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  • 1.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kihlström, Erik
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ståhlbom, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tagesson, Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindahl, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    PLUNC (palate, lung and nasal epithelial clone) proteins in human nasal lavage fluid2003In: Biochemical Society Transactions, ISSN 0300-5127, E-ISSN 1470-8752, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 810-814Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PLUNC (palate, lung and nasal epithelial clone) is a newly discovered gene that is expressed in the upper respiratory tract and is suggested to be of importance in host defence against bacteria. We have identified two forms of the PLUNC protein in human nasal lavage fluid (NLF) using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and MS. The apparent molecular masses and isoelectric points of these forms are 24.8 kDa/pI 5.4 and 25.1 kDa/pI 5.5. Notably, the 24.8 kDa/pI 5.4 form of PLUNC is an abundant protein in the 2-DE protein patterns of NLF from healthy subjects. Decreased levels of PLUNC were found in NLF from smokers and workers exposed to reactive epoxy chemicals, indicating that long-term exposure to airway irritants impairs the production of PLUNC in the upper respiratory tract. We have also investigated the presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding proteins in NLF. Five proteins were found to adsorb to a LPS-coated surface; two of these proteins correspond to the two PLUNC forms, as judged by 2-DE pattern matching. For comparison, human saliva was found to contain a set of LPS-binding proteins with similar 2-DE spot positions (the same pIs but somewhat lower apparent molecular masses of 20 kDa). These results indicate that PLUNC may be a new marker of airway inflammation and may play a part in the innate immune response, and that human saliva contains yet other members of the family of LPS-binding proteins.

  • 2.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ståhlbom, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tagesson, Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindahl, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Newly identified proteins in human nasal lavage fluid from non-smokers and smokers using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and peptide mass fingerprinting2002In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 112-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human nasal lavage fluids (NLFs) were analyzed with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and proteins were identified with peptide mass fingerprinting using matrix-assisted laser desoption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry. In some cases, the identification was verified by analysis of post-source decay fragmentation spectra. Many of the identified proteins were new forms or fragments of previously found proteins (e.g. albumin, lactoferrin, cystatin, calgranulin, von Ebners gland protein and palate lung nasal epithelium clone), while others were proteins that have previously been indicated by 2-DE image matching or immunoblots (e.g. apolipoprotein AI, lysozyme C, and Clara cell secretory protein). Some new proteins, not shown before in 2-DE patterns of NLF were also found, e.g. mammaglobin B, 2-microglobulin and immunoglobulin J chain. Of the identified NLF proteins many appear to be involved in inflammatory and immune responses. A study was therefore conducted to investigate if the levels of these proteins were changed in smokers compared to nonsmokers. It was found that NLF from smokers contained decreased levels of Clara cell secretory protein, and increased proportions of a truncated variant of lipocortin-1, three acidic forms of α1-antitrypsin, and one phosphorylated form of cystatin S. Furthermore, NLF from smokers contained increased proportions of a new variant of palate lung nasal epithelium clone (PLUNC), a recently identified airway irritation marker. The results demonstrate that 2-DE of NLF may be used to assess alterations of proteins or post-translationally modified proteins in smokers. Clara cell secretory protein (CC 16, CC 10) and lipocortin-1 are two anti-inflammatory, phospholipase A2 inhibitory proteins, and α1-antitrypsin and cystatin S are two proteinase inhibitors. Changed levels of these proteins may therefore be of importance to the airway inflammation caused by smoking. The results also support the notion that PLUNC is involved in inflammatory responses in the upper airways.

  • 3.
    Graff, Pål
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro , Sweden.
    Ståhlbom, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nordenberg, Eva
    Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery, Finspång, Sweden.
    Graichen, Andreas
    Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery, Finspång, Sweden.
    Johansson, Pontus
    Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery, Finspång, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Helen
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Evaluating Measuring Techniques for Occupational Exposure during Additive Manufacturing of Metals: A Pilot Study2017In: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290, Vol. 21, p. 120-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Additive manufacturing that creates three-dimensional objects by adding layer uponlayer of material is a new technique that has proven to be an excellent tool for themanufacturing of complex structures for a variety of industrial sectors. Today, knowl-edge regarding particle emissions and potential exposure-related health hazards forthe operators is limited. The current study has focused on particle numbers, masses,sizes, and identities present in the air during additive manufacturing of metals. Mea-surements were performed during manufacturing with metal powder consisting es-sentially of chromium, nickel, and cobalt. Instruments used were Nanotracer (10 to300 nanometers [nm]), Lighthouse (300 nm to 10 micrometers), and traditional filter-basedparticle mass estimation followed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Resultsshowed that there is a risk of particle exposure at certain operations and that particle sizestended to be smaller in recycled metal powder compared to new. In summary, nanosizedparticles were present in the additive manufacturing environment and the operators wereexposed specifically while handling the metal powder. For the workers’ safety, improvedpowder handling systems and measurement techniques for nanosized particles will possiblyhave to be developed and then translated into work environment regulations. Until then,relevant protective equipment and regular metal analyses of urine is recommended

  • 4.
    Lindahl, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Irander, Kristina
    Tagesson, Christer
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Ståhlbom, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Nasal lavage fluid and proteomics as means to identify the effects of the irritating epoxy chemical dimethylbenzylamine2004In: Biomarkers, ISSN 1354-750X, E-ISSN 1366-5804, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 56-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of this study were to describe the changes in the nasal lavage fluid (NLF) protein pattern after exposure to the irritating epoxy chemical dimethylbenzylamine (DMBA) and to identify the affected proteins using a proteomic approach. The protein patterns of NLF from six healthy subjects and eight epoxy workers with airway irritation were analysed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) before and after exposure to 100 μg m-3 DMBA for 2 h in an exposure chamber. NLF proteins were identified by (i) comparison with a 2-DE NLF reference database, (ii) N-terminal amino acid sequencing, and (iii) mass spectrometry. In NLF from healthy subjects, the levels of immunoglobulin A increased and the levels of Clara cell protein 16 (CC16) decreased after chamber exposure, while in NLF from epoxy workers, α2-macroglobulin and caeruloplasmin increased. Two previously unidentified proteins decreased in NLF from epoxy workers after exposure, these were identified as statherin and calgranulin B. In addition, the subjects who developed high counts of eosinophils in their nasal mucosa after chamber exposure had significantly lower levels of immunoglobulin-binding factor (IgBF) before exposure than subjects with low eosinophil infiltration. These results show that short-term exposure to DMBA causes distinct changes in NLF proteins. Moreover, three proteins that have previously not been associated with upper airway irritation were identified: statherin, calgranulin B and IgBF. Further studies are needed to investigate whether these proteins may be used as biomarkers of airway irritation and to give new insight into the ways in which occupational exposure to irritants causes inflammation of the airways.

  • 5.
    Lindahl, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Ståhlbom, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Tagesson, Christer
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Identification of a new potential airway irritation marker, palate lung nasal epithelial clone protein, in human nasal lavage fluid with two-dimensional electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight.2001In: Electrophoresis, ISSN 0173-0835, E-ISSN 1522-2683, Vol. 22, p. 1795-1800Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Lindahl, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Ståhlbom, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Tagesson, Christer
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Newly identified proteins in human nasal and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids: Potential biomedical and clinical applications.1999In: Electrophoresis, ISSN 0173-0835, E-ISSN 1522-2683, Vol. 20, p. 3670-3676Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Nordlund, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, National Centre for Work and Rehabilitation.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, National Centre for Work and Rehabilitation.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Group: med:, Linquest
    Ståhlbom, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Tondel, Martin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    EQ-5D in a general population survey - A description of the most commonly reported EQ-5D health states using the SF-362005In: Quality of Life Research, ISSN 0962-9343, E-ISSN 1573-2649, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 1099-1109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of studying health-related quality of life in the general population has increasingly been emphasized. From a public health perspective, this benefits the identification of population inequalities in health status. One of the currently most popular instruments is the EQ-5D. Evaluations of the EQ-5D generally focus on the overall preference-based index. As this index has a built-in value, exploration of the information from the underlying health states is also important. In this study, the ten most commonly reported EQ-5D health states are described using the SF-36. Data collected in 1999 by questionnaires mailed to a random sample aged 20-74 in south-eastern Sweden were used (n = 9489). Almost 43% reported the best possible EQ-5D health state and 78% were accounted for by three EQ-5D health states. The EQ-5D health state classification was largely reflected by the SF-36, with the EQ-5D items mobility, usual activities, pain/discomfort and anxiety/depression tapping most clearly on the SF-36 scales physical functioning, role limitations due to physical health problems, bodily pain, and mental health, respectively. However, within the same level of EQ-5D (i.e., moderate problems) there was a rather large variation of SF-36 scale scores, particularly regarding the EQ-5D item pain/discomfort and the SF-36 scale BP. © Springer 2005.

  • 8.
    Sjögren, Elaine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Sjögren, Elaine
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Tondel, Martin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Ståhlbom, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Can gender differences in psychosocial factors be explained by socioeconomic status?2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 34, p. 59-68Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Ståhlbom, Bengt
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, FHVC - Folkhälsovetenskapligt centrum, Yrkes-miljömedicin. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dimethylethylamine and dimethylbenzylamine in foundries and the epoxy industry: Analysis, metabolism, biological monitoring, toxicological effects and occupational exposure1998Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Dimethylethylamine (DMEA) and dimethylbenzylamine (DMBA) are tertiary aliphatic amines, used as catalysts e.g., in mould core manufacturing and heat cured epoxy systems. Health effects such as visual disturbances and respiratory irritation occur among workers handling DMEA and airway symptoms are recorded by many workers exposed to DMBA. In this thesis, gas chromatographic methods for the determination of DMEA and DMBA in air and DMEA, dimethylethylamine- N-oxide (DMEAO), DMBA and dimethylbenzylaminc-N-oxide (DMBAO) in urine have been developed in order to monitor the air concentration of the amines, to investigate the metabolism and to establish methods useful for biological monitoring. Studies have been performed on volunteers in experimental exposures and on workers in the industrial setting. Dose-effect and dose-response relations were investigated for both DMEA and DMBA. An exposurechamber was developed, using a permeation technique, for the generation of low air levels of DMBA.

    DMEA and DMBA were rapidly absorbed through the respiratory tract and quickly distributed in the body. DMEA was to a large extent (90 %) metabolised into DMEAO and DMEA and DMEAO (SumDMEA) were excreted into the urine following a biphasic pattern. DMBA was metabolised to nearly 100 % and eliminated into the urine with a half-life of 4.3 h. More than 50 % was eliminated within 2 hours after the exposure. There was a significant correlation between the time-weighted average exposure level (TWA) of the two amines and the concentration of the amines and their metabolites (SumDMEA, SumDMBA) in the post-shift urine, in both the experimental and industrial study. Thus, both U-SumDMEA and U-SumDMBA may become important biomarkers in order to monitor industrial exposures of the corresponding amine.

    DMEA exposure to a constant air level of 40-50 mg/m3 during eight hours caused epithelial corneal oedema with visual disturbances and respiratory irritalion. A 15 min exposure at 80 mg/m 3 caused eye irritation but no visual disturbances and 8 h exposure at 20 mg/m3 did not cause visual disturbances or eye irritation.

    Low air concentrations (20-120 )Jg/m3 ) of DMBA increased the number of metachromatic cells and eosinophils in a dose-response related manner in the nasal mucosa in healthy vountecrs, without causing significant clinical symptoms.

    Industrial exposure levels of DMEA in mould core manufacturing workers were determined. The mean TWA of DMEA was 3.7 mg/m3 (range 0.5-14). The determination of DMBA in epoxy workers showed a mean TW A air concentration of 18 pg/m3 (range 3-48), with a 2 h peak exposure of 91 µ/m3.

    This thesis will facilitate the evaluation and assessment of risk and threshold limit values of DMEA, DMBA, and other related compounds.

  • 10. Welinder, H
    et al.
    Nielsen, J
    Rylander, L
    Ståhlbom, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    A prospective study of the relationship between exposure and specific antibodies in workers exposed to organic acid anhydrides2001In: Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0105-4538, E-ISSN 1398-9995, Vol. 56, no 6, p. 506-511Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The exposure-response relationships for the induction of specific IgE and IgG were evaluated in a prospective study of workers exposed to organic acid anhydrides (OAAs). Special attention was paid to the modifying effects of atopy and smoking. Methods: The subjects were 163 previously unexposed persons exposed to epoxy resins with hexahydro-, methylhexahydro-, and methyltetrahydrophthalic anhydride as curing agents. The levels of OAAs in air and of specific IgE and IgG in serum were recurrently monitored. The mean observation time was 32 (1-105) months. Results: The mean combined OAA exposure of the subjects was 15.4 (< 1-189) ╡g/m3. Positive specific IgE was demonstrated by 21 (13%) subjects with a mean induction time of 8.8 (1-35) months. The incidence of sensitization was 4.1 cases/1000 months at risk. The relative risk (OR) for atopics was 5.4 (1.9-15.3, 95% CI). An exposure-response relationship was demonstrated by an increasing risk of sensitization with increasing exposure. Conclusions: An association between exposure and atopy, respectively, and the induction of specific antibodies against OAAs were observed. The risk for atopics was comparable with the risk for the subjects in the most exposed group.

  • 11.
    Wolrath, Helen
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ståhlbom, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hallén, Anders
    Department of Dermatology and Venereology, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Forsum, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Trimethylamine and trimethylamine oxide levels in normal women and women with bacterial vaginosis reflect a local metabolism in vaginal secretion as compared to urine2005In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 113, no 7-8, p. 513-516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The smell of rotten fish is one of the characteristics of bacterial vaginosis (BV), and is due to trimethylamine (TMA). Trimethylamine can be found in human urine, although most of it occurs as the nonvolatile oxide (TMAO) form. The fraction TMA/TMAO can be expected to be the same in different body fluids if no local production of TMA occurs. In women with BV, TMAO in the vaginal fluid is expected to be chemically reduced by the local bacterial flora to the much more odorous TMA. We have therefore studied the local vaginal production of TMA in vaginal secretion compared to the general TMA-TMAO metabolism that was measured in urine using gas chromatography. Both vaginal fluid and random urine samples were collected from women, with and without BV, attending a Swedish clinic for sexually transmitted diseases, and these samples were analyzed for TMA and TMAO. The results show that a local production of TMA occurs in the vagina that is not part of the general metabolism of TMA-TMAO.

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