liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 1 of 1
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Wihlborg, Elin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Political Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Larsson, Hannu
    School of Business, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Hedström, Karin
    School of Business, Örebro University, Sweden.
    The Computer Says No!: A Case Study on Automated Decision-making in Public Authorities2016In: 2016 49th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS), IEEE Press, 2016, p. 2903-2912Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In e-government automated decision-making increases, forming part of a trend towards “smart” and self-regulating systems. This necessitates the introduction of new relationships and practices, challenging the division of responsibilities in public administration. Using a case study approach, this paper elaborates on implications of automated decision-making for professional officers in a Swedish public organization. We conclude that automation should be framed in relation to the rules of law and ethics of justice. Furthermore, the roles and competences of professionals are changing, with automated systems beginning to resemble cobureaucrats. Professionals can either make an alliance with the automated system or the client. This choice of strategy is related to the issues of legitimacy and professional competences. We also identify practices as being either a form of caring ethics or a formal legal ethic norm. Such practices should be further addressed to influence practices promoting legitimate systems citizens can trust.

1 - 1 of 1
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf