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  • 1.
    Bednarska, Olga
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Peripheral and Central Mechanisms in Irritable Bowel Syndrome: in search of links2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic visceral pain disorder with female predominance, characterized by recurrent abdominal pain and disturbed bowel habits in the absence of an identifiable organic cause. This prevalent and debilitating disease, which accounts for a substantial economic and individual burden, lacks exact diagnostic tools and effective treatment, since its pathophysiology remains uncertain. The bidirectional and multilayered brain-gut axis is a well-established disease model, however, the interactions between central and peripheral mechanisms along the brain-gut axis remain incompletely understood. One of the welldescribed triggering factors, yet accounting for only a fraction of IBS prevalence, is bacterial gastroenteritis that affects mucosal barrier function. Altered gut microbiota composition as well as disturbed intestinal mucosal barrier function and its neuroimmune regulation have been reported in IBS, however, the impact of live bacteria, neither commensal nor pathogenic, on intestinal barrier has not been studied yet. Furthermore, abnormal central processing of visceral sensations and psychological factors such as maladaptive coping have previously been suggested as centrally-mediated pathophysiological mechanisms of importance in IBS. Brain imaging studies have demonstrated an imbalance in descending pain modulatory networks and alterations in brain regions associated with interoceptive awareness and pain processing and modulation, particularly in anterior insula (aINS), although biochemical changes putatively underlying these central alterations remain poorly understood. Most importantly, however, possible associations between these documented changes on central and peripheral levels, which may as complex interactions contribute to disease onset and chronification of symptoms, are widely unknown.

    This thesis aimed to investigate the peripheral and central mechanisms in women with IBS compared to female healthy controls (HC) and to explore possible mutual associations between these mechanisms.

    In Paper I, we studied paracellular permeability and passage of live bacteria, both commensal and pathogenic through colonic biopsies mounted in Ussing chambers. We explored the regulation of the mucosal barrier function by mast cells and the neuropeptide vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) as well as a correlation between mucosal permeability and gastrointestinal and psychological symptoms. We observed increased paracellular permeability and the passage of commensal and pathogenic live bacteria in patients with IBS compared with HC, which was diminished by blocking the VIP receptors as well as after stabilizing mast cells in both groups. Moreover, higher paracellular permeability was associated with less somatic and psychological symptoms in patients.

    In Paper II, we aimed to determine the association between colonic mucosa paracellular permeability and structural and resting state functional brain connectivity. We demonstrated different patterns of associations between mucosa permeability and functional and structural brain connectivity in IBS patients compared to HC. Specifically, lower paracellular permeability in IBS, similar to the levels detected in HC, was associated with more severe IBS symptoms and increased functional and structural connectivity between intrinsic brain resting state network and descending pain modulation brain regions. Our findings further suggested that this association between mucosa permeability and functional brain connectivity was mainly mediated by coping strategies.

    In Paper III, we investigated putative alterations in excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission of aINS, as the brain’s key node of the salience network crucially involved in cognitive control, in IBS patients relative to HC and addressed possible connections with both symptoms and psychological factors. We found decreased concentrations of the excitatory neurotransmitter Glx in bilateral aINS in IBS patients compared to HC, while inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA+ levels were comparable. Further, we demonstrated hemisphere-specific associations between abdominal pain, coping and aINS excitatory neurotransmitter concentration.

    In conclusion, this thesis broadens the knowledge on peripheral and central mechanisms in IBS and presents novel findings that bring together the ends of brain-gut axis. Our results depict association between mucosal permeability, IBS symptoms and functional and structural connectivity engaging brain regions involved in emotion and pain modulation as well as underlying neurotransmitter alterations.

    List of papers
    1. Vasoactive Intestinal Polypeptide and Mast Cells Regulate Increased Passage of Colonic Bacteria in Patients With Irritable Bowel Syndrome
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Vasoactive Intestinal Polypeptide and Mast Cells Regulate Increased Passage of Colonic Bacteria in Patients With Irritable Bowel Syndrome
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    2017 (English)In: Gastroenterology, ISSN 0016-5085, E-ISSN 1528-0012, Vol. 153, no 4, p. 948-+Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND amp; AIMS: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is associated with intestinal dysbiosis and symptoms of IBS develop following gastroenteritis. We aimed to study the passage of live bacteria through the colonic epithelium, and determine the role of mast cells (MCs) and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) in barrier regulation in IBS and healthy individuals. METHODS: Colon biopsies from 32 women with IBS and 15 age-matched healthy women (controls) were mounted in Ussing chambers; we measured numbers of fluorescently labeled Escherichia coli HS and Salmonella typhimurium that passed through from the mucosal side to the serosal side of the tissue. Some biopsies were exposed to agents that block the VIP receptors (VPAC1 and VPAC2) or MCs. Levels of VIP and tryptase were measured in plasma and biopsy lysates. Number of MCs and MCs that express VIP or VIP receptors were quantified by immunofluorescence. Biopsies from an additional 5 patients with IBS and 4 controls were mounted in chambers and Salmonella were added; we studied passage routes through the epithelium by transmission electron microscopy and expression of tight junctions by confocal microscopy. RESULTS: In colon biopsies from patients with IBS, larger numbers of E coli HS and S typhimurium passed through the epithelium than in biopsies from controls (P amp;lt;.0005). In transmission electron microscopy analyses, bacteria were found to cross the epithelium via only the transcellular route. Bacterial passage was reduced in biopsies from patients with IBS and controls after addition of antibodies against VPACs or ketotifen, which inhibits MCs. Plasma samples from patients with IBS had higher levels of VIP than plasma samples from controls. Biopsies from patients with IBS had higher levels of tryptase, larger numbers of MCs, and a higher percentage of MCs that express VPAC1 than biopsies from controls. In biopsies from patients with IBS, addition of Salmonella significantly reduced levels of occludin; subsequent addition of ketotifen significantly reversed this effect. CONCLUSIONS: We found that colonic epithelium tissues from patients with IBS have increased translocation of commensal and pathogenic live bacteria compared with controls. The mechanisms of increased translocation include MCs and VIP.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    W B SAUNDERS CO-ELSEVIER INC, 2017
    Keywords
    Intestinal Permeability; Bacteria; Ketotifen; Inflammation
    National Category
    Gastroenterology and Hepatology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-142158 (URN)10.1053/j.gastro.2017.06.051 (DOI)000411835200024 ()28711627 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Stiftelsen Halsofonden, County Council of Ostergotland; Diarrheal Disease Research Centre, Linkoping University; AFA research foundation; Bengt-Ihre fonden, County Council of Ostergotland; Fondo de Investigacion Sanitaria, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Subdireccion General de Investigacion Sanitaria, Ministerio de Economia y Competitividad [FI12/00254]; NIH [R01 DK048351]; [CP10/00502]; [PI13/00935]; [MV16/00028]; [CIBEREHD CB06/04/0021]

    Available from: 2017-10-24 Created: 2017-10-24 Last updated: 2019-05-07
    2. Interactions between gut permeability and brain structure and function in health and irritable bowel syndrome
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interactions between gut permeability and brain structure and function in health and irritable bowel syndrome
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    2019 (English)In: NeuroImage: Clinical, ISSN 0353-8842, E-ISSN 2213-1582, Vol. 21, article id 101602Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Changes in brain-gut interactions have been implicated in the pathophysiology of chronic visceral pain in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Different mechanisms of sensitization of visceral afferent pathways may contribute to the chronic visceral pain reports and associated brain changes that characterize IBS. They include increased gut permeability and gut associated immune system activation, and an imbalance in descending pain inhibitory and facilitatory mechanisms. In order to study the involvement of these mechanisms, correlations between gut epithelial permeability and live bacterial passage, and structural and functional brain connectivity were measured in women with moderate-to-severe IBS and healthy women. The relationships between gut permeability and functional and anatomical connectivity were significantly altered in IBS compared with the healthy women. IBS participants with lower epithelial permeability reported increased IBS symptoms, which was associated with increased functional and structural connectivity in endogenous pain facilitation regions. The findings suggest that relationships between gut permeability and the brain are significantly altered in IBS and suggest the existence of IBS subtypes based on these interactions.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2019
    Keywords
    Irritable bowel syndrome; Gut epithelial permeability; Resting state fMRI; Brain-gut interactions; Default mode network; Coping skills
    National Category
    Neurosciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-155612 (URN)10.1016/j.nicl.2018.11.012 (DOI)000460337700015 ()30472166 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85056893948 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|AFA FOrskning [AFA140417]; County Council of Ostergotland [SLS-693541, SLS-503411]; Region Ostergotland [LIO-700871, LIO-606201, LIO-536281, LIO-514271]; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft [DFG IC 81/1-1]; Bengt-Ihre Fonden

    Available from: 2019-03-20 Created: 2019-03-20 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
    3. Reduced excitatory neurotransmitter levels in anterior insulae are associated with abdominal pain in irritable bowel syndrome
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reduced excitatory neurotransmitter levels in anterior insulae are associated with abdominal pain in irritable bowel syndrome
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    2019 (English)In: Pain, ISSN 0304-3959, E-ISSN 1872-6623, Vol. 160, no 9, p. 2004-2012Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a visceral pain condition with psychological comorbidity. Brain imaging studies in IBS demonstratealtered function in anterior insula (aINS), a key hub for integration of interoceptive, affective, and cognitive processes. However,alterations in aINS excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission as putative biochemical underpinnings of these functional changesremain elusive. Using quantitative magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we compared women with IBS and healthy women (healthycontrols [HC]) with respect to aINS glutamate 1 glutamine (Glx) and g-aminobutyric acid (GABA1) concentrations and addressedpossible associations with symptoms. Thirty-nine women with IBS and 21 HC underwent quantitative magnetic resonancespectroscopy of bilateral aINS to assess Glx and GABA1 concentrations. Questionnaire data from all participants and prospectivesymptom-diary data from patients were obtained for regression analyses of neurotransmitter concentrations with IBS-related andpsychological parameters. Concentrations of Glx were lower in IBS compared with HC (left aINS P , 0.05, right aINS P , 0.001),whereas no group differences were detected for GABA1concentrations. Lower right-lateralized Glx concentrations in patients weresubstantially predicted by longer pain duration, while less frequent use of adaptive pain‐coping predicted lower Glx in left aINS. Ourfindings provide first evidence for reduced excitatory but unaltered inhibitory neurotransmitter levels in aINS in IBS. The results alsoindicate a functional lateralization of aINS with a stronger involvement of the right hemisphere in perception of abdominal pain and ofthe left aINS in cognitive pain regulation. Our findings suggest that glutaminergic deficiency may play a role in pain processing in IBS.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2019
    Keywords
    Irritable bowel syndrome, Functional magnetic resonance imaging, Quantitative magnetic resonance spectroscopy, Insula, Visceral pain, Coping
    National Category
    Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-160012 (URN)10.1097/j.pain.0000000000001589 (DOI)31045748 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2019-09-02 Created: 2019-09-02 Last updated: 2019-09-09Bibliographically approved
  • 2.
    Bednarska, Olga
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Icenhour, Adriane
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Institute of Medical Psychology and Behavioral Immunobiology, University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany.
    Tapper, Sofie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Witt, Suzanne Tyson
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Tisell, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics.
    Elsenbruch, Sigrid
    Institute of Medical Psychology and Behavioral Immunobiology, University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Reduced excitatory neurotransmitter levels in anterior insulae are associated with abdominal pain in irritable bowel syndrome2019In: Pain, ISSN 0304-3959, E-ISSN 1872-6623, Vol. 160, no 9, p. 2004-2012Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a visceral pain condition with psychological comorbidity. Brain imaging studies in IBS demonstratealtered function in anterior insula (aINS), a key hub for integration of interoceptive, affective, and cognitive processes. However,alterations in aINS excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission as putative biochemical underpinnings of these functional changesremain elusive. Using quantitative magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we compared women with IBS and healthy women (healthycontrols [HC]) with respect to aINS glutamate 1 glutamine (Glx) and g-aminobutyric acid (GABA1) concentrations and addressedpossible associations with symptoms. Thirty-nine women with IBS and 21 HC underwent quantitative magnetic resonancespectroscopy of bilateral aINS to assess Glx and GABA1 concentrations. Questionnaire data from all participants and prospectivesymptom-diary data from patients were obtained for regression analyses of neurotransmitter concentrations with IBS-related andpsychological parameters. Concentrations of Glx were lower in IBS compared with HC (left aINS P , 0.05, right aINS P , 0.001),whereas no group differences were detected for GABA1concentrations. Lower right-lateralized Glx concentrations in patients weresubstantially predicted by longer pain duration, while less frequent use of adaptive pain‐coping predicted lower Glx in left aINS. Ourfindings provide first evidence for reduced excitatory but unaltered inhibitory neurotransmitter levels in aINS in IBS. The results alsoindicate a functional lateralization of aINS with a stronger involvement of the right hemisphere in perception of abdominal pain and ofthe left aINS in cognitive pain regulation. Our findings suggest that glutaminergic deficiency may play a role in pain processing in IBS.

  • 3.
    Bednarska, Olga
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tapper, Sofie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Tisell, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Lowén, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Neurotransmittor Concentration in Pregenual ACC in Stool Consistency Patient Subgroups With IBS2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    The Anterior Cingulate Cortex (ACC) is a key region of the central autonomic brain network. Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is characterized abdominal pain and bowel habit disturbances. Autonomic dysregulation has been reported in IBS as well as altered ACC activation in pregenual ACC during visceral stimulation 1 2. Glutamate is the major excitatory and Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain.

    Aim & Methods

    We aimed to measure neurotransmitter concentration in the pregenual ACC, in stool consistency subgroups with IBS by using quantitative neurotransmitter Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (qMRS)Seven patients with IBS-mixed (6 women) and five patients with IBS -diarrhea (4 women) according to Rome 3 were included. Mean age was 34.2 years (SD 5.3) with no significant difference between subgroups.  Patients completed symptom severity score (IBS-SSS). Quantitative MRS was measured in a 3T MRI scanner. A water-suppressed MEGA-PRESS sequence (TR 2.0 s, TE 68 ms) was used with the editing pulses placed at 1.90 ppm (‘ON-dynamics’) and at 7.46 ppm (‘OFF-dynamics’) with a voxel (3x3x3 cm3) placed in the pACC. Each MEGA-PRESS measurement resulted in a sequence of 40 OFF- and ON-dynamics, where each was computed by 8 phase cycles. Directly after each water-suppressed MEGA-PRESS measurement, a shorter 2-dynamic unsuppressed water MEGA-PRESS measurement was performed within the same voxel, which was used to obtain the concentrations in physically well-defined units of [mM]. The GABA concentrations were computed by averaging the difference spectra obtained by subtracting each OFF-dynamic from subsequent ON-dynamic and using LCModel (Version 6.3) for the final quantification. The Glutamate concentrations were obtained by only averaging the OFF-dynamics, which were not affected by the editing pulses. Additionally, all dynamics were phase and frequency corrected prior to the averaging. For group comparison unpaired T-tests were used.

    Results

    Patients had moderate to severe symptoms with IBS-SSS of 367 (SD 79.7). There was no significant difference between IBS subgroups in terms of IBS-SSS. Mean pACC GABA concentration was 1.66 (SD 0.17) mM in IBS-M and 1.65 (SD 0.27) mM in IBS-D. There was no significant difference between groups (p=0.9). Mean pACC Glutamate concentration was 4.54 (0.35) mM in IBS-M and 5.13 (SD 0.64) mM in IBS-D. There was no significant difference between groups, although a trend with p=0.06 was observed.

    Conclusion

    Further qMRS data have to be collected in IBS patients as well as healthy controls to evaluate if IBS subgroups demonstrate alterations in pACC glutamate and GABA concentrations

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