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  • 1.
    Bäck, Maria
    et al.
    Department of Occupational Therapy and Physiotherapy, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg.
    Jivegård, Lennart
    Department of Vascular Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Sahlgrenska.
    Johansson, Anna
    Department of Occupational Therapy and Physiotherapy, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg.
    Nordanstig, Joakim
    Department of Vascular Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Sahlgrenska.
    Svanberg, Therese
    HTA-Centrum, Region Västra.
    Adania, Ulla Wikberg
    Medical Library, Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Mölndal, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sjögren, Petteri
    HTA-Centrum, Region Västra.
    Home-based supervised exercise versus hospital-based supervised exercise or unsupervised walk advice as treatment for intermittent claudication: a systematic review.2015In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 47, no 9, p. 801-808Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of home-based supervised exercise vs hospital-based supervised exercise, and the effects of home-based supervised exercise vs unsupervised "go home and walk advice" on daily life and corridor-walking capacity, health-related quality of life and patient-reported functional walking capacity in patients with intermittent claudication.

    DATA SOURCES: Systematic literature searches were conducted in PubMed, EMBASE, ProQuest, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), the Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED), the Cochrane Library, and a number of Health Technology Assessment (HTA)-databases in October 2014.

    STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials and non-randomized controlled trials (> 100 patients) were considered for inclusion.

    DATA EXTRACTION: Data extraction and risk of bias assessment was performed independently and discussed in meetings.

    DATA SYNTHESIS: Seven randomized controlled trials and 2 non-randomized controlled studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The included studies had some, or major, limitations.

    CONCLUSION: Based on a low quality of evidence, home-based supervised exercise may lead to less improvement in maximum and pain-free walking distance, and in more improvement in daily life walking capacity, compared with hospital-based supervised exercise. Home-based supervised exercise may improve maximum and pain-free walking distance compared with "go home and walk advice" and result in little or no difference in health-related quality of life and functional walking capacity compared with hospital-based supervised exercise or "go home and walk advice". Further research is needed to establish the optimal exercise modality for these patients.

  • 2.
    Eriksson, Anna
    et al.
    Rehab City Östermalm, Stockholms läns landsting.
    Johansson, Fredrik R
    Department of environmental Medicine,Musculoskeletal and Sportsinjury epidemiologycenter, Karolinska institutet, Stockholm.
    Bäck, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Reliability and criterion-related validity of the 20-yard shuttle test in competitive junior tennis players2015In: Open Access Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 1179-1543, E-ISSN 1179-1543, Vol. 6, p. 269-276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: This study adds to the previous work in the field of sport-specific fitness testing by evaluating a tennis-specific agility test called "the 20-yard shuttle test". The aim of the study was to evaluate the test-retest reliability, the inter-rater reliability, and the criterion-related validity of the 20-yard shuttle test on competitive junior tennis players.

    PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS: Totally, 34 Swedish tennis players (13 girls), mean age 14±1.6 years, participated in the study. To examine test-retest reliability, the subjects performed the 20-yard shuttle test three times on the same day and then the same procedure was repeated after 3 days. To test the inter-rater reliability, the time was measured with a stopwatch simultaneously by two different raters. The time recorded manually was compared to the gold standard of digital timing to evaluate the criterion-related validity.

    RESULTS: Excellent test-retest reliability was found both within the same day (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] 0.95) and between days (ICC 0.91). Furthermore, the results showed excellent inter-rater reliability (ICC 0.99) and criterion-related validity on both test occasions (ICC 0.99).

    CONCLUSION: We have provided introductory support for the 20-yard shuttle test as a reliable and valid test for use in competitive junior tennis players. The ease of administration makes this test a practical alternative to evaluate physical fitness in order to optimally train the athletes.

  • 3.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Klompstra, Leonie
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ben Gal, Tuvia
    Rabin Medical Centre, Israel; Tel Aviv University, Israel.
    Boyne, Josiane
    Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Vellone, Ercole
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    Bäck, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dickstein, Kenneth
    University of Bergen, Norway.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Hoes, Arno
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Piepoli, Massimo F.
    AUSL Piacenza, Italy; Fdn Toscana G Monasterio, Italy.
    Chiala, Oronzo
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    Martensson, Jan
    Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Increasing exercise capacity and quality of life of patients with heart failure through Wii gaming: the rationale, design and methodology of the HF-Wii study; a multicentre randomized controlled trial2015In: European Journal of Heart Failure, ISSN 1388-9842, E-ISSN 1879-0844, Vol. 17, no 7, p. 743-748Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims

    Exercise is known to be beneficial for patients with heart failure (HF), and these patients should therefore be routinely advised to exercise and to be or to become physically active. Despite the beneficial effects of exercise such as improved functional capacity and favourable clinical outcomes, the level of daily physical activity in most patients with HF is low. Exergaming may be a promising new approach to increase the physical activity of patients with HF at home. The aim of this study is to determine the effectiveness of the structured introduction and access to a Wii game computer in patients with HF to improve exercise capacity and level of daily physical activity, to decrease healthcare resource use, and to improve self-care and health-related quality of life.

    Methods and results

    A multicentre randomized controlled study with two treatment groups will include 600 patients with HF. In each centre, patients will be randomized to either motivational support only (control) or structured access to a Wii game computer (Wii). Patients in the control group will receive advice on physical activity and will be contacted by four telephone calls. Patients in the Wii group also will receive advice on physical activity along with a Wii game computer, with instructions and training. The primary endpoint will be exercise capacity at 3months as measured by the 6min walk test. Secondary endpoints include exercise capacity at 6 and 12 months, level of daily physical activity, muscle function, health-related quality of life, and hospitalization or death during the 12 months follow-up.

    Conclusion

    The HF-Wii study is a randomized study that will evaluate the effect of exergaming in patients with HF. The findings can be useful to healthcare professionals and improve our understanding of the potential role of exergaming in the treatment and management of patients with HF.

    Trial registration

    NCT01785121

  • 4.
    Wittboldt, Susanna
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital.
    Cider, Åsa
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, University of Gothenburg.
    Bäck, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Reliability of two questionnaires on physical function in patients with stable coronary artery disease.2016In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 142-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation is highly recommended for patients with coronary artery disease, as it improves physical fitness and reduces mortality and morbidity. Physical fitness per se does not always correlate with the patient's physical function. For this reason, additional measurements of physical function could be included in cardiac rehabilitation programmes to further tailor interventions to suit the individual patient. As a result, reliable measurements to assess physical function are required for patients with coronary artery disease.

    AIM: The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability of the Patient-Specific Functional Scale (PSFS) and the Disability Rating Index (DRI) in patients with stable coronary artery disease.

    MATERIAL: Fifty-one patients (11 women), age 63.9 (SD 7.6) years, with stable coronary artery disease and coronary-angiographic changes indicating an elective percutaneous coronary intervention, were recruited at the Cardiology Department at Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg.

    METHODS: The reliability tests included stability over time, evaluated with a test-retest procedure using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), and internal consistency, measured with Cronbach's alpha and item-total correlation coefficients.

    RESULTS: Both questionnaires were stable over time (DRI, ICC=0.74, and PSFS, ICC=0.72). The internal consistency for the DRI was good, with a Cronbach's alpha value of > 0.85 for all items. The item-total correlation coefficients presented acceptable values of > 0.40, apart from two items.

    CONCLUSION: We have provided introductory support for the reliability of the DRI and PSFS questionnaires in patients with stable CAD. These questionnaires can be used to assess physical function and to evaluate the effect of interventions in addition to measuring physical fitness.

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