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  • 1.
    Alvarez-Rodriguez, Manuel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Atikuzzaman, Mohammad
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Surgery and Theriogenology, Faculty of Veterinary Animal and Biomedical Sciences, Sylhet Agricultural University, Sylhet, Bangladesh.
    Venhoranta, Heli
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Helsinki, Department of Production Animal Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Saari, Finland.
    Wright, Dominic
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rodriguez-Martinez, Heriberto
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Expression of Immune Regulatory Genes in the Porcine Internal Genital Tract Is Differentially Triggered by Spermatozoa and Seminal Plasma2019In: International Journal of Molecular Sciences, ISSN 1422-0067, E-ISSN 1422-0067, Vol. 20, no 3, article id 513Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mating or cervical deposition of spermatozoa or seminal plasma (SP) modifies the expression of genes affecting local immune defense processes at the oviductal sperm reservoir in animals with internal fertilization, frequently by down-regulation. Such responses may occur alongside sperm transport to or even beyond the reservoir. Here, immune-related gene expression was explored with cDNA microarrays on porcine cervix-to-infundibulum tissues, pre-/peri-ovulation. Samples were collected 24 h post-mating or cervical deposition of sperm-peak spermatozoa or SP (from the sperm-peak fraction or the whole ejaculate). All treatments of this interventional study affected gene expression. The concerted action of spermatozoa and SP down-regulated chemokine and cytokine (P00031), interferon-gamma signaling (P00035), and JAK/STAT (P00038) pathways in segments up to the sperm reservoir (utero-tubal junction (UTJ)/isthmus). Spermatozoa in the vanguard sperm-peak fraction (P1-AI), uniquely displayed an up-regulatory effect on these pathways in the ampulla and infundibulum. Sperm-free SP, on the other hand, did not lead to major effects on gene expression, despite the clinical notion that SP mitigates reactivity by the female immune system after mating or artificial insemination.

  • 2.
    Atikuzzaman, Mohammad
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Seminal Influence on the Oviduct: Mating and/or semen components induce gene expression changes in the pre-ovulatory functional sperm reservoir in poultry and pigs2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Internal fertilization occurs in birds and eutherian mammals. Foetal development, however, is either extra- respectively intra-corpore (egg vs uterus). In these animal classes, the female genital tract stores ejaculated spermatozoa into a restricted oviductal segment; the functional pre-ovulatory sperm reservoir, where they survive until ovulation/s occur. Paradoxically, this immunologically foreign sperm suspension in seminal fluid/plasma, often microbiologically contaminated, ought to be promptly eliminated by the female local immune defence which, instead, tolerates its presence. The female immune tolerance is presumably signalled via a biochemical interplay of spermatozoa, as well as the peptides and proteins of the extracellular seminal fluid, with female epithelial and immune cells. Such interplay can result in gene expression shifts in the sperm reservoir in relation to variations in fertility. To further aid our understanding of the underlying mechanisms, this thesis studied the proteome of the seminal fluid (using 2D SDS-PAGE and mass spectrometry) including cytokine content (using Luminex and/or ELISA) of healthy, sexually mature and fertile boars and cocks. As well, gene expression changes (using cDNA microarray) in the oviductal sperm reservoirs of sexually-mature females, mated or artificially infused with homologous sperm-free seminal fluid/plasma were studied. Pigs were of commercial, fertility-selected modern breeds (Landrace), while chicken belonged to the ancestor Red Junglefowl (RJF, low egg laying-capacity), a selected egg-layer White Leghorn (WL) and of their Advanced Intercross Line (AIL). Ejaculates were manually collected as single sample in cocks or as the sperm-rich fraction [SRF] and the post- SRF fraction in boars to harvest seminal fluid/plasma for proteome/cytokine and infusion-studies. Oviducts were retrieved for gene-expression analyses via microarray immediately post-mortem (chicken) or at surgery (pig), 24 h after mating or genital infusion. In pigs, the protein-rich seminal plasma showed the highest amounts of cytokines [interferon-γ, interferon gamma-induced protein 10 (IP-10/CXCL10), macrophage derived chemokine (MDC/CCL22), growth-regulated oncogene (GRO/CXCL1), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), monocyte chemo-attractant protein-1 (MCP-1/ CCL2), interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8/CXCL8, IL-10, IL-15, IL-17 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-3) in the larger, protein-rich and sperm-poor post-SRF, indicating its main immune signalling influence. Chicken showed also a plethora of seminal fluid proteins with serum albumin and ovotransferrin being conserved through selection/evolution. However, they showed fewer cytokines than pigs, as the anti-inflammatory/immune-modulatory TGF-β2 or the pro-inflammatory CXCL10. The RJF contained fewer immune system process proteins and lacked TGF-β2 compared to WL and AIL, suggesting selection for increased fertility could be associated with higher expression of immune-regulating peptides/proteins. The oviductal sperm reservoir reacted in vivo to semen exposure. In chicken, mating significantly changed the expression of immune-modulatory and pH-regulatory genes in AIL. Moreover, modern fertile pigs (Landrace) and chicken (WL), albeit being taxonomically distant, shared gene functions for preservation of viable sperm in the oviduct. Mating or SP/SF-infusion were able to change the expression of comparable genes involved in pH-regulation (SLC16A2, SLC4A9, SLC13A1, SLC35F1, ATP8B3, ATP13A3) or immune-modulation (IFIT5, IFI16, MMP27, ADAMTS3, MMP3, MMP12). The results of the thesis demonstrate that both mating and components of the sperm-free seminal fluid/plasma elicit gene expression changes in the pre-ovulatory female sperm reservoir of chickens and pigs, some conserved over domestication and fertility-selection.

    List of papers
    1. The Seminal Plasma of the Boar is Rich in Cytokines, with Significant Individual and Intra-Ejaculate Variation
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Seminal Plasma of the Boar is Rich in Cytokines, with Significant Individual and Intra-Ejaculate Variation
    Show others...
    2015 (English)In: American Journal of Reproductive Immunology, ISSN 1046-7408, E-ISSN 1600-0897, Vol. 74, no 6, p. 523-532Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Problem The boar, as human, sequentially ejaculates sperm-rich and sperm-poor fractions. Seminal plasma (SP) spermadhesins (PSP-I/PSP-II) induce a primary endometrial inflammatory response in female sows, similar to that elicited by semen deposition in other species, including human. However, the SP is also known to mitigate such response, making it transient to allow for embryo entry to a cleansed endometrium. Although cytokine involvement has been claimed, the exploration of cytokines in different SP fractions is scarce. This study determines Th1, Th2, Th17 and Th3 cytokine profiles in specific ejaculate SP fractions from boars of proven fertility. Methods SP samples from the sperm-rich fraction (SRF) and the sperm-poor post-SRF fraction (post-SRF) of manually collected ejaculates from eight boars (four ejaculates per boar) were analysed by commercial multiplex bead assay kits (Milliplex MAP, Millipore, USA) for interferon-gamma, interferon gamma-induced protein 10, macrophage-derived chemokine, growth-regulated oncogene, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, monocyte chemo-attractant protein-1, interleukins (IL)-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-15, IL-17 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta 1-beta 3. Results Cytokine concentrations differed between the ejaculate fractions among boars, being highest in the post-SRF. Conclusion Boar SP is rich in Th1, Th2, Th17 and Th3 cytokines, with lowest concentrations in the sperm-peak-containing fraction, indicating its main immune influence might reside in the larger, protein-rich sperm-poor post-SRF.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    WILEY-BLACKWELL, 2015
    Keywords
    Ejaculate fractions; immunomodulatory molecules; pig; seminal plasma peptides
    National Category
    Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124497 (URN)10.1111/aji.12432 (DOI)000367669300006 ()26412440 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|MINECO Madrid (Spain) [AGL2012-39903]; FEDER funds (EU); Formas (Stockholm, Sweden); MECD (Madrid, Spain); Seneca Foundation (Murcia, Spain)

    Available from: 2016-02-02 Created: 2016-02-01 Last updated: 2017-11-30
    2. Selection for higher fertility reflects in the seminal fluid proteome of modern domestic chicken
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Selection for higher fertility reflects in the seminal fluid proteome of modern domestic chicken
    Show others...
    2017 (English)In: Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology - Part D: Genomics and Proteomics, ISSN 1744-117X, E-ISSN 1878-0407, Vol. 21, p. 27-40Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The high egg-laying capacity of the modern domestic chicken (i.e. White Leghorn, WL) has arisen from the low egg-laying ancestor Red Junglefowl (RJF) via continuous trait selection and breeding. To investigate whether this long-term selection impacted the seminal fluid (SF)-proteome, 2DE electrophoresis-based proteomic analyses and immunoassays were conducted to map SF-proteins/cytokines in RJF, WL and a 9th generation Advanced Intercross Line (AIL) of RJF/WL-L13, including individual SF (n = 4, from each RJF, WL and AIL groups) and pools of the SF from 15 males of each group, analyzed by 2DE to determine their degree of intra-group (AIL, WL, and RJF) variability using Principal Component Analysis (PCA); respectively an inter-breed comparative analysis of intergroup fold change of specific SF protein spots intensity between breeds. The PCA clearly highlighted a clear intra-group similarity among individual roosters as well as a clear inter-group variability (e.g. between RJF, WL and AIL) validating the use of pools to minimize confounding individual variation. Protein expression varied considerably for processes related to sperm motility, nutrition, transport and survival in the female, including signaling towards immunomodulation. The major conserved SF-proteins were serum albumin and ovotransferrin. Aspartate aminotransferase, annexin A5, arginosuccinate synthase, glutathione S-transferase 2 and l-lactate dehydrogenase-A were RJF-specific. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase appeared specific to the WL-SF while angiotensin-converting enzyme, γ-enolase, coagulation factor IX, fibrinogen α-chain, hemoglobin subunit α-D, lysozyme C, phosphoglycerate kinase, Src-substrate protein p85, tubulins and thioredoxin were AIL-specific. The RJF-SF contained fewer immune system process proteins and lower amounts of the anti-inflammatory/immunomodulatory TGF-β2 compared to WL and AIL, which had low levels- or lacked pro-inflammatory CXCL10 compared to RJF. The seminal fluid proteome differs between ancestor and modern chicken, with a clear enrichment of proteins and peptides related to immune-modulation for sperm survival in the female and fertility.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2017
    Keywords
    Rooster seminal fluid proteome, Cytokines, Egg-laying capacity, Red Junglefowl, White Leghorn, Advanced intercross line, Chicken
    National Category
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy) Genetics and Breeding
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-132624 (URN)10.1016/j.cbd.2016.10.006 (DOI)000395224100004 ()27852008 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding agencies: Research Council FORMAS, Stockholm, Sweden [221-2011-512]; Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovacion (Madrid, Spain) [BFU2013-42833-P]

    Available from: 2016-11-17 Created: 2016-11-17 Last updated: 2018-05-02Bibliographically approved
    3. Mating induces the expression of immune- and pH-regulatory genes in the utero-vaginal junction containing mucosal sperm-storage tubuli of hens
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mating induces the expression of immune- and pH-regulatory genes in the utero-vaginal junction containing mucosal sperm-storage tubuli of hens
    Show others...
    2015 (English)In: Reproduction, Vol. 150, no 6, p. 473-483Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The female chicken, as with other species with internal fertilization, can tolerate the presence of spermatozoa within specialized sperm-storage tubuli (SST) located in the mucosa of the utero-vaginal junction (UVJ) for days or weeks, without eliciting an immune response. To determine if the oviduct alters its gene expression in response to sperm entry, segments from the oviduct (UVJ, uterus, isthmus, magnum and infundibulum) of mated and unmated (control) hens, derived from an advanced inter-cross line between Red Junglefowl and White Leghorn, were explored 24 h after mating using cDNA microarray analysis. Mating shifted the expression of fifteen genes in the UVJ (53.33% immune-modulatory and 20.00% pH-regulatory) and seven genes in the uterus, none of the genes in the latter segment overlapping the former (with the differentially expressed genes themselves being less related to immune-modulatory function). The other oviductal segments did not show any significant changes. These findings suggest sperm deposition causes a shift in expression in the UVJ (containing mucosal SST) and the uterus for genes involved in immune-modulatory and pH-regulatory functions, both relevant for sperm survival in the hen's oviduct.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Bioscientifica, 2015
    National Category
    Genetics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122573 (URN)10.1530/REP-15-0253 (DOI)000365344400004 ()26370241 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding agencies: Research Council FORMAS, Stockholm [221-2011-512]; FORMAS [221-2012-667]; VR [621-2011-4802]

    Available from: 2015-11-09 Created: 2015-11-09 Last updated: 2017-02-20
  • 3.
    Atikuzzaman, Mohammad
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Alvarez-Rodriguez, Manuel
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Carrillo, Alejandro Vicente
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Johnsson, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wright, Dominic
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rodriguez-Martinez, Heriberto
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Conserved gene expression in sperm reservoirs between birds and mammals in response to mating.2017In: BMC Genomics, ISSN 1471-2164, E-ISSN 1471-2164, Vol. 18, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Spermatozoa are stored in the oviductal functional sperm reservoir in animals with internal fertilization, including zoologically distant classes such as pigs or poultry. They are held fertile in the reservoir for times ranging from a couple of days (in pigs), to several weeks (in chickens), before they are gradually released to fertilize the newly ovulated eggs. It is currently unknown whether females from these species share conserved mechanisms to tolerate such a lengthy presence of immunologically-foreign spermatozoa. Therefore, global gene expression was assessed using cDNA microarrays on tissue collected from the avian utero-vaginal junction (UVJ), and the porcine utero-tubal junction (UTJ) to determine expression changes after mating (entire semen deposition) or in vivo cloacal/cervical infusion of sperm-free seminal fluid (SF)/seminal plasma (SP).

    RESULTS: In chickens, mating changed the expression of 303 genes and SF-infusion changed the expression of 931 genes, as compared to controls, with 68 genes being common to both treatments. In pigs, mating or SP-infusion changed the expressions of 1,722 and 1,148 genes, respectively, as compared to controls, while 592 genes were common to both treatments. The differentially expressed genes were significantly enriched for GO categories related to immune system functions (35.72-fold enrichment). The top 200 differentially expressed genes of each treatment in each animal class were analysed for gene ontology. In both pig and chicken, an excess of genes affecting local immune defence were activated, though frequently these were down-regulated. Similar genes were found in both the chicken and pig, either involved in pH-regulation (SLC16A2, SLC4A9, SLC13A1, SLC35F1, ATP8B3, ATP13A3) or immune-modulation (IFIT5, IFI16, MMP27, ADAMTS3, MMP3, MMP12).

    CONCLUSION: Despite being phylogenetically distant, chicken and pig appear to share some gene functions for the preservation of viable spermatozoa in the female reservoirs.

  • 4.
    Atikuzzaman, Mohammad
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Alvarez-Rodriguez, Manuel
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Vicente Carrillo, Alejandro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Johnsson, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wright, Dominic
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rodriguez-Martinez, Heriberto
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Correction: Conserved gene expression in sperm reservoirs between birds and mammals in response to mating (vol 18, 98, 2017)2017In: BMC Genomics, ISSN 1471-2164, E-ISSN 1471-2164, Vol. 18, article id 563Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 5.
    Atikuzzaman, Mohammad
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bhai Mehta, Ratnesh
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science.
    Fogelholm, Jesper
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wright, Dominic
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rodriguez-Martinez, Heriberto
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mating induces the expression of immune- and pH-regulatory genes in the utero-vaginal junction containing mucosal sperm-storage tubuli of hens2015In: Reproduction, Vol. 150, no 6, p. 473-483Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The female chicken, as with other species with internal fertilization, can tolerate the presence of spermatozoa within specialized sperm-storage tubuli (SST) located in the mucosa of the utero-vaginal junction (UVJ) for days or weeks, without eliciting an immune response. To determine if the oviduct alters its gene expression in response to sperm entry, segments from the oviduct (UVJ, uterus, isthmus, magnum and infundibulum) of mated and unmated (control) hens, derived from an advanced inter-cross line between Red Junglefowl and White Leghorn, were explored 24 h after mating using cDNA microarray analysis. Mating shifted the expression of fifteen genes in the UVJ (53.33% immune-modulatory and 20.00% pH-regulatory) and seven genes in the uterus, none of the genes in the latter segment overlapping the former (with the differentially expressed genes themselves being less related to immune-modulatory function). The other oviductal segments did not show any significant changes. These findings suggest sperm deposition causes a shift in expression in the UVJ (containing mucosal SST) and the uterus for genes involved in immune-modulatory and pH-regulatory functions, both relevant for sperm survival in the hen's oviduct.

  • 6.
    Atikuzzaman, Mohammad
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sanz, Libia
    Instituto de Biomedicina de Valencia, CSIC, Valencia, Spain.
    Pla, Davinia
    Instituto de Biomedicina de Valencia, CSIC, Valencia, Spain.
    Alvarez-Rodriguez, Manuel
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Rubér, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wright, Dominic
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Calvete, Juan J.
    Instituto de Biomedicina de Valencia, CSIC, Valencia, Spain.
    Rodriguez-Martinez, Heriberto
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Selection for higher fertility reflects in the seminal fluid proteome of modern domestic chicken2017In: Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology - Part D: Genomics and Proteomics, ISSN 1744-117X, E-ISSN 1878-0407, Vol. 21, p. 27-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The high egg-laying capacity of the modern domestic chicken (i.e. White Leghorn, WL) has arisen from the low egg-laying ancestor Red Junglefowl (RJF) via continuous trait selection and breeding. To investigate whether this long-term selection impacted the seminal fluid (SF)-proteome, 2DE electrophoresis-based proteomic analyses and immunoassays were conducted to map SF-proteins/cytokines in RJF, WL and a 9th generation Advanced Intercross Line (AIL) of RJF/WL-L13, including individual SF (n = 4, from each RJF, WL and AIL groups) and pools of the SF from 15 males of each group, analyzed by 2DE to determine their degree of intra-group (AIL, WL, and RJF) variability using Principal Component Analysis (PCA); respectively an inter-breed comparative analysis of intergroup fold change of specific SF protein spots intensity between breeds. The PCA clearly highlighted a clear intra-group similarity among individual roosters as well as a clear inter-group variability (e.g. between RJF, WL and AIL) validating the use of pools to minimize confounding individual variation. Protein expression varied considerably for processes related to sperm motility, nutrition, transport and survival in the female, including signaling towards immunomodulation. The major conserved SF-proteins were serum albumin and ovotransferrin. Aspartate aminotransferase, annexin A5, arginosuccinate synthase, glutathione S-transferase 2 and l-lactate dehydrogenase-A were RJF-specific. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase appeared specific to the WL-SF while angiotensin-converting enzyme, γ-enolase, coagulation factor IX, fibrinogen α-chain, hemoglobin subunit α-D, lysozyme C, phosphoglycerate kinase, Src-substrate protein p85, tubulins and thioredoxin were AIL-specific. The RJF-SF contained fewer immune system process proteins and lower amounts of the anti-inflammatory/immunomodulatory TGF-β2 compared to WL and AIL, which had low levels- or lacked pro-inflammatory CXCL10 compared to RJF. The seminal fluid proteome differs between ancestor and modern chicken, with a clear enrichment of proteins and peptides related to immune-modulation for sperm survival in the female and fertility.

  • 7.
    Barranco, Isabel
    et al.
    University of Murcia, Spain.
    Roca, Jordi
    University of Murcia, Spain.
    Tvarijonaviciute, Asta
    University of Murcia, Spain.
    Rubér, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Vicente Carrillo, Alejandro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Atikuzzaman, Mohammad
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ceron, Jose J.
    University of Murcia, Spain.
    Martinez, Emilio A.
    University of Murcia, Spain.
    Rodriguez-Martinez, Heriberto
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Measurement of Activity and Concentration of Paraoxonase 1 (PON-1) in Seminal Plasma and Identification of PON-2 in the Sperm of Boar Ejaculates2015In: Molecular Reproduction and Development, ISSN 1040-452X, E-ISSN 1098-2795, Vol. 82, no 1, p. 58-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study revealed and characterised the presence of the antioxidant enzymes paraoxonase (PON) type 1 (PON-1, extracellular) and type 2 (PON-2, intracellular) in boar semen. To evaluate PON-1, an entire ejaculate from each of ten boars was collected and the seminal plasma was harvested after double centrifugation (1,500g for 10min). Seminal plasma was analysed for concentration as well as enzymatic activity of PON-1 and total cholesterol levels. Seminal-plasma PON-1 concentration ranged from 0.961 to 1.670ng/ml while its enzymatic activity ranged from 0.056 to 0.400 IU/ml, which represent individual variance. Seminal-plasma PON-1 concentration and enzymatic activity were negatively correlated (r=-0.763; Pless than0.01). The activity of seminal-plasma PON-1 negatively correlated with ejaculate volume (r=-0.726, Pless than0.05), but positively correlated with sperm concentration (r=0.654, Pless than0.05). Total seminal-plasma cholesterol concentration positively correlated with PON-1 activity (r=0.773; Pless than0.01), but negatively correlated with PON-1 concentration (r=-0.709; Pless than0.05). The presence of intracellular PON-2 was determined via immunocytochemistry in spermatozoa derived from artificial insemination. PON-2 localised to the post-acrosomal area of the sperm head and principal piece of the tail in membrane-intact spermatozoa. In summary, PON is present in boar semen, with PON-1 at low levels in seminal plasma and PON-2 within the spermatozoa. Further studies are needed to characterise the relationship between antioxidant PONs with sperm and other seminal-plasma parameters. Mol. Reprod. Dev. 82: 58-65, 2015. (c) 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  • 8.
    Barranco, Isabel
    et al.
    University of Murcia, Spain.
    Rubér, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Perez-Patino, Cristina
    University of Murcia, Spain.
    Atikuzzaman, Mohammad
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Martinez, Emilio A.
    University of Murcia, Spain.
    Roca, Jordi
    University of Murcia, Spain.
    Rodriguez-Martinez, Heriberto
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The Seminal Plasma of the Boar is Rich in Cytokines, with Significant Individual and Intra-Ejaculate Variation2015In: American Journal of Reproductive Immunology, ISSN 1046-7408, E-ISSN 1600-0897, Vol. 74, no 6, p. 523-532Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Problem The boar, as human, sequentially ejaculates sperm-rich and sperm-poor fractions. Seminal plasma (SP) spermadhesins (PSP-I/PSP-II) induce a primary endometrial inflammatory response in female sows, similar to that elicited by semen deposition in other species, including human. However, the SP is also known to mitigate such response, making it transient to allow for embryo entry to a cleansed endometrium. Although cytokine involvement has been claimed, the exploration of cytokines in different SP fractions is scarce. This study determines Th1, Th2, Th17 and Th3 cytokine profiles in specific ejaculate SP fractions from boars of proven fertility. Methods SP samples from the sperm-rich fraction (SRF) and the sperm-poor post-SRF fraction (post-SRF) of manually collected ejaculates from eight boars (four ejaculates per boar) were analysed by commercial multiplex bead assay kits (Milliplex MAP, Millipore, USA) for interferon-gamma, interferon gamma-induced protein 10, macrophage-derived chemokine, growth-regulated oncogene, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, monocyte chemo-attractant protein-1, interleukins (IL)-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-15, IL-17 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta 1-beta 3. Results Cytokine concentrations differed between the ejaculate fractions among boars, being highest in the post-SRF. Conclusion Boar SP is rich in Th1, Th2, Th17 and Th3 cytokines, with lowest concentrations in the sperm-peak-containing fraction, indicating its main immune influence might reside in the larger, protein-rich sperm-poor post-SRF.

  • 9.
    Rodriguez-Martinez, Heriberto
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tienthai, P.
    Chulalongkorn University, Thailand.
    Atikuzzaman, Mohammad
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Vicente Carrillo, Alejandro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Rubér, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Alvarez-Rodriguez, Manuel
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The ubiquitous hyaluronan: Functionally implicated in the oviduct?2016In: Theriogenology, ISSN 0093-691X, E-ISSN 1879-3231, Vol. 86, no 1, p. 182-186Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hyaluronan (hyaluronic acid) is a simple, nonantigenic, nonsulfated glycosaminoglycan present everywhere in the extracellular compartments of the body. Noteworthy, it is highly conserved phylogenetically, from sauropsida to mammals; and plays a plethora of roles from embryonic/fetal development to adult physiological and pathological events, including tumor development. In reproduction, hyaluronan has proven related to initial events as sperm survival, buildup of the sperm reservoir in the oviduct, regulation of sperm capacitation, and prefertilization to later participate in embryo, fetal, and placental development. Synthesis, binding (via the CD44 membrane receptor), and degradation of hyaluronan occur in male and female genital organs, the oviduct being no exception. This review discusses our current knowledge on roles of this ubiquitous glycosaminoglycan on the survival of immunologically foreign spermatozoa in the pig oviduct, a relevant event for fertility. During preovulatory storage in the functional tubal sperm reservoir, spermatozoa are entrapped in a mucus-like tubal fluid. This fluid contains fluctuating levels of hyaluronan, which is synthesized by the lining epithelium by hyaluronan synthase 3. Both hyaluronan and its CD44 receptor are particularly evident in the deep mucosal furrows of the sperm reservoir, in which most spermatozoa are embedded in; kept alive, uncapacitated but also undetected by the immune system of the female. Hyaluronan is also present in the seminal plasma, and evidence points toward an involvement of hyaluronan and its receptor in the local (tubal and possibly uterine) production of antiinflammatory cytokines, such as interleulcin-10, pertaining maternal immune tolerance of these foreign cells. (C) 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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