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  • 1.
    Zhou, Jiayi
    Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI).
    Beyond ʼnatural’ pressures: Chinese agriculture in the Russian Far East2018In: Routledge Handbook of Asian Borderlands / [ed] Alexander Horstmann, Martin Saxer, Alessandro Rippa, London: Routledge, 2018, p. 190-201Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter describes push-pull factors of Chinese farming in the Russian Far East, going beyond simplistic demographic explanations to unpack aspects of the region’s political economy. It traces the history and evolving modalities of post-Soviet Chinese agricultural engagement in Russia’s Far East Federal District (RFE), from Chinese laborers on Soviet state-owned and collective farms in the late 1980s to private Chinese companies, state farms, and state-owned enterprises leasing large tracts of Russian land. At present, China’s involvement in the RFE agricultural sector has expanded to the degree that their land acquisitions, directly or indirectly through joint ventures with Russians, now constitute over 20% of the region’s arable land. Chinese migration and economic activity in this borderland region is often described as stemming from the ‘natural’ pressures of demographic density, and resource differentials. But while such drivers are important, Chinese agriculture in the RFE also needs to be linked to state-promoted export of Chinese surplus labor, as well as to China’s increased political and policy focus on scaled-up ‘modern’ agriculture at home and abroad. In this regard, the RFE can be seen not only as a unique periphery or borderland economy, but also as a more general case of how China’s rural economic development and agricultural modernization is playing out in international terms.

  • 2.
    Zhou, Jiayi
    Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI), Solna, Sweden.
    Chinese agrarian capitalism in the Russian Far East2016In: Third World Quarterly, ISSN 0143-6597, E-ISSN 1360-2241, Vol. 1, no 5, p. 612-632Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chinese actors have been actively engaged in agriculture in the Russian Far East since border liberalisation, from agriculture labourers, independent farmers with small- and medium-sized plots, to capital-rich agribusinesses that cultivate farmland on a much larger scale. With the use of wage labour and other capitalised production inputs, the occurrence of economic differentiation among producers and strong profit-seeking drivers, this stands in contrast to the situation within China itself – where institutional and structural constraints still limit the development of full-blown capitalist agriculture. This article presents the first case study of this phenomenon, in comparative perspective.

  • 3.
    Zhou, Jiayi
    University of California, Berkeley, California, USA.
    The Muslim Battalions: Soviet Central Asians in the Soviet-Afghan war2012In: Journal of Slavic Military Studies, ISSN 1351-8046, E-ISSN 1556-3006, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 302-328Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article concerns the Soviet military's use of soldiers of Afghan ethnicities (Uzbek, Tajik, Turkmen, and others) during its war in Afghanistan, both as spetsnazand more generally in the 40th army. Special Forces Detachment 154 and Special Forces Detachment 177, the first and second ‘Muslim Battalions,’ would play important roles not only during the palace takeover in December 1979 but also during the 1983 cease-fire in Panjshir. This article challenges earlier views that Soviet Muslims and Central Asians were unreliable soldiers who colluded with mujahedin, and points to a more balanced perspective of their role in Afghanistan.

  • 4.
    Zhou, Jiayi
    et al.
    Stockholm International Peace Research Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sullivan, Katherine
    Stockholm International Peace Research Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Milante, Gary
    Peace and Development, Stockholm International Peace Research Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Towards Pathways for Peacebuilding and Development to Reduce Violent Extremism2017In: Journal of Peacebuilding and Development, ISSN 1542-3166, E-ISSN 2165-7440, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 114-121Article in journal (Refereed)
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