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  • 1.
    Dasenaki, Marilena
    et al.
    Univ Athens, Greece.
    Papatzani, Maria
    Univ Athens, Greece.
    Gounari, Eleni
    Kings Coll Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Magnisali, Paraskevi
    Univ Athens, Greece.
    Papadopoulou-Marketou, Nektaria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology. Univ Athens, Greece.
    Kanaka-Gantenbein, Christina
    Univ Athens, Greece.
    Moutsatsou, Paraskevi
    Univ Athens, Greece.
    Thomaidis, Nikolaos S.
    Univ Athens, Greece.
    Simultaneous Determination of Free Cortisol, Cortisone and their Tetrahydrometabolites in Urine by Single Solvent Extraction and Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry2019In: Analytical Letters, ISSN 0003-2719, E-ISSN 1532-236XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A fast, efficient and low-cost high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry methodology was developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of free urinary cortisone, cortisol and their tetrahydro-metabolites. The developed method comprises a simple liquid-liquid extraction with CH2Cl2, followed by reversed-phase liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) with electrospray ionization (ESI) in positive mode. The baseline chromatographic separation of the analytes, including the stereoisomers tetrahydrocortisol (THF) and allo-THF, was achieved on a Hypersil Gold C-18 column with a mobile phase consisting of 0.05%v/v formic acid in water-acetonitrile, using a gradient elution program. The influence of the mobile phase composition and the ESI parameters on the sensitivity of the method was extensively studied. Sample preparation was also optimized, testing two techniques: solid phase extraction (SPE) and liquid-liquid extraction (LLE). Recoveries ranged from 74.7% (a-THF) to 93.5% (cortisol) and the method limits of detection (MLD) ranged from 0.34 ng mL(-1) (cortisol) to 1.37 ng mL(-1) (THF). Intra- and inter-day coefficient of variation of the assay varied from1.5% (allo-THF) to 13% (tetrahydrocortisone) and from 3.6% (allo-THF) to 14.9% (tetrahydrocortisone), respectively. The method was applied for the analysis of urine samples from 53 healthy individuals with a mean age of 13.96 years in order to estimate the concentration of the five corticosteroids and the ratio of the metabolites. Associations between urinary cortisol/cortisone and serum cortisol/cortisone values were also characterized.

  • 2.
    Papadopoulou-Marketou, Nektaria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology. University of Athens, Greece.
    Chrousos, George P.
    University of Athens, Greece.
    Kanaka-Gantenbein, Christina
    University of Athens, Greece.
    Diabetic nephropathy in type 1 diabetes: a review of early natural history, pathogenesis, and diagnosis2017In: Diabetes/Metabolism Research Reviews, ISSN 1520-7552, E-ISSN 1520-7560, Vol. 33, no 2, article id e2841Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Diabetic nephropathy constitutes a devastating complication in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, and its diagnosis is traditionally based on microalbuminuria. The aim of this review is to update through the medical literature the suggested early natural course of diabetic nephropathy, the theories behind the pathways of its pathogenesis, and its diagnosis. Poor glycemic control, dyslipidemia, smoking, advanced glycation end products, and environmental and genetic clues play an important role in the development of diabetic nephropathy. Microalbuminuria has been traditionally considered as a primary early marker of microvascular complication unraveling the risk for progress to the advanced stages of chronic kidney disease, but because of our inability to make an early diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy in young patients as well as nonalbuminuric diabetic nephropathy, recently, other additional markers of renal injury like serum and urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, chitinase-3-like protein 1, cystatin C, and plasma growth differentiation factor 15 have been proposed to unmask early renal dysfunction, even before microalbuminuria supervenes. Copyright (C) 2016 John Wiley amp; Sons, Ltd.

  • 3.
    Papadopoulou-Marketou, Nektaria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology. University of Athens, Greece.
    Kanaka-Gantenbein, Christina
    University of Athens, Greece.
    Marketos, Nikolaos
    Henri Dunant Hospital, Greece.
    Chrousos, George P.
    University of Athens, Greece.
    Papassotiriou, Ioannis
    Aghia Sophia Childrens Hospital, Greece.
    Biomarkers of diabetic nephropathy: A 2017 update2017In: Critical reviews in clinical laboratory sciences, ISSN 1040-8363, E-ISSN 1549-781X, Vol. 54, no 5, p. 326-342Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN), also named diabetic kidney disease (DKD), is a devastating complication in patients with both type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus (T1D and T2D) and its diagnosis has been traditionally based on the presence of micro-albuminuria (MA). The aim of this article is to update, through review of the relevant medical literature, the most promising biomarkers for early DKD detection. MA has historically been employed as an early marker of microvascular complications, indicating risk for advanced CKD. However, due to the inability of MA to adequately predict DKD, especially in young patients or in non-albuminuric DKD, additional biomarkers of glomerular and/or tubular injury have been proposed to uncover early renal dysfunction and structural lesions, even before MA occurs. Defining new predictive biomarkers to use alongside urinary albumin excretion (UAE) during the initial stages of DKD would provide a window of opportunity for preventive and/or therapeutic interventions to prevent or delay the onset of irreversible long-term complications and to improve outcomes by minimizing the rates of severe cardio-renal morbidity and mortality in DKD patients.

  • 4.
    Papadopoulou-Marketou, Nektaria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology. University of Athens, Greece.
    Margeli, Alexandra
    Aghia Sophia Childrens Hospital, Greece.
    Papassotiriou, Ioannis
    Aghia Sophia Childrens Hospital, Greece.
    Chrousos, George P.
    University of Athens, Greece.
    Kanaka-Gantenbein, Christina
    University of Athens, Greece.
    Wahlberg Topp, Jeanette
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    NGAL as an Early Predictive Marker of Diabetic Nephropathy in Children and Young Adults with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus2017In: Journal of Diabetes Research, ISSN 2314-6745, E-ISSN 2314-6753, article id 7526919Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims. Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is often associated with early microvascular complications. Previous studies demonstrated that increased systolic (SAP) and diastolic arterial blood pressures (DAP) are linked to microvascular morbidity in T1D. The aim of the study was to investigate the predictive role of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) in unravelling early cardiorenal dysfunction in T1D. Methods. Two T1D patient groups participating in two-centre prospective cohorts were studied. Group A consisted of 57 participants aged 13.9 years (SD: 3.1) and group B consisted of 59 patients aged 28.0 years (SD: 4.4). Forty-nine healthy children [age: 10.5 years (SD: 6.6)] and 18 healthy adults [age 27.7 years (SD: 4.2)] served as controls. Serum concentrations of NGAL (ELISA) were determined, and SAP and DAP were examined (SAP and DAP also expressed as z-scores in the younger group). Results. NGAL correlated positively with SAP in both patient groups (P = 0 020 and P = 0 031, resp.) and SAP z-score (P = 0 009) (group A) and negatively with eGFR in both groups (P amp;lt; 0 001 and P amp;lt; 0 001, resp.). Conclusions. NGAL may be proposed as a biomarker of early renal dysfunction even in nonalbuminuric T1D patients, since it was strongly associated with renal function decline and increasing systolic arterial pressure even at prehypertensive range in people with T1D, in a broad age range.

  • 5.
    Papadopoulou-Marketou, Nektaria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology. National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Aghia Sophia Children's Hospital, Athens, Greece..
    Paschou, Stavroula A
    National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Aghia Sophia Children's Hospital, Athens, Greece...
    Marketos, Nikolaos
    Department of Internal Medicine, Medical Center of Athens, Athens, Greece..
    Adamidi, Sofia
    Department of Internal Medicine, Medical Center of Athens, Athens, Greece.
    Adamidis, Sotiris
    Department of Internal Medicine, Medical Center of Athens, Athens, Greece.
    Kanaka-Gantenbein, Christina
    National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Aghia Sophia Children's Hospital, Athens, Greece..
    Diabetic nephropathy in type 1 diabetes2018In: Minerva Medica, ISSN 0026-4806, E-ISSN 1827-1669, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 218-228Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) also named diabetic kidney disease (DN) is one of the leading causes of mortality in people with diabetes. The aim of this review is to update the medical literature, the theories behind its early natural history, the pathways of its pathogenesis, its diagnosis and treatment. Poor glycemic control, hyperlipidemia, smoking, oxidative stress, accumulation of advanced glycated end products, environmental, genetic and epigenetic factors play an important role in the pathophysiological development of DN. Microalbuminuria has been traditionally used as the primary early diagnostic marker of microvascular complication unraveling the risk for progress to severe cardiorenal outcomes, but its prognostic role has been recently debated. The disease often leads to end-stage renal disease and it is often associated with major cardiovascular outcomes. Its early diagnosis is crucial for the patients in order to have a chance for proper treatment.

  • 6.
    Paschou, Stavroula A
    et al.
    Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes, "Aghia Sophia" Hospital, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens - Faculty of Medicine, Athens, Greece.
    Papadopoulou-Marketou, Nektaria
    Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes, "Aghia Sophia" Hospital, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens - Faculty of Medicine, Athens, Greece.
    Chrousos, George
    Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes, "Aghia Sophia" Hospital, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens - Faculty of Medicine, Athens, Greece.
    Kanaka-Gantenbein, Christina
    Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes, "Aghia Sophia" Hospital, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens - Faculty of Medicine, Athens, Greece.
    On type 1 diabetes mellitus pathogenesis2017In: Endocrine Connections, ISSN 2049-3614, E-ISSN 2049-3614, article id EC-17-0347Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) results from the autoimmune destruction of β cells of the endocrine pancreas. Pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes mellitus is different from that of type 2 diabetes mellitus, where both insulin resistance and reduced secretion of insulin by the β cells play a synergistic role. We will present genetic, environmental and immunologic factors that destroy β cells of the endocrine pancreas and lead to insulin deficiency. The process of autoimmune destruction takes place in genetically susceptible individuals under the triggering effect of one or more environmental factors and usually progresses over a period of many months to years, during which period patients are asymptomatic and euglycemic, but positive for relevant autoantibodies. Symptomatic hyperglycemia and frank diabetes occurs after a long latency period, which reflects the large percentage of β cells that need to be destroyed before overt diabetes become evident.

1 - 6 of 6
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