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  • 1.
    Pompermaier, Laura
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Outcome of burn care: the mortality perspective2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Despite the improvements in burn care during the last decades, burns remain catastrophic for the patients and a challenge for the care-givers.  The early outcome of burn care is to assess its quality and to improve it, but the crucial outcome is mortality, which is the main focus of this thesis. In particular, I address questions about mortality that have arisen from working with burned patients and that can have clinical consequences: the impact of pre- existing medical conditions; long-term survival; the causes of unexpected deaths; and the possible differences between sexes in the provision of resources.

    Patients with burns share the fact that the time of their injury is known, its severity can be quantified from the size of the burn, and the care is relatively standardised. The analysis of outcome among burned patients treated at a single burn centre may therefore be of general value to others who treat burns.

    Methods: We retrospectively analysed data that had been collected prospectively (the burn    unit database) from patients with burns admitted consecutively to a national burn centre in Sweden during the last 25 years.

    Results: Age and percentage of total body surface area burned (TBSA %) affected the in- hospital mortality, whereas pre-existing medical conditions did not influence the prediction of outcome (Paper I). After discharge, both age and the presence of full thickness burns reduced the long-term survival, whereas the extent of the burn (TBSA %) did not (Paper II). Most patients with moderate burns who die in hospital despite a good prognosis, die for reasons   other than the burn (Paper III). Previously, it has been shown that sex is not an independent factor for mortality during burn care; in this thesis we show that the sex of the patients did not affect the number of medical interventions given either (Paper IV).

    Conclusion: The addition of “coexisting condition” to a mortality model based on age and   size of burn does not improve its predictive value; rather, the factor “age” is sufficient to adjust for comorbidity in the assessment of a burn and its outcome (Paper I).

    If patients with burns survive, the long-term prognosis is good. The effect of age is the one that governs survival, whereas the effect of the extent of the burn ends when the patient is discharged (Paper II).

    The in-hospital mortality during burn care is low, but some patients die for reasons other than the actual burn (Paper III).

    In a centre where the mortality is independent of the sex of the patient, the provision of medical interventions is also equal between men and women (Paper IV).

    List of papers
    1. Inclusion of coexisting morbidity in a TBSA% and age based model for the prediction of mortality after burns does not increase its predictive power
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inclusion of coexisting morbidity in a TBSA% and age based model for the prediction of mortality after burns does not increase its predictive power
    2015 (English)In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 41, no 8, p. 1868-1876Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Several models for predicting mortality have been developed for patients with burns, and the most commonly used are based on age and total body surface area (TBSA%). They often show good predictive precision as depicted by high values for area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC). However the effect of coexisting morbidity on such prediction models has not to our knowledge been thoroughly examined. We hypothesised that adding it to a previously published model (based on age, TBSA%, full thickness burns, gender, and need for mechanical ventilation) would further improve its predictive power. Methods: We studied 772 patients admitted during the period 1997-2008 to the Linkoping University Hospital, National Burn Centre with any type of burns. We defined coexisting morbidity as any of the medical conditions listed in the Charlson list, as well as psychiatric disorders or drug or alcohol misuse. We added coexisting medical conditions to the model for predicting mortality (age, TBSA%, and need for mechanical ventilation) to determine whether it improved the model as assessed by changes in deviances between the models. Results: Mean (SD) age and TBSA% was 35 (26) years and 13 (17) %, respectively. Among 725 patients who survived, 105 (14%) had one or more coexisting condition, compared with 28 (60%) among those 47 who died. The presence of coexisting conditions increased with age (p < 0.001) among patients with burns. The AUC of the mortality prediction model in this study, based on the variables age, TBSA%, and need for mechanical ventilation was 0.980 (n = 772); after inclusion of coexisting morbidity in the model, the AUC improved only marginally, to 0.986. The model was not significantly better either. Conclusion: Adding coexisting morbidity to a model for prediction of mortality after a burn based on age, TBSA%, and the need for mechanical ventilation did not significantly improve its predictive value. This is probably because coexisting morbidity is automatically adjusted for by age in the original model. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    ELSEVIER SCI LTD, 2015
    Keywords
    Burns; Comorbidity; Mortality; Prediction model
    National Category
    Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124131 (URN)10.1016/j.burns.2015.09.017 (DOI)000367127700031 ()26507519 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2016-01-22 Created: 2016-01-19 Last updated: 2017-11-30
    2. Long-term survival after burns in a Swedish population
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long-term survival after burns in a Swedish population
    Show others...
    2017 (English)In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 157-161Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: As widely reported, the progress in burn care during recent decades has reduced the hospital mortality. The effect of the burns on long-term outcome has not received so much attention, and more study is indicated. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the long-time survival among patients who had been treated for burns.

    METHODS: We studied 1487 patients who were discharged alive from the Linköping University Hospital Burn Centre during the period 1993 until the end of December 2012. We used Cox's regression analysis to study the effect of burns on long-term survival after adjustment for different factors.

    RESULTS: Age and a full-thickness burn were significantly associated with mortality after discharge (p<0.001), whereas percentage of total body surface area burned (TBSA %), need for mechanical ventilation, and gender were not. Less than 1% of the patients with burns (13/1487) died within 30 days of discharge and a total of 176/1487 (12%) died during follow-up.

    CONCLUSION: Age and full-thickness burns reduce the long-time survival after discharge from the Burn Centre, whereas the effect of TBSA% and need for artificial ventilation ends with discharge.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2017
    Keywords
    Burns, Outcome, Long-term survival, Mortality
    National Category
    Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-131478 (URN)10.1016/j.burns.2016.07.018 (DOI)000392476000022 ()27613474 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding agencies: Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery Linkoping University Hospital; Region of Ostergotland; Linkoping University, Linkoping, Sweden

    Available from: 2016-09-22 Created: 2016-09-22 Last updated: 2017-11-09Bibliographically approved
    3. Burned patients who die from causes other than the burn affect the model used to predict mortality: a national exploratory study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Burned patients who die from causes other than the burn affect the model used to predict mortality: a national exploratory study
    Show others...
    2018 (English)In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 280-287Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: The Baux score - the sum of age and total body surface area burned (TBSA %) - is a good predictor of mortality has a high specificity but low sensitivity. Our aim was to examine the causes of death in patients who die with Baux scores of <100, which may explain the lower sensitivity and possibly affect the prediction of mortality.

    METHODS: All patients admitted to our centre for burn care from 1993 to 2015 (n=1946) were included in this retrospective, descriptive, exploratory study. The study group comprised those patients who died with Baux scores of <100 (n=23), and their medical charts were examined for the cause of death and for coexisting diseases.

    RESULTS: Crude mortality was 5% (93/1946) for the overall cohort, and a quarter of the patients who died (23/93) had Baux scores of less than 100 (range 64-99). In this latter group, flame burns were the most common (18/23), the median (10th-90th centile) age was 70 (46-86) years and for TBSA 21 (5.0-40.5) %, of which 7 (0-27.0) % of the area was full thickness. The main causes of death in 17 of the 23 were classified as "other than burn", being cerebral disease (n=9), cardiovascular disease (n=6), and respiratory failure (n=2). Among the remaining six (burn-related) deaths, multiple organ failure (predominantly renal failure) was responsible. When we excluded the cases in which the cause of death was not related to the burn, the Baux mortality prediction value improved (receiver operating characteristics area under the curve, AUC) from 0.9733 (95% CI 0.9633-0.9834) to 0.9888 (95% CI 0.9839-0.9936) and the sensitivity estimate increased from 45.2% to 53.9%.

    CONCLUSION: Patients with burns who died with a Baux score <100 were a quarter of all the patients who died. An important finding is that most of these deaths were caused by reasons other than the burn, usually cerebrovascular disease. This may be the explanation why the sensitivity of the Baux score is low, as factors other than age and TBSA % explain the fatal outcome.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2018
    Keywords
    Baux score, Burns, Cause of death, Mortality
    National Category
    Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-142898 (URN)10.1016/j.burns.2017.07.014 (DOI)000427535000006 ()28830698 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85027674409 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding agencies: Burn Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery, and Burns, Region Ostergotland; Linkoping University, Linkoping, Sweden

    Available from: 2017-11-09 Created: 2017-11-09 Last updated: 2019-04-12Bibliographically approved
  • 2.
    Pompermaier, Laura
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Department of Surgery, Plastic Surgery Unit, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Are there any differences in the provided burn care between men and women? A retrospective study2018In: Burns & Trauma, E-ISSN 2321-3876, Vol. 6, article id 22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Disparity between medical treatment for men and women has been recorded worldwide. However, it is difficult to find out if the disparities in both the use of resources and outcome depend entirely on sex-related discrimination. Our aim was to investigate if there are differences in burn treatments between the sexes.

    Methods

    All patients admitted with burns to Linköping University Hospital during the 16-year period 2000–2015 were included. Interventions were prospectively recorded using the validated Burn SCoring system (BSC). Data were analysed using a multivariable panel regression model adjusted for age, percentage total body surface area (%TBSA), and in-hospital mortality.

    Results

    A total of 1363 patients were included, who generated a total of 22,301 daily recordings while they were inpatients. Males were 70% (930/1363). Sex was not an independent factor for daily scores after adjustment for age, %TBSA, and mortality in hospital (model R2=0.60, p < 0.001).

    Conclusion

    We found no evidence of inequity between the sexes in treatments given in our burn centre when we had adjusted for size of burn, age, and mortality. BSC seems to be an appropriate model in which to evaluate sex-related differences in the delivery of treatments.

  • 3.
    Pompermaier, Laura
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. The Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Burned patients who die from causes other than the burn affect the model used to predict mortality: a national exploratory study2018In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 280-287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: The Baux score - the sum of age and total body surface area burned (TBSA %) - is a good predictor of mortality has a high specificity but low sensitivity. Our aim was to examine the causes of death in patients who die with Baux scores of <100, which may explain the lower sensitivity and possibly affect the prediction of mortality.

    METHODS: All patients admitted to our centre for burn care from 1993 to 2015 (n=1946) were included in this retrospective, descriptive, exploratory study. The study group comprised those patients who died with Baux scores of <100 (n=23), and their medical charts were examined for the cause of death and for coexisting diseases.

    RESULTS: Crude mortality was 5% (93/1946) for the overall cohort, and a quarter of the patients who died (23/93) had Baux scores of less than 100 (range 64-99). In this latter group, flame burns were the most common (18/23), the median (10th-90th centile) age was 70 (46-86) years and for TBSA 21 (5.0-40.5) %, of which 7 (0-27.0) % of the area was full thickness. The main causes of death in 17 of the 23 were classified as "other than burn", being cerebral disease (n=9), cardiovascular disease (n=6), and respiratory failure (n=2). Among the remaining six (burn-related) deaths, multiple organ failure (predominantly renal failure) was responsible. When we excluded the cases in which the cause of death was not related to the burn, the Baux mortality prediction value improved (receiver operating characteristics area under the curve, AUC) from 0.9733 (95% CI 0.9633-0.9834) to 0.9888 (95% CI 0.9839-0.9936) and the sensitivity estimate increased from 45.2% to 53.9%.

    CONCLUSION: Patients with burns who died with a Baux score <100 were a quarter of all the patients who died. An important finding is that most of these deaths were caused by reasons other than the burn, usually cerebrovascular disease. This may be the explanation why the sensitivity of the Baux score is low, as factors other than age and TBSA % explain the fatal outcome.

  • 4.
    Pompermaier, Laura
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Inclusion of coexisting morbidity in a TBSA% and age based model for the prediction of mortality after burns does not increase its predictive power2015In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 41, no 8, p. 1868-1876Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Several models for predicting mortality have been developed for patients with burns, and the most commonly used are based on age and total body surface area (TBSA%). They often show good predictive precision as depicted by high values for area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC). However the effect of coexisting morbidity on such prediction models has not to our knowledge been thoroughly examined. We hypothesised that adding it to a previously published model (based on age, TBSA%, full thickness burns, gender, and need for mechanical ventilation) would further improve its predictive power. Methods: We studied 772 patients admitted during the period 1997-2008 to the Linkoping University Hospital, National Burn Centre with any type of burns. We defined coexisting morbidity as any of the medical conditions listed in the Charlson list, as well as psychiatric disorders or drug or alcohol misuse. We added coexisting medical conditions to the model for predicting mortality (age, TBSA%, and need for mechanical ventilation) to determine whether it improved the model as assessed by changes in deviances between the models. Results: Mean (SD) age and TBSA% was 35 (26) years and 13 (17) %, respectively. Among 725 patients who survived, 105 (14%) had one or more coexisting condition, compared with 28 (60%) among those 47 who died. The presence of coexisting conditions increased with age (p &lt; 0.001) among patients with burns. The AUC of the mortality prediction model in this study, based on the variables age, TBSA%, and need for mechanical ventilation was 0.980 (n = 772); after inclusion of coexisting morbidity in the model, the AUC improved only marginally, to 0.986. The model was not significantly better either. Conclusion: Adding coexisting morbidity to a model for prediction of mortality after a burn based on age, TBSA%, and the need for mechanical ventilation did not significantly improve its predictive value. This is probably because coexisting morbidity is automatically adjusted for by age in the original model. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

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