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  • 1.
    Frankelius, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Guyader, Hugo
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ottosson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Aichagui, Victor
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Witell, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Green Service Innovation: The role of resource integration and service provision2014In: AMA SERVSIG 2014 PROCEEDINGS: Services Marketing in the New Economic and Social Landscape. / [ed] Tsiotsou R.H. & Hajidimitriou Y., 2014, Vol. "Building Sustainability in Services", article id 208Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The importance of green services is increasing. The purpose of the research project is to develop a better understanding of the concept “green services” and its relationship to “service innovation”. The research questions are: What factors can define the green services concept? What are the distinctive characteristics of different types of green services?

     

    Methodology: A multiple case study approach is used. The cases represent companies having introduced green service innovations. Based on interviews with the innovators and customers different categories of green services are indentified and described. The empirical findings are then analyzed in the light of a literature review.

     

    Findings: By combining empirical observations and theory the authors develop a framework for green service innovations. This framework describes how innovation can be attained through emphasizing changes in resource integration (reuse waste, reduce impact on nature and improve nature) and service provision (direct service or indirect service). In this frame six categories of green services are defined: redistribution of resources, changing customer behavior, improving conditions for nature, upcycling, replacement of technology and products to improve nature.

     

    Originality/value: The majority of existing research on green service has had focus on the service companies and the change of technology in providing services. The authors here rather emphasize the customer roles, and stresses that these roles need to change to fulfill green service innovation. Moreover, the perspective here is that green services have the ability to not only mitigate negative impact on the environment but also increase the quality of nature. The term “greenovation” is proposed to emphase this.

  • 2.
    Guyader, Hugo
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Aichagui, Victor
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Transformative Business Models: A case from Collaborative Consumption2015In: The 14th International Research Symposium on Service Excellence in Management: Proceedings of QUIS 14 – Accelerate the Impact of Service Research June 18-21, 2015. Shanghai China. / [ed] Xiande Zhao; Jie J. Zhang; Hyun Jeong (Spring) Han, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study’s purpose is to describe the growth process of Collaborative Consumption (CC) platforms and to identify the challenges of establishing an innovative matchmaking business model. This paper takes a lens of the customer approach to understand how to develop value propositions to satisfy users of CC platforms and their value co-creation process.

    In a CC network system, users exchange, redistribute or share existing products. In 2013, revenues from CC increased by 25% (Geron, 2013), with rentals as the greatest share of business models, e.g. car sharing. Therein, consumers seek access rather than ownership (Bardhi & Eckhardt, 2012). Rental services, a way for consumers to co-create value by sharing existing products that are only temporarily needed, embed the sharing paradigm (Lovelock & Gummesson, 2004), as well as the service logic. In this sharing paradigm, service organizations create online marketplaces enabling peer-to-peer exchange of product-service systems (PSS), i.e. sharing the value proposition with other consumers, instead of owning a product. The organic growth of structured sharing platforms to exchange services is the epitome of CC business models.

    CC dilutes the link between ownership and value in use; today’s defacto standard in consumption-based economies. This “sharing economy” is being revolutionized by ICT development and follows the societal urge to reduce the environmental impact of consumption (Belk, 2010). It disrupts traditional product industries by challenging established business models; not only because consumers follow the economic rationale of saving costs, but also because of its positive socio-environmental impacts (Botsman & Rogers, 2010).

    To provide and maintain a high quality service, CC platforms must reach a critical mass. This means having a well-balanced PSS with enough satisfied users to support the service delivery. Adoption rate is a fundamental problem, as limited initial service delivery capabilities prevent CC to become mainstream.

    Our case study of a car sharing platform expanding its service in Scandinavia shows that car sharing can be identified as three sustainable service offerings: car pooling, renting, and leasing. These services are based on business models that transform throughout maturity. Creating the initial demand or sustaining the supply of PSS, require CC platforms to develop transformative business models.

  • 3.
    Guyader, Hugo
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Aichagui, Victor
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ottosson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Witell, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Closing the green gap: understanding why green consumers choose brown products2014In: NRWC 2014, Nordic Retail and Wholesale Association , 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the impact of in-store marketing and packaging elements on green shopping behavior, aiming to further understand the attitude-behavior Green Gap. The results of first, a choice experiment with 127 respondents and second an eye-tracking experiment with 67 respondents show implications for the retail industry.

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