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  • 1.
    Barazanji, Nawroz
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Hamilton, Paul J.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Icenhour, Adriane
    Ruhr University Bochum, Bochum, Germany.
    Simon, Rozalyn
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Bednarska, Olga
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Tapper, Sofie
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics.
    Tisell, Anders
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics. Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Inflammation and Infection. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Mag- tarmmedicinska kliniken.
    Irritable bowel syndrome in women: Association between decreased insular subregion volumes and gastrointestinal symptoms2022In: NeuroImage: Clinical, E-ISSN 2213-1582, Vol. 35, article id 103128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic pain disorder characterized by disturbed interactions between the gut and the brain with depression as a common comorbidity. In both IBS and depression, structural brain alterations of the insular cortices, key structures for pain processing and interoception, have been demonstrated but the specificity of these findings remains unclear. We compared the gray matter volume (GMV) of insular cortex (IC) subregions in IBS women and healthy controls (HC) and examined relations to gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms and glutamate + glutamine (Glx) concentrations. We further analyzed GMV of IC subregions in women with major depression (MDD) compared to HC and addressed possible differences between depression, IBS, IBS with depression and HC.

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  • 2.
    Bergamino, Maurizio
    et al.
    Laureate Institute for Brain Research, Tulsa, OK, USA.
    Farmer, Madison
    Roosevelt University, Department of Industrial and Organizational Psychology, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Yeh, Hung-Wen
    Laureate Institute for Brain Research, Tulsa, OK, USA.
    Paul, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience.
    Hamilton, Paul J.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Statistical differences in the white matter tracts in subjects with depression by using different skeletonized voxel-wise analysis approaches and DTI fitting procedures2017In: Brain Research, ISSN 0006-8993, E-ISSN 1872-6240, Vol. 1669, p. 131-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is one of the most significant contributors to the global burden of illness. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a procedure that has been used in several studies to characterize abnormalities in white matter (WM) microstructural integrity in MDD. These studies, however, have provided divergent findings, potentially due to the large variety of methodological alternatives available in conducting DTI research. In order to determine the importance of different approaches to coregistration of DTI-derived metrics to a standard space, we compared results from two different skeletonized voxel-wise analysis approaches: the standard TBBS pipeline and the Advanced Normalization Tools (ANTs) approach incorporating a symmetric image normalization (SyN) algorithm and a group-wise template (ANTs TBSS). We also assessed effects of applying twelve different fitting procedures for the diffusion tensor. For our dataset, lower fractional anisotropy (FA) and axial diffusivity (AD) in depressed subjects compared with healthy controls were found for both methods and for all fitting procedures. No group differences were found for radial and mean diffusivity indices. Importantly, for the AD metric, the normalization methods and fitting procedures showed reliable differences, both in the volume and in the number of significant between-groups difference clusters detected. Additionally, a significant voxel-based correlation, in the left inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, between AD and self-reported stress was found only for one of the normalization procedure (ANTs TBSS). In conclusion, the sensitivity to detect group-level effects on DTI metrics might depend on the DTI normalization and/or tensor fitting procedures used.

  • 3.
    Bergamino, Maurizio
    et al.
    Laureate Institute Brain Research, OK, USA.
    Pasternak, Ofer
    Harvard University, MA, USA.
    Farmer, Madison
    Laureate Institute Brain Research, OK, USA.
    Shenton, Martha E.
    Harvard University, MA, USA; VA Boston Healthcare Syst, MA USA.
    Hamilton, Paul
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience (CSAN). Laureate Institute Brain Research, OK, USA.
    Applying a free-water correction to diffusion imaging data uncovers stress-related neural pathology in depression2016In: NeuroImage: Clinical, E-ISSN 2213-1582, Vol. 10, p. 336-342Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) holds promise for developing our understanding of white-matter pathology in major depressive disorder (MDD). Variable findings in DTI-based investigations ofMDD, however, have thwarted development of this literature. Effects of extra-cellular free-water on the sensitivity of DTI metrics could account for some of this inconsistency. Here we investigated whether applying a free-water correction algorithm to DTI data could improve the sensitivity to detect clinical effects using DTI metrics. Only after applying this correction, we found: a) significantly decreased fractional anisotropy and axial diffusivity (AD) in the left inferior frontooccipital fasciculus (IFOF) in MDD; and b) increased self-reported stress that significantly correlated with decreased IFOF AD in depression. We estimated and confirmed the robustness of differences observed between free-water corrected and uncorrected approaches using bootstrapping. We conclude that applying a free-water correction to DTI data increases the sensitivity of DTI-based metrics to detect clinical effects in MDD. (C) 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc.

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  • 4.
    Botvinik-Nezer, Rotem
    et al.
    Tel Aviv Univ, Israel; Tel Aviv Univ, Israel; Dartmouth Coll, NH 03755 USA.
    Holzmeister, Felix
    Univ Innsbruck, Austria.
    Camerer, Colin F.
    CALTECH, CA 91125 USA.
    Dreber, Anna
    Stockholm Sch Econ, Sweden; Univ Innsbruck, Austria.
    Huber, Juergen
    Univ Innsbruck, Austria.
    Johannesson, Magnus
    Stockholm Sch Econ, Sweden.
    Kirchler, Michael
    Univ Innsbruck, Austria.
    Iwanir, Roni
    Tel Aviv Univ, Israel; Tel Aviv Univ, Israel.
    Mumford, Jeanette A.
    Univ Wisconsin, WI USA.
    Adcock, R. Alison
    Duke Univ, NC USA; Duke Univ, NC USA; Univ Ghent, Belgium; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Avesani, Paolo
    Fdn Bruno Kessler, Italy; Univ Trento, Italy; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Baczkowski, Blazej M.
    Max Planck Inst Human Cognit and Brain Sci, Germany.
    Bajracharya, Aahana
    Washington Univ, MO 63110 USA.
    Bakst, Leah
    Boston Univ, MA 02215 USA; Boston Univ, MA 02215 USA.
    Ball, Sheryl
    Virginia Tech, VA USA; Virginia Tech, VA USA.
    Barilari, Marco
    UCLouvain, Belgium.
    Bault, Nadege
    Univ Plymouth, England.
    Beaton, Derek
    Baycrest Hlth Sci Ctr, Canada.
    Beitner, Julia
    Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands; Goethe Univ, Germany.
    Benoit, Roland G.
    Max Planck Inst Human Cognit and Brain Sci, Germany.
    Berkers, Ruud M. W. J.
    Max Planck Inst Human Cognit and Brain Sci, Germany.
    Bhanji, Jamil P.
    Rutgers State Univ, NJ USA.
    Biswal, Bharat B.
    New Jersey Inst Technol, NJ 07102 USA; Univ Elect Sci and Technol China, Peoples R China.
    Bobadilla-Suarez, Sebastian
    New Jersey Inst Technol, NJ 07102 USA.
    Bortolini, Tiago
    D’Or Institute for Research and Education (IDOR), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
    Bottenhorn, Katherine L.
    Florida Int Univ, FL 33199 USA.
    Bowring, Alexander
    Univ Oxford, England.
    Braem, Senne
    Univ Ghent, Belgium; Vrije Univ Brussel, Belgium.
    Brooks, Hayley R.
    Univ Denver, CO 80208 USA.
    Brudner, Emily G.
    Rutgers State Univ, NJ USA.
    Calderon, Cristian B.
    Univ Ghent, Belgium.
    Camilleri, Julia A.
    Res Ctr Julich, Germany; Heinrich Heine Univ Dusseldorf, Germany.
    Castrellon, Jaime J.
    Duke Univ, NC USA; Duke Univ, NC USA.
    Cecchetti, Luca
    Univ Nebraska, NE 68588 USA.
    Cieslik, Edna C.
    Res Ctr Julich, Germany; Heinrich Heine Univ Dusseldorf, Germany.
    Cole, Zachary J.
    Univ Nebraska, NE 68588 USA.
    Collignon, Olivier
    Univ Trento, Italy; UCLouvain, Belgium.
    Cox, Robert W.
    NIMH, MD 20892 USA.
    Cunningham, William A.
    Univ Toronto, Canada.
    Czoschke, Stefan
    Goethe Univ, Germany.
    Dadi, Kamalaker
    Imperial Coll London, England; Univ Oxford, England.
    Davis, Charles P.
    Univ Connecticut, CT USA; Univ Connecticut, CT USA; Univ Connecticut, CT USA.
    Luca, Alberto De
    Univ Med Ctr Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Delgado, Mauricio R.
    New Jersey Inst Technol, NJ 07102 USA.
    Demetriou, Lysia
    Imperial Coll London, England; Univ Oxford, England.
    Dennison, Jeffrey B.
    Temple Univ, PA 19122 USA.
    Di, Xin
    New Jersey Inst Technol, NJ 07102 USA; Univ Elect Sci and Technol China, Peoples R China.
    Dickie, Erin W.
    Ctr Addict and Mental Hlth, Canada; Univ Toronto, Canada.
    Dobryakova, Ekaterina
    Kessler Fdn, NJ USA.
    Donnat, Claire L.
    Stanford Univ, CA 94305 USA.
    Dukart, Juergen
    Res Ctr Julich, Germany; Heinrich Heine Univ Dusseldorf, Germany.
    Duncan, Niall W.
    Taipei Med Univ, Taiwan; TMU ShuangHo Hosp, Taiwan.
    Durnez, Joke
    Stanford Univ, CA USA; Stanford Univ, CA 94305 USA.
    Eed, Amr
    CSIC UMH, Spain.
    Eickhoff, Simon B.
    Res Ctr Julich, Germany; Heinrich Heine Univ Dusseldorf, Germany.
    Erhart, Andrew
    Univ Denver, CO 80208 USA.
    Fontanesi, Laura
    Univ Basel, Switzerland.
    Fricke, G. Matthew
    Univ New Mexico, NM 87131 USA.
    Fu, Shiguang
    Zhejiang Univ Technol, Peoples R China; Zhejiang Univ Technol, Peoples R China.
    Galvan, Adriana
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Gau, Remi
    UCLouvain, Belgium.
    Genon, Sarah
    Res Ctr Julich, Germany; Heinrich Heine Univ Dusseldorf, Germany.
    Glatard, Tristan
    Concordia Univ, Canada.
    Glerean, Enrico
    Aalto Univ, Finland.
    Goeman, Jelle J.
    Leiden Univ, Netherlands.
    Golowin, Sergej A. E.
    Leiden Univ, Netherlands.
    Gonzalez-Garcia, Carlos
    Univ Ghent, Belgium.
    Gorgolewski, Krzysztof J.
    Stanford Univ, CA 94305 USA.
    Grady, Cheryl L.
    Baycrest Hlth Sci Ctr, Canada.
    Green, Mikella A.
    Duke Univ, NC USA; Duke Univ, NC USA.
    Guassi Moreira, Joao F.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Guest, Olivia
    Res Ctr Interact Media Smart Syst and Emerging Tech, Cyprus.
    Hakimi, Shabnam
    Duke Univ, NC USA.
    Hamilton, Paul J.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hancock, Roeland
    Univ Connecticut, CT USA; Univ Connecticut, CT USA.
    Handjaras, Giacomo
    IMT Sch Adv Studies Lucca, Italy.
    Harry, Bronson B.
    Western Sydney Univ, Australia.
    Hawco, Colin
    Ctr Addict and Mental Hlth, Canada.
    Herholz, Peer
    McGill Univ, Canada.
    Herman, Gabrielle
    Ctr Addict and Mental Hlth, Canada.
    Heunis, Stephan
    Eindhoven Univ Technol, Netherlands; Epilepsy Ctr Kempenhaeghe, Netherlands.
    Hoffstaedter, Felix
    Res Ctr Julich, Germany; Heinrich Heine Univ Dusseldorf, Germany.
    Hogeveen, Jeremy
    Univ New Mexico, NM 87131 USA; Univ New Mexico, NM 87131 USA.
    Holmes, Susan
    Stanford Univ, CA 94305 USA.
    Hu, Chuan-Peng
    LIR, Germany.
    Huettel, Scott A.
    Duke Univ, NC USA.
    Hughes, Matthew E.
    Swinburne Univ Technol, Australia.
    Iacovella, Vittorio
    Univ Trento, Italy.
    Iordan, Alexandru D.
    Univ Michigan, MI USA.
    Isager, Peder M.
    Eindhoven Univ Technol, Netherlands.
    Isik, Ayse I.
    Max Planck Inst Empir Aesthet, Germany.
    Jahn, Andrew
    Univ Michigan, MI 48109 USA.
    Johnson, Matthew R.
    Univ Nebraska, NE 68588 USA; Univ Nebraska, NE USA.
    Johnstone, Tom
    Swinburne Univ Technol, Australia.
    Joseph, Michael J. E.
    Ctr Addict and Mental Hlth, Canada.
    Juliano, Anthony C.
    Kessler Fdn, NJ USA.
    Kable, Joseph W.
    Univ Penn, PA 19104 USA; Univ Penn, PA 19104 USA.
    Kassinopoulos, Michalis
    McGill Univ, Canada.
    Koba, Cemal
    IMT Sch Adv Studies Lucca, Italy.
    Kong, Xiang-Zhen
    Max Planck Inst Psycholinguist, Netherlands.
    Koscik, Timothy R.
    Univ Iowa, IA 52242 USA.
    Kucukboyaci, Nuri Erkut
    Univ Nebraska, NE USA; Rutgers New Jersey Med Sch, NJ USA.
    Kuhl, Brice A.
    Univ Oregon, OR 97403 USA.
    Kupek, Sebastian
    Univ Innsbruck, Austria.
    Laird, Angela R.
    Florida Int Univ, FL 33199 USA.
    Lamm, Claus
    Univ Vienna, Austria; Univ Vienna, Austria.
    Langner, Robert
    Res Ctr Julich, Germany; Heinrich Heine Univ Dusseldorf, Germany.
    Lauharatanahirun, Nina
    US CCDC Army Res Lab, MD USA; Univ Penn, PA 19104 USA.
    Lee, Hongmi
    US CCDC Army Res Lab, MD USA.
    Lee, Sangil
    Univ Penn, PA 19104 USA.
    Leemans, Alexander
    Univ Med Ctr Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Leo, Andrea
    IMT Sch Adv Studies Lucca, Italy.
    Lesage, Elise
    Univ Ghent, Belgium.
    Li, Flora
    Fralin Biomed Res Inst, VA USA; Nanjing Audit Univ, Peoples R China.
    Li, Monica Y. C.
    Univ Connecticut, CT USA; Univ Connecticut, CT USA; Univ Connecticut, CT USA; Haskins Labs Inc, CT USA.
    Lim, Phui Cheng
    Univ Nebraska, NE 68588 USA; Univ Nebraska, NE USA.
    Lintz, Evan N.
    Univ Nebraska, NE 68588 USA.
    Liphardt, Schuyler W.
    Univ New Mexico, NM 87131 USA.
    Losecaat Vermeer, Annabel B.
    Univ Vienna, Austria.
    Love, Bradley C.
    Alan Turing Inst, England.
    Mack, Michael L.
    Univ Toronto, Canada.
    Malpica, Norberto
    Univ Rey Juan Carlos, Spain.
    Marins, Theo
    UCL, England; DOr Inst Res and Educ IDOR, Brazil.
    Maumet, Camille
    Univ Rennes, France.
    McDonald, Kelsey
    Duke Univ, NC USA.
    McGuire, Joseph T.
    Boston Univ, MA 02215 USA; Boston Univ, MA 02215 USA.
    Melero, Helena
    Univ Rey Juan Carlos, Spain; CES Cardenal Cisneros, Spain; Northeastern Univ, MA 02115 USA.
    Mendez Leal, Adriana S.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Meyer, Benjamin
    LIR, Germany; Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Germany.
    Meyer, Kristin N.
    Univ N Carolina, NC 27515 USA.
    Mihai, Glad
    Max Planck Inst Human Cognit and Brain Sci, Germany; Tech Univ Dresden, Germany.
    Mitsis, Georgios D.
    McGill Univ, Canada.
    Moll, Jorge
    UCL, England; DOr Inst Res and Educ IDOR, Brazil; Stanford Univ, CA 94305 USA.
    Nielson, Dylan M.
    NIMH, MD 20892 USA.
    Nilsonne, Gustav
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Notter, Michael P.
    Univ Hosp Ctr, Switzerland; Univ Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Olivetti, Emanuele
    Fdn Bruno Kessler, Italy; Univ Trento, Italy.
    Onicas, Adrian I.
    IMT Sch Adv Studies Lucca, Italy.
    Papale, Paolo
    IMT Sch Adv Studies Lucca, Italy; Netherlands Inst Neurosci, Netherlands.
    Patil, Kaustubh R.
    Res Ctr Julich, Germany; Heinrich Heine Univ Dusseldorf, Germany.
    Peelle, Jonathan E.
    Washington Univ, MO 63110 USA.
    Perez, Alexandre
    McGill Univ, Canada.
    Pischedda, Doris
    Charite, Germany; Charite, Germany; Charite, Germany; Free Univ Berlin, Germany; Humboldt Univ, Germany; Berlin Inst Hlth, Germany; Tech Univ Berlin, Germany; Humboldt Univ, Germany; NeuroMI Milan Ctr Neurosci, Italy.
    Poline, Jean-Baptiste
    McGill Univ, Canada; Univ Calif Berkeley, CA 94720 USA.
    Prystauka, Yanina
    Univ Connecticut, CT USA; Univ Connecticut, CT USA; Univ Connecticut, CT USA.
    Ray, Shruti
    New Jersey Inst Technol, NJ 07102 USA.
    Reuter-Lorenz, Patricia A.
    Univ Michigan, MI USA.
    Reynolds, Richard C.
    NIMH, MD 20892 USA.
    Ricciardi, Emiliano
    IMT Sch Adv Studies Lucca, Italy.
    Rieck, Jenny R.
    Baycrest Hlth Sci Ctr, Canada.
    Rodriguez-Thompson, Anais M.
    Univ N Carolina, NC 27515 USA.
    Romyn, Anthony
    Univ Toronto, Canada.
    Salo, Taylor
    Florida Int Univ, FL 33199 USA.
    Samanez-Larkin, Gregory R.
    Duke Univ, NC USA; Duke Univ, NC USA.
    Sanz-Morales, Emilio
    Univ Rey Juan Carlos, Spain.
    Schlichting, Margaret L.
    Univ Toronto, Canada.
    Schultz, Douglas H.
    Dartmouth Coll, NH 03755 USA; Univ Nebraska, NE 68588 USA.
    Shen, Qiang
    Zhejiang Univ Technol, Peoples R China; Zhejiang Univ Technol, Peoples R China.
    Sheridan, Margaret A.
    Alan Turing Inst, England.
    Silvers, Jennifer A.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Skagerlund, Kenny
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Smith, Alec
    Virginia Tech, VA USA; Virginia Tech, VA USA.
    Smith, David V.
    Temple Univ, PA 19122 USA.
    Sokol-Hessner, Peter
    Univ Denver, CO 80208 USA.
    Steinkamp, Simon R.
    Res Ctr Julich, Germany.
    Tashjian, Sarah M.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Thirion, Bertrand
    Univ Paris Saclay, France.
    Thorp, John N.
    Columbia Univ, NY 10027 USA.
    Tinghög, Gustav
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tisdall, Loreen
    Stanford Univ, CA 94305 USA; Univ Basel, Switzerland.
    Tompson, Steven H.
    US CCDC Army Res Lab, MD USA.
    Toro-Serey, Claudio
    Boston Univ, MA 02215 USA; Boston Univ, MA 02215 USA.
    Torre Tresols, Juan Jesus
    Univ Paris Saclay, France.
    Tozzi, Leonardo
    Stanford Univ, CA 94305 USA.
    Truong, Vuong
    Taipei Med Univ, Taiwan; TMU ShuangHo Hosp, Taiwan.
    Turella, Luca
    Univ Trento, Italy.
    van t Veer, Anna E.
    Leiden Univ, Netherlands.
    Verguts, Tom
    Univ Ghent, Belgium.
    Vettel, Jean M.
    US Combat Capabil Dev Command Army Res Lab, MD USA; Univ Calif Santa Barbara, CA 93106 USA; Univ Penn, PA 19104 USA.
    Vijayarajah, Sagana
    Univ Toronto, Canada.
    Vo, Khoi
    Duke Univ, NC USA; Duke Univ, NC USA.
    Wall, Matthew B.
    Invicro, England; Imperial Coll London, England; UCL, England.
    Weeda, Wouter D.
    Leiden Univ, Netherlands.
    Weis, Susanne
    Res Ctr Julich, Germany; Heinrich Heine Univ Dusseldorf, Germany.
    White, David J.
    Imperial Coll London, England.
    Wisniewski, David
    Univ Ghent, Belgium.
    Xifra-Porxas, Alba
    McGill Univ, Canada.
    Yearling, Emily A.
    Univ Connecticut, CT USA; Univ Connecticut, CT USA.
    Yoon, Sangsuk
    Univ Dayton, OH 45469 USA.
    Yuan, Rui
    Stanford Univ, CA 94305 USA.
    Yuen, Kenneth S. L.
    Duke Univ, NC USA; LIR, Germany; Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, Germany.
    Zhang, Lei
    Univ Vienna, Austria.
    Zhang, Xu
    Univ Connecticut, CT USA; Univ Connecticut, CT USA; Univ Connecticut, CT USA.
    Zosky, Joshua E.
    Univ Nebraska, NE 68588 USA; Univ Nebraska, NE USA.
    Nichols, Thomas E.
    Univ Oxford, England.
    Poldrack, Russell A.
    Stanford Univ, CA 94305 USA.
    Schonberg, Tom
    Tel Aviv Univ, Israel; Tel Aviv Univ, Israel.
    Variability in the analysis of a single neuroimaging dataset by many teams2020In: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 582, p. 84-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Data analysis workflows in many scientific domains have become increasingly complex and flexible. Here we assess the effect of this flexibility on the results of functional magnetic resonance imaging by asking 70 independent teams to analyse the same dataset, testing the same 9 ex-ante hypotheses(1). The flexibility of analytical approaches is exemplified by the fact that no two teams chose identical workflows to analyse the data. This flexibility resulted in sizeable variation in the results of hypothesis tests, even for teams whose statistical maps were highly correlated at intermediate stages of the analysis pipeline. Variation in reported results was related to several aspects of analysis methodology. Notably, a meta-analytical approach that aggregated information across teams yielded a significant consensus in activated regions. Furthermore, prediction markets of researchers in the field revealed an overestimation of the likelihood of significant findings, even by researchers with direct knowledge of the dataset(2-5). Our findings show that analytical flexibility can have substantial effects on scientific conclusions, and identify factors that may be related to variability in the analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging. The results emphasize the importance of validating and sharing complex analysis workflows, and demonstrate the need for performing and reporting multiple analyses of the same data. Potential approaches that could be used to mitigate issues related to analytical variability are discussed. The results obtained by seventy different teams analysing the same functional magnetic resonance imaging dataset show substantial variation, highlighting the influence of analytical choices and the importance of sharing workflows publicly and performing multiple analyses.

  • 5.
    Chau, David T.
    et al.
    Laureate Institute for Brain Research, Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA.
    Fogelman, Phoebe
    University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA.
    Nordanskog, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Drevets, Wayne C.
    Laureate Institute for Brain Research, Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA; Janssen Research and Development, Janssen Pharmaceuticals of Johnson and Johnson, Titusville, New Jersey, USA.
    Hamilton, Paul J.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Laureate Institute for Brain Research, Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA.
    Distinct Neural-Functional Effects of Treatments With Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors, Electroconvulsive Therapy, and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Their Relations to Regional Brain Function in Major Depression: A Meta-analysis2017In: Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging, ISSN 2451-9030, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 318-326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Functional neuroimaging studies have examined the neural substrates of treatments for major depressive disorder (MDD). Low sample size and methodological heterogeneity, however, undermine the generalizability of findings from individual studies. We conducted a meta-analysis to identify reliable neural changes resulting from different modes of treatment for MDD and compared them with each other and with reliable neural functional abnormalities observed in depressed versus control samples.

  • 6.
    Croy, Ilona
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Technical University of Dresden, Germany.
    Drechsler, Edda
    Technical University of Dresden, Germany.
    Hamilton, Paul
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience (CSAN).
    Hummel, Thomas
    Technical University of Dresden, Germany.
    Olausson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Olfactory modulation of affective touch processing - A neurophysiological investigation2016In: NeuroImage, ISSN 1053-8119, E-ISSN 1095-9572, Vol. 135, p. 135-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Touch can be highly emotional, and depending on the environment, it can be perceived as pleasant and comforting or disgusting and dangerous. Here, we studied the impact of context on the processing of tactile stimuli using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) paradigm. This was achieved by embedding tactile stimulation in a variable olfactory environment. Twenty people were scanned with BOLD fMRI while receiving the following stimulus blocks: Slow stroking Touch, Civette odor (feces like), Rose odor, Touch + Civette, and Touch + Rose. Ratings of pleasantness and intensity of tactile stimuli and ratings of disgust and intensity of olfactory stimuli were collected. The impact of the olfactory context on the processing of touch was studied using covariance analyses. Coupling between olfactory processing and somatosensory processing areas was assessed with psychophysiological interaction analysis (PPI). A subjectively disgusting olfactory environment significantly reduced the perceived pleasantness of touch. The touch fMRI activation in the secondary somatosensory cortex, operculum 1 (OP1), was positively correlated with the disgust towards the odors. Decreased pleasantness of touch was related to decreased posterior insula activity. PPI analysis revealed a significant interaction between the OP1, posterior insula, and regions processing the disgust of odors (orbitofrontal cortex and amygdala). We conclude that the disgust evaluation of the olfactory environment moderates neural reactivity in somatosensory regions by upregulation of the OP1 and downregulation of the posterior insula. This adaptive regulation of affective touch processing may facilitate adaptive reaction to a potentially harmful stimulus. (C) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 7.
    Frost Bellgowan, Julie
    et al.
    Laureate Institute Brain Research, OK USA.
    Molfese, Peter
    Haskins Labs Inc, CT USA.
    Marx, Michael
    Stanford University, CA 94305 USA.
    Thomason, Moriah
    Wayne State University, MI USA.
    Glen, Daniel
    NIMH, MD 20892 USA.
    Santiago, Jessica
    Laureate Institute Brain Research, OK USA.
    Gotlib, Ian H.
    Stanford University, CA 94305 USA.
    Drevets, Wayne C.
    Laureate Institute Brain Research, OK USA; Janssen Pharmaceut, Belgium.
    Hamilton, Paul J.
    Linköping University, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience (CSAN). Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Laureate Institute Brain Research, OK USA.
    A Neural Substrate for Behavioral Inhibition in the Risk for Major Depressive Disorder2015In: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 0890-8567, E-ISSN 1527-5418, Vol. 54, no 10, p. 841-848Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Behavioral inhibition (BI) is an early developing trait associated with cautiousness and development of clinical depression and anxiety. Little is known about the neural basis of BI and its predictive importance concerning risk for internalizing disorders. We looked at functional connectivity of the default-mode network (DMN) and salience network (SN), given their respective roles in self-relational and threat processing, in the risk for internalizing disorders, with an emphasis on determining the functional significance of these networks for BI. Method: We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to scan, during the resting state, children and adolescents 8 to 17 years of age who were either at high familial risk (HR; n = 16) or low familial risk (LR; n = 18) for developing clinical depression and/or anxiety. Whole-brain DMN and SN functional connectivity were estimated for each participant and compared across groups. We also compared the LR and HR groups on levels of BI and anxiety, and incorporated these data into follow-up neurobehavioral correlation analyses. Results: The HR group, relative to the LR group, showed significantly decreased DMN connectivity with the ventral striatum and bilateral sensorimotor cortices. Within the HR group, trait BI increased as DMN connectivity with the ventral striatum and sensorimotor cortex decreased. The HR and LR groups did not differ with respect to SN connectivity. Conclusion: Our findings show, in the risk for internalizing disorders, a negative functional relation between brain regions supporting self-relational processes and reward prediction. These findings represent a potential neural substrate for behavioral inhibition in the risk for clinical depression and anxiety.

  • 8.
    Hamilton, Paul J.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience (CSAN).
    Glover, Gary H.
    Stanford University, CA, USA.
    Bagarinao, Epifanio
    Stanford University, CA, USA.
    Chang, Catie
    National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Mackey, Sean
    Stanford University, CA, USA.
    Sacchet, Matthew D.
    Stanford University, CA, USA.
    Gotlib, Ian H.
    Stanford University, CA, USA.
    Effects of salience-network-node neurofeedback training on affective biases in major depressive disorder2016In: Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging, ISSN 0925-4927, E-ISSN 1872-7506, Vol. 249, p. 91-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neural models of major depressive disorder (MDD) posit that over-response of components of the brains salience network (SN) to negative stimuli plays a crucial role in the pathophysiology of MDD. In the present proof-of-concept study, we tested this formulation directly by examining the affective consequences of training depressed persons to down-regulate response of SN nodes to negative material. Ten participants in the real neurofeedback group saw, and attempted to learn to down-regulate, activity from an empirically identified node of the SN. Ten other participants engaged in an equivalent procedure with the exception that they saw SN-node neurofeedback indices from participants in the real neurofeedback group. Before and after scanning, all participants completed tasks assessing emotional responses to negative scenes and to negative and positive self-descriptive adjectives. Compared to participants in the sham-neurofeedback group, from pre- to post-training, participants in the realneurofeedback group showed a greater decrease in SN-node response to negative stimuli, a greater decrease in self-reported emotional response to negative scenes, and a greater decrease in self-reported emotional response to negative self-descriptive adjectives. Our findings provide support for a neural formulation in which the SN plays a primary role in contributing to negative cognitive biases in MDD. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 9.
    Oltedal, Leif
    et al.
    University of Bergen, Norway; University of Calif San Diego, CA 92037 USA; University of Calif San Diego, CA 92093 USA; Haukeland Hospital, Norway.
    Bartsch, Hauke
    University of Calif San Diego, CA 92037 USA; University of Calif San Diego, CA 92093 USA.
    Evjenth Sorhaug, Ole Johan
    University of Bergen, Norway.
    Kessler, Ute
    University of Bergen, Norway; Haukeland Hospital, Norway.
    Abbott, Christopher
    University of New Mexico, NM 87131 USA.
    Dols, Annemieke
    VUmc Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Stek, Max L.
    VUmc Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Ersland, Lars
    Haukeland Hospital, Norway.
    Emsell, Louise
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium.
    van Eijndhoven, Philip
    Donders Institute Brain Cognit and Behav, Netherlands.
    Argyelan, Miklos
    Feinstein Institute Medical Research, NY USA.
    Tendolkar, Indira
    Donders Institute Brain Cognit and Behav, Netherlands.
    Nordanskog, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Hamilton, Paul J.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Balslev Jorgensen, Martin
    Psychiat Centre Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Sommer, Iris E.
    University of Medical Centre, Netherlands.
    Heringa, Sophie M.
    University of Medical Centre, Netherlands.
    Draganski, Bogdan
    University of Lausanne, Switzerland; Max Planck Institute Human Brain and Cognit Neurosci, Germany.
    Redlich, Ronny
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Münster, Germany.
    Dannlowski, Udo
    University of Munster, Germany; University of Marburg, Germany.
    Kugel, Harald
    University of Munster, Germany.
    Bouckaert, Filip
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Sienaert, Pascal
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Anand, Amit
    Cleveland Clin, OH 44106 USA.
    Espinoza, Randall
    University of Calif Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Narr, Katherine L.
    University of Calif Los Angeles, CA 90024 USA.
    Holland, Dominic
    University of Calif San Diego, CA 92037 USA; University of Calif San Diego, CA 92093 USA.
    Dale, Anders M.
    University of Calif San Diego, CA 92037 USA; University of Calif San Diego, CA 92093 USA; University of Calif San Diego, CA 92093 USA.
    Oedegaard, Ketil J.
    University of Bergen, Norway; Haukeland Hospital, Norway; KG Jebsen Centre Research Neuropsychiat Disorders, Norway.
    The Global ECT-MRI Research Collaboration (GEMRIC): Establishing a multi-site investigation of the neural mechanisms underlying response to electroconvulsive therapy2017In: NeuroImage: Clinical, E-ISSN 2213-1582, Vol. 14, p. 422-432Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Major depression, currently the worlds primary cause of disability, leads to profound personal suffering and increased risk of suicide. Unfortunately, the success of antidepressant treatment varies amongst individuals and can take weeks to months in those who respond. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), generally prescribed for the most severely depressed and when standard treatments fail, produces a more rapid response and remains the most effective intervention for severe depression. Exploring the neurobiological effects of ECT is thus an ideal approach to better understand the mechanisms of successful therapeutic response. Though several recent neuroimaging studies show structural and functional changes associated with ECT, not all brain changes associate with clinical outcome. Larger studies that can address individual differences in clinical and treatment parameters may better target biological factors relating to or predictive of ECT-related therapeutic response. We have thus formed the Global ECT-MRI Research Collaboration (GEMRIC) that aims to combine longitudinal neuroimaging as well as clinical, behavioral and other physiological data across multiple independent sites. Here, we summarize the ECT sample characteristics from currently participating sites, and the common data-repository and standardized image analysis pipeline developed for this initiative. This includes data harmonization across sites and MRI platforms, and a method for obtaining unbiased estimates of structural change based on longitudinal measurements with serial MRI scans. The optimized analysis pipeline, together with the large and heterogeneous combined GEMRIC dataset, will provide new opportunities to elucidate the mechanisms of ECT response and the factors mediating and predictive of clinical outcomes, which may ultimately lead to more effective personalized treatment approaches. (C) 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc.

  • 10.
    Paul, Elisabeth R.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience.
    Farmer, Madison
    Roosevelt University, Chicago, Illinois.
    Kämpe, Robin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience.
    Cremers, Henk R.
    University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Hamilton, Paul J.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Functional Connectivity Between Extrastriate Body Area and Default Mode Network Predicts Depersonalization Symptoms in Major Depression: Findings From an A Priori Specified Multinetwork Comparison2019In: Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging, ISSN 2451-9022, Vol. 4, no 7, p. 627-635Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Depersonalization/derealization disorder is a dissociative disorder characterized by feelings of unreality and detachment from the self and surroundings. Depersonalization/derealization disorder is classified as a primary disorder, but depersonalization symptoms are frequently observed in mood and anxiety disorders. In the context of major depressive disorder (MDD), depersonalization symptoms are associated with greater depressive severity as indexed by treatment resistance, inpatient visits, and duration of depressive episodes. In the current investigation, we tested four network-based, neural-functional hypotheses of depersonalization in MDD. These hypotheses were framed in terms of functional relationships between 1) extrastriate body area and default mode network (DMN); 2) hippocampus and DMN; 3) medial prefrontal cortex and ventral striatum; and 4) posterior and anterior insular cortex.

    Methods

    We conducted functional magnetic resonance imaging during resting state on 28 female patients with MDD and 27 control subjects with no history of a psychiatric disorder. Functional connectivity between seed and target regions as specified by our network-level hypotheses was computed and correlated with scores on the Cambridge Depersonalization Scale. We used a conservative, unbiased bootstrapping procedure to test the significance of neural-behavioral correlations observed under each of the four models tested.

    Results

    Of the four neural-functional models of depersonalization symptoms tested, only the model proposing that reduced connectivity between the extrastriate body area and DMN predicts higher levels of depersonalization symptoms in MDD was confirmed.

    Conclusions

    Our results indicate that depersonalization/derealization disorder symptoms in patients with depression are related to reduced functional connectivity between brain regions that are proposed to support processing of body-related (extrastriate body area) and autobiographical (DMN) information.

  • 11.
    Paul, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Schwieler, Lilly
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Erhardt, Sophie
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Boda, Sandra
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Trepci, Ada
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Kämpe, Robin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Asratian, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Holm, Lovisa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Yngve, Adam
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dantzer, Robert
    Univ Texas MD Anderson Canc Ctr, TX 77030 USA.
    Heilig, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Psykiatriska kliniken i Linköping.
    Hamilton, Paul J.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Samuelsson, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Psykiatriska kliniken i Linköping.
    Peripheral and central kynurenine pathway abnormalities in major depression2022In: Brain, behavior, and immunity, ISSN 0889-1591, E-ISSN 1090-2139, Vol. 101, p. 136-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Considerable data relate major depressive disorder (MDD) with aberrant immune system functioning. Pro inflammatory cytokines facilitate metabolism of tryptophan along the kynurenine pathway (KP) putatively resulting in reduced neuroprotective and increased neurotoxic KP metabolites in MDD, in addition to modulating metabolic and immune function. This central nervous system hypothesis has, however, only been tested in the periphery. Here, we measured KP-metabolite levels in both plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of depressed patients (n = 63/36 respectively) and healthy controls (n = 48/33). Further, we assessed the relation between KP abnormalities and brain-structure volumes, as well as body mass index (BMI), an index of metabolic disturbance associated with atypical depression. Plasma levels of picolinic acid (PIC), the kynurenic/quinolinic acid ratio (KYNA/QUIN), and PIC/QUIN were lower in MDD, but QUIN levels were increased. In the CSF, we found lower PIC in MDD. Confirming previous work, MDD patients had lower hippocampal, and amygdalar volumes. Hippocampal and amygdalar volumes were correlated positively with plasma KYNA/QUIN ratio in MDD patients. BMI was increased in the MDD group relative to the control group. Moreover, BMI was inversely correlated with plasma and CSF PIC and PIC/QUIN, and positively correlated with plasma QUIN levels in MDD. Our results partially confirm previous peripheral KP findings and extend them to the CSF in MDD. We present the novel finding that abnormalities in KP metabolites are related to metabolic disturbances in depression, but the relation between KP metabolites and depression-associated brain atrophy might not be as direct as previously hypothesized.

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  • 12.
    Perini, Irene
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Per A
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Hamilton, Paul J.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kämpe, Robin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mayo, Leah M.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Heilig, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Psykiatriska kliniken inkl beroendekliniken.
    Zetterqvist, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Brain-based Classification of Negative Social Bias in Adolescents With Nonsuicidal Self-injury: Findings From Simulated Online Social Interaction.2019In: eClinicalMedicine, E-ISSN 2589-5370, Vol. 13, p. 81-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Interpersonal stress and perceived rejection have been clinically observed as common triggers of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI), with self-injury behavior regulating both affective and social experiences. We investigated whether the subjective interpretation of social interaction in a simulated online environment might be biased in the NSSI group, and the brain mechanisms underlying the experience.

    Methods: Thirty female adolescent patients with NSSI and thirty female age-matched controls were investigated in this case-control study. In our novel task that simulates interaction on current social media platforms, participants indicated whether they liked or disliked pictures of other players during a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scan. Participants also viewed positive and negative feedback directed toward them by others. The task also assessed the subjective effects of the social interaction. Finally, subjects underwent a separate facial electromyography session, which measured facial expressions processing.

    Outcomes: Behaviorally, the NSSI group showed a negative bias in processing social feedback from others. A multi-voxel pattern analysis (MVPA) identified brain regions that robustly classified NSSI subjects and controls. Regions in which mutual activity contributed to the classification included dorsomedial prefrontal cortex and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex, a region implicated in mood control. In the NSSI group, multi-voxel classification scores correlated with behavioral sensitivity to negative feedback from others. Results remained significant after controlling for medication, symptoms of depression, and symptoms of borderline personality disorder.

    Interpretation: This study identified behavioral and neural signatures of adolescents with NSSI during social interaction in a simulated social media environment. These findings highlight the importance of understanding social information processing in this clinical population and can potentially advance treatment approaches.

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  • 13.
    Sacchet, Matthew D.
    et al.
    Stanford University, USA; VA Boston Healthcare Syst, MA 02130 USA.
    Levy, Benjamin J.
    VA Boston Healthcare Syst, MA 02130 USA; University of San Francisco, CA 94117 USA.
    Hamilton, Paul J.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. VA Boston Healthcare Syst, MA 02130 USA.
    Maksimovskiy, Arkadiy
    VA Boston Healthcare Syst, MA 02130 USA; Boston University, MA 02118 USA.
    Hertel, Paula T.
    VA Boston Healthcare Syst, MA 02130 USA; Trinity University, TX 78212 USA.
    Joormann, Jutta
    VA Boston Healthcare Syst, MA 02130 USA; Yale University, CT USA.
    Anderson, Michael C.
    VA Boston Healthcare Syst, MA 02130 USA; University of Cambridge, England.
    Wagner, Anthony D.
    Stanford University, CA 94305 USA; Stanford University, CA 94305 USA; VA Boston Healthcare Syst, MA 02130 USA.
    Gotlib, Ian H.
    Stanford University, CA 94305 USA; Stanford University, CA 94305 USA; VA Boston Healthcare Syst, MA 02130 USA.
    Cognitive and neural consequences of memory suppression in major depressive disorder2017In: Cognitive, Affective, & Behavioral Neuroscience, ISSN 1530-7026, E-ISSN 1531-135X, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 77-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Negative biases in cognition have been documented consistently in major depressive disorder (MDD), including difficulties in the ability to control the processing of negative material. Although negative information-processing biases have been studied using both behavioral and neuroimaging paradigms, relatively little research has been conducted examining the difficulties of depressed persons with inhibiting the retrieval of negative information from long-term memory. In this study, we used the think/no-think paradigm and functional magnetic resonance imaging to assess the cognitive and neural consequences of memory suppression in individuals diagnosed with depression and in healthy controls. The participants showed typical behavioral forgetting effects, but contrary to our hypotheses, there were no differences between the depressed and nondepressed participants or between neutral and negative memories. Relative to controls, depressed individuals exhibited greater activity in right middle frontal gyrus during memory suppression, regardless of the valence of the suppressed stimuli, and differential activity in the amygdala and hippocampus during memory suppression involving negatively valenced stimuli. These findings indicate that depressed individuals are characterized by neural anomalies during the suppression of long-term memories, increasing our understanding of the brain bases of negative cognitive biases in MDD.

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  • 14.
    Strauss, Timmy
    et al.
    Tech Univ Dresden, Germany.
    Rottstaedt, Fabian
    Tech Univ Dresden, Germany.
    Sailer, Uta
    Univ Oslo, Norway.
    Schellong, Julia
    Tech Univ Dresden, Germany.
    Hamilton, Paul J.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Raue, Claudia
    Tech Univ Dresden, Germany.
    Weidner, Kerstin
    Tech Univ Dresden, Germany.
    Croy, Ilona
    Tech Univ Dresden, Germany.
    Touch aversion in patients with interpersonal traumatization2019In: Depression and anxiety (Print), ISSN 1091-4269, E-ISSN 1520-6394, Vol. 36, no 7, p. 635-646Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Interpersonal touch is a key aspect of human interaction and a usually very comforting experience. For patients suffering from posttraumatic stress disorders (PTSD) caused by interpersonal traumatization, such touch is affectively ambiguous. Methods In two studies, we investigated the experience and neural processing of various types of interpersonal and impersonal touch in patients as compared with healthy controls. Results Patients strongly disliked show, interpersonal skin-to-skin stroking, while controls appreciated this kind of touch. No group differences were observed for ratings of impersonal touch. Similarly, the neural activation differed between groups for interpersonal, but not for impersonal touch. The interpersonal touch aversion in patients was accompanied by enhanced blood-oxygen-level-dependent response in the superior temporal gyrus and by a pronounced reduction of response in the hippocampus. This reduction was significantly correlated to symptoms of negative alterations and arousal within the patients. Conclusion We interpret the hippocampal suppression as an attempt to control traumatic memories, evoked by interpersonal touch. This mechanism may maintain the aversion of interpersonal touch in patients with interpersonal trauma-related PTSD.

  • 15.
    Takamiya, Akihiro
    et al.
    Keio Univ, Japan; Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Dols, Annemiek
    GGZ InGeest Specialized Mental Hlth Care, Netherlands; Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Emsell, Louise
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Abbott, Christopher
    Univ New Mexico, NM 87131 USA.
    Yrondi, Antoine
    Univ Toulouse, France.
    Mas, Carles Soriano
    Bellvitge Biomed Res Inst IDIBELL, Spain; Carlos III Hlth Inst, Spain; Univ Autonoma Barcelona, Spain.
    Jorgensen, Martin Balslev
    Psychiat Ctr Copenhagen, Denmark; Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Nordanskog, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Psykiatricentrum, Psykiatriska kliniken i Linköping.
    Rhebergen, Didi
    GGZ Centraal, Netherlands.
    van Exel, Eric
    GGZ InGeest Specialized Mental Hlth Care, Netherlands; Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Oudega, Mardien L.
    GGZ InGeest Specialized Mental Hlth Care, Netherlands; Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Bouckaert, Filip
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Vandenbulcke, Mathieu
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Sienaert, Pascal
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Peran, Patrice
    Univ Toulouse, France.
    Cano, Marta
    Carlos III Hlth Inst, Spain; Univ Autonoma Barcelona, Spain; Parc Tauli Univ Hosp, Spain.
    Cardoner, Narcis
    Parc Tauli Univ Hosp, Spain.
    Jorgensen, Anders
    Psychiat Ctr Copenhagen, Denmark; Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Paulson, Olaf B.
    Rigshosp, Denmark.
    Hamilton, Paul J.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kämpe, Robin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bruin, Willem
    Amsterdam UMC, Netherlands.
    Bartsch, Hauke
    Haukeland Hosp, Norway; Haukeland Hosp, Norway; Univ Bergen, Norway.
    Ousdal, Olga Therese
    Haukeland Hosp, Norway; Univ Bergen, Norway.
    Kessler, Ute
    Univ Bergen, Norway; Haukeland Hosp, Norway.
    van Wingen, Guido
    Amsterdam UMC, Netherlands.
    Oltedal, Leif
    Haukeland Hosp, Norway; Univ Bergen, Norway.
    Kishimoto, Taishiro
    Keio Univ, Japan.
    Neural Substrates of Psychotic Depression: Findings From the Global ECT-MRI Research Collaboration2022In: Schizophrenia Bulletin, ISSN 0586-7614, E-ISSN 1745-1701, Vol. 48, no 2, p. 514-523Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Psychotic major depression (PMD) is hypothesized to be a distinct clinical entity from nonpsychotic major depression (NPMD). However, neurobiological evidence supporting this notion is scarce. The aim of this study is to identify gray matter volume (GMV) differences between PMD and NPMD and their longitudinal change following electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data from 8 independent sites in the Global ECT-MRI Research Collaboration (GEMRIC) database (n = 108; 56 PMD and 52 NPMD; mean age 71.7 in PMD and 70.2 in NPMD) were analyzed. All participants underwent MRI before and after ECT. First, cross-sectional whole-brain voxel-wise GMV comparisons between PMD and NPMD were conducted at both time points. Second, in a flexible factorial model, a main effect of time and a group-by-time interaction were examined to identify longitudinal effects of ECT on GMV and longitudinal differential effects of ECT between PMD and NPMD, respectively. Compared with NPMD, PMD showed lower GMV in the prefrontal, temporal and parietal cortex before ECT; PMD showed lower GMV in the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) after ECT. Although there was a significant main effect of time on GMV in several brain regions in both PMD and NPMD, there was no significant group-by-time interaction. Lower GMV in the MPFC was consistently identified in PMD, suggesting this may be a trait-like neural substrate of PMD. Longitudinal effect of ECT on GMV may not explain superior ECT response in PMD, and further investigation is needed.

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