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  • 1.
    Almquist, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Almquist, Viktor
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Vergara Alonso, Ekhiotz Jon
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Software and Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nadjm-Tehrani, Simin
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Software and Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Communication Energy Overhead of Mobiles Games2015In: MobiGames '15: Proceedings of the 2nd Workshop on Mobile Gaming, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2015, p. 1-6Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Although a significant proportion of the mobile apps are games there has been little attention paid to their specific characteristics with respect to communication energy. In this paper we select 20 mobile games among the top 100 free Android games, and study their data patterns and communication energy use over a total of 25 hours of playing. The analysis of the energy for communication over 3G networks indicates that there is a wide variation among the games, the largest footprint being 8 times higher than the lowest one. The results also indicates both app-specific and category-specific relations between data pattern and energy use, as well as variations in CPU utilisation.

  • 2.
    de Leng, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Artificial Intelligence and Integrated Computer Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tiger, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Artificial Intelligence and Integrated Computer Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Almquist, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Almquist, Viktor
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Carlsson, Niklas
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Database and information techniques. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Second Screen Journey to the Cup: Twitter Dynamics during the Stanley Cup Playoffs2018In: Proceedings of the 2nd Network Traffic Measurement and Analysis Conference (TMA), 2018, p. 1-8Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With Twitter and other microblogging services, users can easily express their opinion and ideas in short text messages. A recent trend is that users use the real-time property of these services to share their opinions and thoughts as events unfold on TV or in the real world. In the context of TV broadcasts, Twitter (over a mobile device, for example) is referred to as a second screen. This paper presents the first characterization of the second screen usage over the playoffs of a major sports league. We present both temporal and spatial analysis of the Twitter usage during the end of the National Hockey League (NHL) regular season and the 2015 Stanley Cup playoffs. Our analysis provides insights into the usage patterns over the full 72-day period and with regards to in-game events such as goals, but also with regards to geographic biases. Quantifying these biases and the significance of specific events, we then discuss and provide insights into how the playoff dynamics may impact advertisers and third-party developers that try to provide increased personalization.

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