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  • 1.
    Ali Khan, Ghazanfar
    et al.
    Department of Chemistry, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Berglund, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Maqbool Khan, Kashif
    College of Pharmacy, University of Punjab, Lahore, Pakistan.
    Lindgren, Per-Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fick, Jerker
    Department of Chemistry, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Occurrence and Abundance of Antibiotics and Resistance Genes in Rivers, Canal and near Drug Formulation Facilities – A Study in Pakistan2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antibiotic resistance (AR) is a global phenomenon that has severe epidemiological ramifications world-wide. It has been suggested that antibiotics that have been discharged into the natural aquatic environments after usage or manufacture can promote the occurrence of antibiotic resistance genes (ARG). These environmental ARGs could serve as a reservoir and be horizontally transferred to human-associated bacteria and thus contribute to AR proliferation. The aim of this study was to investigate the anthropogenic load of antibiotics in Northern Pakistan and study the occurrence of ARGs in selected samples from this region. 19 sampling sites were selected; including six rivers, one dam, one canal, one sewage drain and four drug formulation facilities. Our results show that five of the rivers have antibiotic levels comparable to surface water measurements in unpolluted sites in Europe and the US. However, high levels of antibiotics could be detected in the downstream river in close vicinity of the 10 million city Lahore, 1100, 1700 and 2700 ng L−1 for oxytetracycline, trimethoprim, and sulfamethoxazole respectively. Highest detected levels were at one of the drug formulation facilities, with the measured levels of 1100, 4100, 6200, 7300, 8000, 27000, 28000 and 49000 ng L−1 of erythromycin, lincomycin, ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, levofloxacin, oxytetracycline, trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole respectively. ARGs were also detected at the sites and the highest levels of ARGs detected, sulI and dfrA1, were directly associated with the antibiotics detected at the highest concentrations, sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim. Highest levels of both antibiotics and ARGs were seen at a drug formulation facility, within an industrial estate with a low number of local residents and no hospitals in the vicinity, which indicates that the levels of ARGs at this site were associated with the environmental levels of antibiotics.

  • 2.
    Berglund, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Deliberations on the impact of antibiotic contamination on dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes in aquatic environments2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The great success of antibiotics in treating bacterial infectious diseases has been hampered by the increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistant bacteria. Not only does antibiotic resistance threaten to increase the difficulty in treating bacterial infectious diseases, but it could also make medical procedures such as routine surgery and organ transplantations very dangerous to perform. Traditionally, antibiotic resistance has been regarded as a strictly clinical problem and studies of the problem have mostly been restricted to a clinical milieu. Recently, non-clinical environments, and in particular aquatic environments, have been recognised as important factors in development and dissemination of antibiotic resistance. Elevated concentrations of antibiotics in an environment are likely to drive a selection pressure which favours resistant bacteria, and are also believed to promote horizontal gene transfer among the indigenous bacteria. Antibiotic resistance genes are often located on mobile genetic elements such as plasmids and integrons, which have the ability to disseminate among taxonomically unrelated species. The environmental bacteria can thus serve as both reservoirs for resistance and hot spots for the development of new antibiotic resistance determinants.

    There is still a lack of data pertaining to how high antibiotic concentrations are necessary to drive a selection pressure in aquatic environments. The aim of this thesis is to determine the effect of high and low concentrations of antibiotics on environmental bacterial  communities from different aquatic environments. In the studies performed, antibiotics were measured using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Bacterial diversity and evenness were assessed using molecular fingerprints obtained with 16S rRNA gene-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and antibiotic resistance genes and class 1 integrons were quantified using real-time PCR.

    Water and sediment samples were collected from different rivers and canals in Pakistan. The environments differed in anthropogenic exposure from undisturbed to heavily contaminated. A general trend could be observed of high concentrations of antibiotics correlating to elevated concentrations of antibiotic resistance genes and integrons. Extremely high concentrations of antibiotic resistance genes and integrons were found in the sediments downstream of an industrial drug formulation site, which likely correlated to the high load of antibiotics found in the water. Antibiotic and antibiotic resistance gene concentrations were also shown to increase downstream of Ravi river, which flows through Lahore, a city of more than 10 million inhabitants. Rivers not impacted by anthropogenic contamination were found to contain antibiotics and resistance gene concentrations of similar levels as in Europe and the U.S. Similar measurements were performed in the Swedish river Stångån. The concentrations of antibiotic resistance genes and class 1 integrons were shown to increase in the river after it had passed, and received urban wastewater effluent from the city of Linköping.

    A series of constructed wetlands were exposed to a mixture of different antibiotics at environmentally relevant concentrations over a few weeks. The antibiotic exposure did not observably affect the bacterial diversity or integron concentrations. Antibiotic resistance genes were found at low background concentrations, but the antibiotic exposure did not observably affect the concentrations. The constructed wetlands were also found to reduce most antibiotics at levels comparable to conventional wastewater treatment schemes, suggesting that constructed wetlands may be useful supplementary alternatives to conventional wastewater treatment.

    To investigate the effect of antibiotics on an uncontaminated aquatic environment in a more controlled setting, microcosms were constructed from lake water and sediments and subsequently exposed to varying concentrations of antibiotics (ranging from wastewater-like concentrations to 1,000 times higher). The water and sediments were gathered from the lake Nydalasjön, near Umeå, which is not exposed to urban waste. While antibiotic resistance genes and class 1 integrons were found in the lake sediments, no increase in the concentrations of these genes could be observed due to the antibiotic additions.

    In conclusion, although antibiotic resistance genes and integrons are part of the environmental gene pool, low concentrations of antibiotics do not seem to immediately impact their prevalence. However, aquatic environments exposed to anthropogenic waste do exhibit elevated levels of antibiotic resistance genes and integrons. Aquatic environments heavily polluted with antibiotics also clearly display correspondingly high concentrations of antibiotic resistance genes and integrons. These results clearly indicate the necessity to keep down pollution levels as well as the need to establish the range of antibiotic concentrations which do promote resistance. This must be done in order to enable risk assessments and to establish acceptable levels of antibiotic pollution. It should also be stressed that more research is required to elucidate what effect low levels of antibiotic exposure has on environmental bacterial communities.

    List of papers
    1. Occurrence and Abundance of Antibiotics and Resistance Genes in Rivers, Canal and near Drug Formulation Facilities – A Study in Pakistan
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Occurrence and Abundance of Antibiotics and Resistance Genes in Rivers, Canal and near Drug Formulation Facilities – A Study in Pakistan
    Show others...
    2013 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 6Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Antibiotic resistance (AR) is a global phenomenon that has severe epidemiological ramifications world-wide. It has been suggested that antibiotics that have been discharged into the natural aquatic environments after usage or manufacture can promote the occurrence of antibiotic resistance genes (ARG). These environmental ARGs could serve as a reservoir and be horizontally transferred to human-associated bacteria and thus contribute to AR proliferation. The aim of this study was to investigate the anthropogenic load of antibiotics in Northern Pakistan and study the occurrence of ARGs in selected samples from this region. 19 sampling sites were selected; including six rivers, one dam, one canal, one sewage drain and four drug formulation facilities. Our results show that five of the rivers have antibiotic levels comparable to surface water measurements in unpolluted sites in Europe and the US. However, high levels of antibiotics could be detected in the downstream river in close vicinity of the 10 million city Lahore, 1100, 1700 and 2700 ng L−1 for oxytetracycline, trimethoprim, and sulfamethoxazole respectively. Highest detected levels were at one of the drug formulation facilities, with the measured levels of 1100, 4100, 6200, 7300, 8000, 27000, 28000 and 49000 ng L−1 of erythromycin, lincomycin, ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, levofloxacin, oxytetracycline, trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole respectively. ARGs were also detected at the sites and the highest levels of ARGs detected, sulI and dfrA1, were directly associated with the antibiotics detected at the highest concentrations, sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim. Highest levels of both antibiotics and ARGs were seen at a drug formulation facility, within an industrial estate with a low number of local residents and no hospitals in the vicinity, which indicates that the levels of ARGs at this site were associated with the environmental levels of antibiotics.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Public Library of Science, 2013
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-96426 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0062712 (DOI)000321148400001 ()
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning FORMAS|210-2006-2132|Foundation for Strategic Environmental Research (MISTRA)||

    Available from: 2013-08-20 Created: 2013-08-19 Last updated: 2017-12-06
    2. Detection and Quantification of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Stångån River, Sweden
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Detection and Quantification of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Stångån River, Sweden
    2014 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Antibiotic resistant bacteria are an emerging global problem which threatens to undermine important advances in modern medicine. It is becoming increasingly clear that the dynamics of antibiotic resistance are not confined to clinical settings. The environment is likely to play an important role in dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes from and to both environmental and pathogenic bacteria. Wastewater treatment plants accumulate both chemical and biological waste from the surrounding urban milieu and have therefore been viewed as potential hotspots for dissemination and development of antibiotic resistance. To assess the effect of wastewater effluent on a river which flows through a Swedish city, sediment and water samples were collected from Stångån River, both upstream and downstream of an adjacent wastewater treatment plant over three months. Seven antibiotic resistance genes and the integrase gene on class 1 integrons were quantified in the collected sediment using realtime PCR. Furthermore, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to assess the abundance of ten different antibiotics in the water phase of the samples. The results showed an increase in ARGs and integrons downstream of the wastewater treatment plant as compared to upstream. The measured concentrations of antibiotics were low in the water samples from Stångån River, suggesting that selection for antibiotic resistance genes did not occur in the surface water. Instead, the downstream increase in antibiotic resistance genes is likely to be due to accumulation of genes present in the treated effluent discharged from the wastewater treatment plant.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-105869 (URN)
    Available from: 2014-04-11 Created: 2014-04-11 Last updated: 2014-04-11
    3. Efficient removal of antibiotics in surface-flow constructed wetlands, with no observed impact on antibiotic resistance genes.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Efficient removal of antibiotics in surface-flow constructed wetlands, with no observed impact on antibiotic resistance genes.
    Show others...
    2014 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 476-477, p. 29-37Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, there have been growing concerns about pharmaceuticals including antibiotics as environmental contaminants. Antibiotics of concentrations commonly encountered in wastewater have been suggested to affect bacterial population dynamics and to promote dissemination of antibiotic resistance. Conventional wastewater treatment processes do not always adequately remove pharmaceuticals causing environmental dissemination of low levels of these compounds. Using constructed wetlands as an additional treatment step after sewage treatment plants have been proposed as a cheap alternative to increase reduction of wastewater contaminants, however this means that the natural microbial community of the wetlands becomes exposed to elevated levels of antibiotics. In this study, experimental surface-flow wetlands in Sweden were continuously exposed to antibiotics of concentrations commonly encountered in wastewater. The aim was to assess the antibiotic removal efficiency of constructed wetlands and to evaluate the impact of low levels of antibiotics on bacterial diversity, resistance development and expression in the wetland bacterial community. Antibiotic concentrations were measured using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and the effect on the bacterial diversity was assessed with 16S rRNA-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Real-time PCR was used to detect and quantify antibiotic resistance genes and integrons in the wetlands, during and after the exposure period. The results indicated that the antibiotic removal efficiency of constructed wetlands was comparable to conventional wastewater treatment schemes. Furthermore, short-term treatment of the constructed wetlands with environmentally relevant concentrations (i.e. 100-2000 ng×l(-1)) of antibiotics did not significantly affect resistance gene concentrations, suggesting that surface-flow constructed wetlands are well-suited for wastewater treatment purposes.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2014
    Keywords
    Antibiotic resistance genes; Antibiotics; Quantitative real-time PCR; Constructed wetlands
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-105870 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2013.12.128 (DOI)000333772500004 ()24448029 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2014-04-11 Created: 2014-04-11 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
    4. Abundance and dynamics of antibiotic resistance genes and integrons in lake sediment microcosms
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Abundance and dynamics of antibiotic resistance genes and integrons in lake sediment microcosms
    Show others...
    2014 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 9, p. e108151-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Antibiotic resistance in bacteria causing disease is an ever growing threat to the world. Recently, environmental bacteria have become established as important both as sources of antibiotic resistance genes and in disseminating resistance genes. Low levels of antibiotics and other pharmaceuticals are regularly released into water environments via wastewater, and the concern is that such environmental contamination may serve to create hotspots for antibiotic resistance gene selection and dissemination. In this study, microcosms were created from water and sediments gathered from a lake in Sweden only lightly affected by human activities. The microcosms were exposed to a mixture of antibiotics of varying environmentally relevant concentrations (i.e., concentrations commonly encountered in wastewaters) in order to investigate the effect of low levels of antibiotics on antibiotic resistance gene abundances and dynamics in a previously uncontaminated environment. Antibiotic concentrations were measured using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Abundances of seven antibiotic resistance genes and the class 1 integron integrase gene, intL1, were quantified using real-time PCR. Resistance genes sulI and ermB were quantified in the microcosm sediments with mean abundances 5 and 15 gene copies/10(6) 16S rRNA gene copies, respectively. Class 1 integrons were determined in the sediments with a mean concentration of 3.86x10(4) copies/10(6) 16S rRNA gene copies. The antibiotic treatment had no observable effect on antibiotic resistance gene or integron abundances.

    National Category
    Basic Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-105871 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0108151 (DOI)000342351800068 ()25247418 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2014-04-11 Created: 2014-04-11 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
  • 3.
    Berglund, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bich Hoang, Ngoc Thi
    Vietnam Natl Childrens Hosp, Vietnam.
    Tärnberg, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kien Le, Ngai
    Vietnam Natl Childrens Hosp, Vietnam.
    Nilsson, Maud
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Khanh Khu, Dung Thi
    Vietnam Natl Childrens Hosp, Vietnam; TRAC Sweden Vietnam, Vietnam.
    Svartstrom, Olov
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Welander, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Nilsson, Lennart E
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Olson, Linus
    TRAC Sweden Vietnam, Vietnam; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Minh Dien, Tran
    Vietnam Natl Childrens Hosp, Vietnam.
    Thanh Le, Hai
    Vietnam Natl Childrens Hosp, Vietnam; TRAC Sweden Vietnam, Vietnam.
    Larsson, Mattias
    TRAC Sweden Vietnam, Vietnam; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Hanberger, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases. TRAC Sweden Vietnam, Vietnam.
    Molecular and phenotypic characterization of clinical isolates belonging to a KPC-2-producing strain of ST15 Klebsiella pneumoniae from a Vietnamese pediatric hospital2019In: Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control, ISSN 2047-2994, E-ISSN 2047-2994, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae are becoming increasingly common in hospital settings worldwide and are a source of increased morbidity, mortality and health care costs. The global epidemiology of carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae is characterized by different strains distributed geographically, with the strain ST258 being predominant in Europe and USA, and ST11 being most common in East Asia. ST15 is a less frequently occurring strain but has nevertheless been reported worldwide as a source of hospital outbreaks of carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae. Methods In this study, whole-genome sequencing and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was used to characterize 57 clinical isolates of carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae belonging to a strain of ST15, which were collected at a Vietnamese pediatric hospital from February throughout September 2015. Results Aside from the carbapenem resistance gene bla(KPC-2), which was carried by all isolates, prevalence of resistance genes to other antibiotics including aminoglycosides, macrolides, quinolones, fosfomycin and trimethoprim, was also high. All isolates were multidrug-resistant. Susceptibility was highest to ceftazidime/avibactam (96%), gentamicin (91%) and tigecycline (82%). Notably, the colistin resistance rate was very high (42%). Single-nucleotide polymorphism analysis indicated that most isolates belonged to a single clone. Conclusions The diverse variety of antibiotic resistance genes and the high antibiotic resistance rates to last-resort antibiotics such as carbapenems and colistin, is indicative of a highly adaptable strain. This emphasizes the importance of implementation of infection controls measures, continued monitoring of antibiotic resistance and prudent use of antibiotics to prevent further selection of resistant strains and the emergence of pan-resistant clones.

  • 4.
    Berglund, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bich Hoang, Ngoc Thi
    Vietnam Natl Childrens Hosp, Vietnam.
    Tärnberg, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kien Le, Ngai
    Vietnam Natl Childrens Hosp, Vietnam.
    Svartström, Olov
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Khanh Khu, Dung Thi
    Vietnam Natl Childrens Hosp, Vietnam.
    Nilsson, Maud
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Thanh Le, Hai
    Vietnam Natl Childrens Hosp, Vietnam.
    Welander, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Olson, Linus
    TRAC, Sweden; TRAC, Vietnam; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Larsson, Mattias
    TRAC, Sweden; TRAC, Vietnam; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Lennart E
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hanberger, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases. TRAC, Sweden; TRAC, Vietnam.
    Insertion sequence transpositions and point mutations in mgrB causing colistin resistance in a clinical strain of carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae from Vietnam2018In: International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents, ISSN 0924-8579, E-ISSN 1872-7913, Vol. 51, no 5, p. 789-793Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Resistance among Klebsiella pneumoniae to the last-resort antibiotics carbapenems and colistin is increasing worldwide. In this study, whole-genome sequencing was used to determine the colistin resistance mechanisms in clinical isolates of carbapenem-and colistin-resistant K. pneumoniae from Vietnam. Alterations in the regulatory gene mgrB, via mutations and insertion sequence transpositions, were found in 30 of 31 isolates, emphasising the importance of this resistance mechanism in colistin-resistant K. pneumoniae. (c) 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  • 5.
    Berglund, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Chen, Baoli
    Shandong Ctr Dis Control and Prevent, Peoples R China.
    Tärnberg, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sun, Qiang
    Shandong Univ, Peoples R China.
    Xu, Liuchen
    Shandong Ctr Dis Control and Prevent, Peoples R China.
    Welander, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Li, Yan
    Shandong Ctr Dis Control and Prevent, Peoples R China.
    Bi, Zhenwang
    Shandong Ctr Dis Control and Prevent, Peoples R China.
    Nilsson, Maud
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Lennart E
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Characterization of extended-spectrum -lactamase-producing Escherichia coli harboring mcr-1 and toxin genes from human fecal samples from China2018In: FUTURE COMPUTING ... the ... International Conference on Future Computational Technologies and Applications, ISSN 1746-0913, E-ISSN 1999-5903, Vol. 13, no 15, p. 1647-1656Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To characterize extended-spectrum -lactamase-producing Escherichia coli harboring the colistin resistance gene mcr-1 from human fecal samples collected in 2012 in a rural area of Shandong province, PR China. Materials amp; methods: Whole-genome sequencing and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed on 25 mcr-1-positive isolates to determine carriage of antibiotic resistance and virulence genes, diversity and antibiotic resistance profiles. Results: The isolates were highly genetically diverse and carried a large variety of different antibiotic resistance genes. The multidrug-resistance rate was high (96%). Virulence genes associated with intestinal pathogenic E. coli were carried by 32% of the isolates. Conclusion: Further monitoring of the epidemiological situation is necessary to ensure a preparedness for potential emergence of novel, difficult-to-treat strains and awareness of available treatment options.

  • 6.
    Berglund, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Claesson, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Lennart E
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hanberger, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Letter: High Prevalence of Heterogeneously Glycopeptide-Intermediate Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci in Sternal Wounds in ANTIMICROBIAL AGENTS AND CHEMOTHERAPY, vol 60, issue 8, pp 5097-50982016In: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, ISSN 0066-4804, E-ISSN 1098-6596, Vol. 60, no 8, p. 5097-5098Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 7.
    Berglund, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dienus, Olaf
    County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden.
    Sokolova, Ekaterina
    Chalmers, Sweden.
    Berglind, Emma
    County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden.
    Matussek, Andreas
    County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden; Karolinska University of Lab, Sweden.
    Pettersson, Thomas
    Chalmers, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Per-Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden.
    Occurrence and removal efficiency of parasitic protozoa in Swedish wastewater treatment plants2017In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 598, p. 821-827Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Giardia intestinalis, Cryptosporidium spp., Entamoeba histolytica and Dientamoeba fragilis are parasitic protozoa and causative agents of gastroenteritis in humans. G. intestinalis and Cryptosporidium spp. in particular are the most common protozoa associated with waterborne outbreaks in high-income countries. Surveillance of protozoan prevalence in wastewater and evaluation of wastewater treatment removal efficiencies of protozoan pathogens is therefore imperative for assessment of human health risk. In this study, influent and effluent wastewater samples from three wastewater treatment plants in Sweden were collected over nearly one year and assessed for prevalence of parasitic protozoa. Quantitative real-time PCR using primers specific for the selected protozoa Cryptosporidium spp., G, intestinalis, E. histolytica, Entamoeba dispar and D. fragilis was used for protozoan DNA detection and assessment of wastewater treatment removal efficiencies. Occurrence of G. intestinalis, E. dispar and D. fragilis DNA was assessed in both influent (44, 30 and 39 out of 51 samples respectively) and effluent wastewater (14, 9 and 33 out of 51 samples respectively) in all three wastewater treatment plants. Mean removal efficiencies of G. intestinalis, E. dispar and D. fragilis DNA quantities, based on all three wastewater treatment plants studied varied between 67 and 87%, 37-75% and 20-34% respectively. Neither E. histolytica nor Cryptosporidium spp. were detected in any samples. Overall, higher quantities of protozoan DNA were observed from February to June 2012. The high prevalence of protozoa in influent wastewater indicates the need for continued monitoring of these pathogens in wastewater-associated aquatic environments to minimise the potential risk for human infection. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 8.
    Berglund, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fick, Jerker
    Department of Chemistry, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Per-Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Department of Microbiology, Medical Services, County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Detection and Quantification of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Stångån River, Sweden2014Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Antibiotic resistant bacteria are an emerging global problem which threatens to undermine important advances in modern medicine. It is becoming increasingly clear that the dynamics of antibiotic resistance are not confined to clinical settings. The environment is likely to play an important role in dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes from and to both environmental and pathogenic bacteria. Wastewater treatment plants accumulate both chemical and biological waste from the surrounding urban milieu and have therefore been viewed as potential hotspots for dissemination and development of antibiotic resistance. To assess the effect of wastewater effluent on a river which flows through a Swedish city, sediment and water samples were collected from Stångån River, both upstream and downstream of an adjacent wastewater treatment plant over three months. Seven antibiotic resistance genes and the integrase gene on class 1 integrons were quantified in the collected sediment using realtime PCR. Furthermore, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to assess the abundance of ten different antibiotics in the water phase of the samples. The results showed an increase in ARGs and integrons downstream of the wastewater treatment plant as compared to upstream. The measured concentrations of antibiotics were low in the water samples from Stångån River, suggesting that selection for antibiotic resistance genes did not occur in the surface water. Instead, the downstream increase in antibiotic resistance genes is likely to be due to accumulation of genes present in the treated effluent discharged from the wastewater treatment plant.

  • 9.
    Berglund, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fick, Jerker
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Per-Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden.
    URBAN WASTEWATER EFFLUENT INCREASES ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE GENE CONCENTRATIONS IN A RECEIVING NORTHERN EUROPEAN RIVER2015In: Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, ISSN 0730-7268, E-ISSN 1552-8618, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 192-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are an emerging global problem that threatens to undermine important advances in modern medicine. The environment is likely to play an important role in the dissemination of antibiotic-resistance genes (ARGs) among both environmental and pathogenic bacteria. Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) accumulate both chemical and biological waste from the surrounding urban milieu and have therefore been viewed as potential hotspots for dissemination and development of antibiotic resistance. To assess the effect of wastewater effluent on a river that flows through a Swedish city, sediment and water samples were collected from Stangan River, both upstream and downstream of an adjacent WWTP over 3 mo. Seven ARGs and the integrase gene on class 1 integrons were quantified in the collected sediment using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to assess the abundance of 10 different antibiotics in the water phase of the samples. The results showed an increase in ARGs and integrons downstream of the WWTP. The measured concentrations of antibiotics were low in the water samples from the Stangan River, suggesting that selection for ARGs did not occur in the surface water. Instead, the downstream increase in ARGs is likely to be attributable to accumulation of genes present in the treated effluent discharged from the WWTP. Environ Toxicol Chem 2015;34:192-196. (c) 2014 SETAC

  • 10.
    Berglund, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hoang, Ngoc Thi Bich
    National Hospital of Pediatrics, Hanoi, Vietnam.
    Tärnberg, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Le, Ngai Kien
    National Hospital of Pediatrics, Hanoi, Vietnam.
    Welander, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Nilsson, Maud
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Khu, Dung Thi Khanh
    National Hospital of Pediatrics, Hanoi, Vietnam.
    Nilsson, Lennart E.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Olson, Linus
    The Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Le, Hai Thanh
    National Hospital of Pediatrics, Hanoi, Vietnam.
    Larsson, Mattias
    The Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hanberger, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Colistin- and carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae carrying mcr-1 and bla(OXA-48) isolated at a paediatric hospital in Vietnam2018In: Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, ISSN 0305-7453, E-ISSN 1460-2091, Vol. 73, no 4, p. 1100-1102Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 11.
    Berglund, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Khan, Ghazanfar Ali
    Department of Chemistry, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Richard
    Department of Chemistry, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Fick, Jerker
    Department of Chemistry, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Per-Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Abundance and dynamics of antibiotic resistance genes and integrons in lake sediment microcosms2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 9, p. e108151-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antibiotic resistance in bacteria causing disease is an ever growing threat to the world. Recently, environmental bacteria have become established as important both as sources of antibiotic resistance genes and in disseminating resistance genes. Low levels of antibiotics and other pharmaceuticals are regularly released into water environments via wastewater, and the concern is that such environmental contamination may serve to create hotspots for antibiotic resistance gene selection and dissemination. In this study, microcosms were created from water and sediments gathered from a lake in Sweden only lightly affected by human activities. The microcosms were exposed to a mixture of antibiotics of varying environmentally relevant concentrations (i.e., concentrations commonly encountered in wastewaters) in order to investigate the effect of low levels of antibiotics on antibiotic resistance gene abundances and dynamics in a previously uncontaminated environment. Antibiotic concentrations were measured using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Abundances of seven antibiotic resistance genes and the class 1 integron integrase gene, intL1, were quantified using real-time PCR. Resistance genes sulI and ermB were quantified in the microcosm sediments with mean abundances 5 and 15 gene copies/10(6) 16S rRNA gene copies, respectively. Class 1 integrons were determined in the sediments with a mean concentration of 3.86x10(4) copies/10(6) 16S rRNA gene copies. The antibiotic treatment had no observable effect on antibiotic resistance gene or integron abundances.

  • 12.
    Berglund, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Khan, Ghazanfar Ali
    Department of Chemistry, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Weisner, Stefan E B
    Wetland Research Centre, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Ehde, Per Magnus
    Wetland Research Centre, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Fick, Jerker
    Department of Chemistry, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Per-Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Efficient removal of antibiotics in surface-flow constructed wetlands, with no observed impact on antibiotic resistance genes.2014In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 476-477, p. 29-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, there have been growing concerns about pharmaceuticals including antibiotics as environmental contaminants. Antibiotics of concentrations commonly encountered in wastewater have been suggested to affect bacterial population dynamics and to promote dissemination of antibiotic resistance. Conventional wastewater treatment processes do not always adequately remove pharmaceuticals causing environmental dissemination of low levels of these compounds. Using constructed wetlands as an additional treatment step after sewage treatment plants have been proposed as a cheap alternative to increase reduction of wastewater contaminants, however this means that the natural microbial community of the wetlands becomes exposed to elevated levels of antibiotics. In this study, experimental surface-flow wetlands in Sweden were continuously exposed to antibiotics of concentrations commonly encountered in wastewater. The aim was to assess the antibiotic removal efficiency of constructed wetlands and to evaluate the impact of low levels of antibiotics on bacterial diversity, resistance development and expression in the wetland bacterial community. Antibiotic concentrations were measured using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and the effect on the bacterial diversity was assessed with 16S rRNA-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Real-time PCR was used to detect and quantify antibiotic resistance genes and integrons in the wetlands, during and after the exposure period. The results indicated that the antibiotic removal efficiency of constructed wetlands was comparable to conventional wastewater treatment schemes. Furthermore, short-term treatment of the constructed wetlands with environmentally relevant concentrations (i.e. 100-2000 ng×l(-1)) of antibiotics did not significantly affect resistance gene concentrations, suggesting that surface-flow constructed wetlands are well-suited for wastewater treatment purposes.

  • 13.
    Bi, Z.
    et al.
    Shandong Ctr Dis Control and Prevent, Peoples R China.
    Sun, C.
    China Agr Univ, Peoples R China.
    Borjesson, S.
    Natl Vet Inst SVA, Sweden.
    Chen, B.
    Shandong Ctr Dis Control and Prevent, Peoples R China.
    Ji, X.
    China Agr Univ, Peoples R China.
    Berglund, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wang, M.
    Shandong Ctr Dis Control and Prevent, Peoples R China.
    Nilsson, Maud
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Yin, Hong
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sun, Q.
    Shandong Univ, Peoples R China; Shandong Univ, Peoples R China.
    Hulth, A.
    Publ Hlth Agcy Sweden, Sweden.
    Wang, Y.
    China Agr Univ, Peoples R China.
    Wu, C.
    China Agr Univ, Peoples R China.
    Bi, Z.
    Shandong Ctr Dis Control and Prevent, Peoples R China.
    Nilsson, Lennart E
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Identical genotypes of community-associated MRSA (ST59) and livestock-associated MRSA (ST9) in humans and pigs in rural China2018In: Zoonoses and Public Health, ISSN 1863-1959, E-ISSN 1863-2378, Vol. 65, no 3, p. 367-371Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated the prevalence of MRSA in samples taken in households, with and without backyard pigs in villages in a rural area of Shandong Province, China. Community-associated MRSA and livestock-associated MRSA, belonging to ST59 and ST9, respectively, were identified in both humans and pigs. The genotypic and phenotypic comparison of isolates indicates that bidirectional transmission of MRSA has occurred between humans and pigs in the villages.

  • 14.
    Bi, Zhenwang
    et al.
    Shandong Centre Disease Control and Prevent, Peoples R China.
    Berglund, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sun, Qiang
    Shandong University, Peoples R China; Shandong University, Peoples R China.
    Nilsson, Maud
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Chen, Baoli
    Shandong Centre Disease Control and Prevent, Peoples R China.
    Tärnberg, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ding, Lilu
    Shandong University, Peoples R China.
    Stalsby Lundborg, Cecilia
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Bi, Zhenqiang
    Shandong Centre Disease Control and Prevent, Peoples R China.
    Tomson, Goran
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Yao, Jingjing
    Shandong University, Peoples R China.
    Gu, Zhanying
    Shandong University, Peoples R China.
    Yin, Xiao
    Jinan Central Hospital, Peoples R China.
    Kou, Zengqiang
    Shandong Centre Disease Control and Prevent, Peoples R China.
    Nilsson, Lennart E
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Prevalence of the mcr-1 colistin resistance gene in extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli from human faecal samples collected in 2012 in rural villages in Shandong Province, China2017In: International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents, ISSN 0924-8579, E-ISSN 1872-7913, Vol. 49, no 4, p. 493-497Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since its initial discovery in China in 2015, the plasmid-mediated colistin resistance gene mcr-1 has been reported in Escherichia coli isolated from clinical samples, animals and meat worldwide. In this study, 706 extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing E. coli from 411 persons were detected in a collection of faecal samples from 1000 rural residents in three counties in Shandong Province, China. These isolates were screened for mcr-1 and phenotypic colistin resistance. The gene was found in 3.5% of the isolates (from 4.9% of persons) from all three counties. All isolates with phenotypic colistin resistance carried mcr-1. These data indicate that commensal carriage of ESBL-producing E. coli with mcr-1 among persons in rural China was already present in 2012 and that mcr-1 was the most important colistin resistance mechanism. Interventions are necessary to minimise further dissemination of mcr-1, which would limit the future usefulness of colistin as a last-resort antibiotic. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  • 15.
    Chi, Xiaohui
    et al.
    Shandong Univ, Peoples R China.
    Berglund, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Zhejiang Univ, Peoples R China.
    Zou, Huiyun
    Shandong Univ, Peoples R China.
    Zheng, Beiwen
    Zhejiang Univ, Peoples R China.
    Börjesson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Natl Vet Inst, Sweden.
    Ji, Xiang
    Shandong Univ, Peoples R China.
    Ottoson, Jakob
    Natl Food Agcy, Sweden.
    Lundborg, Cecilia Stalsby
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Li, Xuewen
    Shandong Univ, Peoples R China.
    Nilsson, Lennart E
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Characterization of Clinically Relevant Strains of Extended-Spectrum beta-Lactamase-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Occurring in Environmental Sources in a Rural Area of China by Using Whole-Genome Sequencing2019In: Frontiers in Microbiology, ISSN 1664-302X, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 10, article id 211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a gram-negative, opportunistic pathogen, and a common cause of healthcare-associated infections such as pneumonia, septicemia, and urinary tract infection. The purpose of this study was to survey the occurrence of and characterize K. pneumoniae in different environmental sources in a rural area of Shandong province, China. Two hundred and thirty-one samples from different environmental sources in 12 villages were screened for extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-(ESBL)-producing K. pneumoniae, and 14 (6%) samples were positive. All isolates were multidrug-resistant and a few of them belonged to clinically relevant strains which are known to cause hospital outbreaks worldwide. Serotypes, virulence genes, serum survival, and phagocytosis survival were analyzed and the results showed the presence of virulence factors associated with highly virulent clones and a high degree of phagocytosis survivability, indicating the potential virulence of these isolates. These results emphasize the need for further studies designed to elucidate the role of the environment in transmission and dissemination of ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae and the potential risk posed to human and environmental health.

  • 16.
    Hanna, Nada
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Sun, Pan
    Shandong Univ, Peoples R China.
    Sun, Qiang
    Shandong Univ, Peoples R China.
    Li, Xuewen
    Shandong Univ, Peoples R China.
    Yang, Xiwei
    Shandong Univ, Peoples R China.
    Ji, Xiang
    Shandong Univ, Peoples R China.
    Zou, Huiyun
    Shandong Univ, Peoples R China.
    Ottoson, Jakob
    Natl Food Agcy, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Lennart E
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Berglund, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dyar, Oliver James
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Tamhankar, Ashok J.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Lundborg, Cecilia Stalsby
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Presence of antibiotic residues in various environmental compartments of Shandong province in eastern China: Its potential for resistance development and ecological and human risk2018In: Environment International, ISSN 0160-4120, E-ISSN 1873-6750, Vol. 114, p. 131-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To investigate the occurrence of antibiotic residues in different types of environmental samples including water samples in rural Shandong province, China. Further, to characterize the potential ecological risk for development of antibiotic resistance in the environment, and the potential direct human health risk of exposure to antibiotics via drinking water and vegetables. Methods: Environmental samples (n = 214) (river water, waste water, drinking water, sediments, manure, soil and edible parts of vegetables) were collected in twelve villages in Shandong province in eastern China. High performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) was used to determine the concentration of antibiotic residues. The ratio of the measured environmental concentrations (MEC) to the predicted no-effect concentrations (PNEC) was used to evaluate the ecological risk (risk quotient, RQ) for development of antibiotic resistance. The potential risks to human health through exposure to antibiotics in drinking water were assessed by comparing measured environmental concentrations (MEC) and predicted no-effect concentration in drinking water (PNECDW), and in vegetables by comparing estimated daily intake (EDI) to ADI. Results: Sulfapyridine, sulfamethoxazole, ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, levofloxacin, norfloxacin, chloramphenicol, florfenicol, doxycycline, and metronidazole were detected at concentrations ranging between 0.3 and 3.9 ng/L in river water, 1.3 and 12.5 ng/L in waste water, 0.5 and 21.4 ng/L in drinking water, 0.31 and 1.21 mu g/kg in river sediment, 0.82 and 1.91 mu g/kg in pig manure, 0.1 and 11.68 mu g/kg in outlet sediment, 0.5 and 2.5 mu g/kg in soil, and 6.3 and 27.2 mu g/kg in vegetables. The RQs for resistance development were amp;gt; 1 for enrofloxacin, levofloxacin, and ranged between 0.1 and 1 for ciprofloxacin. MECs/PNECDW ratios were amp;lt; 1 from exposure to antibiotics through drinking water for both adults and children. EDI/ADI ratios were amp;lt; 0.1 from exposure to antibiotics by vegetable consumption. Conclusions: Antibiotic pollutants were ubiquitous in various environmental compartments of Shandong province of China. Risk estimates indicated a potential for the measured levels of enrofloxacin, levofloxacin and ciprofloxacin in waste water to pose an ecological risk for resistance selection, and further studies are needed to validate this finding. The investigated antibiotics did not appear to pose an appreciable direct human health risk from environmental exposure through drinking water or vegetables consumption. However, they might still pose a risk for resistance development.

  • 17.
    Ji, Xiang
    et al.
    Shandong Univ, Peoples R China.
    Zheng, Beiwen
    Zhejiang Univ, Peoples R China.
    Berglund, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Zhejiang Univ, Peoples R China.
    Zou, Huiyun
    Shandong Univ, Peoples R China.
    Sun, Qiang
    Shandong Univ, Peoples R China.
    Chi, Xiaohui
    Shandong Univ, Peoples R China.
    Ottoson, Jakob
    Natl Food Agcy, Sweden.
    Li, Xuewen
    Shandong Univ, Peoples R China.
    Lundborg, Cecilia Stalsby
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Lennart E
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dissemination of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli carrying mcr-1 among multiple environmental sources in rural China and associated risk to human health2019In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 251, p. 619-627Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antibiotic resistance among gram-negative bacteria is increasingly becoming a problem of global concern. Particularly problematic is the emergence of resistance to last-resort antibiotics such as carbapenems and colistin. The increasing number of reports on the plasmid-mediated colistin resistance gene mcr-1 in isolates worldwide is raising concerns for the future usefulness of this class of antibiotics. Dissemination of mcr-1 is believed to have originated mainly from animal breeding, however, the role of the environment as a transmission source is not yet fully understood. In the current study, 89 extended spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli isolated from 231 samples from different environmental sources in 12 villages in a rural area of Shandong, China, were screened for mcr-1.17 (19.1%) mcr-1-positive isolates were found from different environmental sources, aggregated in 6 villages. Plasmids of three different Inc-groups carrying mcr-1 were confirmed, indicating that the widespread geographical distribution of mcr-1 in the local area is due to a number of different plasmids. Additionally, almost a third (29.4%) of the isolates carried virulence factors associated to intestinal pathogenic E. coli. These results illustrate the high complexity of the transmission patterns of mcr-1 among different environmental matrices on a local scale and the potential for the environment to facilitate dissemination and emergence of antibiotic-resistant and virulent strains of bacteria. (C) 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 18.
    Sun, Pan
    et al.
    Shandong University, Peoples R China.
    Bi, Zhenwang
    Shandong Centre Disease Control and Prevent, Peoples R China.
    Nilsson, Maud
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Zheng, Beiwen
    Zhejiang University, Peoples R China.
    Berglund, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Stalsby Lundborg, Cecilia
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Borjesson, Stefan
    National Vet Institute, Sweden.
    Li, Xuewen
    Shandong University, Peoples R China.
    Chen, Baoli
    Shandong Centre Disease Control and Prevent, Peoples R China.
    Yin, Hong
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Lennart E
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Occurrence of bla(KPC-2), bla(CTX-M), and mcr-1 in Enterobacteriaceae from Well Water in Rural China2017In: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, ISSN 0066-4804, E-ISSN 1098-6596, Vol. 61, no 4, article id e02569Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on the coexistence of mcr-1 and blaCTX-M in multidrugresistant, extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli belonging to the sequence type 10 complex isolated from well water in rural China. Raoultella ornithinolytica with bla(KPC-2) was also detected in well water from the same area. This study shows that genes coding for resistance to last-resort antibiotics are present in wells in rural China, indicating a potential source of antibiotic resistance.

  • 19.
    Zou, Huiyun
    et al.
    Shandong Univ, Peoples R China.
    Zheng, Beiwen
    Zhejiang Univ, Peoples R China.
    Sun, Mingli
    Ctr Dis Prevent and Control, Peoples R China.
    Ottoson, Jakob
    Natl Food Agcy, Sweden.
    Li, Yubo
    Ctr Dis Prevent and Control, Peoples R China.
    Berglund, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Zhejiang Univ, Peoples R China.
    Chi, Xiaohui
    Shandong Univ, Peoples R China.
    Ji, Xiang
    Shandong Univ, Peoples R China.
    Li, Xuewen
    Shandong Univ, Peoples R China.
    Lundborg, Cecilia Stalsby
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology, Infection and Inflammation. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Evaluating Dissemination Mechanisms of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria in Rural Environments in China by Using CTX-M-Producing Escherichia coli as an Indicator2019In: Microbial Drug Resistance, ISSN 1076-6294, E-ISSN 1931-8448Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is becoming increasingly recognized that the environment plays an important role both in the emergence and in dissemination of antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB), Mechanisms and factors facilitating this development are, however, not yet well understood. The high detection rate of CTX-M genes in environmental sources provides an opportunity to explore this issue. In this study, 88 CTX-M-producing Escherichia coli were isolated from 30 pig feces samples from 30 pig farms and 201 environmental samples. CTX-M-producing E. coli was detected with the following frequencies in the different types of samples: pig feces, 73%; river water, 64%; river sediment, 52%; wastewater, 31%; drinking water, 23%; outlet sediment, 21%; soil, 17%; and vegetables, 4.4%. Dissemination of CTX-M-producing E. coli to different environmental matrices was evaluated by analyzing the genetic relatedness of isolates from different environmental sources, and putative transmission routes through bird feces, pig feces, drinking water, river sediment, river water, and wastewater were hypothesized. Dissemination through these routes is likely facilitated by anthropogenic activities and environmental factors. Wild birds as potential vectors for dissemination of CTX-M-producing E. coli have the capacity to spread ARB across long distances. Regional dissemination between different environmental matrices of CTX-M-producing E. coli increases the exposure risk of humans and animals in the area.

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