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  • 1.
    Anskär, Eva
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Primärvårdscentrum, Vårdcentralen Mantorp.
    Time flies in primary care: a study on time utilisation and perceived psychosocial work environment2019Licentiatavhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Time utilisation among primary care professionals has been affected by structural changes and reorganisation performed in Swedish primary care over several decades. The work situation is complex with a heavy administrative work load. The overall aim with this thesis was to describe time utilisation among staff in Swedish primary care and to investigate associations with perceived psychosocial work environment and legitimacy of work tasks.

    Methods: A multicentre, descriptive, cross-sectional study design was used including all staff categories in primary care i.e. registered nurses, primary care physicians, care administrators, nurse assistants and allied professionals (physiotherapists, occupational therapists, psychologists, counsellors, dieticians and chiropodists) at eleven primary care centres located in southeast Sweden. The data collection consisted of a questionnaire including a subjective estimate of workload, the Bern Illegitimate Tasks Scale (BITS) and the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ). Also, a time study was performed, where the participants reported their work time based on three main categories; direct patient work tasks, indirect patient work tasks and other work tasks, each with a number of subcategories. The participants reported time spent on different work tasks, day by day during two separate weeks. Response rates were 75% for the questionnaire and 79% for the time study.

    Results: In paper I the time study revealed that health professionals at the primary care centres spent 37% of their work time with direct patient work tasks. All professions estimated a higher proportion of time spent directly with patients than they reported in the time study. Physicians scored highest on the psychosocial scales of quantitative demands, stress and role conflicts. The proportion of administrative work tasks was associated with role conflicts, the more administration the more role conflicts. Findings in paper II were that more than a quarter of physicians scored above the cut-off value for BITS regarding unnecessary work tasks, which was significantly more than the proportion observed in all other professions in the survey. Across all staff groups, a perception of having to perform illegitimate work tasks was associated with experiencing negative psychosocial work environment and with high proportion of administrative-related work tasks.

    Conclusions: Swedish primary care staff spend a limited proportion of their work time directly with patients and primary care physicians perceive the psychosocial work environment in negative terms to a greater extent than all other staff members. Allocation of work tasks has an influence on the perceived psychosocial work environment. The perception of having a large number of illegitimate work tasks affects the psychosocial work environment negatively, which might influence the perception the staff have of their professional roles. Perception of high proportion of unreasonable work tasks is associated with a high proportion of non-patient-related administration.

    This thesis illuminates the importance of decision makers thoroughly considering the distribution and allocation of non-patient related work tasks among staff in primary care, in order to achieve efficient use of personnel resources and favourable working conditions. Hopefully, the results of this study will contribute to further development of primary care so that medical competence will benefit patients as much as possible.

    Delarbeid
    1. Time utilization and perceived psychosocial work environment among staff in Swedish primary care settings
    Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Time utilization and perceived psychosocial work environment among staff in Swedish primary care settings
    2018 (engelsk)Inngår i: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 18, artikkel-id 166Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Over the past decades, reorganizations and structural changes in Swedish primary care have affected time utilization among health care professionals. Consequently, increases in administrative tasks have substantially reduced the time available for face-to-face consultations. This study examined how work-time was utilized and the association between work time utilization and the perceived psychosocial work environment in Swedish primary care settings. Methods: This descriptive, multicentre, cross-sectional study was performed in 2014-2015. Data collection began with questionnaire. In the first section, respondents were asked to estimate how their workload was distributed between patients (direct and indirect patient work) and other work tasks. The questionnaire also comprised the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire, which assessed the psychosocial work environment. Next a time study was conducted where the participants reported their work-time based on three main categories: direct patient-related work, indirect patient-related work, and other work tasks. Each main category had a number of subcategories. The participants recorded the time spent (minutes) on each work task per hour, every day, for two separate weeks. Eleven primary care centres located in southeast Sweden participated. All professionals were asked to participate (n = 441), including registered nurses, primary care physicians, care administrators, nurse assistants, and allied professionals. Response rates were 75% and 79% for the questionnaires and the time study, respectively. Results: All health professionals allocated between 30.9% - 37.2% of their work-time to each main category: direct patient work, indirect patient work, and other work. All professionals estimated a higher proportion of time spent in direct patient work than they reported in the time study. Physicians scored highest on the psychosocial scales of quantitative demands, stress, and role conflicts. Among allied professionals, the proportion of work-time spent on administrative tasks was associated with more role conflicts. Younger staff perceived more adverse working conditions than older staff. Conclusions: This study indicated that Swedish primary care staff spent a limited proportion of their work time directly with patients. PCPs seemed to perceive their work environment in negative terms to a greater extent than other staff members. This study showed that work task allocations influenced the perceived psychosocial work environment.

    sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
    BIOMED CENTRAL LTD, 2018
    Emneord
    Work-time allocation; Primary care; Occupational health; Organization and administration; Stress
    HSV kategori
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-147117 (URN)10.1186/s12913-018-2948-6 (DOI)000426855700008 ()29514637 (PubMedID)
    Merknad

    Funding Agencies|Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden; Sodertorn University Sweden

    Tilgjengelig fra: 2018-04-20 Laget: 2018-04-20 Sist oppdatert: 2019-05-01
    2. Legitimacy of work tasks, psychosocial work environment, and time utilization among primary care staff in Sweden
    Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Legitimacy of work tasks, psychosocial work environment, and time utilization among primary care staff in Sweden
    2019 (engelsk)Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, E-ISSN 1502-7724, s. 1-8Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Epub ahead of print
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Primary care staff faces a complex work environment including a heavy administrative work load and perceive some work tasks as illegitimate. This study aimed to elucidate associations between the perceived legitimacy of work tasks, the psychosocial work environment, and the utilization of work time among Swedish primary care staff.

    Design and setting: The study was designed as a multicenter study involving all staff categories, i.e. registered nurses, primary care physicians, care administrators, nurse assistants and allied professionals, at eleven primary care centers in Sweden.

    Subjects: Participants completed the Bern Illegitimate Tasks Scale and the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire. They also recorded time spent on all work tasks, day by day during two separate weeks.

    Main outcome measures and results: More than a quarter (27%) of primary care physicians perceived a high proportion of unnecessary work tasks. After adjusting for profession, age and gender, the perception of having to perform unreasonable work tasks was positively associated with experiencing role conflicts and with the proportion of organization-related administration and service work tasks.

    Conclusion: Across all staff groups, the perception of unreasonable work tasks was more pronounced among staff with a high proportion of non-patient related administration. Also, the perception of having to perform a large amount of illegitimate work tasks affected the psychosocial work environment negatively, which might influence staffs perception of their professional roles. These results illuminate the importance of decision makers to thoroughly consider the distribution and allocation of non-patient related work tasks among staff in primary care.Key pointsWe observed an interaction between perception of having a large proportion of illegitimate work tasks and impaired psychosocial work environment. • More than a quarter of the primary care physicians perceived a high proportion of unnecessary work tasks.• Across all staff groups, performing unreasonable work tasks was associated with an experience of having role conflicts.• Across all staff groups, a perception of performing unreasonable work tasks was associated with the proportion of non-patient related administrative work tasks.

    sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
    Taylor & Francis, 2019
    Emneord
    Primary care, occupational health, organization and administration, professional roles
    HSV kategori
    Identifikatorer
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-161649 (URN)10.1080/02813432.2019.1684014 (DOI)000494011100001 ()31682152 (PubMedID)
    Merknad

    Funding agencies: Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden; Sodertorn University Sweden

    Tilgjengelig fra: 2019-11-05 Laget: 2019-11-05 Sist oppdatert: 2019-11-19bibliografisk kontrollert
  • 2.
    Anskär, Eva
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Lindberg, Malou
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland, Forsknings- och utvecklingsenheten för Närsjukvården i Östergötland.
    Falk, Magnus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Primärvårdscentrum, Vårdcentralen Kärna, Linköping.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Ledningsstab Region Östergötland, Enheten för forskningsstöd.
    Legitimacy of work tasks, psychosocial work environment, and time utilization among primary care staff in Sweden2019Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, E-ISSN 1502-7724, s. 1-8Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Primary care staff faces a complex work environment including a heavy administrative work load and perceive some work tasks as illegitimate. This study aimed to elucidate associations between the perceived legitimacy of work tasks, the psychosocial work environment, and the utilization of work time among Swedish primary care staff.

    Design and setting: The study was designed as a multicenter study involving all staff categories, i.e. registered nurses, primary care physicians, care administrators, nurse assistants and allied professionals, at eleven primary care centers in Sweden.

    Subjects: Participants completed the Bern Illegitimate Tasks Scale and the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire. They also recorded time spent on all work tasks, day by day during two separate weeks.

    Main outcome measures and results: More than a quarter (27%) of primary care physicians perceived a high proportion of unnecessary work tasks. After adjusting for profession, age and gender, the perception of having to perform unreasonable work tasks was positively associated with experiencing role conflicts and with the proportion of organization-related administration and service work tasks.

    Conclusion: Across all staff groups, the perception of unreasonable work tasks was more pronounced among staff with a high proportion of non-patient related administration. Also, the perception of having to perform a large amount of illegitimate work tasks affected the psychosocial work environment negatively, which might influence staffs perception of their professional roles. These results illuminate the importance of decision makers to thoroughly consider the distribution and allocation of non-patient related work tasks among staff in primary care.Key pointsWe observed an interaction between perception of having a large proportion of illegitimate work tasks and impaired psychosocial work environment. • More than a quarter of the primary care physicians perceived a high proportion of unnecessary work tasks.• Across all staff groups, performing unreasonable work tasks was associated with an experience of having role conflicts.• Across all staff groups, a perception of performing unreasonable work tasks was associated with the proportion of non-patient related administrative work tasks.

  • 3.
    Anskär, Eva
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Primärvårdscentrum, Vårdcentralen Mantorp. Region Östergötland, Regionstyrelsen, Enheten för forskningsstöd Ledningsstaben.
    Lindberg, Malou
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Närsjukvården i västra Östergötland.
    Falk, Magnus
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Primärvårdscentrum, Vårdcentralen Kärna, Linköping.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, Avdelningen för samhällsmedicin. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Regionstyrelsen, Enheten för forskningsstöd Ledningsstaben.
    Time utilization and perceived psychosocial work environment among staff in Swedish primary care settings2018Inngår i: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 18, artikkel-id 166Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Over the past decades, reorganizations and structural changes in Swedish primary care have affected time utilization among health care professionals. Consequently, increases in administrative tasks have substantially reduced the time available for face-to-face consultations. This study examined how work-time was utilized and the association between work time utilization and the perceived psychosocial work environment in Swedish primary care settings. Methods: This descriptive, multicentre, cross-sectional study was performed in 2014-2015. Data collection began with questionnaire. In the first section, respondents were asked to estimate how their workload was distributed between patients (direct and indirect patient work) and other work tasks. The questionnaire also comprised the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire, which assessed the psychosocial work environment. Next a time study was conducted where the participants reported their work-time based on three main categories: direct patient-related work, indirect patient-related work, and other work tasks. Each main category had a number of subcategories. The participants recorded the time spent (minutes) on each work task per hour, every day, for two separate weeks. Eleven primary care centres located in southeast Sweden participated. All professionals were asked to participate (n = 441), including registered nurses, primary care physicians, care administrators, nurse assistants, and allied professionals. Response rates were 75% and 79% for the questionnaires and the time study, respectively. Results: All health professionals allocated between 30.9% - 37.2% of their work-time to each main category: direct patient work, indirect patient work, and other work. All professionals estimated a higher proportion of time spent in direct patient work than they reported in the time study. Physicians scored highest on the psychosocial scales of quantitative demands, stress, and role conflicts. Among allied professionals, the proportion of work-time spent on administrative tasks was associated with more role conflicts. Younger staff perceived more adverse working conditions than older staff. Conclusions: This study indicated that Swedish primary care staff spent a limited proportion of their work time directly with patients. PCPs seemed to perceive their work environment in negative terms to a greater extent than other staff members. This study showed that work task allocations influenced the perceived psychosocial work environment.

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