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  • 1.
    Bergamino, Maurizio
    et al.
    Laureate Institute for Brain Research, Tulsa, OK, USA.
    Farmer, Madison
    Roosevelt University, Department of Industrial and Organizational Psychology, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Yeh, Hung-Wen
    Laureate Institute for Brain Research, Tulsa, OK, USA.
    Paul, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hamilton, Paul J.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Statistical differences in the white matter tracts in subjects with depression by using different skeletonized voxel-wise analysis approaches and DTI fitting procedures2017In: Brain Research, ISSN 0006-8993, E-ISSN 1872-6240, Vol. 1669, p. 131-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is one of the most significant contributors to the global burden of illness. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a procedure that has been used in several studies to characterize abnormalities in white matter (WM) microstructural integrity in MDD. These studies, however, have provided divergent findings, potentially due to the large variety of methodological alternatives available in conducting DTI research. In order to determine the importance of different approaches to coregistration of DTI-derived metrics to a standard space, we compared results from two different skeletonized voxel-wise analysis approaches: the standard TBBS pipeline and the Advanced Normalization Tools (ANTs) approach incorporating a symmetric image normalization (SyN) algorithm and a group-wise template (ANTs TBSS). We also assessed effects of applying twelve different fitting procedures for the diffusion tensor. For our dataset, lower fractional anisotropy (FA) and axial diffusivity (AD) in depressed subjects compared with healthy controls were found for both methods and for all fitting procedures. No group differences were found for radial and mean diffusivity indices. Importantly, for the AD metric, the normalization methods and fitting procedures showed reliable differences, both in the volume and in the number of significant between-groups difference clusters detected. Additionally, a significant voxel-based correlation, in the left inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, between AD and self-reported stress was found only for one of the normalization procedure (ANTs TBSS). In conclusion, the sensitivity to detect group-level effects on DTI metrics might depend on the DTI normalization and/or tensor fitting procedures used.

  • 2.
    Bergamino, Maurizio
    et al.
    Laureate Institute Brain Research, OK, USA.
    Pasternak, Ofer
    Harvard University, MA, USA.
    Farmer, Madison
    Laureate Institute Brain Research, OK, USA.
    Shenton, Martha E.
    Harvard University, MA, USA; VA Boston Healthcare Syst, MA USA.
    Hamilton, Paul
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience (CSAN). Laureate Institute Brain Research, OK, USA.
    Applying a free-water correction to diffusion imaging data uncovers stress-related neural pathology in depression2016In: NeuroImage: Clinical, ISSN 0353-8842, E-ISSN 2213-1582, Vol. 10, p. 336-342Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) holds promise for developing our understanding of white-matter pathology in major depressive disorder (MDD). Variable findings in DTI-based investigations ofMDD, however, have thwarted development of this literature. Effects of extra-cellular free-water on the sensitivity of DTI metrics could account for some of this inconsistency. Here we investigated whether applying a free-water correction algorithm to DTI data could improve the sensitivity to detect clinical effects using DTI metrics. Only after applying this correction, we found: a) significantly decreased fractional anisotropy and axial diffusivity (AD) in the left inferior frontooccipital fasciculus (IFOF) in MDD; and b) increased self-reported stress that significantly correlated with decreased IFOF AD in depression. We estimated and confirmed the robustness of differences observed between free-water corrected and uncorrected approaches using bootstrapping. We conclude that applying a free-water correction to DTI data increases the sensitivity of DTI-based metrics to detect clinical effects in MDD. (C) 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  • 3.
    Chau, David T.
    et al.
    Laureate Institute for Brain Research, Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA.
    Fogelman, Phoebe
    University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA.
    Nordanskog, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Drevets, Wayne C.
    Laureate Institute for Brain Research, Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA; Janssen Research and Development, Janssen Pharmaceuticals of Johnson and Johnson, Titusville, New Jersey, USA.
    Hamilton, Paul J.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Laureate Institute for Brain Research, Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA.
    Distinct Neural-Functional Effects of Treatments With Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors, Electroconvulsive Therapy, and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Their Relations to Regional Brain Function in Major Depression: A Meta-analysis2017In: Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging, ISSN 2451-9030, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 318-326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Functional neuroimaging studies have examined the neural substrates of treatments for major depressive disorder (MDD). Low sample size and methodological heterogeneity, however, undermine the generalizability of findings from individual studies. We conducted a meta-analysis to identify reliable neural changes resulting from different modes of treatment for MDD and compared them with each other and with reliable neural functional abnormalities observed in depressed versus control samples.

  • 4.
    Croy, Ilona
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Technical University of Dresden, Germany.
    Drechsler, Edda
    Technical University of Dresden, Germany.
    Hamilton, Paul
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience (CSAN).
    Hummel, Thomas
    Technical University of Dresden, Germany.
    Olausson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Olfactory modulation of affective touch processing - A neurophysiological investigation2016In: NeuroImage, ISSN 1053-8119, E-ISSN 1095-9572, Vol. 135, p. 135-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Touch can be highly emotional, and depending on the environment, it can be perceived as pleasant and comforting or disgusting and dangerous. Here, we studied the impact of context on the processing of tactile stimuli using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) paradigm. This was achieved by embedding tactile stimulation in a variable olfactory environment. Twenty people were scanned with BOLD fMRI while receiving the following stimulus blocks: Slow stroking Touch, Civette odor (feces like), Rose odor, Touch + Civette, and Touch + Rose. Ratings of pleasantness and intensity of tactile stimuli and ratings of disgust and intensity of olfactory stimuli were collected. The impact of the olfactory context on the processing of touch was studied using covariance analyses. Coupling between olfactory processing and somatosensory processing areas was assessed with psychophysiological interaction analysis (PPI). A subjectively disgusting olfactory environment significantly reduced the perceived pleasantness of touch. The touch fMRI activation in the secondary somatosensory cortex, operculum 1 (OP1), was positively correlated with the disgust towards the odors. Decreased pleasantness of touch was related to decreased posterior insula activity. PPI analysis revealed a significant interaction between the OP1, posterior insula, and regions processing the disgust of odors (orbitofrontal cortex and amygdala). We conclude that the disgust evaluation of the olfactory environment moderates neural reactivity in somatosensory regions by upregulation of the OP1 and downregulation of the posterior insula. This adaptive regulation of affective touch processing may facilitate adaptive reaction to a potentially harmful stimulus. (C) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 5.
    Frost Bellgowan, Julie
    et al.
    Laureate Institute Brain Research, OK USA.
    Molfese, Peter
    Haskins Labs Inc, CT USA.
    Marx, Michael
    Stanford University, CA 94305 USA.
    Thomason, Moriah
    Wayne State University, MI USA.
    Glen, Daniel
    NIMH, MD 20892 USA.
    Santiago, Jessica
    Laureate Institute Brain Research, OK USA.
    Gotlib, Ian H.
    Stanford University, CA 94305 USA.
    Drevets, Wayne C.
    Laureate Institute Brain Research, OK USA; Janssen Pharmaceut, Belgium.
    Hamilton, Paul J.
    Linköping University, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience (CSAN). Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Laureate Institute Brain Research, OK USA.
    A Neural Substrate for Behavioral Inhibition in the Risk for Major Depressive Disorder2015In: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 0890-8567, E-ISSN 1527-5418, Vol. 54, no 10, p. 841-848Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Behavioral inhibition (BI) is an early developing trait associated with cautiousness and development of clinical depression and anxiety. Little is known about the neural basis of BI and its predictive importance concerning risk for internalizing disorders. We looked at functional connectivity of the default-mode network (DMN) and salience network (SN), given their respective roles in self-relational and threat processing, in the risk for internalizing disorders, with an emphasis on determining the functional significance of these networks for BI. Method: We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to scan, during the resting state, children and adolescents 8 to 17 years of age who were either at high familial risk (HR; n = 16) or low familial risk (LR; n = 18) for developing clinical depression and/or anxiety. Whole-brain DMN and SN functional connectivity were estimated for each participant and compared across groups. We also compared the LR and HR groups on levels of BI and anxiety, and incorporated these data into follow-up neurobehavioral correlation analyses. Results: The HR group, relative to the LR group, showed significantly decreased DMN connectivity with the ventral striatum and bilateral sensorimotor cortices. Within the HR group, trait BI increased as DMN connectivity with the ventral striatum and sensorimotor cortex decreased. The HR and LR groups did not differ with respect to SN connectivity. Conclusion: Our findings show, in the risk for internalizing disorders, a negative functional relation between brain regions supporting self-relational processes and reward prediction. These findings represent a potential neural substrate for behavioral inhibition in the risk for clinical depression and anxiety.

  • 6.
    Hamilton, Paul J.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience (CSAN).
    Glover, Gary H.
    Stanford University, CA, USA.
    Bagarinao, Epifanio
    Stanford University, CA, USA.
    Chang, Catie
    National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Mackey, Sean
    Stanford University, CA, USA.
    Sacchet, Matthew D.
    Stanford University, CA, USA.
    Gotlib, Ian H.
    Stanford University, CA, USA.
    Effects of salience-network-node neurofeedback training on affective biases in major depressive disorder2016In: Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging, ISSN 0925-4927, E-ISSN 1872-7506, Vol. 249, p. 91-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neural models of major depressive disorder (MDD) posit that over-response of components of the brains salience network (SN) to negative stimuli plays a crucial role in the pathophysiology of MDD. In the present proof-of-concept study, we tested this formulation directly by examining the affective consequences of training depressed persons to down-regulate response of SN nodes to negative material. Ten participants in the real neurofeedback group saw, and attempted to learn to down-regulate, activity from an empirically identified node of the SN. Ten other participants engaged in an equivalent procedure with the exception that they saw SN-node neurofeedback indices from participants in the real neurofeedback group. Before and after scanning, all participants completed tasks assessing emotional responses to negative scenes and to negative and positive self-descriptive adjectives. Compared to participants in the sham-neurofeedback group, from pre- to post-training, participants in the realneurofeedback group showed a greater decrease in SN-node response to negative stimuli, a greater decrease in self-reported emotional response to negative scenes, and a greater decrease in self-reported emotional response to negative self-descriptive adjectives. Our findings provide support for a neural formulation in which the SN plays a primary role in contributing to negative cognitive biases in MDD. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 7.
    Oltedal, Leif
    et al.
    University of Bergen, Norway; University of Calif San Diego, CA 92037 USA; University of Calif San Diego, CA 92093 USA; Haukeland Hospital, Norway.
    Bartsch, Hauke
    University of Calif San Diego, CA 92037 USA; University of Calif San Diego, CA 92093 USA.
    Evjenth Sorhaug, Ole Johan
    University of Bergen, Norway.
    Kessler, Ute
    University of Bergen, Norway; Haukeland Hospital, Norway.
    Abbott, Christopher
    University of New Mexico, NM 87131 USA.
    Dols, Annemieke
    VUmc Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Stek, Max L.
    VUmc Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Ersland, Lars
    Haukeland Hospital, Norway.
    Emsell, Louise
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium.
    van Eijndhoven, Philip
    Donders Institute Brain Cognit and Behav, Netherlands.
    Argyelan, Miklos
    Feinstein Institute Medical Research, NY USA.
    Tendolkar, Indira
    Donders Institute Brain Cognit and Behav, Netherlands.
    Nordanskog, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Hamilton, Paul J.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Balslev Jorgensen, Martin
    Psychiat Centre Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Sommer, Iris E.
    University of Medical Centre, Netherlands.
    Heringa, Sophie M.
    University of Medical Centre, Netherlands.
    Draganski, Bogdan
    University of Lausanne, Switzerland; Max Planck Institute Human Brain and Cognit Neurosci, Germany.
    Redlich, Ronny
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Münster, Germany.
    Dannlowski, Udo
    University of Munster, Germany; University of Marburg, Germany.
    Kugel, Harald
    University of Munster, Germany.
    Bouckaert, Filip
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Sienaert, Pascal
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Anand, Amit
    Cleveland Clin, OH 44106 USA.
    Espinoza, Randall
    University of Calif Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Narr, Katherine L.
    University of Calif Los Angeles, CA 90024 USA.
    Holland, Dominic
    University of Calif San Diego, CA 92037 USA; University of Calif San Diego, CA 92093 USA.
    Dale, Anders M.
    University of Calif San Diego, CA 92037 USA; University of Calif San Diego, CA 92093 USA; University of Calif San Diego, CA 92093 USA.
    Oedegaard, Ketil J.
    University of Bergen, Norway; Haukeland Hospital, Norway; KG Jebsen Centre Research Neuropsychiat Disorders, Norway.
    The Global ECT-MRI Research Collaboration (GEMRIC): Establishing a multi-site investigation of the neural mechanisms underlying response to electroconvulsive therapy2017In: NeuroImage: Clinical, ISSN 0353-8842, E-ISSN 2213-1582, Vol. 14, p. 422-432Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Major depression, currently the worlds primary cause of disability, leads to profound personal suffering and increased risk of suicide. Unfortunately, the success of antidepressant treatment varies amongst individuals and can take weeks to months in those who respond. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), generally prescribed for the most severely depressed and when standard treatments fail, produces a more rapid response and remains the most effective intervention for severe depression. Exploring the neurobiological effects of ECT is thus an ideal approach to better understand the mechanisms of successful therapeutic response. Though several recent neuroimaging studies show structural and functional changes associated with ECT, not all brain changes associate with clinical outcome. Larger studies that can address individual differences in clinical and treatment parameters may better target biological factors relating to or predictive of ECT-related therapeutic response. We have thus formed the Global ECT-MRI Research Collaboration (GEMRIC) that aims to combine longitudinal neuroimaging as well as clinical, behavioral and other physiological data across multiple independent sites. Here, we summarize the ECT sample characteristics from currently participating sites, and the common data-repository and standardized image analysis pipeline developed for this initiative. This includes data harmonization across sites and MRI platforms, and a method for obtaining unbiased estimates of structural change based on longitudinal measurements with serial MRI scans. The optimized analysis pipeline, together with the large and heterogeneous combined GEMRIC dataset, will provide new opportunities to elucidate the mechanisms of ECT response and the factors mediating and predictive of clinical outcomes, which may ultimately lead to more effective personalized treatment approaches. (C) 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc.

  • 8.
    Sacchet, Matthew D.
    et al.
    Stanford University, USA; VA Boston Healthcare Syst, MA 02130 USA.
    Levy, Benjamin J.
    VA Boston Healthcare Syst, MA 02130 USA; University of San Francisco, CA 94117 USA.
    Hamilton, Paul J.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. VA Boston Healthcare Syst, MA 02130 USA.
    Maksimovskiy, Arkadiy
    VA Boston Healthcare Syst, MA 02130 USA; Boston University, MA 02118 USA.
    Hertel, Paula T.
    VA Boston Healthcare Syst, MA 02130 USA; Trinity University, TX 78212 USA.
    Joormann, Jutta
    VA Boston Healthcare Syst, MA 02130 USA; Yale University, CT USA.
    Anderson, Michael C.
    VA Boston Healthcare Syst, MA 02130 USA; University of Cambridge, England.
    Wagner, Anthony D.
    Stanford University, CA 94305 USA; Stanford University, CA 94305 USA; VA Boston Healthcare Syst, MA 02130 USA.
    Gotlib, Ian H.
    Stanford University, CA 94305 USA; Stanford University, CA 94305 USA; VA Boston Healthcare Syst, MA 02130 USA.
    Cognitive and neural consequences of memory suppression in major depressive disorder2017In: Cognitive, Affective, & Behavioral Neuroscience, ISSN 1530-7026, E-ISSN 1531-135X, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 77-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Negative biases in cognition have been documented consistently in major depressive disorder (MDD), including difficulties in the ability to control the processing of negative material. Although negative information-processing biases have been studied using both behavioral and neuroimaging paradigms, relatively little research has been conducted examining the difficulties of depressed persons with inhibiting the retrieval of negative information from long-term memory. In this study, we used the think/no-think paradigm and functional magnetic resonance imaging to assess the cognitive and neural consequences of memory suppression in individuals diagnosed with depression and in healthy controls. The participants showed typical behavioral forgetting effects, but contrary to our hypotheses, there were no differences between the depressed and nondepressed participants or between neutral and negative memories. Relative to controls, depressed individuals exhibited greater activity in right middle frontal gyrus during memory suppression, regardless of the valence of the suppressed stimuli, and differential activity in the amygdala and hippocampus during memory suppression involving negatively valenced stimuli. These findings indicate that depressed individuals are characterized by neural anomalies during the suppression of long-term memories, increasing our understanding of the brain bases of negative cognitive biases in MDD.

  • 9.
    Strauss, Timmy
    et al.
    Tech Univ Dresden, Germany.
    Rottstaedt, Fabian
    Tech Univ Dresden, Germany.
    Sailer, Uta
    Univ Oslo, Norway.
    Schellong, Julia
    Tech Univ Dresden, Germany.
    Hamilton, Paul J.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Raue, Claudia
    Tech Univ Dresden, Germany.
    Weidner, Kerstin
    Tech Univ Dresden, Germany.
    Croy, Ilona
    Tech Univ Dresden, Germany.
    Touch aversion in patients with interpersonal traumatization2019In: Depression and anxiety (Print), ISSN 1091-4269, E-ISSN 1520-6394, Vol. 36, no 7, p. 635-646Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Interpersonal touch is a key aspect of human interaction and a usually very comforting experience. For patients suffering from posttraumatic stress disorders (PTSD) caused by interpersonal traumatization, such touch is affectively ambiguous. Methods In two studies, we investigated the experience and neural processing of various types of interpersonal and impersonal touch in patients as compared with healthy controls. Results Patients strongly disliked show, interpersonal skin-to-skin stroking, while controls appreciated this kind of touch. No group differences were observed for ratings of impersonal touch. Similarly, the neural activation differed between groups for interpersonal, but not for impersonal touch. The interpersonal touch aversion in patients was accompanied by enhanced blood-oxygen-level-dependent response in the superior temporal gyrus and by a pronounced reduction of response in the hippocampus. This reduction was significantly correlated to symptoms of negative alterations and arousal within the patients. Conclusion We interpret the hippocampal suppression as an attempt to control traumatic memories, evoked by interpersonal touch. This mechanism may maintain the aversion of interpersonal touch in patients with interpersonal trauma-related PTSD.

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