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  • 1.
    Ball, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    How many rhotic phonemes does modern Welsh have?2015In: Representations and Interpretations in Celtic Studies / [ed] Tomasz Czerniak, Maciej Czerniakowski, Krzysztof Jaskuła, Lublin: John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin , 2015, p. 49-61Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Ball, Martin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science.
    Is there phonology without meaning?2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Ball, Martin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science.
    Multilingualism and acquired neurogenic speech disorders. Plenary presentation.2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Ball, Martin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science.
    The Establishment of DisorderedSpeechBank: A digital archive of disordered speech across languages2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Ball, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Isaksson, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Elias
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Müller, Nicole
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dysarthria in Swedish2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Ball, Martin J.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Multilingualism and acquired neurogenic speech disorders2015In: Proceedings of the International Symposium on Monolingual and Bilingual Speech 2015 / [ed] Elena Babatsouli, David Ingram, Chania, Crete: Institute of Monolingual and Bilingual Speech , 2015, p. 40-46Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Acquired neurogenic communication disorders can affect language, speech, or both. Although neurogenic speech disorders have been researched for a considerable time, much of this work has been restricted to a few languages (mainly English, with German, French, Japanese and Chinese also represented). Further, the work has concentrated on monolingual speakers. In this account, I aim to outline the main acquired speech disorders, and give examples of research into multilingual aspects of this topic. The various types of acquired neurogenic speech disorders support a tripartite analysis of normal speech production. Dysarthria (of varying sub - types) is a disorder of the neural pathways and muscle activity: the implementation of the motor plans for speech. Apraxia of speech on the other hand is a disorder of compilation of those motor plans (seen through the fact that novel utterances are disordered, while often formulaic utterances are not). Aphasia (at least when it affects speech rather than just language) manifests as a disorder at the phonological level; for example, paraphasias disrupt the normal ordering of segments, and jargon aphasias affect both speech sound inventories and the link between sound and meaning. I will illustrate examples of various acquired neurogenic speech dis orders in multilingual speakers drawn from recent literature. We will conclude by considering an example of jargon aphasia produced by a previously bilingual speaker (that is, bilingual before the acquired neurological damage). This example consists of non - perseverative non - word jargon, produced by a Louisiana French - English bilingual woman with aphasia. The client’s jargon has internal systematicity and these systematic properties show overlaps with both the French and English phonological system and structure. Therefore, while she does not have access to the lexicon of either language, it would seem that she accesses both the French and English phonological systems.

  • 7.
    Ball, Martin J.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Principles of clinical phonology: theoretical approaches2016 (ed. 1)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Those working on the description of disordered speech are bound to be also involved with clinical phonology to some extent. This is because interpreting the speech signal is only the first step to an analysis. Describing the organization and function of a speech system is the next step. However, it is here that phonologists differ in their descriptions, as there are many current approaches in modern linguistics to undertaking phonological analyses of both normal and disordered speech.

    Much of the work in theoretical phonology of the last fifty years or so is of little use in either describing disordered speech or explaining it. This is because the dominant theoretical approach in linguists as a whole attempts elegant descriptions of linguistic data, not a psycholinguistic model of what speakers do when they speak. The latter is what is needed in clinical phonology. In this text, Martin J. Ball addresses these issues in an investigation of what principles should underlie a clinical phonology. This is not, however, simply another manual on how to do phonological analyses of disordered speech data, though examples of the application of various models of phonology to such data are provided. Nor is this a guide on how to do therapy, though a chapter on applications is included. Rather, this is an exploration of what theoretical underpinnings are best suited to describing, classifying, and treating the wide range of developmental and acquired speech disorders encountered in the speech-language pathology clinic.

  • 8.
    Ball, Martin J.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Representations and Interpretations in Celtic Studies2015In: How many rhotic phonemes does modern Welsh have? / [ed] Tomasz Paweł Czerniak, Maciej Czerniakowski, Krzysztof Jaskuła; Katolicki Uniwersytet Lubelski Jana Pawła II. Wydawnictwo, Lublin: John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin , 2015, 1, p. 49-61Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Ball, Martin J
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The rhaeadr effect in clinical phonology2014In: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076, Vol. 28, no 7-8, p. 453-462Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A distinction is drawn between Crystals bucket theory of language processing and an overflow of effects between different linguistic levels in language production. Most of the examples are drawn from Welsh (a language of mutual interest to the author and the honoree of this issue). For that reason, it is proposed that this effect is termed the rhaeadr effect (from the Welsh for waterfall). The rhaeadr effect is illustrated with the initial consonant mutation systems of Welsh and Irish, and with data from both normal phonological (and morphophonological) development and disordered speech.

  • 10.
    Ball, Martin J
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Granese, Angela
    University of Louisiana at Lafayette.
    Towards an evidence-base for /r/ therapy in English.2013In: Journal of Clinical Speech and Language Studies, ISSN 0791-5985, Vol. 20, p. 1-23Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Ball, Martin J.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Howard, Sara
    Esling, John
    Dickson, Craig
    Revisions to the extIPA and VoQS symbol sets.2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Ball, Martin J.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Muller, Nicole
    The phonemic status of the rhotics in Modern Standard Welsh.2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Ball, Martin J
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Müller, Nicole
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Editorial Material2014In: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076, Vol. 28, no 7-8, p. 451-452Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 14.
    Ball, Martin J
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Müller, Nicole
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Editorial Material: Special Issue: Selected Papers from ICPLA 2014 in CLINICAL LINGUISTICS and PHONETICS, vol 29, issue 4, pp 247-2482015In: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 247-248Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 15.
    Ball, Martin J
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Müller, NicoleLinköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.Nelson, Ryan L.University of Louisiana at Lafayette, LA, USA.
    Handbook of qualitative research in communication disorders2014Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This volume provides a comprehensive and in-depth handbook of qualitative research in the field of communication disorders. It introduces and illustrates the wide range of qualitative paradigms that have been used in recent years to investigate various aspects of communication disorders.

    The first part of the Handbook introduces in some detail the concept of qualitative research and its application to communication disorders, and describes the main qualitative research approaches. The contributions are forward-looking rather than merely giving an overview of their topic. The second part illustrates these approaches through a series of case studies of different communication disorders using qualitative methods of research.

    This Handbook is an essential resource for senior undergraduate and graduate students, researchers and practitioners, in communication disorders and related fields.

  • 16.
    Ball, Martin J
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rutter, Ben
    University of Sheffield, UK.
    Kroll, Tobias
    Texas Tech University, USA.
    Interactional phonetics: background and examples.2014In: Handbook of qualitative research in communication disorders / [ed] Martin J. Ball, Nicole Müller, and Ryan L. Nelson, New York: Psychology Press, 2014, p. 311-328Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Code, Chris
    et al.
    University of Exeter.
    Ball, Martin
    University of Lousiana at Lafayette, Lafayette, LA, USA.
    Tree, Jeremy
    University of Swansea.
    Dawe, Karen
    Bristol University.
    The effects of initiation, termination and inhibition impairments on speech rate in a case of progressive nonfluent aphasia with progressive apraxia of speech with frontotemporal degeneration2013In: Journal of Neurolinguistics, ISSN 0911-6044, E-ISSN 1873-8052, Vol. 26, no 6, p. 602-618Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent research into nonfluent forms of primary progressive aphasia and progressive apraxia of speech has highlighted the importance of speech rate as a diagnostic feature. We describe detailed investigation and comparison of speech rate (latencies and utterance length in single word/nonword production and speech rate in connected speech) on a range of experimental tasks in a man with progressive speech deterioration of 10 years duration from Pick's Disease. C.S. had a progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA) together with progressive apraxia of speech (pAOS) with an absence of significant interlectual, phonological or semantic impairment. C.S. showed increased latencies but reduced word length compared to matched controls on single word and nonword repetition and reading, an absence of a syllabic length effect in either single word/nonword tasks or connected speech tasks. Further investigation suggested that underlying his speech production impairments were problems with speech initiation, termination and inhibition. Most impairments worsened with progression over a 12-month period. Results provide support for the view that progressive apraxia of speech presents differently to apraxia of speech following stroke and, especially at advanced stages, involves deterioration in more central and supportive cognitive processes.

  • 18.
    Fletcher, Paul
    et al.
    University College Cork, Ireland.
    Ball, MartinLinköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.Crystal, DavidUniversity of Bangor, UK.
    Profiling grammar: more languages of LARSP2016Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book brings together twelve previously unpublished language profiles based on the original Language Assessment, Remediation and Screening Procedure (LARSP). The languages featured are: Afrikaans, Bulgarian, Cantonese, Finnish, Greek, Hindi, Hungarian, Japanese, Kannada, Korean, Malay and Swedish. Each chapter includes a grammatical sketch of the language, details of typical language development in speakers of the language, as well as a description of and justification for the profile itself. The book will be an invaluable resource for speech-language pathologists and others wishing to analyse the grammatical abilities of individuals speaking one of these languages. This new collection complements a previous book in this series on the same theme: Assessing Grammar: The Languages of LARSP (Ball et al., 2012,).

  • 19.
    Lockenvitz, Sarah
    et al.
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Missouri State University, Springfield, MO, USA.
    Kuecker, Karrie
    Department of Communicative Disorders, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Lafayette, LA, USA.
    Ball, Martin J
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Evidence for the distinction between ‘consonantal-/r/’ and ‘vocalic-/r/’ in American English2015In: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076, Vol. 29, no 8-10, p. 613-622Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examine the distinction between “consonantal-r” and “vocalic-r” in American English, terms encountered in the speech pathology literature but rarely in phonetic studies. We review evidence from phonetics, phonology and therapy, and describe our own study which measured percentage rhoticity in pre- and post-vocalic /r/. We suggest that the evidence supports a view that there is no more variation between pre-vocalic and post-vocalic /r/ than found in many other consonants. We also evaluate the different transcription traditions for post-vocalic /r/ in American English (as a consonant or a vowel), and describe a preliminary study demonstrating that these transcriptions are not equivalent, and denote different realisations.

  • 20.
    Müller, Nicole
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ball, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Clinical linguistics (and phonetics)2015In: Children's speech sound disorders / [ed] Caroline Bowen, Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell, 2015, 2, p. 28-31Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Müller, Nicole
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ball, Martin J.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Editorial Material: NICOLE MULLER and MARTIN J. BALL in CLINICAL LINGUISTICS and PHONETICS, vol 29, issue 8-10, pp 573-5742015In: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076, Vol. 29, no 8-10, p. 573-574Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 22.
    Müller, Nicole
    et al.
    University of Louisiana, Lafayette, USA.
    Ball, Martin J.University of Louisiana, Lafayette, USA.
    Research methods in clinical linguistics and phonetics: A practical guide2013Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The only volume to offer hands-on information about the wide range of research philosophies, methods and tools used across linguistics, phonetics, and speech science, as applied to disordered speech and language. • Covers core topics for students undertaking their own research, including experimental and qualitative methods, sociolinguistics, corpus construction and analysis, data recording, transcription and digital analysis of speech, and speech imaging. • Considers the research ethics associated with working with people who have speech, language or other communication difficulties. • Includes a detailed discussion of the dissemination of research results, and advice on the writing of theses and dissertations, and on the writing and publishing of journal articles, as well the peer review process. • Offers students and researchers from a variety of entry points – such as linguistics, education, psychology, and speech pathology – an introduction to the scope of research in clinical linguistics and phonetics, and a practical guide to this interdisciplinary field

  • 23.
    Müller, Nicole
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ball, Martin J.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Rhotic Phonemes in Modern Standard Welsh: The effect of Welsh-English Bilingualism?2015Conference paper (Refereed)
1 - 23 of 23
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