosterone/MR pathway in three different species.

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  • 2.
    Augier, Eric
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dulman, Russell S.
    NIAAA, MD USA.
    Damadzic, Ruslan
    NIAAA, MD USA.
    Pilling, Andrew
    NIAAA, MD USA.
    Hamilton, Paul
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Heilig, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    The GABA(B) Positive Allosteric Modulator ADX71441 Attenuates Alcohol Self-Administration and Relapse to Alcohol Seeking in Rats2017In: Neuropsychopharmacology, ISSN 0893-133X, E-ISSN 1740-634X, Vol. 42, no 9, p. 1789-1799Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    GABAergic signaling is involved in modulating the reinforcing properties of alcohol, and GABA(B) receptors have been proposed as a potential target for clinical treatment of alcoholism. The orthosteric GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen has been shown to suppress operant self-administration of alcohol in animals and alcohol use in alcohol-dependent patients, but its utility is limited by a narrow therapeutic index. We tested the effects of ADX71441, a novel GABA(B) receptor positive allosteric modulator, on alcohol-related behaviors in rats. We first assessed the effects of ADX71441 ( 1, 3, 10 and 30 mg/kg, I.P.) on both non-dependent and dependent male Wistar rats trained to self-administer 20% alcohol. We then determined the effects of ADX71441 on stress-induced as well as cue-induced relapse-like behavior. Finally, we sought to identify the brain regions through which ADX71441 may act to prevent relapse-like behavior by mapping the neuronal activation induced by stress-induced reinstatement of alcohol-seeking using c-Fos immunohistochemistry. ADX71441 dose-dependently decreased alcohol self-administration of both dependent and non-dependent animals, but its potency was higher in alcohol-dependent rats. Furthermore, both cue-and stress-induced alcohol seeking were blocked by the GABA(B) receptor positive allosteric modulator. Finally, pretreatment with 3 mg/kg of ADX71441 before stress-induced reinstatement significantly decreased c-Fos expression in a network of brain regions implicated in stress-induced relapse, comprising the nucleus accumbens shell, the dorsal raphe nucleus and the medial prefrontal cortex. Our findings support a causal role of GABAB receptors in alcohol reinforcement and relapse to alcohol seeking. These effects are observed in the absence of significant sedative side effects. Jointly, these observations indicate that GABAB receptor positive allosteric modulators merit being tested clinically for the treatment of alcoholism. Our data also point to a potential biomarker of target engagement for early clinical studies.

  • 3.
    Badiani, Aldo
    et al.
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy; Sussex Addiction Research and Intervention Centre (SARIC), University of Sussex, Brighton, UK.
    Berridge, Kent C.
    Department of Psychology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
    Heilig, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Nutt, David J.
    Imperial College, London, UK.
    Robinson, Terry E.
    Department of Psychology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
    Comments: Addiction research and theory: a commentary on the Surgeon Generals Report on alcohol, drugs, and health2018In: Addiction Biology, ISSN 1355-6215, E-ISSN 1369-1600, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 3-5Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Office of the Surgeon General recently produced its first Report on the consequences of alcohol and drug abuse on health, making several very laudable policy recommendations. The Report also emphasizes the importance of adequate funding for biomedical research, which is good news for both researchers and patients. However, the Report is marred by a biased viewpoint on the psychology and neurobiology of drug addiction. We highlight here four controversial issues that were depicted as facts in the Report, thereby potentially misleading non-expert readers about the current state-of-the-art understanding of the psychology and neurobiology of drug addiction. It will be important to recognize a fuller range of scientific viewpoints in addiction neuroscience to avoid amplifying this bias in the coming years.

  • 4.
    Barbier, Estelle
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tapocik, Jenica D.
    NIAAA, MD 20892 USA.
    Juergens, Nathan
    NIAAA, MD 20892 USA.
    Pitcairn, Caleb
    NIAAA, MD 20892 USA.
    Borich, Abbey
    NIAAA, MD 20892 USA.
    Schank, Jesse R.
    NIAAA, MD 20892 USA.
    Sun, Hui
    NIAAA, MD 20892 USA.
    Schuebel, Kornel
    NIAAA, MD 20892 USA.
    Zhou, Zhifeng
    NIAAA, MD 20892 USA.
    Yuan, Qiaoping
    NIAAA, MD 20892 USA.
    Vendruscolo, Leandro F.
    NIDA, MD 21224 USA.
    Goldman, David
    NIAAA, MD 20892 USA.
    Heilig, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    DNA Methylation in the Medial Prefrontal Cortex Regulates Alcohol-Induced Behavior and Plasticity2015In: Journal of Neuroscience, ISSN 0270-6474, E-ISSN 1529-2401, Vol. 35, no 15, p. 6153-6164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent studies have suggested an association between alcoholism and DNA methylation, a mechanism that can mediate long-lasting changes in gene transcription. Here, we examined the contribution of DNA methylation to the long-term behavioral and molecular changes induced by a history of alcohol dependence. In search of mechanisms underlying persistent rather than acute dependence-induced neuroadaptations, we studied the role of DNA methylation regulating medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) gene expression and alcohol-related behaviors in rats 3 weeks into abstinence following alcohol dependence. Postdependent rats showed escalated alcohol intake, which was associated with increased DNA methylation as well as decreased expression of genes encoding synaptic proteins involved in neurotransmitter release in the mPFC. Infusion of the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor RG108 prevented both escalation of alcohol consumption and dependence-induced downregulation of 4 of the 7 transcripts modified in postdependent rats. Specifically, RG108 treatment directly reversed both downregulation of synaptotagmin 2 (Syt2) gene expression and hypermethylation on CpG#5 of its first exon. Lentiviral inhibition of Syt2 expression in the mPFC increased aversion-resistant alcohol drinking, supporting a mechanistic role of Syt2 in compulsive-like behavior. Our findings identified a functional role of DNA methylation in alcohol dependence-like behavioral phenotypes and a candidate gene network that may mediate its effects. Together, these data provide novel evidence for DNA methyltransferases as potential therapeutic targets in alcoholism.

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  • 5.
    Bejerot, Susanne
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Clinical Neuroscience Stockholm, Sweden .
    Landén, Mikael
    Göteborgs universitet, Sahlgrenska akademin, Sweden.
    Heilig, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Anckarsäter, Henrik
    Göteborgs universitet, Sahlgrenska akademin, Sweden.
    Waern, Magda
    Göteborgs universitet, Sahlgrenska akademin, Sweden.
    Socialstyrelsens målnivåer signalerar brist på tillit2017In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 114Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Best, Laura M.
    et al.
    Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada; Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada; Univ Toronto, Canada.
    Williams, Belinda
    Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada.
    Le Foll, Bernard
    Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada; Univ Toronto, Canada; Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada; Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada; Univ Toronto, Canada; Univ Toronto, Canada; Univ Toronto, Canada.
    Mansouri, Esmaeil
    Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada; Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada; Univ Toronto, Canada.
    Bazinet, Richard P.
    Univ Toronto, Canada.
    Lin, Lin
    Univ Toronto, Canada.
    De Luca, Vincenzo
    Univ Toronto, Canada; Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada; Univ Toronto, Canada; Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada.
    Lagzdins, Dina
    Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada.
    Rusjan, Pablo
    Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada; Univ Toronto, Canada; Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada; Univ Toronto, Canada.
    Tyndale, Rachel F.
    Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada; Univ Toronto, Canada; Univ Toronto, Canada.
    Wilson, Alan A.
    Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada; Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada; Univ Toronto, Canada.
    Hendershot, Christian S.
    Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada; Univ Toronto, Canada; Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada.
    Heilig, Markus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Psykiatriska kliniken i Linköping.
    Houle, Sylvain
    Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada; Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada; Univ Toronto, Canada.
    Tong, Junchao
    Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada; Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada; Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada; Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada; Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada.
    Kish, Stephen J.
    Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada; Univ Toronto, Canada; Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada; Univ Toronto, Canada; Univ Toronto, Canada; Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada.
    Boileau, Isabelle
    Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada; Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada; Univ Toronto, Canada; Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada; Univ Toronto, Canada; Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Canada.
    Lower brain fatty acid amide hydrolase in treatment-seeking patients with alcohol use disorder: a positron emission tomography study with [C-11]CURB2020In: Neuropsychopharmacology, ISSN 0893-133X, E-ISSN 1740-634X, Vol. 45, no 8, p. 1289-1296Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The endocannabinoid enzyme, fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), has been proposed as a therapeutic target for alcohol use disorder (AUD) and co-morbid psychiatric illnesses. Investigating this target in the living human brain and its relationship to clinical outcome is a critical step of informed drug development. Our objective was to establish whether brain FAAH levels are low in individuals with AUD and related to drinking behavior. In this pilot study, treatment-seeking patients with AUD completed two PET scans with the FAAH radiotracer [C-11]CURB after 3-7 days (n = 14) and 2-4 weeks (n = 9) of monitored abstinence. Healthy controls (n = 25) completed one scan. FAAH genetic polymorphism (rs324420) and blood concentrations of anandamide and other N-acylethanolamines metabolized by FAAH were determined and AUD symptoms assessed. In AUD, brain FAAH levels were globally lower than controls during early abstinence (F(1,36) = 5.447; p = 0.025)) and FAAH substrates (anandamide, oleoylethanolamide, and N-docosahexaenoylethanolamide) were significantly elevated (30-67%). No significant differences in FAAH or FAAH substrates were noted after 2-4 weeks abstinence. FAAH levels negatively correlated with drinks per week (r = -0.57, p = 0.032) and plasma concentrations of the three FAAH substrates (r > 0.57; p < 0.04)). Our findings suggest that early abstinence from alcohol in AUD is associated with transiently low brain FAAH levels, which are inversely related to heavier alcohol use and elevated plasma levels of FAAH substrates. Whether low FAAH is an adaptive beneficial response to chronic alcohol is unknown. Therapeutic strategies focusing on FAAH inhibition should consider the possibility that low FAAH during early abstinence may be related to drinking.

  • 7.
    Bilbao, Ainhoa
    et al.
    University of Heidelberg, Mannheim, Germany.
    Robinson, J Elliott
    Department of Neurology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.
    Heilig, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Malanga, C J
    Department of Neurology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.
    Spanagel, Rainer
    University of Heidelberg, Mannheim, Germany.
    Sommer, Wolfgang H
    University of Heidelberg, Mannheim, Germany.
    Thorsell, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    A Pharmacogenetic Determinant of Mu-Opioid Receptor Antagonist Effects on Alcohol Reward and Consumption: Evidence from Humanized Mice.2015In: Biological Psychiatry, ISSN 0006-3223, E-ISSN 1873-2402, Vol. 77, no 10, p. 850-858Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: It has been proposed that therapeutic responses to naltrexone in alcoholism are moderated by variation at the mu-opioid receptor gene locus (OPRM1). This remains controversial because human results vary and no prospectively genotyped studies have been reported. We generated humanized mice carrying the respective human OPRM1 A118G alleles. Here, we used this model system to examine the role of OPRM1 A118G variation for opioid antagonist effects on alcohol responses.

    METHODS: Effects of naltrexone on alcohol reward were examined using intracranial self-stimulation. Effects of naltrexone or nalmefene on alcohol intake were examined in continuous access home cage two-bottle free-choice drinking and operant alcohol self-administration paradigms.

    RESULTS: Alcohol lowered brain stimulation reward thresholds in 118GG mice in a manner characteristic of rewarding drugs, and this effect was blocked by naltrexone. Brain stimulation reward thresholds were unchanged by alcohol or naltrexone in 118AA mice. In the home cage, increased alcohol intake emerged in 118GG mice with increasing alcohol concentrations and was 33% higher at 17% alcohol. At this concentration, naltrexone selectively suppressed alcohol intake in 118GG animals to a level virtually identical to that of 118AA mice. No effect of naltrexone was found in the latter group. Similarly, both naltrexone and nalmefene were more effective in suppressing operant alcohol self-administration in 118GG mice.

    CONCLUSIONS: In a model that allows close experimental control, OPRM1 A118G variation robustly moderates effects of opioid antagonism on alcohol reward and consumption. These findings strongly support a personalized medicine approach to alcoholism treatment that takes into account OPRM1 genotype.

  • 8.
    Björk, Karl
    et al.
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Terasmaa, Anton
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Sun, Hui
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Thorsell, Annika
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Sommer, Wolfgang H.
    Central Institute of Mental Health, Mannheim, Germany.
    Heilig, Markus
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Ethanol-induced activation of AKT and DARPP-32 in the mouse striatum mediated by opioid receptors2010In: Addiction Biology, ISSN 1355-6215, E-ISSN 1369-1600, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 299-303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The reinforcing properties of ethanol are in part attributed to interactions between opioid and dopaminergic signaling pathways, but intracellular mediators of such interactions are poorly understood. Here we report that an acute ethanol challenge induces a robust phosphorylation of two key signal transduction kinases, AKT and DARPP-32, in the striatum of mice. Ethanol-induced AKT phosphorylation was blocked by the opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone but unaffected by blockade of dopamine D2 receptors via sulpiride. In contrast, DARPP-32 phosphorylation was abolished by both antagonists. These data suggest that ethanol acts via two distinct but potentially synergistic striatal signaling cascades. One of these is D2-dependent, while the other is not. These findings illustrate that pharmacology of ethanol reward is likely more complex than that for other addictive drugs.

  • 9.
    Björk, Karl
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Tronci, Valeria
    Psychobiology Section, NIDA, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, MD, USA .
    Thorsell, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tanda, Gianluigi
    Psychobiology Section, NIDA, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, MD, USA .
    Hirth, Natalie
    University of Heidelberg, Mannheim, Germany .
    Heilig, Markus
    Laboratory of Clinical and Translational Studies, NIAAA, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA .
    Hansson, Anita C.
    Laboratory of Clinical and Translational Studies, NIAAA, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Sommer, Wolfgang H
    Laboratory of Clinical and Translational Studies, NIAAA, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    β-Arrestin 2 knockout mice exhibit sensitized dopamine release and increased reward in response to a low dose of alcohol2013In: Psychopharmacology, ISSN 0033-3158, E-ISSN 1432-2072, Vol. 230, no 3, p. 439-449Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rationale

    The rewarding effects of alcohol have been attributed to interactions between opioid and dopaminergic system within the mesolimbic reward pathway. We have previously shown that ablation of β-arrestin 2 (Arrb2), a crucial regulator of μ-opioid receptor function, attenuates alcohol-induced hyperlocomotion and c-fos activation in the nucleus accumbens.

    Objectives

    Here, we further investigated the role of Arrb2 in modulating alcohol-induced dopamine (DA) release and conditioned place preference (CPP). We also assessed the functional importance of Arrb2 for μ-opioid receptor surface expression and signaling following an acute alcohol challenge.

    Methods

    Alcohol-evoked (0.375, 0.75, and 1.5 g/kg intraperitoneally) DA release was measured by in vivo microdialysis in the shell of nucleus accumbens. Reward was assessed by the CPP paradigm. Receptor function was assessed by μ-receptor binding and [35S]GTP-γ-S autoradiography.

    Results

    In Arrb2 knockout mice accumbal DA levels reach maximum response at a lower dose compared to wild-type (wt) animals. In line with these results, Arrb2 knockout mice display increased CPP for alcohol as compared to wt mice. Finally, Arrb2 mutant mice display increased μ-opioid receptor signaling in the ventral and dorsal striatum and amygdala in response to a low dose of alcohol, indicating impaired desensitization mechanisms in these mice.

    Conclusions

    Our results show that Arrb2 modulates the response to low doses of alcohol on various levels including μ-opioid receptor signaling, DA release, and reward. They also reveal a clear dissociation between the effects of Arrb2 on psychomotor and reward behaviors.

  • 10.
    Bäckryd, Emmanuel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Heilig, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Hoffmann, Mikael
    Stiftelsen NEPI - nätverk för läkmedelsepidemiologi - Linköping, Sweden .
    Dynamiken i förskrivningen av opioider i Sverige 2000–2015 - Markanta omfördelningar inom opioidgruppen, men ingen »epidemi«2017In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Opioid prescription changes in Sweden 2000-2015 In contrast to the well-established »opioid epidemic« in the US, very little is known about how the prescription of opioids in Sweden has developed during the last decade. Aggregated data from the open Statistical database of the Swedish Board of Health and Welfare were analyzed descriptively. The yearly prevalence of opioid prescription did not change 2006-2015, but there were dramatic shifts in the choice of opioids. During this period, dextropropoxyphene was pulled off the market. Tramadol was used by fewer individuals (-54 % over the decade), but dosages expressed as Defined Daily Dose/patient/year (DDD/pat/y) increased (+41 %). In contrast, oxycodone and morphine were used by more individuals (+465 % and +137 %, respectively), but DDD/pat/y decreased during the period (-56% and -54%). Studies on non-aggregated data from available registries are needed to further elucidate the circumstances and possible consequences of these shifts in opioid prescription patterns.

  • 11.
    Böhme, Rebecca
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Frost-Karlsson, Morgan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Heilig, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Psykiatriska kliniken i Linköping.
    Olausson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Johansson Capusan, Andrea
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Psykiatriska kliniken i Linköping.
    Sharpened self-other distinction in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder2020In: NeuroImage: Clinical, E-ISSN 2213-1582, Vol. 27, article id 102317Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Differentiation between self-produced tactile stimuli and touch by others is necessary for social interactions and for a coherent concept of “self”. In attention-deficit-hyperactivity-disorder (ADHD), tactile hypersensitivity and social cognition problems are part of the symptomatology, but pathophysiological mechanisms are largely unknown. Differentiation of self- and non-self- generated sensations might be key to understand and develop novel strategies for managing hypersensitivity. Here, we compared the neural signatures of affective self- and other-touch between adults with ADHD and neurotypical controls (NC).

    Methods

    Twenty-eight adult ADHD participants and 30 age- and gender-matched NC performed a self-other-touch-task during functional magnetic resonance imaging: they stroked their own arm, an object, or were stroked by the experimenter. In addition, tactile detection thresholds and rubber hand illusion (RHI) were measured.

    Results

    ADHD participants had more autistic traits than NC and reported to engage less in interpersonal touch. They also reported to be more sensitive to tactile stimuli. Compared to NC, ADHD participants showed enhanced responses to both the self- and other-touch conditions: stronger deactivation during self-touch in the anterior and posterior insula, and increased activation during other-touch in primary somatosensory cortex. ADHD participants had intact tactile detection thresholds, but were less susceptible to the RHI.

    Conclusions

    Unaltered detection thresholds suggest that peripheral processing is intact, and that hypersensitivity might be driven by central mechanisms. This has clinical implications for managing somatosensory hypersensitivity in ADHD. The more pronounced differentiation between self- and other-touch might indicate a clearer self-other-distinction. This is of interest regarding body ownership perception in both NC and ADHD, and possibly other psychiatric conditions with altered self-experiences, like schizophrenia. A sharper boundary of the own body might relate to deficits in social cognition and tactile hypersensitivity.

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  • 12.
    Böhme, Rebecca
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Hauser, Steven
    Univ Virginia, VA 22904 USA.
    Gerling, Gregory J.
    Univ Virginia, VA 22904 USA.
    Heilig, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Psykiatriska kliniken inkl beroendekliniken.
    Olausson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Distinction of self-produced touch and social touch at cortical and spinal cord levels2019In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 116, no 6, p. 2290-2299Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Differentiation between self-produced tactile stimuli and touch by others is necessary for social interactions and for a coherent concept of "self." The mechanisms underlying this distinction are unknown. Here, we investigated the distinction between self-and other-produced light touch in healthy volunteers using three different approaches: fMRI, behavioral testing, and somatosensory-evoked potentials (SEPs) at spinal and cortical levels. Using fMRI, we found self-other differentiation in somatosensory and sociocognitive areas. Other-touch was related to activation in several areas, including somatosensory cortex, insula, superior temporal gyrus, supramarginal gyrus, striatum, amygdala, cerebellum, and prefrontal cortex. During self-touch, we instead found deactivation in insula, anterior cingulate cortex, superior temporal gyrus, amygdala, parahippocampal gyrus, and prefrontal areas. Deactivation extended into brain areas encoding low-level sensory representations, including thalamus and brainstem. These findings were replicated in a second cohort. During self-touch, the sensorimotor cortex was functionally connected to the insula, and the threshold for detection of an additional tactile stimulus was elevated. Differential encoding of self-vs. other-touch during fMRI correlated with the individual self-concept strength. In SEP, cortical amplitudes were reduced during self-touch, while latencies at cortical and spinal levels were faster for other-touch. We thus demonstrated a robust self-other distinction in brain areas related to somatosensory, social cognitive, and interoceptive processing. Signs of this distinction were evident at the spinal cord. Our results provide a framework for future studies in autism, schizophrenia, and emotionally unstable personality disorder, conditions where symptoms include social touch avoidance and poor self-vs.-other discrimination.

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  • 13.
    Ciccocioppo, Roberto
    et al.
    University of Camerino, Italy.
    Gehlert, Donald R.
    Lilly Research Laboratories, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
    Ryabinin, Andrey
    Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA.
    Kaur, Simranjit
    Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA.
    Cippitelli, Andrea
    University of Camerino, Italy.
    Thorsell, Annika
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Lê, Anh D.
    University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    Hipskind, Philip A.
    Lilly Research Laboratories, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
    Hamdouchi, Chafiq
    Lilly Research Laboratories, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
    Lu, Jianliang
    Lilly Research Laboratories, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
    Hembre, Erik J.
    Lilly Research Laboratories, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
    Cramer, Jeffrey
    Lilly Research Laboratories, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
    Song, Min
    Lilly Research Laboratories, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
    McKinzie, David
    Lilly Research Laboratories, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
    Morin, Michelle
    Lilly Research Laboratories, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
    Economidou, Daina
    University of Camerino, Italy.
    Stopponi, Serena
    University of Camerino, Italy.
    Cannella, Nazzareno
    University of Camerino, Italy.
    Braconi, Simone
    University of Camerino, Italy.
    Kallupi, Marsida
    University of Camerino, Italy.
    de Guglielmo, Giordano
    University of Camerino, Italy.
    Massi, Maurizio
    University of Camerino, Italy.
    George, David T.
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Gilman, Jody
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Hersh, Jacqueline
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Tauscher, Johannes T.
    Lilly Research Laboratories, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
    Hunt, Stephen P.
    University College London, UK.
    Hommer, Daniel
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Heilig, Markus
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcolholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Stress-related neuropeptides and alcoholism: CRH, NPY, and beyond2009In: Alcohol, ISSN 0741-8329, E-ISSN 1873-6823, Vol. 43, no 7, p. 491-498Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article summarizes the proceedings of a symposium held at the conference on "Alcoholism and Stress: A Framework for Future Treatment Strategies" in Volterra, Italy, May 6-9, 2008. Chaired by Markus Heilig and Roberto Ciccocioppo, this symposium offered a forum for the presentation of recent data linking neuropetidergic neurotransmission to the regulation of different alcohol-related behaviors in animals and in humans. Dr. Donald Gehlert described the development of a new corticotrophin-releasing factor receptor 1 antagonist and showed its efficacy in reducing alcohol consumption and stress-induced relapse in different animal models of alcohol abuse. Dr. Andrey Ryabinin reviewed recent findings in his laboratory, indicating a role of the urocortin 1 receptor system in the regulation of alcohol intake. Dr. Annika Thorsell showed data supporting the significance of the neuropeptide Y receptor system in the modulation of behaviors associated with a history of ethanol intoxication. Dr. Roberto Ciccocioppo focused his presentation on the nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) receptors as treatment targets for alcoholism. Finally, Dr. Markus Heilig showed recent preclinical and clinical evidence suggesting that neurokinin 1 antagonism may represent a promising new treatment for alcoholism. Collectively, these investigators highlighted the significance of neuropeptidergic neurotransmission in the regulation of neurobiological mechanisms of alcohol addiction. Data also revealed the importance of these systems as treatment targets for the development of new medication for alcoholism.

  • 14.
    Cippitelli, Andrea
    et al.
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Damadzic, Ruslan
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Frankola, Kate
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Goldstein, Andrea
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Thorsell, Annika
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Singley, Erick
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Eskay, Robert L
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Heilig, Markus
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Alcohol-induced neurodegeneration, suppression of transforming growth factor-beta, and cognitive impairment in rats: prevention by group II metabotropic glutamate receptor activation2010In: Biological Psychiatry, ISSN 0006-3223, E-ISSN 1873-2402, Vol. 67, no 9, p. 823-830Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Glutamatergic neurotransmission has been implicated in mechanisms of alcohol-induced neurodegeneration and cognitive impairment, but the underlying mechanism remains unknown. Here, we examined whether the group II metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist LY379268 prevents neuronal death and learning deficits in a rat model of binge-like exposure to alcohol.

    METHODS: Following 4-day binge alcohol exposure concurrent with LY379268 or vehicle treatment, Fluoro-Jade B and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) staining were carried out, and reversal learning in the Morris water maze was assessed.

    RESULTS: Fluoro-Jade B staining indicating neurodegeneration was most extensive in the ventral hippocampus and the entorhinal cortex (EC). LY379268 was potently neuroprotective in the EC but not in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. In parallel, binge alcohol exposure suppressed TGF-beta expression in both the EC and dentate gyrus, whereas LY379268 increased TGF-beta in the EC only. Finally, neuroprotective effects of LY379268 were accompanied by prevention of deficits in spatial reversal learning.

    CONCLUSIONS: Our data support a neuroprotective role for group II metabotropic glutamate receptor agonists and TGF-beta in alcohol-induced neurodegeneration.

  • 15.
    Cippitelli, Andrea
    et al.
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Damadzic, Ruslan
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Hamelink, Carol
    National Institute of Mental Health, NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Brunnquell, Michael
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Thorsell, Annika
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Heilig, Markus
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Eskay, Robert L.
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Binge-like ethanol consumption increases corticosterone levels and neurodegneration whereas occupancy of type II glucocorticoid receptors with mifepristone is neuroprotective2014In: Addiction Biology, ISSN 1355-6215, E-ISSN 1369-1600, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 27-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Excessive ethanol (EtOH) use leads to impaired memory and cognition. Using a rat model of binge-like intoxication, we tested whether elevated corticosterone (Cort) levels contribute to the neurotoxic consequences of EtOH exposure. Rats were adrenalectomized (Adx) and implanted with cholesterol pellets, or cholesterol pellets containing Cort in order to achieve basal, medium, or high blood concentrations of Cort. Intragastric EtOH or an isocaloric control solution was given three times daily for 4 days to achieve blood alcohol levels ranging between 200 and 350 mg/dl. Mean 24-hour plasma levels of Cort were ∼110 and ∼40 ng/ml in intact EtOH-treated and intact control animals, respectively. Basal Cort replacement concentrations in EtOH-treated Adx animals did not exacerbate alcohol-induced neurodegeneration in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) or the entorhinal cortex (EC) as observed by amino-cupric silver staining. In contrast, Cort replacement pellets resulting in plasma Cort levels twofold higher (medium) than normal, or greater than twofold higher (high) in Adx-Cort-EtOH animals increased neurodegeneration. In separate experiments, pharmacological blockade of the Type II glucocorticoid (GC) receptor was initiated with mifepristone (RU38486; 0, 5, 15 mg/kg/day, i.p.). At the higher dose, mifepristone decreased the number of degenerating hippocampal DG cells in binge-EtOH-treated intact animals, whereas, only a trend for reduction was observed in 15 mg/kg/day mifepristone-treated animals in the EC, as determined by fluoro-jade B staining. These results suggest that elevated circulating Cort in part mediates EtOH-induced neurotoxicity in the brain through activation of Type II GC receptors.

  • 16.
    Cippitelli, Andrea
    et al.
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Damadzic, Ruslan
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Hansson, Anita C.
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Singley, Erick
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Sommer, Wolfgang H.
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Eskay, Robert
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Thorsell, Annika
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Heilig, Markus
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) suppresses yohimbine-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking2010In: Psychopharmacology, ISSN 0033-3158, E-ISSN 1432-2072, Vol. 208, no 3, p. 417-426Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Reinstatement of responding to a previously alcohol-associated lever following extinction is an established model of relapse-like behavior and can be triggered by stress exposure. Here, we examined whether neuropeptide Y (NPY), an endogenous anti-stress mediator, blocks reinstatement of alcohol-seeking induced by the pharmacological stressor yohimbine.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: NPY [5.0 or 10.0 mug/rat, intracerebroventricularly (ICV)] dose-dependently blocked the reinstatement of alcohol seeking induced by yohimbine (1.25 mg/kg, i.p.) but failed to significantly suppress the maintenance of alcohol self-administration. We then used c-fos expression mapping to examine neuronal activation following treatment with yohimbine or NPY alone or yohimbine following NPY pre-treatment.

    RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: The analysis was focused on a network of structures previously implicated in yohimbine-induced reinstatement, comprised of central (CeA) and basolateral (BLA) amygdala and the shell of the nucleus accumbens (Nc AccS). Within this network, both yohimbine and NPY potently induced neuronal activation, and their effects were additive, presumably indicating activation of excitatory and inhibitory neuronal populations, respectively.

    CONCLUSION: These results suggest that NPY selectively suppresses relapse to alcohol seeking induced by stressful events and support the NPY system as an attractive target for the treatment of alcohol addiction.

  • 17.
    Cippitelli, Andrea
    et al.
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Damadzic, Ruslan
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Singley, Erick
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Thorsell, Annika
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Ciccocioppo, Roberto
    University of Camerino, Italy.
    Eskay, Robert L.
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Heilig, Markus
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Pharmacological blockade of corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRH1R) reduces voluntary consumption of high alcohol concentrations in non-dependent Wistar rats2012In: Pharmacology, Biochemistry and Behavior, ISSN 0091-3057, E-ISSN 1873-5177, Vol. 100, no 3, p. 522-529Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: A dysregulation of the corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) system has been implicated in the development of excessive alcohol consumption and dependence. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether the CRH system is also recruited when non-dependent Wistar rats escalate to high alcohol intake in the intermittent (alternate days) model of drinking.

    METHODS: We compared intermittent and continuous access to 20% (v/v) alcohol in a two-bottle free choice drinking paradigm. Following a total of twenty 24-hour exposures for every experimental group, we assessed signs of alcohol withdrawal, including anxiety-like behavior and sensitivity to stress. The selective CRH1 receptor (CRH1R) antagonist antalarmin (0, 10, 20 mg/kg, i.p.) was tested on alcohol consumption.

    RESULTS: Intermittent access to 20% alcohol led non-selected Wistar rats to escalate their voluntary intake to a high and stable level, whereas continuously exposed animals maintained a lower consumption. These groups did not differ in physical withdrawal signs. In addition, no differences were found when anxiogenic-like behavior was studied, neither under basal conditions or following restraint stress. Nevertheless, sensitivity to the treatment with the CRH1R antalarmin was observed since a reduction of 20% alcohol intake was found in both groups of animals regardless of the regimen of alcohol exposure. In addition, antalarmin was effective when injected to animals exposed to intermittent 10% (v/v) alcohol whereas it failed to suppress 10% continuous alcohol intake.

    CONCLUSIONS: Pharmacological blockade of CRH1R reduced alcohol drinking when sustained high levels of intake were achieved suggesting that the CRH system plays a key role when high doses of ethanol are consumed by non-dependent subjects. This supports the notion that CRH system not only maintains the dependent state but also engages the transition to dependence.

  • 18.
    Cippitelli, Andrea
    et al.
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Karlsson, Camilla
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Shaw, Janice L.
    Eli Lilly, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
    Thorsell, Annika
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Gehlert, Donald R.
    Eli Lilly, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
    Heilig, Markus
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Suppression of alcohol self-administration and reinstatement of alcohol seeking by melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 (MCH1-R) antagonism in Wistar rats2010In: Psychopharmacology, ISSN 0033-3158, E-ISSN 1432-2072, Vol. 211, no 4, p. 367-375Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    RATIONALE: Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is involved in regulation of appetitive behaviors as well as emotional reactivity and reward, behavioral domains relevant to alcohol addiction.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: We evaluated the effects of the non-peptide MCH1 receptor antagonist, GW803430 [6-(4-chloro-phenyl)-3-[3-methoxy-4-(2-pyrrolidin-1-yl-ethoxy)-phenyl]-3H-thieno[3,2-d]pyrimidin-4-one; 3-30 mg/kg, i.p.] on alcohol-related behaviors in Wistar rats.

    RESULTS: Ex vivo binding experiments demonstrated that the GW803430 dose range used resulted in high central MCH1 receptor occupancy. Alcohol self-administration was dose-dependently and potently suppressed, by approximately 80% at the highest dose. Reinstatement of alcohol-seeking induced by alcohol-associated cues was essentially eliminated. In contrast, reinstatement induced by footshock stress was not significantly altered. Taste preference for a quinine/saccharin solution, locomotor activity, and alcohol elimination were unaffected.

    CONCLUSION: Together, these observations support a specific involvement of the MCH system in mediating alcohol reward and cue-induced relapse to alcohol seeking. MCH1-R antagonism may constitute an attractive treatment target for alcohol use disorders.

  • 19.
    Cippitelli, Andrea
    et al.
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Rezvani, Amir H.
    Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA.
    Robinson, J. Elliott
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Eisenberg, Lindsay
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Levin, Edward D.
    Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA.
    Bonaventure, Pascal
    Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research and Development, San Diego, USA.
    Motley, S. Timothy
    Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research and Development, San Diego, USA.
    Lovenberg, Timothy W.
    Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research and Development, San Diego, USA.
    Heilig, Markus
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Thorsell, Annika
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    The novel, selective, brain-penetrant neuropeptide Y Y2 receptor antagonist, JNJ-31020028, tested in animal models of alcohol consumption, relapse, and anxiety2011In: Alcohol, ISSN 0741-8329, E-ISSN 1873-6823, Vol. 45, no 6, p. 567-576Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) signaling has been shown to modulate stress responses and to be involved in regulation of alcohol intake and dependence. The present study explores the possibility that blockade of NPY Y2 autoreceptors using a novel, blood-brain barrier penetrant NPY Y2 receptor antagonist, JNJ-31020028 (N-(4-{4-[2-(diethylamino)-2-oxo-1-phenylethyl]piperazin-1-yl}-3-fluorophenyl)-2-pyridin-3-ylbenzamide), may achieve a therapeutically useful activation of the NPY system in alcohol- and anxiety-related behavioral models. We examined JNJ-31020028 in operant alcohol self-administration, stress-induced reinstatement to alcohol seeking, and acute alcohol withdrawal (hangover)-induced anxiety. Furthermore, we tested its effects on voluntary alcohol consumption in a genetic animal model of alcohol preference, the alcohol-preferring (P) rat. Neither systemic (0, 15, 30, and 40 mg/kg, subcutaneously [s.c.]) nor intracerebroventricular (0.0, 0.3, and 1.0 nmol/rat) administration of JNJ-31020028 affected alcohol-reinforced lever pressing or relapse to alcohol seeking behavior following stress exposure. Also, when its effects were tested on unlimited access to alcohol in P rats, preference for alcohol solution was transiently suppressed but without affecting voluntary alcohol intake. JNJ-31020028 (15 mg/kg, s.c.) did reverse the anxiogenic effects of withdrawal from a single bolus dose of alcohol on the elevated plus-maze, confirming the anxiolytic-like properties of NPY Y2 antagonism. Our data do not support Y2 antagonism as a mechanism for reducing alcohol consumption or relapse-like behavior, but the observed effects on withdrawal-induced anxiety suggest that NPY Y2 receptor antagonists may be a putative treatment for the negative affective states following alcohol withdrawal.

  • 20.
    de Wit, Harriet
    et al.
    Univ Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Heilig, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Psykiatriska kliniken i Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Bershad, A. K.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Does acute stress play a role in the lasting therapeutic effects of psychedelic drugs?2023In: Neuropsychopharmacology, ISSN 0893-133X, E-ISSN 1740-634X, Vol. 48, no 10, p. 1422-1424Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Psychedelic drugs, when used in the context of psychotherapy, can produce significant and long-lasting memories with enduring beneficial effects. Yet, the behavioral and neurobiological mechanisms that underlie these beneficial effects remain a mystery. Here, we suggest that both the quality and durability of memories of the drug-facilitated therapeutic experience may be mediated, in part, by the acute stress responses induced by the drugs. It is known that high doses of psychedelic drugs activate autonomic and hormonal stress responses. For evolutionarily adaptive reasons, acute stress is known to i) instill meaning to the immediate context in which it is experienced, and ii) lead to the formation of salient and lasting memories of the events surrounding the stress. Thus, the stress-inducing effect of psychedelic drugs may contribute to the reported sense of meaning, as well as the durability of the memory of the drug experience. When used in a therapeutic context these actions may i) enhance the salience of insights gained during the experience and ii) strengthen the memories formed by these experiences. Future empirical studies will help to determine whether acute stress contributes to the emotional significance and lasting effects of psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy.

  • 21.
    Domi, Esi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Xu, Li
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Sichuan Prov Peoples Hosp, Peoples R China.
    Paetz, Marvin
    Heidelberg Univ, Germany.
    Nordeman, Anton
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Augier, Gaëlle
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Holm, Lovisa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Toivainen, Sanne
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Augier, Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hansson, Anita C.
    Heidelberg Univ, Germany.
    Heilig, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Psykiatriska kliniken i Linköping.
    Nicotine increases alcohol self-administration in male rats via a mu-opioid mechanism within the mesolimbic pathway2020In: British Journal of Pharmacology, ISSN 0007-1188, E-ISSN 1476-5381, Vol. 177, no 19, p. 4516-4531Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Purpose: Alcohol and nicotine use disorders are commonly comorbid. Both alcohol and nicotine can activate opioid systems in reward-related brain regions, leading to adaptive changes in opioid signalling upon chronic exposure. The potential role of these adaptations for comorbidity is presently unknown. Here, we examined the contribution of mu and kappa-opioid receptors to nicotine-induced escalation of alcohol self-administration in rats. Experimental Approach: Chronic nicotine was tested on alcohol self-administration and motivation to obtain alcohol. We then tested the effect of the kappa antagonist CERC-501 and the preferential mu receptor antagonist naltrexone on basal and nicotine-escalated alcohol self-administration. To probe mu or kappa receptor adaptations, receptor binding and G-protein coupling assays were performed in reward-related brain regions. Finally, dopaminergic activity in response to alcohol was examined, using phosphorylation of DARPP-32 in nucleus accumbens as a biomarker. Key Results: Nicotine robustly induced escalation of alcohol self-administration and motivation to obtain alcohol. This was blocked by naltrexone but not by CERC-501. Escalation of alcohol self-administration was associated with decreased DAMGO-stimulated mu receptor signalling in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and decreased pDARPP-32 in the nucleus accumbens shell in response to alcohol. Conclusions and Implications: Collectively, these results suggest that nicotine contributes to escalate alcohol self-administration through a dysregulation of mu receptor activity in the VTA. These data imply that targeting mu rather than kappa receptors may be the preferred pharmacotherapeutic approach for the treatment of alcohol use disorder when nicotine use contributes to alcohol consumption.

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  • 22.
    Domi, Esi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Univ Camerino, Italy.
    Xu, Li
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Toivainen Eloff, Sanne
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wiskerke, Joost
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Coppola, Andrea
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Holm, Lovisa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Augier, Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Petrella, Michele
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Heilig, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Psykiatriska kliniken i Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Activation of GABA(B) receptors in central amygdala attenuates activity of PKC delta plus neurons and suppresses punishment-resistant alcohol self-administration in rats2023In: Neuropsychopharmacology, ISSN 0893-133X, E-ISSN 1740-634X, Vol. 48, p. 1386-1395Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alcohol use despite negative consequences is a core phenomenon of alcohol addiction. We recently used alcohol self-administration that is resistant to footshock punishment as a model of this behavior, and found that activity of PKC delta + GABAergic neurons in the central amygdala (CeA) is a determinant of individual susceptibility for punishment resistance. In the present study, we examined whether activation of GABA(B) receptors in CeA can attenuate the activity of PKC delta + neurons in this region, and whether this will result in suppression of punishment- resistant alcohol self-administration in the minority of rats that show this behavior. Systemic administration of the clinically approved GABA(B) agonist baclofen (1 and 3 mg/kg) dose- dependently reduced punishment-resistant alcohol self-administration. Bilateral microinjections of baclofen into CeA (64 ng in 0.3 mu l/side) reduced the activity of PKC delta + neurons, as measured by Fos expression. This manipulation also selectively suppressed punished alcohol self-administration in punishment-resistant rats. Expression analysis indicated that virtually all CeA PKC delta + neurons express the GABA(B) receptor. Using in vitro electrophysiology, we found that baclofen induced hyperpolarization of CeA neurons, reducing their firing rate in response to depolarizing current injections. Together, our findings provide a potential mechanism that contributes to the clinical efficacy of baclofen in alcohol addiction. Therapeutic use of baclofen itself is limited by problems of tolerance and need for dose escalation. Our findings support a mechanistic rationale for developing novel, improved alcohol addiction medications that target GABA(B) receptors, and that lack these limitations, such as e.g., GABA(B) positive allosteric modulators (PAM:s).

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  • 23.
    Elliott Robinson, J.
    et al.
    University of N Carolina, NC 27599 USA; University of N Carolina, NC 27599 USA.
    Vardy, Eyal
    University of N Carolina, NC 27599 USA.
    DiBerto, Jeffrey F.
    University of N Carolina, NC 27599 USA; University of N Carolina, NC 27599 USA.
    Chefer, Vladimir I.
    NIDA, MD USA.
    White, Kate L.
    University of N Carolina, NC 27599 USA.
    Fish, Eric W.
    University of N Carolina, NC 27599 USA.
    Chen, Meng
    University of N Carolina, NC 27599 USA; University of N Carolina, NC 27599 USA.
    Gigante, Eduardo
    NIDA, MD USA.
    Krouse, Michael C.
    University of N Carolina, NC 27599 USA.
    Sun, Hui
    NIAAA, MD USA.
    Thorsell, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Roth, Bryan L.
    University of N Carolina, NC 27599 USA; University of N Carolina, NC 27599 USA.
    Heilig, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Malanga, C. J.
    University of N Carolina, NC 27599 USA; University of N Carolina, NC 27599 USA.
    Receptor Reserve Moderates Mesolimbic Responses to Opioids in a Humanized Mouse Model of the OPRM1 A118G Polymorphism2015In: Neuropsychopharmacology, ISSN 0893-133X, E-ISSN 1740-634X, Vol. 40, no 11, p. 2614-2622Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The OPRM1 A118G polymorphism is the most widely studied mu-opioid receptor (MOR) variant. Although its involvement in acute alcohol effects is well characterized, less is known about the extent to which it alters responses to opioids. Prior work has shown that both electrophysiological and analgesic responses to morphine but not to fentanyl are moderated by OPRM1 A118G variation, but the mechanism behind this dissociation is not known. Here we found that humanized mice carrying the 118GG allele (h/mOPRM1-118GG) were less sensitive than h/mOPRM1-118AA littermates to the rewarding effects of morphine and hydrocodone but not those of other opioids measured with intracranial self-stimulation. Reduced morphine reward in 118GG mice was associated with decreased dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens and reduced effects on GABA release in the ventral tegmental area that were not due to changes in drug potency or efficacy in vitro or receptor-binding affinity. Fewer MOR-binding sites were observed in h/mOPRM1-118GG mice, and pharmacological reduction of MOR availability unmasked genotypic differences in fentanyl sensitivity. These findings suggest that the OPRM1 A118G polymorphism decreases sensitivity to low-potency agonists by decreasing receptor reserve without significantly altering receptor function.

  • 24.
    Gehlert, Donald R.
    et al.
    Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
    Cippitelli, Andrea
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Thorsell, Annika
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Lê, Anh Dzung
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    Hipskind, Philip A
    Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
    Hamdouchi, Chafiq
    Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
    Lu, Jianliang
    Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
    Hembre, Erik J.
    Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
    Cramer, Jeffrey
    Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
    Song, Min
    Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
    McKinzie, David
    Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
    Morin, Michelle
    Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
    Ciccocioppo, Roberto
    University of Camerino, Italy.
    Heilig, Markus
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    3-(4-Chloro-2-morpholin-4-yl-thiazol-5-yl)-8-(1-ethylpropyl)-2,6-dimethyl-imidazo[1,2-b]pyridazine: a novel brain-penetrant, orally available corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 1 antagonist with efficacy in animal models of alcoholism2007In: Journal of Neuroscience, ISSN 0270-6474, E-ISSN 1529-2401, Vol. 27, no 10, p. 2718-2726Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe a novel corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 1 (CRF1) antagonist with advantageous properties for clinical development, and its in vivo activity in preclinical alcoholism models. 3-(4-Chloro-2-morpholin-4-yl-thiazol-5-yl)-8-(1-ethylpropyl)-2,6-dimethyl-imidazo[1,2-b]pyridazine (MTIP) inhibited 125I-sauvagine binding to rat pituitary membranes and cloned human CRF1 with subnanomolar affinities, with no detectable activity at the CRF2 receptor or other common drug targets. After oral administration to rats, MTIP inhibited 125I-sauvagine binding to rat cerebellar membranes ex vivo with an ED50 of approximately 1.3 mg/kg and an oral bioavailability of 91.1%. Compared with R121919 (2,5-dimethyl-3-(6-dimethyl-4-methylpyridin-3-yl)-7-dipropylamino-pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine) and CP154526 (N-butyl-N-ethyl-4,9-dimethyl-7-(2,4,6-trimethylphenyl)-3,5,7-triazabicyclo[4.3.0]nona-2,4,8,10-tetraen-2-amine), MTIP had a markedly reduced volume of distribution and clearance. Neither open-field activity nor baseline exploration of an elevated plus-maze was affected by MTIP (1-10 mg/kg). In contrast, MTIP dose-dependently reversed anxiogenic effects of withdrawal from a 3 g/kg alcohol dose. Similarly, MTIP blocked excessive alcohol self-administration in Wistar rats with a history of dependence, and in a genetic model of high alcohol preference, the msP rat, at doses that had no effect in nondependent Wistar rats. Also, MTIP blocked reinstatement of stress-induced alcohol seeking both in postdependent and in genetically selected msP animals, again at doses that were ineffective in nondependent Wistar rats. Based on these findings, MTIP is a promising candidate for treatment of alcohol dependence.

  • 25.
    George, David T.
    et al.
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Gilman, Jodi
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Hersh, Jacqueline
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Thorsell, Annika
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Herion, David
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Geyer, Christopher
    National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Peng, Xiaomei
    Lilly Research Laboratories, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
    Kielbasa, William
    Lilly Research Laboratories, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
    Rawlings, Robert
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Brandt, John E.
    Lilly Research Laboratories, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
    Gehlert, Donald R.
    Lilly Research Laboratories, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
    Tauscher, Johannes T.
    Lilly Research Laboratories, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
    Hunt, Stephen P.
    University College London, UK.
    Hommer, Daniel
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Heilig, Markus
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Neurokinin 1 receptor antagonism as a possible therapy for alcoholism2008In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 319, no 5869, p. 1536-1539Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alcohol dependence is a major public health challenge in need of new treatments. As alcoholism evolves, stress systems in the brain play an increasing role in motivating continued alcohol use and relapse. We investigated the role of the neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R), a mediator of behavioral stress responses, in alcohol dependence and treatment. In preclinical studies, mice genetically deficient in NK1R showed a marked decrease in voluntary alcohol consumption and had an increased sensitivity to the sedative effects of alcohol. In a randomized controlled experimental study, we treated recently detoxified alcoholic inpatients with an NK1R antagonist (LY686017; n = 25) or placebo (n = 25). LY686017 suppressed spontaneous alcohol cravings, improved overall well-being, blunted cravings induced by a challenge procedure, and attenuated concomitant cortisol responses. Brain functional magnetic resonance imaging responses to affective stimuli likewise suggested beneficial LY686017 effects. Thus, as assessed by these surrogate markers of efficacy, NK1R antagonism warrants further investigation as a treatment in alcoholism.

  • 26.
    Gowin, Joshua L.
    et al.
    NIAAA, MD USA.
    Vatsalya, Vatsalya
    NIAAA, MD USA; University of Louisville, KY 40292 USA; Robley Rex VAMC, KY USA.
    Westman, Jonathan G.
    NIAAA, MD USA.
    Schwandt, Melanie L.
    NIAAA, MD 20892 USA.
    Bartlett, Selena
    Queensland University of Technology, Australia.
    Heilig, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience (CSAN). Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Momenan, Reza
    NIAAA, MD USA.
    Ramchandani, Vijay A.
    NIAAA, MD USA.
    The Effect of Varenicline on the Neural Processing of Fearful Faces and the Subjective Effects of Alcohol in Heavy Drinkers2016In: Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, ISSN 0145-6008, E-ISSN 1530-0277, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 979-987Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Pharmacotherapies for alcohol use disorder have been shown to reduce hazardous drinking and improve overall health. The effect sizes for the effectiveness of these medications, however, are small, underscoring the need to expand the range of therapeutics and develop personalized treatment approaches. Recent studies have suggested that varenicline, an 42-nicotinic partial agonist widely used for smoking cessation, can help alcoholics reduce drinking, but the neurocognitive underpinnings of its effectiveness remain largely unexplored. Methods: In this double-blind study, 32 heavy drinkers were randomized to receive varenicline (2 mg/d) or placebo. After 2 weeks of dosing, participants underwent functional MRI scans, during which they viewed images of faces with either neutral or fearful expressions at baseline and following an intravenous alcohol infusion to a target breath alcohol concentration of 80 mg%. Blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) response was analyzed with Analysis of Functional Neuroimaging software. Linear mixed-effects models were used to examine the effects of facial expression (fearful vs. neutral) and medication (placebo vs. varenicline) on BOLD response. The effect of medication on measures of subjective response to alcohol was also examined. Results: Results indicated a significant facial expression-by-medication interaction in the left amygdala. The groups showed equivalent activation to neutral faces, but, whereas the placebo group showed increased activation to fearful faces, the varenicline group showed no change in activation. Amygdala activation to fearful faces correlated with number of drinks in the previous 90 days and Obsessive Compulsive Drinking Scale scores. There was no effect of varenicline on subjective response to alcohol. Conclusions: Our results indicate that varenicline may disrupt amygdala response to fearful faces in heavy drinkers. Further, amygdala activation correlated with alcohol consumption, suggesting that the effects of varenicline may be related to aspects of drinking behavior. These results suggest that amygdala response to fearful faces may be developed as a biomarker of the effectiveness of medications being developed for the treatment of alcohol use disorder.

  • 27.
    Grodin, Erica N.
    et al.
    Clinical NeuroImaging Research Core, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland; Department of Neuroscience, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, USA.
    Sussman, Lauren
    Clinical NeuroImaging Research Core, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.
    Sundby, Kelsey
    Clinical NeuroImaging Research Core, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.
    Brennan, Grace M
    Clinical NeuroImaging Research Core, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.
    Diazgranados, Nancy
    Office of the Clinical Directory, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.
    Heilig, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Momenan, Reza
    Clinical NeuroImaging Research Core, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.
    Neural Correlates of Compulsive Alcohol Seeking in Heavy Drinkers2018In: Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging, ISSN 2451-9022, Vol. 3, no 12, p. 1022-1031Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Compulsive alcohol use, the tendency to continue alcohol seeking and taking despite negative consequences, is a hallmark of alcohol use disorder. Preclinical rodent studies have suggested a role for the medial prefrontal cortex, anterior insula, and nucleus accumbens in compulsive alcohol seeking. It is presently unknown whether these findings translate to humans. We used a novel functional magnetic resonance imaging paradigm and tested the hypothesis that heavy drinkers would compulsively seek alcohol despite the risk of an aversive consequence, and that this behavior would be associated with the activity of frontostriatal circuitry.

  • 28.
    Hansen, Johan Liseth
    et al.
    Quantify Res, Sweden; Univ Oslo, Norway.
    Heilig, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Psykiatriska kliniken i Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Kalso, Eija
    Helsinki Univ Hosp, Finland; Univ Helsinki, Finland.
    Stubhaug, Audun
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway; Univ Oslo, Norway.
    Knutsson, Douglas
    Quantify Res, Sweden.
    Sandin, Patrik
    Quantify Res, Sweden.
    Dorling, Patricia
    Pfizer Inc, NY USA.
    Beck, Craig
    Pfizer Ltd, England.
    Grip, Emilie Toresson
    Quantify Res, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Blakeman, Karin Hygge
    Pfizer AB, Sweden.
    Arendt-Nielsen, Lars
    Aalborg Univ, Denmark.
    Problematic opioid use among osteoarthritis patients with chronic post-operative pain after joint replacement: analyses from the BISCUITS study2023In: Scandinavian Journal of Pain, ISSN 1877-8860, E-ISSN 1877-8879, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 353-363Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Opioids are commonly used to manage pain, despite an increased risk of adverse events and complications when used against recommendations. This register study uses data of osteoarthritis (OA) patients with joint replacement surgery to identify and characterize problematic opioid use (POU) prescription patterns.Methods: The study population included adult patients diagnosed with OA in specialty care undergoing joint replacement surgery in Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden during 1 January 2011 to 31 December 2014. Those with cancer or OA within three years before the first eligible OA diagnosis were excluded. Patients were allocated into six POU cohorts based on dose escalation, frequency, and dosing of prescription opioids post-surgery (definitions were based on guidelines, previous literature, and clinical experience), and matched on age and sex to patients with opioid use, but not in any of the six cohorts. Data on demographics, non-OA pain diagnoses, cardiovascular diseases, psychiatric disorders, and clinical characteristics were used to study patient characteristics and predictors of POU.Results: 13.7% of patients with OA and a hip/knee joint replacement were classified as problematic users and they had more comorbidities and higher pre-surgery doses of opioids than matches. Patients dispensing high doses of opioids pre-surgery dispensed increased doses post-surgery, a pattern not seen among patients prescribed lower doses pre-surgery. Being dispensed 1-4,500 oral morphine equivalents in the year pre-surgery or having a non-OA pain diagnosis was associated with post-surgery POU (OR: 1.44-1.50, and 1.11-1.20, respectively).Conclusions: Based on the discovered POU predictors, the study suggests that prescribers should carefully assess pain management strategies for patients with a history of comorbidities and pre-operative, long-term opioid use. Healthcare units should adopt risk assessment tools and ensure that these patients are followed up closely. The data also demonstrate potential areas for further exploration in improving patient outcomes and trajectories.

  • 29.
    Heilig, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Alkohol, droger och hjärnan: tro och vetande utifrån modern neurovetenskap2015Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Alkohol, droger och hjärnan beskriver framsteg inom hjärnforskningen som gjort det möjligt att bättre förstå alkohol- och drogproblem. Boken är skriven från författarens perspektiv som läkare och forskare och visar hur vetenskapens framsteg pekar ut vägar mot empatisk, rationell behandling som alternativ till moraliserande attityder och vårdideologiska strider.

    Missbruksproblem är mycket vanliga, och nästan varje familj har erfarenhet av någon som drabbats. Svenskars användningsmönster av alkohol har förändrats. After Work-ölen och mitt-i-veckan-drinken är förhållandevis nya i svensk dryckeskultur, samtidigt som traditionen av tungt helgdrickande finns kvar. Dessa dryckesbeteenden aktualiserar behovet av fördjupad kunskap och vetenskapligt grundade behandlingsmetoder. För att nå dit behöver forskningens resultat nå ut utanför akademiska kretsar.

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  • 30.
    Heilig, Markus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience (CSAN). Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Carlezon, William A.
    Harvard University, MA USA.
    Editorial Material: Circumspectives: Cannabis and Psychiatric Illness: Blunt Thoughts in NEUROPSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY, vol 41, issue 2, pp 391-3922016In: Neuropsychopharmacology, ISSN 0893-133X, E-ISSN 1740-634X, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 391-392Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 31.
    Heilig, Markus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Carlezon, William A. Jr.
    Harvard University, MA USA.
    Editorial Material: Circumspectives: The Replacements in NEUROPSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY, vol 40, issue 8, pp 1813-18142015In: Neuropsychopharmacology, ISSN 0893-133X, E-ISSN 1740-634X, Vol. 40, no 8, p. 1813-1814Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 32.
    Heilig, Markus
    et al.
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Thorsell, Annika
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Sommer, Wolfgang H.
    Central Institute of Mental Health, Mannheim, Germany.
    Hansson, Anita C.
    Central Institute of Mental Health, Mannheim, Germany.
    Ramchandani, Vijay A.
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    George, David T.
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Hommer, Daniel
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Barr, Christina S.
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Translating the neuroscience of alcoholism into clinical treatments: from blocking the buzz to curing the blues2010In: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, ISSN 0149-7634, E-ISSN 1873-7528, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 334-344Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding the pathophysiology of addictive disorders is critical for development of new treatments. A major focus of addiction research has for a long time been on systems that mediate acute positively reinforcing effects of addictive drugs, most prominently the mesolimbic dopaminergic (DA) system and its connections. This research line has been successful in shedding light on the physiology of both natural and drug reward, but has not led to therapeutic breakthroughs. The role of classical reward systems is perhaps least clear in alcohol addiction. Here, recent work is summarized that points to some clinically important conclusions. First, important pharmacogenetic differences exist with regard to positively reinforcing effects of alcohol and the ability of this drug to activate classical reward pathways. This offers an opportunity for personalized treatment approaches in alcoholism. Second, brain stress and fear systems become pathologically activated in later stages of alcoholism and their activation is a major influence in escalation of alcohol intake, sensitization of stress responses, and susceptibility to relapse. These findings offer a new category of treatment mechanisms. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) signaling through CRH1 receptors is a major candidate target in this category, but recent data indicate that antagonists for substance P (SP) neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptors may have a similar potential.

  • 33.
    Johnstone, Andrea L.
    et al.
    Univ Miami, FL 33136 USA; Univ Miami, FL 33136 USA; EpiCypher Inc, NC USA.
    Andrade, Nadja S.
    Univ Miami, FL 33136 USA.
    Barbier, Estelle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Khomtchouk, Bohdan B.
    Univ Miami, FL 33136 USA; Univ Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Rienas, Christopher A.
    Univ Miami, FL 33136 USA.
    Lowe, Kenneth
    Univ Miami, FL 33136 USA.
    Van Booven, Derek J.
    Univ Miami, FL 33136 USA.
    Domi, Esi
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Esanov, Rustam
    Univ Miami, FL 33136 USA.
    Vilca, Samara
    Univ Miami, FL 33136 USA.
    Tapocik, Jenica D.
    NIAAA, MD USA.
    Rodriguez, Keli
    EpiCypher Inc, NC USA.
    Maryanski, Danielle
    EpiCypher Inc, NC USA.
    Keogh, Michael Christopher
    EpiCypher Inc, NC USA.
    Meinhardt, Marcus W.
    Heidelberg Univ, Germany.
    Sommer, Wolfgang H.
    Heidelberg Univ, Germany.
    Heilig, Markus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Psykiatriska kliniken i Linköping.
    Zeier, Zane
    Univ Miami, FL 33136 USA.
    Wahlestedt, Claes
    Univ Miami, FL 33136 USA.
    Dysregulation of the histone demethylase KDM6B in alcohol dependence is associated with epigenetic regulation of inflammatory signaling pathways2021In: Addiction Biology, ISSN 1355-6215, E-ISSN 1369-1600, Vol. 26, no 1, article id e12816Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Epigenetic enzymes oversee long-term changes in gene expression by integrating genetic and environmental cues. While there are hundreds of enzymes that control histone and DNA modifications, their potential roles in substance abuse and alcohol dependence remain underexplored. A few recent studies have suggested that epigenetic processes could underlie transcriptomic and behavioral hallmarks of alcohol addiction. In the present study, we sought to identify epigenetic enzymes in the brain that are dysregulated during protracted abstinence as a consequence of chronic and intermittent alcohol exposure. Through quantitative mRNA expression analysis of over 100 epigenetic enzymes, we identified 11 that are significantly altered in alcohol-dependent rats compared with controls. Follow-up studies of one of these enzymes, the histone demethylase KDM6B, showed that this enzyme exhibits region-specific dysregulation in the prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens of alcohol-dependent rats. KDM6B was also upregulated in the human alcoholic brain. Upregulation of KDM6B protein in alcohol-dependent rats was accompanied by a decrease of trimethylation levels at histone H3, lysine 27 (H3K27me3), consistent with the known demethylase specificity of KDM6B. Subsequent epigenetic (chromatin immunoprecipitation [ChIP]-sequencing) analysis showed that alcohol-induced changes in H3K27me3 were significantly enriched at genes in the IL-6 signaling pathway, consistent with the well-characterized role of KDM6B in modulation of inflammatory responses. Knockdown of KDM6B in cultured microglial cells diminished IL-6 induction in response to an inflammatory stimulus. Our findings implicate a novel KDM6B-mediated epigenetic signaling pathway integrated with inflammatory signaling pathways that are known to underlie the development of alcohol addiction.

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  • 34.
    Karlsson, Camilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Rehman, Faazal
    NIH, MD 20892 USA.
    Damdazic, Ruslan
    NIH, MD 20892 USA.
    Atkins, Alison Lynn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Schank, Jesse R.
    University of Georgia, GA 30602 USA.
    Gehlert, Donald R.
    Eli Lilly and Co, IN 46285 USA.
    Steensland, Pia
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Thorsell, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Heilig, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience (CSAN). Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    The melanin-concentrating hormone-1 receptor modulates alcohol-induced reward and DARPP-32 phosphorylation2016In: Psychopharmacology, ISSN 0033-3158, E-ISSN 1432-2072, Vol. 233, no 12, p. 2355-2363Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is involved in the regulation of food intake and has recently been associated with alcohol-related behaviors. Blockade of MCH-1 receptors (MCH1-Rs) attenuates operant alcohol self-administration and decreases cue-induced reinstatement, but the mechanism through which the MCH1-R influences these behaviors remains unknown. MCH1-Rs are highly expressed in the nucleus accumbens shell (NAcSh) where they are co-expressed with dopamine (DA) receptors. MCH has been shown to potentiate responses to dopamine and to increase phosphorylation of DARPP-32, an intracellular marker of DA receptor activation, in the NAcSh. In the present study, we investigated the role of the MCH1-R in alcohol reward using the conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm. We then used immunohistochemistry (IHC) to assess activation of downstream signaling after administration of a rewarding dose of alcohol. We found that alcohol-induced CPP was markedly decreased in mice with a genetic deletion of the MCH1-R as well as after pharmacological treatment with an MCH1-R antagonist, GW803430. In contrast, an isocaloric dose of dextrose did not produce CPP. The increase in DARPP-32 phosphorylation seen in wildtype (WT) mice after acute alcohol administration in the NAcSh was markedly reduced in MCH1-R knock-out (KO) mice. Our results suggest that MCH1-Rs regulate the rewarding properties of alcohol through interactions with signaling cascades downstream of DA receptors in the NAcSh.

  • 35.
    Karlsson, Camilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Schank, Jesse R.
    Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA.
    Rehman, Faazal
    Laboratory of Clinical and Translational Studies, National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Stojakovic, Andrea
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Björk, Karl
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Barbier, Estelle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Solomon, Matthew
    Laboratory of Clinical and Translational Studies, National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Tapocik, Jenica
    Laboratory of Clinical and Translational Studies, National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Engblom, David
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Thorsell, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Heilig, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Proinflammatory signaling regulates voluntary alcohol intake and stress-induced consumption after exposure to social defeat stress in mice2017In: Addiction Biology, ISSN 1355-6215, E-ISSN 1369-1600, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 1279-1288Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Proinflammatory activity has been postulated to play a role in addictive processes and stress responses, but the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here, we examined the role of interleukin 1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-a) in regulation of voluntary alcohol consumption, alcohol reward and stress-induced drinking. Mice with a deletion of the IL-1 receptor I gene (IL-1RI KO) exhibited modestly decreased alcohol consumption. However, IL-1RI deletion affected neither the rewarding properties of alcohol, measured by conditioned place preference (CPP), nor stress-induced drinking induced by social defeat stress. TNF-a signaling can compensate for phenotypic consequences of IL1-RI deletion. We therefore hypothesized that double deletion of both IL-1RI and TNF-1 receptors (TNF-1R) may reveal the role of these pathways in regulation of alcohol intake. Double KOs consumed significantly less alcohol than control mice over a range of alcohol concentrations. The combined deletion of TNF-1R and IL-1RI did not influence alcohol reward, but did prevent increased alcohol consumption resulting from exposure to repeated bouts of social defeat stress. Taken together, these data indicate that IL-1RI and TNF-1R contribute to regulation of stress-induced, negatively reinforced drinking perhaps through overlapping signaling events downstream of these receptors, while leaving rewarding properties of alcohol largely unaffected.

  • 36.
    Karlsson, Camilla
    et al.
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Zook, Michelle
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Ciccocioppo, Roberto
    University of Camerino, Italy.
    Gehlert, Donald R.
    Eli Lilly, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
    Thorsell, Annika
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Heilig, Markus
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Cippitelli, Andrea
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 (MCH1-R) antagonism: reduced appetite for calories and suppression of addictive-like behaviors2012In: Pharmacology, Biochemistry and Behavior, ISSN 0091-3057, E-ISSN 1873-5177, Vol. 102, no 3, p. 400-406Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    RATIONALE: The hypothalamic neuropeptide melanin-concentrating hormone and its MCH1 receptor have been implicated in regulation of feeding and energy homeostasis, as well as modulation of reward-related behaviors. Here, we examined whether the MCH system plays a role both in caloric and motivational aspects of sugar intake.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: The non-peptide MCH1-R antagonist GW803430 (3, 10, 30 mg/kg, i.p.) was first tested on self-administration under a fixed ratio schedule of reinforcement of both a caloric (10% w/v sucrose) and a non-caloric (0.06% w/v saccharin) sweet solution. GW803430 was then tested for its ability to alter motivational properties and seeking of sucrose. Lastly, the drug was tested to concurrently examine its effects on the escalated consumption of both sugar and food in animals following intermittent sugar access.

    RESULTS: The MCH1-R antagonist reduced sucrose- but not saccharin-reinforced lever pressing, likely reflecting a decreased appetite for calories in GW803430-treated rats. GW803430 reduced sucrose self-administration under a progressive ratio schedule, and suppressed cue-induced reinstatement of sucrose seeking, suggesting effects on rewarding properties of sucrose. GW803430 attenuated food intake in rats on intermittent access to sucrose at all doses examined (3, 10, 30 mg/kg), while reduction of sugar intake was weaker in magnitude.

    CONCLUSION: Together, these observations support an involvement of the MCH system in regulation of energy balance as well as mediation of sucrose reward. MCH may be an important regulator of sugar intake by acting on both caloric and rewarding components.

  • 37.
    Karlsson, Rose-Marie
    et al.
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Choe, Jessica S.
    National Institute of Mental Health, NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA .
    Cameron, Heather A
    National Institute of Mental Health, NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Thorsell, Annika
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Crawley, Jacqueline N
    National Institute of Mental Health, NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Holmes, Andrew
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Heilig, Markus
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    The neuropeptide Y Y1 receptor subtype is necessary for the anxiolytic-like effects of neuropeptide Y, but not the antidepressant-like effects of fluoxetine, in mice2008In: Psychopharmacology, ISSN 0033-3158, E-ISSN 1432-2072, Vol. 195, no 4, p. 547-557Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    RATIONALE: Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is implicated in the pathophysiology of affective illness. Multiple receptor subtypes (Y1R, Y2R, and Y5R) have been suggested to contribute to NPY's effects on rodent anxiety and depression-related behaviors.

    OBJECTIVES: To further elucidate the role of Y1R in (1) NPY's anxiolytic-like effects and (2) fluoxetine's antidepressant-like and neurogenesis-inducing effects.

    METHODS: Mice lacking Y1R were assessed for spontaneous anxiety-like behavior (open field, elevated plus-maze, and light/dark exploration test) and Pavlovian fear conditioning, and for the anxiolytic-like effects of intracerebroventricularly (icv)-administrated NPY (elevated plus-maze). Next, Y1R -/- were assessed for the antidepressant-like effects of acute fluoxetine in the forced swim test and chronic fluoxetine in the novelty-induced hypophagia test, as well as for chronic fluoxetine-induced hippocampal neurogenesis.

    RESULTS: Y1R -/- exhibited largely normal baseline behavior as compared to +/+ littermate controls. Intraventricular administration of NPY in Y1R -/- mice failed to produce the normal anxiolytic-like effect in the elevated plus-maze test seen in +/+ mice. Y1R mutant mice showed higher immobility in the forced swim test and longer latencies in the novelty-induced hypophagia test. In addition, Y1R -/- mice responded normally to the acute and chronic effects of fluoxetine treatment in the forced swim test and the novelty-induced hypophagia test, respectively, as well as increased neuronal precursor cell proliferation in the hippocampus.

    CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate that Y1R is necessary for the anxiolytic-like effects of icv NPY, but not for the antidepressant-like or neurogenesis-inducing effects of fluoxetine. The present study supports targeting Y1R as a novel therapeutic target for anxiety disorders.

  • 38.
    Lee, Mary R.
    et al.
    Vet Affairs Med Ctr, DC 20422 USA.
    Rio, Daniel
    NIAAA, MD USA.
    Kwako, Laura
    NIAAA, MD USA.
    George, David T.
    NIAAA, MD USA.
    Heilig, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Psykiatriska kliniken i Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Momenan, Reza
    NIAAA, MD USA.
    Corticotropin-Releasing Factor receptor 1 (CRF1) antagonism in patients with alcohol use disorder and high anxiety levels: effect on neural response during Trier Social Stress Test video feedback2023In: Neuropsychopharmacology, ISSN 0893-133X, E-ISSN 1740-634X, Vol. 48, no 5, p. 816-820Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In preclinical models of alcohol use disorder, the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptor is upregulated, particularly in the extended amygdala. This upregulation is thought to play a role in stress-induced relapse to drinking by a mechanism that is independent of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. As part of a double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study with pexacerfont, a selective, orally available, and brain-penetrant CRF1 receptor antagonist which has anti-anxiety effects in preclinical studies, we examined the effect of pexacerfont on the neural response to a social stress task adapted to fMRI. Subjects were 39 individuals (4 women) with high trait anxiety and moderate to severe alcohol use disorder randomized to receive pexacerfont or placebo. The task involved feedback of videoclips of an individual performing the Trier Social Stress Test. Pexacerfont had no effect on the neural response to self-observation under stress. The neural response to viewing oneself under stress vs an unknown other under stress activated prefrontal brain regions including insula, inferior frontal gyrus as well as medial, superior frontal gyri. These regions of activation overlap with those found in studies using similar paradigms. Potential applications of this task to probe neurocircuitry that is disrupted in addiction is discussed.

  • 39.
    Lindell, S. G.
    et al.
    Laboratory of Comparative Behavioral Genomics, NIH/NIAAA/LNG, USA; Laboratory of Clinical and Translational Studies, National Institutes of Health/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH Animal Center, USA.
    Schwandt, M. L.
    Laboratory of Clinical and Translational Studies, National Institutes of Health/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH Animal Center, USA.
    Suomi, S. J.
    Laboratory of Comparative Ethology, National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH Animal Center, USA.
    Rice, K. C.
    Chemical Biology Research Branch, National Institute on Drug Abuse, Bethesda, USA.
    Heilig, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry. Laboratory of Clinical and Translational Studies, National Institutes of Health/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH Animal Center, USA.
    Barr, C. S.
    Laboratory of Comparative Behavioral Genomics, NIH/NIAAA/LNG, USA; Laboratory of Clinical and Translational Studies, National Institutes of Health/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH Animal Center, USA.
    Intermittent Access to Ethanol Induces Escalated Alcohol Consumption in Primates2017In: Journal of addictive behaviors, therapy and rehabilitation, ISSN 2324-9005, Vol. 6, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Escalation of voluntary alcohol drinking is characteristic of alcohol addiction and can be induced in rodents using intermittent access to alcohol. This model has been used to evaluate candidate therapeutics, but key systems involved in the transition into alcohol addiction, such as CRF, differ in their organization between rodents and primates. We examined the ability of an intermittent access schedule to induce escalation of voluntary alcohol drinking in non-human primates and used this model to assess the role of corticotropin releasing hormone (CRF) signaling in this process.

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  • 40.
    Ljungvall, Hanna
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Persson, Anna
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Asenlof, Pernilla
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Heilig, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Psykiatriska kliniken i Linköping.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Reliability of the Addiction Severity Index self-report form (ASI-SR): a self-administered questionnaire based on the Addiction Severity Index composite score domains2020In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 74, no 1, p. 9-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The Addiction Severity Index (ASI) is a standardized interview used to assess problems associated with substance use. Although widely used, the time required for the interview remains an obstacle to its acceptance in many clinical settings. We examined if a self-administered questionnaire based on the composite score (CS) items, the ASI Self-Report form (ASI-SR), offers a reliable alternative to the ASI in assessing current substance use and related problems. Methods: Participants were 59 treatment seeking individuals entering outpatient programs at the Addiction Psychiatric Clinic at Uppsala University Hospital who were assessed with Swedish versions of the ASI and ASI-SR. Agreement between the ASI interviews CS and ASI-SRs CS was evaluated on the individual basis by intraclass correlation analysis (ICC) and on group level with the Wilcoxon signed rank test. Reliability and internal consistency were evaluated using Cronbachs alpha. Results: For 6 out of 7 CS domains, the ICC for the ASI interview and ASI-SR were good to excellent. Internal consistency was acceptable for 6 out of 7 CS domains on the ASI interview and for 5 out of 7 CS domains on the ASI-SR. Conclusions: The present study suggests that the ASI-SR is a reliable alternative to the ASI interview for assessing current patient functioning and evaluation of problems related to alcohol and drug use.

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  • 41.
    Löfberg, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Psykiatriska kliniken i Linköping.
    Gustafsson, Per A.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Gauffin, Emelie
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Psykiatriska kliniken i Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Perini, Irene
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience.
    Heilig, Markus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Psykiatriska kliniken i Linköping. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Capusan, Andrea J.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Psykiatriska kliniken i Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Assessing Childhood Maltreatment Exposure in Patients Without and With a Diagnosis of Substance Use Disorder2023In: Journal of addiction medicine, ISSN 1932-0620, E-ISSN 1935-3227, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 263-270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Childhood maltreatment (CM), widely held as a risk factor for substance use disorders (SUDs), is commonly assessed using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ). Retrospective self-reports are, however, potentially subject to bias. We used a unique patient sample with prospectively documented CM to examine the performance of the CTQ and how this is affected by the presence of SUD.

    Methods: Analysis was based on a total of 104 individuals. Subjects with prospectively recorded CM were identified from a specialized childhood trauma unit in Linköping, Sweden (n = 55; 31 with SUD, 61% females; 24 without SUD, 71% females). Clinical controls had SUD but no CM (n = 25, 48% females). Healthy controls had neither SUD nor CM (n = 24, 54% females). We analyzed the agreement between retrospective CTQ scores and prospectively documented CM by κ analysis and assessed the performance of the CTQ to identify CM exposure using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis.

    Results: Agreement between prospectively and retrospectively recorded CM exposure was poor for sexual abuse (36.6%, Cohen κ = 0.32, P = 0.008) and physical abuse (67.3%, κ = 0.35, P = 0.007). Overall CTQ performance was fair (ROC: area under the ROC curve = 0.78, optimal cutoff = 36.5, sensitivity = 0.65, specificity = 0.75). However, performance was excellent in the absence of SUD (area under the ROC curve = 0.93, cutoff = 32.0, sensitivity = 0.88, specificity = 0.88), but poor in participants with lifetime SUD (area under the ROC curve = 0.62, cutoff = 42.0, sensitivity = 0.60, specificity = 0.36).

    Conclusions: These data support the CTQ as a tool to assess CM exposure but suggest that it may be less useful in patients with SUD.

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  • 42.
    Mahmoud, Saifeldin
    et al.
    Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, PA, USA.
    Thorsell, Annika
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Sommer, Wolfgang H.
    University of Heidelberg, Germany.
    Heilig, Markus
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Holgate, Joan K.
    Ernest Gallo Clinic and Research Center, University of California-San Francisco, Emeryville, CA, USA.
    Bartlett, Selena E.
    Ernest Gallo Clinic and Research Center, University of California-San Francisco, Emeryville, CA, USA.
    Ruiz-Velasco, Victor
    Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, PA, USA.
    Pharmacological consequence of the A118G μ opioid receptor polymorphism on morphine- and fentanyl-mediated modulation of Ca²⁺ channels in humanized mouse sensory neurons2011In: Anesthesiology, ISSN 0003-3022, E-ISSN 1528-1175, Vol. 115, no 5, p. 1054-1062Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The most common functional single nucleotide polymorphism of the human OPRM1 gene, A118G, has been shown to be associated with interindividual differences in opioid analgesic requirements, particularly with morphine, in patients with acute postoperative pain. The purpose of this study was to examine whether this polymorphism would modulate the morphine and fentanyl pharmacological profile of sensory neurons isolated from a humanized mouse model homozygous for either the 118A or 118G allele.

    METHODS: The coupling of wild-type and mutant μ opioid receptors to voltage-gated Ca channels after exposure to either ligand was examined by employing the whole cell variant of the patch-clamp technique in acutely dissociated trigeminal ganglion neurons. Morphine-mediated antinociception was measured in mice carrying either the 118AA or 118GG allele.

    RESULTS: The biophysical parameters (cell size, current density, and peak current amplitude potential) measured from both groups of sensory neurons were not significantly different. In 118GG neurons, morphine was approximately fivefold less potent and 26% less efficacious than that observed in 118AA neurons. On the other hand, the potency and efficacy of fentanyl were similar for both groups of neurons. Morphine-mediated analgesia in 118GG mice was significantly reduced compared with the 118AA mice.

    CONCLUSIONS: This study provides evidence to suggest that the diminished clinical effect observed with morphine in 118G carriers results from an alteration of the receptor's pharmacology in sensory neurons. In addition, the impaired analgesic response with morphine may explain why carriers of this receptor variant have an increased susceptibility to become addicted to opioids.

  • 43.
    Mayo, Leah
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Asratian, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lindé, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Morena, Maria
    Cummings Scool Med, Canada; Univ Calgary, Canada; Univ Calgary, Canada.
    Haataja, Roosa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hammar, Valter
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Augier, Gaëlle
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hill, Matthew N.
    Cummings Scool Med, Canada; Cummings Scool Med, Canada; Univ Calgary, Canada; Univ Calgary, Canada.
    Heilig, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Psykiatriska kliniken i Linköping.
    Elevated Anandamide, Enhanced Recall of Fear Extinction, and Attenuated Stress Responses Following Inhibition of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase: A Randomized, Controlled Experimental Medicine Trial2020In: Biological Psychiatry, ISSN 0006-3223, E-ISSN 1873-2402, Vol. 87, no 6, p. 538-547Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Posttraumatic stress disorder, an area of large unmet medical needs, is characterized by persistence of fear memories and maladaptive stress responses. In rodents, elevation of the endocannabinoid anandamide due to inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) facilitates fear extinction and protects against the anxiogenic effects of stress. We recently reported that elevated anandamide levels in people homozygous for a loss-of-function FAAH mutation are associated with a similar phenotype, suggesting a translational validity of the preclinical findings. METHODS: In this double-blind, placebo-controlled experimental medicine study, healthy adults were randomized to an FAAH inhibitor (PF-04457845, 4 mg orally, once daily; n = 16) or placebo (n = 29) for 10 days. On days 9 and 10, participants completed a task battery assessing psychophysiological indices of fear learning, stress reactivity, and stress-induced affective responses. RESULTS: FAAH inhibition produced a 10-fold increase in baseline anandamide. This was associated with potentiated recall of fear extinction memory when tested 24 hours after extinction training. FAAH inhibition also attenuated autonomic stress reactivity, assessed via electrodermal activity, and protected against stress-induced negative affect, measured via facial electromyography. CONCLUSIONS: Our data provide preliminary human evidence that FAAH inhibition can improve the recall of fear extinction memories and attenuate the anxiogenic effects of stress, in a direct translation of rodent findings. The beneficial effects of FAAH inhibition on fear extinction, as well as stress- and affect-related behaviors, provide a strong rationale for developing this drug class as a treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder.

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  • 44.
    Mayo, Leah M.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Asratian, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lindé, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Holm, Lovisa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nätt, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Augier, Gaëlle
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Stensson, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Vecchiarelli, Haley A.
    Hotchkiss Brain Institute and Mathison Centre for Mental Health Research and Education, Departments of Cell Biology and Anatomy and Psychiatry, University of Calgary, Canada.
    Balsevich, Georgia
    Hotchkiss Brain Institute and Mathison Centre for Mental Health Research and Education, Departments of Cell Biology and Anatomy and Psychiatry, University of Calgary, Canada.
    Aukema, Robert J.
    Hotchkiss Brain Institute and Mathison Centre for Mental Health Research and Education, Departments of Cell Biology and Anatomy and Psychiatry, University of Calgary, Canada.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine.
    Spagnolo, Primavera A.
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism and National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH, Bethesda, USA.
    Lee, Francis S.
    Institute for Developmental Psychobiology, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, USA.
    Hill, Matthew N.
    Hotchkiss Brain Institute and Mathison Centre for Mental Health Research and Education, Departments of Cell Biology and Anatomy and Psychiatry, University of Calgary, Canada.
    Heilig, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Psykiatriska kliniken i Linköping.
    Protective effects of elevated anandamide on stress and fear-related behaviors: translational evidence from humans and mice2020In: Molecular Psychiatry, ISSN 1359-4184, E-ISSN 1476-5578, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 993-1005Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a common, debilitating condition with limited treatment options. Extinction of fear memories through prolonged exposure therapy, the primary evidence-based behavioral treatment for PTSD, has only partial efficacy. In mice, pharmacological inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) produces elevated levels of anandamide (AEA) and promotes fear extinction, suggesting that FAAH inhibitors may aid fear extinction-based treatments. A human FAAH 385C-greater thanA substitution encodes an FAAH enzyme with reduced catabolic efficacy. Individuals homozygous for the FAAH 385A allele may therefore offer a genetic model to evaluate the impact of elevations in AEA signaling in humans, helping to inform whether FAAH inhibitors have the potential to facilitate fear extinction therapy for PTSD. To overcome the challenge posed by low frequency of the AA genotype (appr. 5%), we prospectively genotyped 423 individuals to examine the balanced groups of CC, AC, and AA individuals (n = 25/group). Consistent with its loss-of-function nature, the A allele was dose dependently associated with elevated basal AEA levels, facilitated fear extinction, and enhanced the extinction recall. Moreover, the A-allele homozygotes were protected against stress-induced decreases in AEA and negative emotional consequences of stress. In a humanized mouse model, AA homozygous mice were similarly protected against stress-induced decreases in AEA, both in the periphery, and also in the amygdala and prefrontal cortex, brain structures critically involved in fear extinction and regulation of stress responses. Collectively, these data suggest that AEA signaling can temper aspects of the stress response and that FAAH inhibition may aid the treatment for stress-related psychiatric disorders, such as PTSD.

  • 45.
    Mayo, Leah M
    et al.
    University of Chicago, IL 60637 USA .
    Fraser, Diana
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. NIAAA, MD 20892 USA .
    Childs, Emma
    University of Chicago, IL 60637 USA .
    Momenan, Reza
    NIAAA, MD 20892 USA .
    Hommer, Daniel W
    NIAAA, MD 20892 USA .
    de Wit, Harriet
    University of Chicago, IL 60637 USA .
    Heilig, Markus
    NIAAA, MD 20892 USA .
    Conditioned Preference to a Methamphetamine-Associated Contextual Cue in Humans2013In: Neuropsychopharmacology, ISSN 0893-133X, E-ISSN 1740-634X, Vol. 38, no 6, p. 921-929Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Classical conditioning is widely used to study motivational properties of addictive drugs in animals, but has rarely been used in humans. We established a procedure suitable for studying the neurobiology and individual determinants of classical conditioning in humans. Healthy volunteers were randomly assigned to four groups that received methamphetamine or placebo in the presence of distinctive environmental cues under paired or unpaired conditions. During each session, subjects performed tasks known to activate the ventral striatum. Tasks were performed in the presence of a distinctive context, consisting of a screen background image of a beach or mountains, accompanied by corresponding sounds. Separate groups of subjects carried out the tasks under high ($35-50) or low ($5-20) reward conditions. Within each of the two reward conditions, one group (paired) received methamphetamine (20 mg, oral) or placebo consistently associated with one of the contexts, while the other (unpaired) received drug or placebo unrelated to context. A fifth group (paired) performed the tasks with contextual cues but in the absence of monetary incentives. Before and after conditioning, participants carried out a series of forced choice tasks for the contextual cues, and change of preference over time was analyzed. All paired groups showed a significant increase in preference for the drug-associated context, with a linear trend for increase across the levels of reward. Preference was unrelated to subjective drug effects, and did not change in the unpaired group. These data support the translational utility of our conditioning procedure for studies of reward mechanisms in humans.

  • 46.
    Mueller, Sebastian
    et al.
    University of Heidelberg, Germany.
    Heilig, MarkusLinköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Psykiatriska kliniken i Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Alcohol and Alcohol-related Diseases2023Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Alcohol is one of the major risk factors for negative health outcomes worldwide. It accounts for more than 60 alcohol-related diseases, ranging from addiction, through liver cirrhosis, to cancer. Collectively, these conditions account for mortality and morbidity that make alcohol use one of the leading preventable causes of disability adjusted life-years (DALYs) lost globally. In this book, an international faculty covers all aspects of alcohol-related disorders, ranging from addiction/alcohol use disorders (AUD) to alcohol-related diseases of other organs such as liver, heart or cancer. A special focus is to reach out to primary care physicians who are in the front line of this major health problem. The book also provides an update for addiction specialists, as well as specialists in internal medicine, gastroenterology and hepatology. The book is divided into sections that include epidemiology, alcohol use disorders and addiction, alcohol-related liver disease, alcoholic hepatitis, primary care and interdisciplinary approaches and other alcohol-related diseases. Besides current diagnostic measures and treatment strategies, the book deals with the many underlying molecular and genetic mechanisms of alcohol toxicity. Novel insights include prospective data on all-cause mortality and the emerging major role of alcohol-mediated hemolysis and enhanced red blood cell turnover. The book also aims at guiding policy makers to handle the topic of alcohol in our society more responsibly. 

  • 47.
    Muench, Christine
    et al.
    NIAAA, MD 20892 USA.
    Charlet, Katrin
    NIAAA, MD 20892 USA.
    Balderston, Nicholas L.
    NIMH, MD 20892 USA.
    Grillon, Christian
    NIMH, MD 20892 USA.
    Heilig, Markus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Psykiatriska kliniken i Linköping.
    Cortes, Carlos R.
    NIAAA, MD 20892 USA.
    Momenan, Reza
    NIAAA, MD 20892 USA.
    Lohoff, Falk W.
    NIAAA, MD 20892 USA.
    Fear conditioning and extinction in alcohol dependence: Evidence for abnormal amygdala reactivity2021In: Addiction Biology, ISSN 1355-6215, E-ISSN 1369-1600, Vol. 26, no 1, article id e12835Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fear conditioning and extinction (FCE) are vital processes in adaptive emotion regulation and disrupted in anxiety disorders. Despite substantial comorbidity between alcohol dependence (ALC) and anxiety disorders and reports of altered negative emotion processing in ALC, neural correlates of FCE in this clinical population remain unknown. Here, we used a 2-day fear learning paradigm in 43 healthy participants and 43 individuals with ALC at the National Institutes of Health. Main outcomes of this multimodal study included structural and functional brain magnetic resonance imaging, clinical measures, as well as skin conductance responses (SCRs) to confirm differential conditioning. Successful FCE was demonstrated across participants by differential SCRs in the conditioning phase and no difference in SCRs to the conditioned stimuli in the extinction phase. The ALC group showed significantly reduced blood oxygenation level-dependent responses in the right amygdala during conditioning (Cohens d = .89, P-(FWE) = .037) and in the left amygdala during fear renewal (Cohens d = .68, P-(FWE) = .039). Right amygdala activation during conditioning was significantly correlated with ALC severity (r = .39, P-(Bonferroni) = .009), depressive symptoms (r = .37, P-(Bonferroni) = .015), trait anxiety (r = .41, P-(Bonferroni) = .006), and perceived stress (r = .45, P-(Bonferroni) = .002). Our data suggest that individuals with ALC have dysregulated fear learning, in particular, dysregulated neural activation patterns, in the amygdala. Furthermore, amygdala activation during fear conditioning was associated with ALC-related clinical measures. The FCE paradigm may be a promising tool to investigate structures involved in negative affect regulation, which might inform the development of novel treatment approaches for ALC.

  • 48.
    Patnaik, S.
    et al.
    NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Marugan, J.
    NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Liu, K.
    NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Zheng, W.
    NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Thorsell, Annika
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Eskay, R.
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Southall, N.
    NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Heilig, Marcus
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Inglese, J.
    NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Austin, C.
    NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Identification of small molecule antagonists of the neuropeptide S receptor2010In: Probe Reports from the NIH Molecular Libraries Program [Internet], National Center for Biotechnology Information (US) , 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Patnaik, Samarjit
    et al.
    NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Marugan, Juan J.
    NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Liu, Ke
    NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Zheng, Wei
    NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Southall, Noel
    NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Dehdashti, Seameen J.
    NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Thorsell, Annika
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Heilig, Markus
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Bell, Lauren
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Zook, Michelle
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Eskay, Bob
    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH; Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Brimacombe, Kyle R.
    NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Austin, Christopher P.
    NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Structure-Activity Relationship of Imidazopyridinium Analogues as Antagonists of Neuropeptide S Receptor2013In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 56, no 22, p. 9045-9056Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The discovery and characterization of a novel chemical series of phosphorothioyl-containing imidazopyridines as potent neuropeptide S receptor antagonists is presented. The synthesis of analogues and their structure-activity relationship with respect to the Gq, Gs, and ERK pathways is detailed. The pharmacokinetics and in vivo efficacy of a potent analogue in a food intake rodent model are also included, underscoring its potential therapeutic value for the treatment of sleep, anxiety, and addiction disorders.

  • 50.
    Paul, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Schwieler, Lilly
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Erhardt, Sophie
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Boda, Sandra
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Trepci, Ada
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Kämpe, Robin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Asratian, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Holm, Lovisa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Yngve, Adam
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dantzer, Robert
    Univ Texas MD Anderson Canc Ctr, TX 77030 USA.
    Heilig, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Psykiatriska kliniken i Linköping.
    Hamilton, Paul J.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Samuelsson, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Psykiatriska kliniken i Linköping.
    Peripheral and central kynurenine pathway abnormalities in major depression2022In: Brain, behavior, and immunity, ISSN 0889-1591, E-ISSN 1090-2139, Vol. 101, p. 136-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Considerable data relate major depressive disorder (MDD) with aberrant immune system functioning. Pro inflammatory cytokines facilitate metabolism of tryptophan along the kynurenine pathway (KP) putatively resulting in reduced neuroprotective and increased neurotoxic KP metabolites in MDD, in addition to modulating metabolic and immune function. This central nervous system hypothesis has, however, only been tested in the periphery. Here, we measured KP-metabolite levels in both plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of depressed patients (n = 63/36 respectively) and healthy controls (n = 48/33). Further, we assessed the relation between KP abnormalities and brain-structure volumes, as well as body mass index (BMI), an index of metabolic disturbance associated with atypical depression. Plasma levels of picolinic acid (PIC), the kynurenic/quinolinic acid ratio (KYNA/QUIN), and PIC/QUIN were lower in MDD, but QUIN levels were increased. In the CSF, we found lower PIC in MDD. Confirming previous work, MDD patients had lower hippocampal, and amygdalar volumes. Hippocampal and amygdalar volumes were correlated positively with plasma KYNA/QUIN ratio in MDD patients. BMI was increased in the MDD group relative to the control group. Moreover, BMI was inversely correlated with plasma and CSF PIC and PIC/QUIN, and positively correlated with plasma QUIN levels in MDD. Our results partially confirm previous peripheral KP findings and extend them to the CSF in MDD. We present the novel finding that abnormalities in KP metabolites are related to metabolic disturbances in depression, but the relation between KP metabolites and depression-associated brain atrophy might not be as direct as previously hypothesized.

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