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  • 1.
    Archer, Brent
    et al.
    University of Louisiana at Lafayette, PO Box 43170, Lafayette, LA 70504-3170, USA.
    Müller, Nicole
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Penn, Claire
    University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, 1 Jan Smuts Avenue, Braamfontein, Gauteng 2000, South Africa.
    Facilitation effects of cueing techniques in two Sesotho speakers with anomia2016Ingår i: Speech, Language and Hearing, ISSN 2050-571X, Vol. 19, nr 3, s. 140-152Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Aphasiologists developing treatments for anomia should closely align therapy methods with the typological and morphological characteristics of the language in question. The lead author initiated this study to develop more defensible interventions for speakers of Sesotho, a South African language. Prefix-based cueing (our alternative name for initial phoneme cueing that describes these cues in Sesotho-oriented terms) was compared to a novel technique, root-based cueing (RBC). While prefix-based cues are described in the literature, we hypothesized root-based cues would be more appropriate in this context since they were thought to be more consonant with the linguistic parameters of Sesotho. Two speakers with aphasia, who demonstrated significant anomic symptoms, served as participants. We used a multiple-baseline, single case study design. Two 144-item word lists were developed with every item represented by a photograph. Each of the two word lists was associated with one of the two cueing techniques investigated. After baseline measurements were obtained, each participant attended eight facilitation sessions for each cueing condition, resulting in eight data points per condition and participant. For both participants, RBC resulted in greater naming performance than cueing by means of initial phonemes. Our explanation of these results is based on the Interactive Lexical Network model of lexical access; root-based cues may be more effective because they more efficiently constrain the number of lemmas activated after a cue is provided. We argue that a confluence of factors (word-retrieval processes and the character of Sesotho morphosyntax) gave rise to the noted differences in naming facilitation.

  • 2.
    Ball, Martin
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Isaksson, Fredrik
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Larsson, Elias
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Müller, Nicole
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Dysarthria in Swedish2016Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 3.
    Ball, Martin J
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Müller, Nicole
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Editorial Material2014Ingår i: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076, Vol. 28, nr 7-8, s. 451-452Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 4.
    Ball, Martin J
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Müller, Nicole
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Editorial Material: Special Issue: Selected Papers from ICPLA 2014 in CLINICAL LINGUISTICS and PHONETICS, vol 29, issue 4, pp 247-2482015Ingår i: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076, Vol. 29, nr 4, s. 247-248Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 5.
    Ball, Martin J
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Müller, NicoleLinköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.Nelson, Ryan L.University of Louisiana at Lafayette, LA, USA.
    Handbook of qualitative research in communication disorders2014Samlingsverk (redaktörskap) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    This volume provides a comprehensive and in-depth handbook of qualitative research in the field of communication disorders. It introduces and illustrates the wide range of qualitative paradigms that have been used in recent years to investigate various aspects of communication disorders.

    The first part of the Handbook introduces in some detail the concept of qualitative research and its application to communication disorders, and describes the main qualitative research approaches. The contributions are forward-looking rather than merely giving an overview of their topic. The second part illustrates these approaches through a series of case studies of different communication disorders using qualitative methods of research.

    This Handbook is an essential resource for senior undergraduate and graduate students, researchers and practitioners, in communication disorders and related fields.

  • 6.
    Guendouzi, Jacqueline
    et al.
    Southeastern Louisiana University, USA.
    Meaux, A.
    Southeastern Louisiana University, USA.
    Müller, Nicole
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Avoiding interactional conflict in dementia: the influence of gender styles on interactions.2016Ingår i: Journal of Language Aggression and Conflict, ISSN 2213-1272, Vol. 4, nr 1, s. 9-35Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Sociolinguistic research in the general population has established the existence of gender differences in the social use of language. In particular, it has been noted that women use more markers of politeness, small talk and structural devices (e.g. minimal responses, tag questions) to help maintain their conversations. Analysis of interactions involving people with dementia (PWD) suggests that these gender based differences were still present in the face of dementia. Furthermore, the use of these forms of language helped the women with dementia to avoid conflict and extend the length of their interactions. This study investigated whether the use of such language helped or hindered women with dementia in maintaining conversational satisfaction.

  • 7.
    Guendouzi, Jacqueline
    et al.
    Southeastern Louisiana University, Hammond, USA.
    Müller, Nicole
    University of Louisiana, Lafayette, USA.
    Approaches to discourse in dementia2005 (uppl. 1)Bok (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    The qualitative analysis of naturally occurring discourse in neurogenic communication disorders, specifically in dementia studies, has experienced recent burgeoning interest from wide-ranging disciplines. This multidisciplinarity has been exciting, but has added contextual confusion. This book advances the study of discourse in dementia by systematically exploring and applying different approaches to the same free conversational data sets, collected and transcribed by the authors. The applied methodologies and theories comprise a useful sourcebook for students, researchers, and practitioners alike.

  • 8.
    Johansson, Inga-Lena
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för Logopedi, Audiologi och Otorhinolaryngologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för Logopedi, Audiologi och Otorhinolaryngologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Müller, Nicole
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för Logopedi, Audiologi och Otorhinolaryngologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Patients’ and communication partners’ experiences of communicative changes in Parkinson’s disease2019Ingår i: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was to investigate the experiences of people with Parkinson’s disease and their close communication partners regarding disease-related communicative changes and participation in everyday conversations.

    Materials and methods: Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with six dyads consisting of a person with Parkinson’s disease and a close communication partner. The interview material was analysed through thematic analysis.

    Results: The main theme was the experiences of barriers and facilitators for participation in conversations. Subthemes were experiences related to changes in voice and articulation, language and cognition, body language and facial expressions, fatigue, self-image, communicative initiative, and familiarity with conversation partner. The results show individual variation. A change observed in almost all dyads was the person with Parkinson’s disease participating less in conversations.

    Conclusions: Assessment and interventions should be based on a broad perspective on communication, and individuals’ priorities should be foregrounded in intervention planning. Both the person with Parkinson’s disease and communication partners need to make adjustments for communication to work. Therefore, close communication partners should be included in assessment and intervention of communicationin Parkinson’s disease from an early stage.

  • 9.
    Kuecker, Karrie
    et al.
    University of Louisiana Lafayette, LA 70504 USA.
    Lockenvitz, Sarah
    Missouri State University, MO USA.
    Müller, Nicole
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Amount of rhoticity in schwar and in vowel plus /r/ in American English2015Ingår i: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076, Vol. 29, nr 8-10, s. 623-629Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a preliminary study of the duration of rhoticity in coda-r words in American English. We note that traditional descriptions of American English phonology divide these words into two categories: words that end in a vowel followed by a separate /r/ segment (plus possible final consonant), and words that end in an r-colored vowel (plus possible final consonant). R-colored central vowels are termed here stressed and unstressed schwar. Recordings of 15 speakers of American English producing tokens containing these types of vowels were acoustically analysed, and the durations of the rhotic parts of the tokens were measured. The results demonstrated that stressed schwars were usually completely rhotic, unstressed schwars were usually not completely rhotic, but still had on average longer rhotic portions than the vowels+/r/. These findings have implications for intervention with /r/ disorders, which are encountered commonly in child speech disorders. It is argued that if these findings are borne out in a broader study, there might be no need to teach two different types of coda-r in therapy.

  • 10.
    Mok, Zaneta
    et al.
    La Trobe University, Australia.
    Müller, Nicole
    University of Louisiana at Lafayette, USA.
    Staging casual conversations for people with dementia.2014Ingår i: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684, Vol. 13, nr 6, s. 834-853Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Social isolation is a key concern for individuals with dementia in long-term care. A possible solution is to promote social interaction between residents. A first step toward facilitating positive relationships between residents with dementia is to understand the mechanisms behind their interactions with each other, and also how their relationships with each other are built through such interactions. Drawing on casual conversations between residents in a special care unit for dementia, this paper uses systemic functional linguistics to examine how people with dementia use language to enact and construct their role-relations with each other. Results suggest people with dementia are able and willing conversationalists. However, factors such as the extent of communication breakdown and compatibility of the interlocutors may influence whether positive relations develop or not. Casual conversation is suggested to be a promising activity to encourage positive interpersonal processes between individuals with dementia in residential care.

  • 11.
    Müller, Nicole
    Department of Communicative Disorders, University of Louisiana at Lafayette-Université des Acadiens, P.O. Box 43170, Lafayette.
    Aging with French: Observations from South Louisiana2009Ingår i: Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology, ISSN 0169-3816, E-ISSN 1573-0719, Vol. 24, nr 2, s. 143-155Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    South Louisiana is home to long-established French and French-Creole speaking minorities of varied origin. This paper reports on fieldwork observation in a nursing home among whose residents were many French speakers. The research question with which this context was approached was kept deliberately wide, namely, how bilingualism might feature in the lives of participants, or what the linguistic practices and preferences of participants might be. Thus, rather than impose pre-determined analytical categories on the research situation that could be formulated into a hypothesis to be tested by quantificational means, the work reported here is an attempt to describe the participants' practices, and perspectives on the phenomenon under investigation.

  • 12.
    Müller, Nicole
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Distributed cognition and cognitive-communication skills in dementia, or: What is wrong with cognitive testing2015Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 13.
    Müller, Nicole
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Irish-English bilinguals in residential nursing care2015Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 14.
    Müller, Nicole
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Language use and language attitudes in bilingual nursing home residents2015Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The study to which this abstract refers is, at the time of abstract preparation, still ongoing. Data collection is scheduled to finish on February 28th, 2015. This qualitative, observational study uses low-involvement participant observation and informal interviews to investigate language use among bilingual nursing home residents in Ireland, whose first and second languages are Irish and English, respectively. The primary participants (nursing home residents) all show clear episodic memory deficits, consistent with mild-to-moderate dementia, although not all have a clinical diagnosis of dementia. Secondary participants are staff employed at the nursing home, most of whom also have at least a working knowledge of the residents’ first language, Irish.

     

    This presentation will focus on the following research questions:

    What are the language use and language preference patterns of Irish-English bilinguals residential care for the elderly? How do residents and others (e.g. care staff) value their languages?

     

    Because the study is still ongoing, only tentative conclusions can be drawn at this point. However, the following patterns are emerging: This nursing home is a deliberately (on the part of both staff and management, and residents) bilingual environment, and systematic code-switching is employed to counteract potential feelings of exclusion or isolation on the part of residents. Residents express positive attitudes towards their L1 in a variety of ways, ranging from responding in Irish to Irish conversations initiated by the researcher, to meta-comments about language, accents, and appraisal of language and speech (for example when teasing staff members in a good-natured fashion for less-than-fluent attempts at Irish). Participants also value finding themselves in the role of the expert and teacher, and of the more competent and fluent speaker (as compared to some staff members, and the researcher). In addition, residents code-switch systematically to maintain smooth communication in the face of language barriers, for instance when translating for less-than-fluent staff members.

     

    The findings of this study have potentially important implications for the social and communicative well-being of bilingual elders in residential care. Active and deliberate use of both languages can have a positive effect on participation and thus reduce social isolation. A communicative environment that encourages functional code-switching also encourages recourse to a bilingual’s cognitive resources, and furthermore casts the bilingual elder in the role of expert, which in turn contributes to the maintenance of a positive identity.

     

  • 15.
    Müller, Nicole
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Ball, Martin
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Clinical linguistics (and phonetics)2015Ingår i: Children's speech sound disorders / [ed] Caroline Bowen, Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell, 2015, 2, s. 28-31Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
  • 16.
    Müller, Nicole
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Ball, Martin J.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Editorial Material: NICOLE MULLER and MARTIN J. BALL in CLINICAL LINGUISTICS and PHONETICS, vol 29, issue 8-10, pp 573-5742015Ingår i: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076, Vol. 29, nr 8-10, s. 573-574Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 17.
    Müller, Nicole
    et al.
    University of Louisiana, Lafayette, USA.
    Ball, Martin J.University of Louisiana, Lafayette, USA.
    Research methods in clinical linguistics and phonetics: A practical guide2013Samlingsverk (redaktörskap) (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The only volume to offer hands-on information about the wide range of research philosophies, methods and tools used across linguistics, phonetics, and speech science, as applied to disordered speech and language. • Covers core topics for students undertaking their own research, including experimental and qualitative methods, sociolinguistics, corpus construction and analysis, data recording, transcription and digital analysis of speech, and speech imaging. • Considers the research ethics associated with working with people who have speech, language or other communication difficulties. • Includes a detailed discussion of the dissemination of research results, and advice on the writing of theses and dissertations, and on the writing and publishing of journal articles, as well the peer review process. • Offers students and researchers from a variety of entry points – such as linguistics, education, psychology, and speech pathology – an introduction to the scope of research in clinical linguistics and phonetics, and a practical guide to this interdisciplinary field

  • 18.
    Müller, Nicole
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Ball, Martin J.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Rhotic Phonemes in Modern Standard Welsh: The effect of Welsh-English Bilingualism?2015Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 19.
    Müller, Nicole
    et al.
    University of Louisiana at Lafayette.
    Guendouzi, Jacqueline
    Southeastern Louisiana University, Hammond.
    Transcribing discourse: Interactions with Alzheimer's disease2002Ingår i: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076, Vol. 16, nr 5, s. 345-359Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper illustrates the use of a 'discourse line' in transcribing spoken interaction between a person with Alzheimer's disease, and a visitor. Discourse is here interpreted as a metacategory, or an analytic level of interaction. We view transcribing as an integral part of 'doing discourse', and use two sub-layers of the discourse line, dedicated to speech acts and conversation analysis, respectively. The prosody and voice layer is used to show the analysis of a speaker's use of a specific voice quality in discourse terms.

  • 20.
    Müller, Nicole
    et al.
    Professor, Department of Communicative Disorders, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Lafayette, Louisiana.
    Guendouzi, Jacqueline A.
    Associate Professor, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Southeastern Louisiana University, Hammond, Louisiana.
    Discourses of dementia: A call for an ethnographic, action research approach to care in linguistically and culturally diverse environments2009Ingår i: Seminars in Speech and Language, ISSN 0734-0478, E-ISSN 1098-9056, Vol. 30, nr 3, s. 198-206Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The methods of ethnography and action research have much to offer to the field of speech-language pathology, particularly as our clinical populations are becoming increasingly diverse. We suggest that practicing speech-language pathologists and students, as well as researchers, will benefit from strategies that use the methods of participatory action research and ethnography as guiding principles to their work. Ethnography seeks to discover meaningful structures in a culture from the perspective of those whose culture it is. Action research, which shares a methodological basis with ethnography, is undertaken with the aim of improving the functioning of the social institution, practice, or structure investigated for the benefit of those most closely involved with that institution or practice. By way of illustration, we use data collected during fieldwork in Louisiana, involving persons with dementia from linguistically and culturally diverse backgrounds.

  • 21.
    Müller, Nicole
    et al.
    Department of Communicative Disorders, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Lafayette, Louisiana.
    Mok, Zaneta
    La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Applying Systemic Functional Linguistics to conversations with dementia: The linguistic construction of relationships between participants2012Ingår i: Seminars in Speech and Language, ISSN 0734-0478, E-ISSN 1098-9056, Vol. 33, nr 1, s. 5-15Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Social isolation in dementia is a growing concern as the incidence and prevalence of dementing conditions is on the rise in many societies. Positive social interactions, which foster the construction and enactment of positive interpersonal relationships and therefore positive discursive identities, make an important contribution to emotional well-being. In this article, we investigate how two women diagnosed with dementia of the Alzheimer's type use language to relate to each other and two visiting graduate students. We use Systemic Functional Linguistics as an analytical framework, specifically investigating the use of vocatives and naming, and conversational moves and exchanges.

  • 22.
    Müller, Nicole
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Mok, Zaneta
    La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia.
    “Getting to know you”: Situated and distributed cognition in conversation with dementia2014Ingår i: Dialogue and Dementia: Cognitive and Communicative Resources for Engagement / [ed] Robert Schrauf, Nicole Müller, New York: Psychology Press, 2014, s. 61-86Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 23.
    Müller, Nicole
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Mok, Zaneta
    La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Keegan, Louise
    Appalachian State University, NC, USA.
    Systemic functional linguistics and qualitative research in clinical applied linguistics2014Ingår i: Handbook of qualitative research in communication disorders / [ed] Martin J. Ball, Nicole Müller, Ryan Nelson, New York: Psychology Press, 2014, 1, s. 149-170Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 24.
    Müller, Nicole
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Schrauf, Robert
    The Pennsylvania State University, PA, USA.
    Conversation as cognition: reframing cognition in dementia2014Ingår i: Dialogue and Dementia: Cognitive and Communicative Resources for Engagement / [ed] Robert Schrauf, Nicole Müller, New York: Psychology Press, 2014, s. 3-26Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 25.
    Müller, Nicole
    et al.
    University of Louisiana at Lafayette, LA, USA.
    Wilson, Brent T.
    SUNY Cortland, NY, USA.
    Collaborative role construction in a conversation with dementia: An application of Systemic Functional Linguistics2008Ingår i: Clinical Linguistics and Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, Vol. 22, nr 10-11, s. 767-774Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This study applies the tools provided by Systemic Functional Linguistics (SFL) to the description of patterns in a conversation between a person with dementia and a person without. It shows how, in the presence of, on the one hand, considerable communicative and cognitive deficits, and on the other, a collaborative interlocutor, a person with dementia succeeds in leading and sustaining a lengthy conversation, and of constructing for himself a positive role in the interaction, namely that of the elder advising a much younger man.

  • 26.
    Papakyritsis, Ioannis
    et al.
    Western Illinois University, Macomb, USA.
    Müller, Nicole
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Perceptual and acoustic analysis of lexical stress in Greek speakers with dysarthria2014Ingår i: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076, Vol. 28, nr 7-8, s. 555-572Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The study reported in this paper investigated the abilities of Greek speakers with dysarthria to signal lexical stress at the single word level. Three speakers with dysarthria and two unimpaired control participants were recorded completing a repetition task of a list of words consisting of minimal pairs of Greek disyllabic words contrasted by lexical stress location only. Fourteen listeners were asked to determine the attempted stress location for each word pair. Acoustic analyses of duration and intensity ratios, both within and across words, were undertaken to identify possible acoustic correlates of the listeners judgments concerning stress location. Acoustic and perceptual data indicate that while each participant with dysarthria in this study had some difficulty in signaling stress unambiguously, the pattern of difficulty was different for each speaker. Further, it was found that the relationship between the listeners judgments of stress location and the acoustic data was not conclusive.

  • 27.
    Qiang, Li
    et al.
    Department of Communicative Disorders, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, USA / School of Foreign Languages, Dalian University of Technology, China.
    Guo, X
    School of International Education, Dalian University of Technology, China.
    Yao, Y.
    School of International Education, Dalian University of Technology, China.
    Müller, Nicole
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Relative clauses preference in learners of Chinese as a second language2016Ingår i: Chinese Journal of Applied Linguistics, ISSN 2192-9505, Vol. 39, s. 199-214Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Whether preference for subject-extracted relative clauses in language processing is a universal rule has been debated with evidences from both the first and the second language acquisition studies. But very few studies focus on learners of Chinese as a second language. The current research studied Chinese subject/object-extracted relative clauses processing among learners of Chinese as a second language by the self-paced reading experiment. The results demonstrate a faster and more accurate processing of subject-extracted relative clauses in both subject and object modifying conditions, adding more evidence to the universal preference for the subject-extracted relative clauses. Both Frequency-based Accounts and Memory-based Accounts are discussed related to the current findings.

  • 28.
    Schrauf, Robert W.
    et al.
    The Pennsylvania State University, PA, USA.
    Müller, NicoleLinköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Dialogue and dementia : cognitive and communicative resources for engagement2014Samlingsverk (redaktörskap) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    This volume takes the positive view that conversation between persons with dementia and their interlocutors is a privileged site for ongoing cognitive engagement. The book aims to identify and describe specific linguistic devices or strategies at the level of turn-by-turn talk that promote and extend conversation, and to explore real-world engagements that reflect these strategies.

    Final reflections tie these linguistic strategies and practices to wider issues of the "self" and "agency" in persons with dementia. Thematically, the volume fosters an integrated perspective on communication and cognition in terms of which communicative resources are recognized as cognitive resources, and communicative interaction is treated as reflecting cognitive engagement. This reflects perspectives in cognitive anthropology and cognitive science that regard human cognitive activity as distributed and culturally rooted.

    This volume is intended for academic researchers and advanced students in applied linguistics, linguistic and medical anthropology, nursing, and social gerontology; and practice professionals in speech-language pathology and geropsychology.

  • 29.
    Wilson, Brent T
    et al.
    Radford University, P.O. Box 6961, Radford.
    Müller, Nicole
    University of Louisiana at Lafayette,USA.
    Damico, Jack S.
    University of Louisiana at Lafayette,USA.
    The use of conversational laughter by an individual with dementia2007Ingår i: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076, Vol. 21, nr 11-12, s. 1001-1006Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    While laughter has been shown to play a significant role in any social interaction; its conversational usage by a person with dementia has rarely been investigated. This paper will investigate the functional aspects of laughter during conversation in an individual with dementia. Conversation analysis is used in order to investigate laughter as a social phenomenon and to be able to investigate laughter in an empirical and authentic manner. The conversational strategies employed through laughter will be detailed and implications will be discussed.

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