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  • 1.
    Brandén, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Birkelund, Gunn Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. University of Oslo, Oslo, Sweden.
    Szulkin, Ryszard
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ethnic Composition of Schools and Students’ Educational Outcomes: Evidence from Sweden2019In: The international migration review, ISSN 0197-9183, E-ISSN 1747-7379, Vol. 53, no 2, p. 486-517Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examine the impact of ethnic school composition on students’ educational outcomes using Swedish population register data. We add to the literature on the consequences of ethnic school segregation for native and immigrant students by distinguishing social interaction effects from selection and environmental effects through one- and two-way fixed effects models. Our findings demonstrate that native and immigrant students’ grades are relatively unaffected by social interaction effects stemming from the proportion of immigrant schoolmates. However, we find nontrivial effects on their eligibility for upper secondary school. Immigrants’ educational outcomes are weakly positively affected by the proportion of co-ethnics in school.

  • 2.
    Brandén, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department of Sociology, Stockholm University.
    Bygren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department of Sociology, Stockholm University / Institute for Futures Studies, Stockholm.
    School Choice and School Segregation: Lessons from Sweden’s School Voucher System2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to investigate how school choice opportunities affect school segregation. Theoretically, free school choice may affect school segregation in different directions, depending on its design, baseline residential segregation, and underlying preferences for separation. Our test case is the Swedish voucher-based free school choice system, and we utilize Swedish population register data that include 13 cohorts of ninth graders, with geocoded information on schools, their socioeconomic and ethnic composition, and the composition of the neighborhoods surrounding the schools. To identify causal effects of school choice opportunities, we treat fixed school areas as the unit of analysis, and we follow these over time to net out time-invariant area-level confounders. Within-area panel estimates indicate segregation based on both ethnic and educational background to be strongly affected by school choice opportunities. Increased choice opportunities lead to increased school segregation, to a large extent because of a higher propensity among native children and children with well-educated parents to attend newly established (non-public) independent schools. The segregating impact of school choice opportunities is uniform across school areas with different socioeconomic and ethnic profiles, but school segregation increases much more in residentially integrated areas as a consequence of an increase in school choice options. The lesson to be learned from the Swedish case is that large scale school voucher systems need to be designed to include mechanisms that counteract the strong segregating forces that such systems appear to produce.

  • 3.
    Brandén, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Haandrikman, Karen
    Department of Human Geography, Stockholm University.
    Who Moves to Whom? Gender Differences in the Distance Moved to a Shared Residence2019In: European Journal of Population, ISSN 0168-6577, E-ISSN 1572-9885, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 435-458Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the migration of couples and families is well examined, the migration that occurs at the start of co-residence has only been minimally studied. This study examines (1) whether women move more often and move over longer distances at the start of co-residence and (2) whether gender differences (if any) stem from compositional differences between women and men, such as gender differences in ties, or if they are the consequence of the within-couple distribution of bargaining power. The analyses are performed on Swedish population register data from 1991 to 2008, including longitudinal information on the residence of all couples who either married or had a child as cohabitants in 2008, backtracking them to the year of union formation. The results indicate that women are more prone to move for the sake of their male partner in the process of union formation than vice versa. If partners lived in close proximity prior to co-residence, the woman’s increased likelihood of moving and longer distance moved is nearly completely explained by power imbalances in the couple. Gender differences in ties only have minor importance in explaining gender differences in these types of migration patterns. If partners lived far apart prior to co-residence, gender differences are particularly pronounced. These differences remain after adjusting for the two partners’ relative resources. We contribute to the family migration literature by suggesting that women’s higher propensity to move and their longer distance moved are indications that even couples’ decisions at the start of co-residence are made in favour of the man’s career.

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