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  • 1.
    Bustamante, Mariana
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Gupta, Vikas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Forsberg, Daniel
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Sectra, Linköping, Sweden.
    Carlhäll, Carljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Automated multi-atlas segmentation of cardiac 4D flow MRI2018In: Medical Image Analysis, ISSN 1361-8415, E-ISSN 1361-8423, Vol. 49, p. 128-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Four-dimensional (4D) flow magnetic resonance imaging (4D Flow MRI) enables acquisition of time-resolved three-directional velocity data in the entire heart and all major thoracic vessels. The segmentation of these tissues is typically performed using semi-automatic methods. Some of which primarily rely on the velocity data and result in a segmentation of the vessels only during the systolic phases. Other methods, mostly applied on the heart, rely on separately acquired balanced Steady State Free Precession (b-SSFP) MR images, after which the segmentations are superimposed on the 4D Flow MRI. While b-SSFP images typically cover the whole cardiac cycle and have good contrast, they suffer from a number of problems, such as large slice thickness, limited coverage of the cardiac anatomy, and being prone to displacement errors caused by respiratory motion. To address these limitations we propose a multi-atlas segmentation method, which relies only on 4D Flow MRI data, to automatically generate four-dimensional segmentations that include the entire thoracic cardiovascular system present in these datasets. The approach was evaluated on 4D Flow MR datasets from a cohort of 27 healthy volunteers and 83 patients with mildly impaired systolic left-ventricular function. Comparison of manual and automatic segmentations of the cardiac chambers at end-systolic and end-diastolic timeframes showed agreements comparable to those previously reported for automatic segmentation methods of b-SSFP MR images. Furthermore, automatic segmentation of the entire thoracic cardiovascular system improves visualization of 4D Flow MRI and facilitates computation of hemodynamic parameters.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-08-13 11:32
  • 2.
    Gupta, Vikas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Lantz, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Henriksson, Lilian
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Automated three-dimensional tracking of the left ventricular myocardium in time-resolved and dose-modulated cardiac CT images using deformable image registration2018In: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, ISSN 1934-5925, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 139-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Assessment of myocardial deformation from time-resolved cardiac computed tomography (4D CT) would augment the already available functional information from such an examination without incurring any additional costs. A deformable image registration (DIR) based approach is proposed to allow fast and automatic myocardial tracking in clinical 4D CT images.

    Methods Left ventricular myocardial tissue displacement through a cardiac cycle was tracked using a B-spline transformation based DIR. Gradient of such displacements allowed Lagrangian strain estimation with respect to end-diastole in clinical 4D CT data from ten subjects with suspected coronary artery disease. Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), point-to-curve error (PTC), and tracking error were used to assess the tracking accuracy. Wilcoxon signed rank test provided significance of tracking errors. Topology preservation was verified using Jacobian of the deformation. Reliability of estimated strains and torsion (normalized twist angle) was tested in subjects with normal function by comparing them with normal strain in the literature.

    Results Comparison with manual tracking showed high accuracy (DSC: 0.99± 0.05; PTC: 0.56mm± 0.47 mm) and resulted in determinant(Jacobian) > 0 for all subjects, indicating preservation of topology. Average radial (0.13 mm), angular (0.64) and longitudinal (0.10 mm) tracking errors for the entire cohort were not significant (p > 0.9). For patients with normal function, average strain [circumferential, radial, longitudinal] and peak torsion estimates were: [-23.5%, 31.1%, −17.2%] and 7.22°, respectively. These estimates were in conformity with the reported normal ranges in the existing literature.

    Conclusions Accurate wall deformation tracking and subsequent strain estimation are feasible with the proposed method using only routine time-resolved 3D cardiac CT.

  • 3.
    Lantz, Jonas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Gupta, Vikas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Henriksson, Lilian
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Carlhäll, Carl-Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Impact of Pulmonary Venous Inflow on Cardiac Flow Simulations: Comparison with In Vivo 4D Flow MRI2019In: Annals of Biomedical Engineering, ISSN 0090-6964, E-ISSN 1573-9686, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 413-424Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Blood flow simulations are making their way into the clinic, and much attention is given to estimation of fractional flow reserve in coronary arteries. Intracardiac blood flow simulations also show promising results, and here the flow field is expected to depend on the pulmonary venous (PV) flow rates. In the absence of in vivo measurements, the distribution of the flow from the individual PVs is often unknown and typically assumed. Here, we performed intracardiac blood flow simulations based on time-resolved computed tomography on three patients, and investigated the effect of the distribution of PV flow rate on the flow field in the left atrium and ventricle. A design-of-experiment approach was used, where PV flow rates were varied in a systematic manner. In total 20 different simulations were performed per patient, and compared to in vivo 4D flow MRI measurements. Results were quantified by kinetic energy, mitral valve velocity profiles and root-mean-square errors of velocity. While large differences in atrial flow were found for varying PV inflow distributions, the effect on ventricular flow was negligible, due to a regularizing effect by mitral valve. Equal flow rate through all PVs most closely resembled in vivo measurements and is recommended in the absence of a priori knowledge.

  • 4.
    Lantz, Jonas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Gupta, Vikas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Henriksson, Lilian
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Carlhäll, Carljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Intracardiac Flow at 4D CT: Comparison with 4D Flow MRI2018In: Radiology, ISSN 0033-8419, E-ISSN 1527-1315, Vol. 289, no 1, p. 51-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    To investigate four-dimensional (4D) flow CT for the assessment of intracardiac blood flow patterns as compared with 4D flow MRI.

    Materials and Methods

    This prospective study acquired coronary CT angiography and 4D flow MRI data between February and December 2016 in a cohort of 12 participants (age range, 36–74 years; mean age, 57 years; seven men [age range, 36–74 years; mean age, 57 years] and five women [age range, 52–73 years; mean age, 64 years]). Flow simulations based solely on CT-derived cardiac anatomy were assessed together with 4D flow MRI measurements. Flow patterns, flow rates, stroke volume, kinetic energy, and flow components were quantified for both techniques and were compared by using linear regression.

    Results

    Cardiac flow patterns obtained by using 4D flow CT were qualitatively similar to 4D flow MRI measurements, as graded by three independent observers. The Cohen κ score was used to assess intraobserver variability (0.83, 0.79, and 0.70) and a paired Wilcoxon rank-sum test showed no significant change (P > .05) between gradings. Peak flow rate and stroke volumes between 4D flow MRI measurements and 4D flow CT measurements had high correlation (r = 0.98 and r = 0.81, respectively; P < .05 for both). Integrated kinetic energy quantified at peak systole correlated well (r = 0.95, P < .05), while kinetic energy levels at early and late filling showed no correlation. Flow component analysis showed high correlation for the direct and residual components, respectively (r = 0.93, P < .05 and r = 0.87, P < .05), while the retained and delayed components showed no correlation.

    Conclusion

    Four-dimensional flow CT produced qualitatively and quantitatively similar intracardiac blood flow patterns compared with the current reference standard, four-dimensional flow MRI.

1 - 4 of 4
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