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  • 1.
    Aid, Graham
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Ragn-Sells AB.
    Eklund, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Anderberg, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Baas, Leo
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Expanding roles for the Swedish waste management sector in interorganizational resource management2017In: Resources, Conservation and Recycling, ISSN 0921-3449, E-ISSN 1879-0658, Vol. 124, p. 85-97Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several waste management (WM) professionals see an ongoing shift in the focus of the industry, from that of atransport and treatment sector to that of a more integrated sustainable service provision and material productionsector. To further develop such transitional ambitions, WM organizations are increasingly looking toward interorganizationalresource network concepts (such as the circular economy and industrial symbiosis) as models ofhow they would like to create new value together with their customers and partners.This article aims to take a step in addressing uncertainties behind such transitions by analyzing barriers forinter-organizational resource management and in turn uncovering some potential opportunities and risks ofnovel offerings from the WM sector. Obstacles for developing innovative inter-organizational resource networkshave been identified based on studies of implementing industrial symbiosis networks. Subsequently, managingexecutives from Swedish private and public WM organizations were interviewed regarding the sector’s capacityto overcome such barriers – opportunities and risks of providing new resource management services – and howtheir organizations might approach the role of actively facilitating more resource efficient regions.Eco-Industrial park management and contracting out holistic resource management are some areas in whichthe respondents see WM organizations offering new services. In relation to such approaches, various risks (e.g.being cut out of investment benefits, or unstable supply) and opportunities (e.g. new markets and enhancedsustainability profiles) were identified. Additionally, it was seen that WM companies would need to makesubstantial changes to their business approach, becoming less dependent on flows of mixed materials forexample, if they are to become even more central value chain actors. To strengthen such approaches, it was seenthat the sector will need to find methods to strategically build strong, long term partnerships, expand upon andtake advantage of available knowledge resources (i.e. best practice technologies and regional material flows),and explore new business models (i.e. stockpiling, park management, or waste minimization). Additionally,working with sector representatives to argue for a more balanced market conditions next to primary productionshould assist the viability of new offerings in the wider market.

  • 2.
    Ammenberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Biogas Research Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Biogas Research Center (BRC).
    Anderberg, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Biogas Research Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lönnqvist, Tomas
    Division of Energy Processes, Department of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Grönkvist, Stefan
    Division of Energy Processes, Department of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sandberg, Thomas
    Department of Industrial Economics and Management, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Biogas in the transport sector: Actor and policy analysis focusing on the demand side in the Stockholm region2018In: Resources, Conservation and Recycling, ISSN 0921-3449, E-ISSN 1879-0658, Vol. 129, p. 70-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden has ambitions to phase out fossil fuels and significantly increase the share of biofuels it uses. This articlefocuses on Stockholm County and biogas, with the aim to increase the knowledge about regional preconditions.Biogas-related actors have been interviewed, focusing on the demand side. Biogas solutions play an essentialrole, especially regarding bus transports and taxis. Long-term development has created well-functioning sociotechnicalsystems involving collaboration. However, uncertainties about demand and policy cause hesitation andsigns of stagnating development.Public organizations are key actors regarding renewables. For example, Stockholm Public Transport procuresbiogas matching the production at municipal wastewater treatment plants, the state-owned company Swedaviasteers via a queuing system for taxis, and the municipalities have shifted to “environmental cars”.There is a large interest in electric vehicles, which is expected to increase significantly, partially due tosuggested national policy support. The future role of biogas will be affected by how such an expansion comesabout. There might be a risk of electricity replacing biogas, making it more challenging to reach a fossil-freevehicle fleet. Policy issues strongly influence the development. The environmental car definition is of importance,but its limited focus fails to account for several different types of relevant effects. The dynamic policylandscape with uncertainties about decision makers’ views on biogas seems to be one important reason behindthe decreased pace of development. A national, long-term strategy is missing. Both the European Union andSweden have high ambitions regarding a bio-based and circular economy, which should favor biogas solutions.

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-10-20 10:58
  • 3.
    Anderberg, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Assessing the Contribution of Organic Agriculture: PovertyReduction and Employment Creation in Selected Value Chains2016In: Vulnerability of Agricultural Production Networks and Global Food Value Chainsdue to Natural Disasters: Book of Abstracts / [ed] Meinhard Breiling, Anbumozhi Venkatachalam, Vienna: TU Wien , 2016, p. 23-24Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organic agriculture (OA) is increasingly viewed as an economic opportunity for farmers allover the world. This paper addresses the effects of OA in terms of income, vulnerability andpoverty alleviation in rural areas in developing countries. It is based on a literature reviewwith emphasis on two value chains: cotton and coffee, which both involve smallholders indeveloping regions, and growing organic markets, but differ in terms of value chain structuresand geographical patterns.

  • 4.
    Anderberg, Stefan
    LUCSUS, Lunds universitets centrum för studier av uthållig samhällsplanering, Lunds universitet.
    Bæredygtig brug af energi og råstoffer2013In: GeoScience: en inspirationsbog til fagene geovidenskab og naturgeografi i gymnasiet / [ed] Carsten Broder Hansen, Köpenhamn: Københavns Universitet, GEUS, Århus Universitet , 2013, p. 64-71Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Anderberg, Stefan
    LUCSUS, Lunds universitets centrum för studier av uthållig samhällsutveckling, Lund University, Sweden.
    Globaliseringen og det økologisk fodaftryk2010In: Geografisk Orientering, ISSN 0109-8659, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 484-491Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Anderberg, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hamnarna rustas för fartygens avloppsvatten2014In: Sjöfarten kring Sverige och dess påverkan på havsmiljön / [ed] Tina Johansen Lilja och Eva-Lotta Sundblad, Göteborg: Havsmiljöinstitutet , 2014, no 4, p. 10-11Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    När avloppsvatten från sjöfarten släpps ut i havet påverkar det miljön negativt genom att bakterier sprids och näringsämnen kommer ut i havet. Utsläppen är koncentrerade till farleder och hamnar och där kan effekterna vara tydliga, även om utsläppen är små i förhållande till de totala utsläppen till havet.

  • 7.
    Anderberg, Stefan
    LUCSUS, Lunds universitets centrum för studier av uthållig samhällsutveckling, Lund University, Sweden.
    Hållbar stadsutveckling i Öresundsregionen: Köpenhamns och Malmös gröna profilering2009In: Geografiska Notiser, ISSN 0016-724X, no 1, p. 23-33Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Anderberg, Stefan
    LUCSUS, Lunds universitets centrum för studier av uthållig samhällsutveckling, Lund University, Sweden.
    Industrialization and environmental development around the Øresund: a long-term perspective on the regional development2009In: Transcending boundaries: environmental histories from the Øresund region / [ed] Fredrik Björk, Per Eliasson, Bo Poulsen, Malmö: Malmö högskola , 2009, p. 11-33Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Anderberg, Stefan
    LUCSUS, Lund University Centre for Sustainability Studies, Lund University.
    Natural Resource Flows and Sustainability in Urban Areas2012In: Encyclopedia of Sustainability Science and Technology / [ed] Robert A. Meyers, New York: Springer, 2012, p. 6853-6864Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Anderberg, Stefan
    LUCSUS, Lunds universitets centrum för studier av uthållig samhällsplanering, Lunds universitet.
    Städernas metabolism: den urbana hållbarhetsutmaningens ”kärna”2012In: Hållbar utveckling: Samhällsplanering, lokala villkor och globala beroenden / [ed] Lennart Torell, Stockholm: Svenska sällskapet för Antropologi och Geografi , 2012, p. 59-77Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Anderberg, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Urban green growth-myth or reality?2015In: URBACT II New Urban Economies : How can cities foster economic development and develop ‘new urban economies’ / [ed] Willem van Winden, Luis Carvalho, Saint-Denis, France: URBACT II Programme , 2015, p. 35-38Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    ‘To create the most resource-efficient region in the world’. This is the vision of Tekniska verken, the municipalityowned infrastructural company in Linköping, Sweden. It reflects the city’ s long-standing ambitions to be a ‘forerunner in climate and environmental initiatives’ and to support ‘business-driven’ environmental development, actively stimulating the development of a green economic sector. Linköping and the surrounding county of Östergötland are here used for discussing the development of the green economy in cities and regions.

  • 12.
    Anderberg, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Western harbor in Malmö2015In: Review 11. Re-inventing planning: examples from the Profession, Rotterdam, Nederländerna: International Society of City and Regional Planners , 2015, Vol. 11, p. 210-227Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    For the last 15 years Västra hamnen (Western Harbor) in Malmö, and Hammarby Sjöstad in Stockholm have been the major flagships of Swedish international eco-city ambitions. These city development projects are presented both as leading examples of the conversion of former industrial harbor areas and of environmental adaptation of densely built urban environments. Western Harbor is a centrally located former shipyard area which, since the end of the 1990s, has developed into a mixed city area for housing, schools, offices, shops and other workplaces as well as for recreational areas with beaches, parks and yacht harbors. Since its first phase, part of a housing expo in 2001, it has attracted international interest for its dense architecture, bold energy goals based on varied local renewable energy production, household waste systems, green and blue structures, and dialogue processes. By 2031, when the area is completed, it is expected to be the home for 25,000 people and 25,000 workplaces. In 2014, there were 7,300 inhabitants and more than 12,000 work places in Western Harbor, already twice of the work force of the former shipyard at its height.

  • 13.
    Anderberg, Stefan
    et al.
    LUCSUS, Lunds universitets centrum för studier av uthållig samhällsutveckling, Lund University, Sweden.
    Clark, Eric
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Green and sustainable Øresund region: Eco-branding Copenhagen and Malmö2013In: Urban Sustainability: A Global Perspective / [ed] Igor Vojnovic, East Lansing, Michigan: Michigan State University Press, 2013, p. 591-610Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter we discuss the recent development of the region and analyze the relation between environmental quality in the region and policy programs to undergird the image of Øresund, Copenhagen, and Malmö as green environmental forerunners of urban sustainability. Have the latter had marked impact on the environment? Or has eco-branding primarily capitalized on previous environmental improvement—much of which was exogenously driven? Is this a place where sustainable living is in the becoming? Our aim is not to provide exhaustive answers to these  questions, but more modestly to present an analysis supporting the relevance of these questions while indicating conclusions that more thorough analyses may reach.

  • 14.
    Anderberg, Stefan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kevin, Cullinane
    Företagsekonomiska institutionen, Handelshögskolan, Göteborgs universitet.
    Johansson Nikopolou, Zoi
    Företagsekonomiska institutionen, Handelshögskolan, Göteborgs universitet.
    Utsläppshandel kan vara en lönsam vägtill lägre utsläpp från sjöfarten2017In: Åtgärder för att minska sjöfartens påverkan på havsmiljön / [ed] Tina Johansen Lilja, Frida Lundberg och Eva-Lotta Sundblad., Göteborg: Havsmiljöinstitutet , 2017, p. 14-16Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Handel med utsläppsrätter under ett fastställt ”tak” av totalautsläpp som efterhand sänks, har i en del regioner i världenvisat sig vara en både kostnadseffektiv och framgångsrikstrategi för att minska luftföroreningarna. Frågan är om utsläppshandelskulle kunna vara ett effektivt sätt för att minskasjöfartens utsläpp i Europa eller Östersjöregionen?

  • 15.
    Anderberg, Stefan
    et al.
    LUCSUS, Lunds universitets centrum för studier av uthållig samhällsutveckling, Lund University, Sweden.
    Schou, Per
    Lund University.
    Malmö från ovan2012 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Ta med på en tur över Malmö och se staden ur ett annorlunda perspektiv. Med sitt medeltida centrum, sina kanaler, parker och boulevarder har Malmö stora strukturer som inte alltid uppfattas från gatuplanet.

    Malmö har blivit en dynamisk stad som sticker ut med en ung befolkning, multikulturell atmosfär, djärva projekt och nya byggnader som Turning Torso eller stadsdelar som Hyllievång, Västra hamnen och Ön. Men också genom dess kontraster och stora utmaningar. Hit kommer tusentals besökare för att studera exempel på hållbar stadsutveckling och övergången från industristad till kunskapsstad. Här möts gammalt och nytt vilket gör Malmö till dagens spännande stad.

  • 16.
    Anderberg, Stefan
    et al.
    LUCSUS, Lunds universitets centrum för studier av uthållig samhällsplanering, Lunds universitet.
    Slentø, Erik
    Stof- og energistrømme i bylandskabet: Storkøbenhavns miljøhistorie2009In: Byen i landskabet – Landskabet i byen. / [ed] Sten Engelstoft, Köpenhamn: Geografforlaget , 2009, 1, p. 102-120Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Anderberg, Stefan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wilewska Bien, Magda
    Sjöfart och marin teknik/maritim miljö och energisystem, Chalmers tekniska högskola, Göteborg.
    Billigare avfallshantering i hamnarna har inte gett förväntad effekt2017In: Åtgärder för att minska sjöfartens påverkan på havsmiljön / [ed] Tina Johansen Lilja, Frida Lundberg och Eva-Lotta Sundblad, Göteborg: Havsmiljöinstitutet , 2017, p. 26-27Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Hamnarna kan spela en viktig roll för att minska sjöfartensutsläpp i havet. Reglerna för fartygens avfallsdumpning harskärpts och i Östersjöområdet har det länge funnits en överenskommelseom att fartygen ska kunna lämna sitt avfall ihamn utan extra avgift. I praktiken låter dock de stora förbättringarnavänta på sig.

  • 18.
    Anderberg, Stefan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wilewska-Bien, Magda
    Sjöfart och marin teknik/maritim miljö och energisystem, Chalmers tekniska högskola, Göteborg.
    Expanderande kryssningsbransch ställer krav på Östersjöns hamnar2017In: Åtgärder för att minska sjöfartens påverkan på havsmiljön / [ed] Tina Johansen Lilja, Frida Lundberg och Eva-Lotta Sundblad, Göteborg: Havsmiljöinstitutet , 2017, p. 24-25Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Kryssningssjöfarten ger växande inkomster för kuststäderna,men innebär också ökad påverkan på miljön i Östersjön och dess hamnar. Trots att branschen åtagit sig att sluta släppa utavloppsvatten till sjöss lämnar bara var tredje kryssningsfartygsitt avfallsvatten vid hamnbesök. Dessutom är delar av fartygsflottani stort behov av förbättrad miljöprestanda.

  • 19.
    Busch, Henner
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Anderberg, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Green Attraction: Transnational Municipal Climate Networks and Green City Branding2015In: Journal of Management and Sustainability, ISSN 1925-4733, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we investigate the nexus of green city branding and municipal climate networks. In recent decades, a number of formal transnational municipal climate networks have emerged and their membership continues to increase. In parallel, city branding that is based on green policies, has gained importance. Based on quantitative and qualitative data, we assess how and to what extent German cities use their membership in transnational municipal climate networks to communicate green city brands. In contrast to our expectations, we encountered very few indications of green city branding efforts by German cities. Our analysis shows that in general, branding considerations only play a negligible role in the involvement of cities in transnational municipal climate networks or climate policies. Instead, it seems that German cities use their membership in climate networks, to genuinely improve local climate change strategies. We therefore suggest that research on green city branding should be more sensitive to the particular context of cities and efforts should be made to unveil theunderlying motives for the communication of green policies.

  • 20.
    Mandere, Nicodemus
    et al.
    Lund University Centre for Sustainability Studies, Lund, Sweden; Lund University, Sweden.
    Anderberg, Stefan
    Lund University Centre for Sustainability Studies, Lund, Sweden.
    Armah, Frederick Ato
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Abaya, Samson Wakuma
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Assessing the contribution of alternative agriculture to poverty reduction and employment creation: A case study of sugar beet cultivation in Kenya2011In: African Journal of Agricultural Research, ISSN 1991-637X, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 440-450Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Kenya, the government is promoting high-value and drought resistant crop varieties in an effort to reduce poverty in rural areas. Sugar beet is one such crop. This study was conducted with two objectives: 1) to assess the opportunities and challenges for sugar beet cultivation and adoption in the Nyandarua district of Kenya and 2) to assess whether sugar beet adoption can offer an opportunity for escaping poverty for smallholder farmers in the district. The factors favoring sugar beet cultivation and adoption in the district include: adequate land area suitable for sugar beet cultivation and the high sugar beet yield that can be attained per unit suitable land area, farmers' awareness of the positive aspects of sugar beet cultivation, and the willingness of many farmers to grow the sugar beet crop. Notwithstanding these favorable conditions, some socio-economic factors-mainly the affordability of sugar beet production and possible lack of appropriate farming technologies, will present challenges to widespread sugar beet adoption, particularly to those farmers in the low-and medium-income categories. The sugar beet profit analysis showed that depending on the market price, sugar beet can potentially increase household net income. However, since the majority of households are in the low-and medium-income categories, for sugar beet to pull the smallholder farmers out of poverty, interventions from government and other stakeholders is of vital necessity. The impact of sugar beet adoption and cultivation will vary from household to household. Those households within the high-income category who can raise the required start up capital are likely to benefit, while the low-and medium-income households may not, which is true for any new crop with high start up costs. Alternative agriculture alone is therefore not a sufficient strategy to address the problems of poverty and unemployment. Any successful strategy to address these issues must be broad-based, and include alternative agriculture and other growth and development strategies. Provision for the entire necessary infrastructure should precede or accompany all of these strategies in order to optimize implementation benefits.

  • 21.
    Mandere, Nicodemus
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Ness, Barry
    Lunds universitet.
    Anderberg, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Peri-urban development, livelihood change and household income: A case study of peri-urban Nyahururu, Kenya2010In: Journal of Agricultural Extension and Rural Development, ISSN 2141-2170, Vol. 2, no 5, p. 73-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Peri-urban development has attracted increased attention in recent years particularly due to conflict/competition between new (urban) and traditional (rural) land uses as a result of peri-urban expansion. Much of the research in peri-urban development is concentrated in peri-urban concepts and definitions, environmental impacts and also impact on agriculture. Little attention is put in the assessment of the peri-urban development on household livelihood and income. This study was therefore conducted with the objective of assessing the impact of the peri-urban development dynamics to household income using the case study of peri-urban Nyahururu, Kenya. The analysis shows a decline in full time farming households from 90% in the 1960s to 49%; an indication of the declining economic significance of agriculture. The decline in significance of agriculture was mainly due to rapidly shrinking household agricultural land as well as low and fluctuating agricultural output prices which reduced the profitability from agricultural production. The decrease in agricultural land was due to the sale of land for residence/business premises and also land bequests to children. In return, households have adopted diverse non-farm activities whose earnings proved to be of varying importance to the annual household income. However most of the households engage in low income productive non-farm activities – nevertheless, the number of households engaged in high income productive non-farm activities was comparatively higher (10% more) compared to the most rural parts of the district. The infrastructural developments coupled with emerging business enterprises were found to be the main factors that enhanced the opportunities for household engagement in high income productive activities. However most of these developments are limited to the financially constrained informal sector and hence can not provide sufficient high income opportunities to lift majority of the population from poverty. Therefore, the possibility for peri-urban development to accomplish a reduction in poverty for the households will not only depend on the infrastructural developments but also on the socio-economic opportunities that arise from the developments – which will be dependent on the developers involved and the government policy. In addition, despite the declining economic significance of agriculture in the study area, we emphasize the importance of government intervention to enhance agricultural productivity and control agricultural land conversion for food security reasons

  • 22.
    Mandere, Nicodemus
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Persson, Andreas
    Lunds universitet.
    Anderberg, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Pilesjö, Petter
    Lunds universitet.
    Tropical Sugar Beet Land Evaluation Scheme: TSBLES: Development, validation and application under Kenyan conditions2010In: GeoJournal, ISSN 0343-2521, E-ISSN 1572-9893, Vol. 75, no 2, p. 215-228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Kenya the government is promoting diversification of crops to embrace high value crops and drought resistant crop varieties in efforts to reduce poverty in rural areas. Sugar beet is one of the crops considered as an option in this context and it is therefore important to increase knowledge about the potentials in the country for cultivating this crop. Sugar beet trials conducted in Nyandarua and Butere Mumias Districts of Kenya have shown that the crop yields are comparable to those obtained in traditional sugar-beet cultivation regions of Europe. Since sugar beet yield is affected by climate and soils, the results of Nyandarua and Butere Mumias sugar beet trials are not adequate to propose that comparable yields can be obtained elsewhere in the country and other tropical regions. Physical land evaluations assessing the potentials and constraints for sugar beet production are therefore essential. The objectives of this study was to develop a Tropical Sugar Beet Land Evaluation Scheme (TSBLES) that can aid assessment of the suitability of different areas in the tropics for sugar beet cultivation; and to test this scheme for an assessment of suitable sugar beet zones and land areas in Kenya. The development of the scheme was based on various literature sources and expert judgment on sugar beet requirements, and a Tropical Sugar Beet yield prediction Model. The TSBLES accounts for physical conditions of land i.e. climatic, edaphic and topographic conditions. According to the assessment results 27% of the land area in Kenya is suitable for sugar beet cultivation. Of this area, 5% is highly suitable, another 5% is moderately suitable and 17% is marginally suitable. Most of the highly suitable land area is concentrated in Rift Valley, Central and Nyanza provinces. The Rift Valley has the highest share of the suitable land area.

  • 23.
    McCormick, Kes
    et al.
    International Institute for Industrial Environmental Economics (IIIEE), Lund University, Sweden.
    Anderberg, Stefan
    Centre for Sustainability Studies (LUCSUS), Lund University, Sweden.
    Coenen, Lars
    Centre for Innovation, Research and Competence in the Learning Economy (CIRCLE), Lund University, Sweden; Nordic Institute for Studies in Innovation, Research and Education (NIFU), Norway.
    Neij, Lena
    International Institute for Industrial Environmental Economics (IIIEE), Lund University, Sweden.
    Advancing Sustainable Urban Transformation.2013In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 50, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite increased awareness of the urgency to respond to climate change and to promote sustainable development, there are few powerful initiatives that are decisively shifting urban development in a sustainable, resilient and low-carbon direction. This Special Volume of the Journal of Cleaner Production explores sustainable urban transformation focusing on structural transformation processes – multi-dimensional and radical change – that can effectively direct urban development towards ambitious sustainability goals. The 20 articles are based on 35 cases and over 130 surveyed examples of urban initiatives on sustainability in many countries. While cities in Europe dominate, there are also examples from North America, South America, Africa, Asia and Oceania. The combined articles in this Special Volume contribute to knowledge and understanding on sustainable urban transformation across a range of areas, including governance and planning, innovation and competitiveness, lifestyle and consumption, resource management and climate mitigation and adaptation, transport and accessibility, buildings, and the spatial environment and public space. Overall, this Special Volume documents and analyses real-life action in cities and communities around the world to respond to sustainability challenges and it provides critical insights into how to catalyse, intensify and accelerate sustainable urban transformation globally. A main finding of the articles is that governance and planning are the key leverage points for transformative change.

  • 24.
    McCormick, Kes
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Anderberg, Stefan
    LUCSUS, Lund University Centre for Sustainability Studies, Lund University.
    Neij, Lena
    Lunds universitet, International institute for industrial environmental economics.
    Sustainable urban transformation and the green urban economy2013In: The economy of green cities: a world compendium on the green urban economy / [ed] Richard Simpson, Monika Zimmermann, Bonn, Tyskland: International Council for Local Environmental InitiativesInternational Council for Local Environmental Initiatives , 2013, p. 33-43Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Ness, Barry
    et al.
    Centre for Sustainability Studies (LUCSUS), Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Anderberg, Stefan
    Centre for Sustainability Studies (LUCSUS), Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Olsson, Lennart
    Centre for Sustainability Studies (LUCSUS), Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Structuring problems in sustainability science: The multi-level DPSIR framework2010In: Geoforum, ISSN 0016-7185, E-ISSN 1872-9398, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 479-488Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainability science needs approaches that allow for the integration of knowledge across disciplines and scales. This paper suggests an approach to conceptualize problems of unsustainability by embedding the Drivers–Pressure–State–Impact–Response (DPSIR) scheme within a multi-level institutional framework represented by Hägerstrand’s system of nested domains. The proposed taxonomy helps to decipher and to better understand key casual chains and societal responses at the appropriate spatial levels for particular sustainability problem areas. To illustrate the scheme more concretely the example of recent problem-solving efforts for Baltic Sea eutrophication driven by Swedish agriculture is examined. The discussion focuses on how the scheme fulfills the four research strategy requirements within the field of sustainability science and how the scheme is distinct from alternative approaches.

  • 26.
    Umair, Shakila
    et al.
    Division of Environmental Strategies Research - Fms, Royal Institute of Technology KTH, Stockholm, Sweden; Centre for Sustainable Communications (CESC), Royal Institute of Technology KTH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Anderberg, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Potting, José
    Division of Environmental Strategies Research - Fms, Royal Institute of Technology KTH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Informal electronic waste recycling in Pakistan2016In: The Journal of Solid Waste Technology and Management, ISSN 1088-1697, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 222-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) is growing dramatically all over the world. The fast growth and diffusion of ICTs, their early obsolescence and short life have made electronic waste (e-waste) to the fastest growing waste stream in the world. This waste stream is valuable and highly toxic at the same time, and therefore it requires proper handling. Most e-waste currently ends up in developing countries, like Pakistan, where it is usually recycled informally. Informal recycling involves crude processes, which harm the environment and have severe impacts on the health of recycling workers. This paper analyses the e-waste flows and the informal recycling system in Pakistan, and related governance challenges. Based on field studies in three major cities in Pakistan, we investigate why the e-waste flows keep entering the country, the routes through which they end up in the informal recycling, the actual recycling processes, and identify the various stakeholders and their roles. The analysis illustrates the poor governance that results from weak enforcement of legislation, the complexities emerging with numerous stakeholders, the profitability of informal recycling, little concern for the health damaging exposure for workers from poorest and most vulnerable people in society, and the lack of awareness of the hazards involved. The paper highlights how this business is a market driven entity without priority for proper e-waste handling, which is also hampered by lacking characteristics of good governance, which make it a challenge to control this business.

  • 27.
    Wilewska-Bien, Magda
    et al.
    Department of Mechanics and Maritime Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Anderberg, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Reception of sewage in the Baltic Sea: The port's role in the sustainable management of ship wastes2018In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 93, p. 207-213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2019, the special area requirements under MARPOL 73/78 Annex IV will come into effect in the Baltic Sea.This puts pressure on ports to develop reception facilities for sewage from passenger ships. This paper is built ona review of published information about the ports´ work to update sewage reception facilities and the results ofan e-mail questionnaire that was sent to a number of ports in the region, and interviews with environmentalmanagers from two major ports in the region. During the last 15 years, major investments have been made inport reception facilities in many passenger ports. However, there are still diverging views on the question if theport waste reception capacity in the region is sufficient. A few ports have for a long time been dominant asregards the reception of sewage in the Baltic Sea region, but recent increases in the ports´ waste receptioncapacity have predominantly occurred in smaller ports. This has been brought about by a replacement of mobilemeans for sewage collection with fixed connection systems or an increase of capacity of existing fixed connectionsystems. Following HELCOM recommendation, the majority of the ports have introduced a no-special-fee systembut there are differences in how this is applied.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-05-09 14:13
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