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  • 1.
    Amars, Latif
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Independent Climate Researcher, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.
    Fridahl, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Hagemann, Markus
    NewClimate Institute, Germany.
    Röser, Frauke
    NewClimate Institute, Germany.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research.
    The transformational potential of Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions in Tanzania: assessing the concept’s cultural legitimacy among stakeholders in the solar energy sector2017In: Local Environment: the International Journal of Justice and Sustainability, ISSN 1354-9839, E-ISSN 1469-6711, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 86-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While energy-sector emissions remain the biggest source of climate change, many least-developed countries still invest in fossil-fuel development paths. These countries generally have high levels of fossil fuel technology lock-in and low capacities to change, making the shift to sustainable energy difficult. Tanzania, a telling example, is projected to triple fossil-fuel power production in the next decade. This article assesses the potential to use internationally supported Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) to develop solar energy in Tanzania and contribute to transformational change of the electricity supply system. By assessing the cultural legitimacy of NAMAs among key stakeholders in the solar energy sector, we analyse the conditions for successful uptake of the concept in (1) national political thought and institutional frameworks and (2) the solar energy niche. Interview data are analysed from a multi-level perspective on transition, focusing on its cultural dimension. Several framings undermining legitimacy are articulated, such as attaching low-actor credibility to responsible agencies and the concept’s poor fit with political priorities. Actors that discern opportunities for NAMAs could, however, draw on a framing of high commensurability between experienced social needs and opportunities to use NAMAs to address them through climate compatible development. This legitimises NAMAs and could challenge opposing framings.

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  • 2.
    André, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Simonsson, Louise
    Totalförsvarets forskningsinstitut, Umeå.
    Gerger Swartling, Åsa
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Method development for identifying and analysing stakeholders in climate change adaptation processes2012In: Journal of Environmental Policy and Planning, ISSN 1523-908X, E-ISSN 1522-7200, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 243-261Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is now widely recognized that stakeholder interaction and dialogue is essential to improve decisions about and awareness of climate change. The term ‘stakeholder’ is broad and researchers and practitioners may have interrelated and contrasting views on who is a stakeholder or who is (or should be) responsible for adaptation to climate change. To engage stakeholders in research or other projects on adaptation thus requires a careful mapping of the stakeholder landscape and identification of relevant actors at different levels. Through a case study approach, based on studies of two Swedish urban regions, Stockholm and Gothenburg, this paper proposes a systematic method to analyse and identify roles and responsibilities in the stakeholder landscape. The initial mapping exercise was complemented by participatory studies of local and regional stakeholders’ perceptions of who is, or should be, involved in adaptation and their significance for climate change adaptation in the respective regions. The results indicate the value of careful stakeholder analysis for sustainable, effective, planned adaptation that is flexible, but also systematic enough to fulfil practical and scientific requirements for the study and advancement of ongoing adaptation processes and implementation.

  • 3.
    Backstrand, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Kuyper, Jonathan W.
    Stockholm University, Sweden; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. University of Oxford, England.
    Lövbrand, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Non-state actors in global climate governance: from Copenhagen to Paris and beyond2017In: Environmental Politics, ISSN 0964-4016, E-ISSN 1743-8934, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 561-579Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 4.
    Benulic, Kajsa-Stina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kropf, Marianne
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Wibeck, Victoria
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    The meaning of leadership in polycentric climate action2022In: Environmental Politics, ISSN 0964-4016, E-ISSN 1743-8934, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 1016-1036Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research points to leadership as a key ingredient in mitigation of and adaptation to climate change. We adopt a polycentric perspective and use focus group interviews with Swedish actors within the business sector, politics, and government agencies, to analyse participants views on what it means to lead, preconditions of leadership, and division of responsibilities, in a context of transformative change. Our results suggest that participants focus on collective dimensions of leadership rather than front-running but see multiple ways of demonstrating climate leadership as being available to actors across governance levels and issue areas. Challenges to these views on leadership include the request for shared rules and regulations, and courage among leaders to enact coercive top-down leadership to handle conflicts and trade-offs. We conclude that polycentric transformative leadership is by default polysemic and will require multiple leadership roles at different scales changing over time.

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  • 5.
    Bohman, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Glaas, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Karlson, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Navarra, Carlo
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Olsson, Jonas
    SMHI.
    Hundecha, Yeshewatesfa
    SMHI.
    Opach, Tomas
    Department of Geography, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU).
    Schmid Neset, Tina-Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Visual Water: En visualiseringsplattform för dagvatten- och skyfallsplanering i ett klimat under förändring2021Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Visual Water (http//visualwater.se) is an interactive web-based platform for geographic and information visualization aiming to support Swedish municipalities working towards sustainable stormwater management. The content and functionalities of the platform are designed to respond to central challenges as they are defined by actors in the Swedish stormwater sector who find themselves in the shift away from underground pipe-bound solutions towards blue-green measures in the urban environment.

  • 6.
    Bohman, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Glaas, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Klein, Johannes
    Geol Survey Finland, Finland.
    Landauer, Mia
    Univ Lapland, Finland; IIASA, Austria.
    Schmid Neset, Tina
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Juhola, Sirkku
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Univ Helsinki, Finland; Helsinki Inst Sustainabil Sci HELSUS, Finland.
    On the call for issue advocates, or what it takes to make adaptation research useful2018In: Climatic Change, ISSN 0165-0009, E-ISSN 1573-1480, Vol. 149, no 2, p. 121-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This essay discusses the concept of usefulness of research for climate change adaptation. Based on prior research and stakeholder interactions with policymakers and practitioners in the Nordic countries, we contend that critical issues related to the usefulness of adaptation research seem less associated with content (i.e. research outputs), but rather centre around the efforts made to design and communicate research, that is, to put research at the service of society and make the case for adaptation on the political agenda. This, we argue, to some extent mirrors the situation and political context in the Nordic countries, where adaptation in many locations still is an issue in its infancy, not firmly established on the political agendas, and where working procedures are not yet institutionally settled. In this context, science is considered and sometimes used as a discursive tool to make the case for adaptation. Based on the calls for research that inspires, raises hope and helps to raise the issue of adaptation on the political agendas, we elaborate the role of honest issue advocates for researchers in the field of adaptation science.

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  • 7.
    Cioc, Mark
    et al.
    University of California at Santa Cruz .
    Linnér, Björn Ola
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Osborn, Matt
    Green Mountain College, USA.
    Environmental History Writing in Northern Europe2000In: Environmental History, ISSN 1084-5453, E-ISSN 1930-8892, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 397-407Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Eliasson, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Wiréhn, Lotten
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Neset, Tina-Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Transformations towards sustainable food systems: contrasting Swedish practitioner perspectives with the European Commission’s Farm to Fork Strategy2022In: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 17, p. 2411-2425Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores features of food system transformations towards sustainability in the Farm to Fork Strategy in relation toperspectives of Swedish food system practitioners. Transformations towards sustainable food systems are essential to achievethe United Nations’ 2030 Agenda and the need for more sustainable food systems has been recognised in the European GreenDeal and its Farm to Fork Strategy. The Swedish ambition to act as a global leader in achieving the 2030 Agenda and theEuropean Commission’s aspiration for Europe to lead global food system transformations offer a critical opportunity to studytransformational processes and agents of change in a high-income region with externalised environmental and sustainabilityimpacts. Drawing on theories of complex systems transformations, this study identifies features of food system transformations,exploring places to intervene and examines the roles, responsibilities, and agency related to these changes. The resultsof this study provide three main conclusions highlighting (i) alignment of high-level policy and the perspectives of nationalpractitioners at the paradigm level, especially concerning how food is valued, which is a crucial first step for transformationalprocesses to come about (ii) a lack of clarity as well as diversity of pathways to transform food systems although commonobjectives are expressed, and (iii) governance mechanisms as enablers for a diversity of transformations. Moreover, theseprocesses must acknowledge the contextual and complex nature of food systems and the level of agency and power of actors.

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  • 9.
    Feetham, Pam
    et al.
    Massey Univ, Sch Commun Journalism & Mkt, Private Bag 11 222, Palmerston North 4442, New Zealand.
    Vaccarino, Franco
    Massey Univ, Sch Commun Journalism & Mkt, Private Bag 11 222, Palmerston North 4442, New Zealand.
    Wibeck, Victoria
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Using Talanoa as a Research Method can Facilitate Collaborative Engagement and Understanding between Indigenous and Non-Indigenous Communities2023In: Qualitative Research, ISSN 1468-7941, E-ISSN 1741-3109, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 1439-1460, article id 14687941221087863Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inclusion of indigenous knowledge and voices is paramount if societal transformations relative to climate change are to be fully and appropriately considered. However, much of the research in this area still uses Western-based research methodologies rather than methodologies driven by the local Indigenous communities. Therefore, it is highly likely that large numbers of affected communities remain excluded from global discussions and decisions around climate change solutions and policy. This article presents talanoa, a qualitative culturally centred research methodology used in many Pacific Island countries. As non-Indigenous researchers, we present our exploration of Indigenous research methods and talanoa experiences in a framework that confirms the importance of relationships when conducting research with Indigenous communities. We also propose that talanoa is a crucial component for qualitative research as it can help facilitate knowledge exchange and understanding among Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities.

  • 10.
    Francisco, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    AI and the governance of sustainable development. An idea analysis of the European Union, the United Nations, and the World Economic Forum2023In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 150, article id 103590Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an idea analysis of AI in the policy documents and reports of the United Nations, the European Union, and the World Economic Forum. The three organisations expect AI to contribute to sustainability and a prosperous future with better data analysis, greater amounts of quantitative knowledge, and by making economic and social activities less wasteful and more energy efficient. Several challenges are also named: ethics, human rights, cybersecurity, access to reliable data, transparency, and the digital gap. The solutions presented are multi-stakeholder collaboration, cohesive but flexible governance frameworks, but also taking the lead to push for ethical and value-based AI and making sure AI is sustainable. Ideas about AI appear to stem from discourses of ecological modernisation and green governmentality. This framing turns political and structural challenges into technical issues to be solved with more data, greater collaboration, and technical progress. The similarities in ideas between the EU, the UN, and the World Economic Forum also suggest that ideas about AI and sustainable development have reached discourse institutionalisation. Ideas about AI are therefore likely to reinforce already existing institutional and discursive settings.

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  • 11.
    Fridahl, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Objectives for Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs): Moving from Mitigation to Sustainable Development for more Ambitious Climate Policy2015Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    he new global climate agreement due in Paris, late 2015, will most likely be the sum of envisioned, nationally determined, actions. The concept of Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) was agreed in 2007 to incentivise developing countries to enhance the implementation of the Climate Convention. A strategic choice for the international policy makers is whether NAMAs should emphasize mitigation or if emission reductions can be a supplementary benefit of pursuing sustainable development objectives. The International Negotiations Survey at the UN Climate Change Conferences shows critical differences among developing and developed countries’ governmental representatives on the primary goal of NAMAs. Yet substantial overlaps exist, which allows for probing common ground to build agreement. There seems to be support for making mitigation a co-benefit of NAMAs. Doing so would take the negotiations toward a very explicit low-emission development trajectory focus for developing countries, which may result in a more effective treaty. It is imperative to stress that mitigation prospects alone will not sell NAMAs to decision makers in most developing countries; the possibility of attracting international financial support to nationally defined development opportunities, with ancillary mitigation benefits, on the contrary, can be sold politically. Greater adherence to a wider development focus of NAMAs, with sustainable development as primary objective and mitigation as co-benefit, may well stimulate broader participation and spur enhanced national ambitions for Paris.

  • 12.
    Fridahl, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research .
    Perspectives on the Green Climate Fund: Possible compromises on capitalization and balanced allocation2016In: Climate and Development, ISSN 1756-5529, E-ISSN 1756-5537, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 105-109Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Finance is at the heart of UN climate diplomacy. Through the long-term finance pledge, developed countries have committed to mobilize USD 100 billion annually from 2020 onwards to support climate action in developing countries. The Green Climate Fund (GCF) is also expected to become a key player in the climate finance landscape. This viewpoint presents the views of representatives of developed and developing countries’ governments on how the annual sum of USD 100 billion should be dispensed by the GCF, based on a survey conducted at the 2013 UN Climate Change Conference in Warsaw. Respondents’ give their views on (1) the mitigation/adaptation ratio in GCF support and (2) the public/private ratio in financial sources. Respondents from developing countries would prefer to channel a substantially higher amount of the long-term finance pledge through the GCF. The extent to which the long-term finance pledge should be governed by the GCF is contentious, because governments pledge long-term finance without specifying the mitigation/adaptation ratio, whereas the GCF Board is tasked with balancing the allocation of its funds between adaptation and mitigation. This contention is fuelled by the fact that developing countries have a greater say in the allocation of funds from the GCF than from alternative sources of finance for the long-term finance pledge. We suggest that it is time to (1) reformulate the pledge to clarify its mitigation/adaptation ratio and (2) agree to definitions of key concepts such as “climate finance” and “private finance” to allow for more distinct negotiating positions on sources of finance.

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  • 13.
    Friman (Fridahl), Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research.
    Getting the NAMA Registry’s flawed incentive structure right2014In: Annual Status Report on Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) 2014 / [ed] Xander van Tilburg and Shikha Bhasin, Petten and Cologne: ECN and Ecofys , 2014, , p. 41p. 32-33Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report is prepared and published as part of the MitigationMomentum project, a collaboration between ECN Policy Studies and Ecofys Germany. The project aims to support the development of Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) by contributing to the concrete development of NAMA proposals, and foster cooperation and knowledge exchange within the NAMA community.

    The UNFCCC NAMA Registry will most likely become asidelined remnant in the future NAMA landscape unlessthe flawed incentive structure for making submissions isaddressed. The main disincentive for filing NAMAs in theRegistry is plain: its matching function is failing, so far.The potential of the Registry as a site of learning, trustbuilding and efficiency will be hard to realize withoutaddressing this disincentive.

    Here, we suggest ideas to actualize the Registry intoa central node for both matching NAMA proposalswith support and information sharing. We centre theargument on making the Registry a submission portalfor NAMAs seeking support. The suggestions imply anumber of consequential issues that we also outline inbrief.

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  • 14.
    Friman (Fridahl), Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Technologies confining equity: the case of historical responsibility in UNFCCC negotiations2006In: Technologies of Nature Politics, 2006, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of historical responsibility aims at attributing individual country burdens in mitigating climate change based on the relative levels of past emissions. Brazil presented the first comprehensive version of the concept of historical responsibility before the pre Kyoto climate change negotiations in 1997. The -Brazilian proposal- combined retributive and distributive as well as inter- and intra-generational justice. However, the issue of historical responsibility very soon turned technical and was referred to the Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technological Advice. It illustrates how disparities in knowledge production influence the negotiations. The proposal was restrained in policy process due to lack of scientific expertise from Southern countries and due to non-inclusive discourse. The proposal stranded on problems of how to correctly represent physical nature in mathematical models, marginalising the original intentions of equity in relation to the North-South divide as well as to past and future generations thus undercutting a potential angle of approach for achieving good global governance. 

  • 15.
    Friman (Fridahl), Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Linnér, Björn-ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Technology obscuring equity: historical responsibility in UNFCCC negotiations2008In: Climate Policy, ISSN 1469-3062, E-ISSN 1752-7457, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 339-354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to the concept of historical responsibility, the commitments of individual countries to take action on climate change are distributed based on the relative effects of their past emissions as manifested in present climate change. Brazil presented a comprehensive version of the concept to pre-Kyoto negotiations in 1997. The ‘Brazilian proposal’ originally combined several justice principles; however, following referral to the Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technological Advice, discussion soon became confined to technical calculations. This case illustrates how disparities in knowledge production and framing can influence the inclusiveness of negotiations. Southern participation in the policy process was restrained due to lack of scientific expertise on the part of Southern countries and due to the non-inclusive biophysical discourse traditionally preferred by Northern policy-makers. The historical responsibility issue became stranded on problems of how to correctly represent physical nature in climate models. This marginalized the original intention that equity should be the guiding principle of the North–South interaction, arguably undercutting a potential angle of approach to advance the climate change negotiations. The article concludes that in the interest of facilitating the North–South dialogue in climate change negotiations, any framing of historical responsibility that excludes equity needs to be redefined.

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  • 16.
    Friman (Fridahl), Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Technology obscuring equity: the case of historical responsibility in UNFCCC2007Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Many of today's most pressing environmental problems share one important characteristic: they are cross-boundary, i.e., they disregard political and geographical borders. Obviously, this is challenging for several reasons. One is that present legal and political institutionshave no effective reach beyond the nation-state. The same is the case with most political authority. Furthermore, the border crossing character of many environmental problems is also ethically challenging. What is a fair distribution of the burdens required to mitigate and adapt to e.g., climate change, chemical pollution andover use of marine resources and/or to make society less vulnerable to its' consequences? And perhaps even more difficult: Who has theresponsibility to take action - those causing the problems or those inrisk to suffer from the devastating effects? The papers in this section are discussing environmental problems from such points of view as authority, responsibility and distributive justice. 

  • 17.
    Friman (Fridahl), Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Technology obscuring equity: the case of historical responsibility in UNFCCC negotiations2007In: Authority, Responsibility and Justice in Environmental Politics: Papers from the 8. Nordic Environmental Social Science Research Conference June 18-20 2007. Workshop 1 / [ed] Inger Balberg and Hege Hofstad, Oslo: NIBR , 2007, p. 103-122Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    According to the concept of historical responsibility, the commitments of individual countries to mitigating climate change are distributed based on the relative effects of their past emissions as manifested in present climate change. Brazil presented a comprehensive version of the concept to pre-Kyoto negotiations in 1997. The “Brazilian proposal” originally combined several justice principles; however, following referral to the Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technological Advice, discussion soon became technical. This case illustrates how disparities in knowledge production and framing can influence the inclusiveness of negotiations. Southern participation in the policy process was restrained due to lack of scientific expertise on the part of Southern countries and due to the non-inclusive biophysical discourse traditionally preferred by the North. The historical responsibility issue became stranded on problems of how correctly to represent physical nature in climate models. This marginalized the original intention that equity should be the guiding principle of the North−South interaction, arguably undercutting a potential angle of approach to advance the climate change negotiations.

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    Technology obscuring equity: the case of historical responsibility in UNFCCC negotiations
  • 18.
    Friman (Fridahl), Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Upadhyaya, Prabhat
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    A Phased Approach to Internationally Supported NAMAs2013In: Mitigation Talks, Vol. 3-4, no 4 & 1, p. 4p. 5-8Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Friman (Fridahl), Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Upadhyaya, Prabhat
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Supporting Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions through the Green Climate Fund: Governance capacities and challenges2014In: Proceedings of the Forum on Development and Mitigation, Cape Town 2014 / [ed] Jooste, Meagan, Emily Tyler, Kim Coetzee, Anya Boyd, and Michael Boulle, Cape Town: Energy Research Centre, University of Cape Town , 2014, p. 65-77Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Green Climate Fund (GCF), the new operating entity under the Financial Mechanism of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, is emerging as an innovative multilateral climate finance institution. Among other things, it is commissioned to support developing countries’ project-based and programmatic pursuits to address climate change, including Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs). Promising as these ambitions may be, the GCF’s effectiveness in supporting NAMAs hinges on overcoming significant governance challenges. Using perspectives from international environmental law and governance literature, this paper identifies some crucial governance challenges and analyses the capacities granted to the GCF Board in dealing with them. Developed countries expect that support will lead to measured emissions reductions. Developing countries prefer stringent monitoring of support while hesitating to agree on internationally defined NAMA criteria. The GCF will struggle with this balancing act. Absence of concrete criteria for deciding on NAMA support may prompt potential funders to seek other channels for supporting NAMAs. On the other hand, too-rigid criteria may discourage developing countries from submitting NAMA proposals. For the GCF to be effective in incentivising development and diffusion of NAMAs, we argue that the contracting Parties to the Convention will have to forge an institution that has the capacity to balance diverging expectations on NAMAs. Our analysis indicates that the GCF Board has the governance capacity to efficiently deal with this challenging balancing act. Inability to exercise this capacity may result in establishing a strong empty shell for supporting NAMAs.

  • 20.
    Glaas, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Bohman, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Karlson, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Navarra, Carlo
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Olsson, Jonas
    Swedish Meteorol & Hydrol Inst, Sweden.
    Hundecha, Yeshewatesfa
    Swedish Meteorol & Hydrol Inst, Sweden.
    Opach, Tomasz
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Norway.
    Cederlund, Douglas
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sjulander, Jennifer
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Neset, Tina-Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Development and user testing of the ICT-platform Visual Water supporting sustainable municipal stormwater planning2022In: Urban Water Journal, ISSN 1573-062X, E-ISSN 1744-9006, Vol. 19, no 9, p. 962-974Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The need to develop sustainable stormwater management is intensifying due to climate impacts and urban densification. Such complex planning processes require insights into disparate issues, connecting heterogeneous actors. While many decision-support tools are developed to facilitate such planning, research assessing their usefulness is requested. This study introduces and assesses one such ICT-tool; the Visual Water platform, aiming to support sustainable stormwater planning in Swedish municipalities. The study aims to identify critical points to consider for developers of related decision-support tools and to detangle requirements and tradeoffs in making them relevant and user-friendly, building on test-sessions with Swedish practitioners. Results show that the platform responds to challenges within municipal planning as outlined by Swedish practitioners. However, though the platform content is considered relevant, its application in real-world planning is perceived as somewhat unclear. The paper discusses ideas for how sustainability-related decision-support tools better can respond to user demands.

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    fulltext
  • 21.
    Glaas, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research.
    Gammelgaard Ballantyne, Anne
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Department of Business Development and Technology, Aarhus BSS, Aarhus University, Danmark.
    Neset, Tina-Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research.
    Navarra, Carlo
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research.
    Johansson, Jimmy
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Opach, Tomasz
    Department of Geography, Norwegian University of Science and Technology; Department of Global Development and Planning, University of Agder, Norge.
    Rød, Jan Ketil
    Department of Geography, Norwegian University of Science and Technology; Department of Global Development and Planning, University of Agder, Norge.
    Goodsite, Michael E.
    Department of Technology and Innovation, University of Southern Denmark, Danmark.
    Facilitating climate change adaptation through communication: Insights from the development of a visualization tool2015In: Energy Research and Social Science, ISSN 2214-6296, Vol. 10, p. 57-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change communication on anticipated impacts and adaptive responses is frequently presentedas an effective means to facilitate implementation of adaptation to mitigate risks to residential buildings.However, it requires that communication is developed in a way that resonates with the context of thetarget audience, provides intelligible information and addresses perceived barriers to adaptation. In thispaper we reflect upon criteria for useful climate change communication gained over a three year developmentprocess of a web-based tool – VisAdaptTM – aimed at increasing the adaptive capacity amongNordic homeowners. Based on the results from continuous user-testing and focus group interviews weoutline lessons learned and key aspects to consider in the design of tools for communicating complexissues such as climate change effects and adaptive response measures.

  • 22.
    Glaas, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Gammelgaard Ballantyne, Anne
    Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department of Business Development and Technology, Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Schmid Neset, Tina
    Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Visualization for supporting individual climate change adaptation planning: Assessment of a web-based tool2017In: Landscape and Urban Planning, ISSN 0169-2046, E-ISSN 1872-6062, Vol. 158, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Homeowners are important actors in implementing climate change adaptation. However, individual socio-cognitive constraints related to risk perceptions and perceived capacity may hamper their action. Climate change visualization could help planning and management overcome such constraints by offering accessible information to increase individual adaptive capacity. Such visualization would require that information be perceived as legitimate and credible by emphasizing the diversity of impacts and alternative options, and simultaneously as salient by highlighting context-specific risks and measures. Based on focus group interviews and test sessions, we analysed how homeowners made sense of and discussed a specific interactive planning support tool – VisAdapt™ – integrating climate scenarios, local risk maps, and adaptation measures for various house types. The tool combines precise and general depictions in visualizing climate change to support adaptation among Nordic homeowners. Results reveal that the tool spurred reflection on concrete local risks and various adaptation actions. The tool was less successful in providing a framework for assessing the magnitude of anticipated changes, making these appear as generally small. Visualization aspects that are important for spurring reflection on adaptive action are specifying various climate parameters, relating climate impacts to established practices for managing weather risks, and emphasizing diverse concrete short- and long-term measures.

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  • 23.
    Gottenhuber, Sara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Wibeck, Victoria
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Persson, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Stockholm Environment Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Greening recovery – Overcoming policy incoherence for sustainability transformations2023In: Environmental Policy and Governance, ISSN 1756-932X, E-ISSN 1756-9338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Policy coherence is crucial in the 2030 Agenda's transformative ambitions and heralded as of paramount importance to ensure the successful implementation of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals and climate policy targets. Despite political efforts to achieve policy coherence, apparent trade-offs and goal conflicts have emerged – even in a proclaimed ‘front-runner’ country like Sweden. This paper examines the role of ideas in proposing and legitimising policy options and achieving policy coherence in the light of the Swedish recovery debate in 2020 following the COVID-19 pandemic. Ideas of a green economic recovery put forward in the public debate are examined through thematic text and frame analysis. We show that ideas of a green transition, boosted by economic recovery spending, draw on a synergistic frame in combining social, environmental, and economic policy options, carrying a potential for coherency. However, the absence of a discussion on power, as in who stands to gain what under which circumstances, coupled with an inherent understanding of a temporal hierarchy of policy priorities does not only impact the ability to design coherent policies but may have considerable impacts on the prospects of achieving sustainability transformations.

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    fulltext
  • 24.
    Grennfelt, Peringe
    et al.
    IVL Swedish Environm Research Institute, Sverige .
    Kjellen, Bo
    Stockholm Environm Institute, Sverige.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Zetterberg, Lars
    IVL Swedish Environm Research Institute, Sverige.
    Socio-Economic Research in Support of Climate Policy Development: Mistras Research Program Clipore2012In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mistras Climate Policy Research Program, Clipore, is one of the largest research programs directed to support international climate policy development, involving research groups in Sweden, Norway, United States and India. It has been running from 2004 to 2011 with a budget of more than 100 MSEK (15 M USD). The paper briefly describes the program and its outcomes in relation to climate policy development. Discussion focuses on how the program has been able to be in the front of and include the development of emissions trading systems in Europe and the United States and how the program has been able to follow and produce inputs to the agenda of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). The paper also discusses how the program has managed to present its outcomes and maintain an active dialogue with the various stakeholders. The paper emphasises options and obstacles in the communication between science and policy.

  • 25.
    Hedrén, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Utopian thought and sustainable development2009In: Futures, ISSN 0016-3287, Vol. 41, no 4, p. 197-200Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Hedrén, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Utopian thought and the politics of sustainable development2009In: FUTURES, ISSN 0016-3287, Vol. 41, no 4, p. 210-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article argues that utopian thought is a necessary condition for the politics of sustainable development. Since utopian thought has so far been constrained by some typically Western features from the era of modernity, this requires a shift that transcends the following three fundamental aspects: the notions of fixed truth, fixed territoriality and fixed final goals for politics. The article argues that the concept of global sustainable development can entail three new elements of utopian thought: the disintegration of fixed territoriality, a never-ending story, and prismatic blueprints. Using these elements, utopian thought can provide transformative power, so that politics and policy making call meet contemporary global challenges to development and the environment.

  • 27.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Environmental management since world war II2006Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This background report to the IVA project “Environmental Foresight” presents how environmental problems and their management have evolved since World War II divided into five time periods: 1945-1971, 1972-1981, 1982-1991, 1992-2001, and 2002 and beyond. For each time period, the report recapitulates some of the most important socioeconomic and geopolitical trends internationally and nationally as well as the environmental debate. It presents a selection of environmental issues that received a lot of attention, including, inter alia, how and at what administrative level the issues under consideration were managed and what types of political interventions were used.

    In the first period we give three examples of issues that were essential in the environmental discourse at the time: 1) Global food supply, which illustrates that environmental issues always have contained a global dimension. 2) Struggles over the expansion of water power, shows another aspect of the controversies that follow exploitation of natural resources. 3) The spreading of mercury, represents the growing awareness that economic activities affected the environment and the growing concerns about pollution that arose at that time. In the second time period 1972-1981, the first example involves the efforts to link economic development and environmental consideration at UN level and in which Swedish diplomacy played a key role. The second example concerns an issue that has remained essential, namely the supply of energy, particularly the two oil crises and the fate of nuclear power. In the 1980s, and certain environmental problems were framed and more or less successfully handled in this new context. The report provides three examples of the increased emphasis on transboundary framing and handling of environmental degradation in the 1980s: 1) Acidification, which was managed rapidly at national level in Sweden wheras international regulation took almost two more decades. 2) The ozone hole, which inter alia illustrates the role of science in detecting environmental issues. Emblematic for the period 1992-2001 are the revival of the attempts to link economic growth and environmental consideration and the controversies surrounding of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change. Today we see an increasing emphasis on linkages between environmental issues, not the least climate, and trade. Another topical issue today is the Baltic Sea, which is a common regional resource that provides a multitude of ecological services and faces a number of environmental challenges.

    Globalisation and social, technological, cultural and economic modernisation processes influence two fundamental processes that characterize the period cover in this report: an unprecedented global environmental change, a dramatic shift in social organisation vis-à-vis the environment. The report concludes that although history do not repeat itself, we can conclude that hitherto chances of a successful management of an environmental issues has increased with a combination of political will/ambition as well as windows of opportunities in geopolitical, socioeconomic and technological respects. Consequently, reflexive and adaptive institutions have an advantage in coping with the inherent uncertainties of future conditions in economy, technology, politics and society.

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  • 28.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Functions of COP side-events in climate-change governance2010In: Climate Policy, ISSN 1469-3062, E-ISSN 1752-7457, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 167-180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Side-events are the most visible venue for civil society involvement in international climate negotiations. The many varied functions that side-events fulfil for participants and organizers are identified and analysed for their contributions generally as well as for their contribution to the negotiation process. The analysis is based on two surveys of over 2,000 side-event participants and organizers at COP-13 and COP-14. The surveyed side-events were found to fulfil the broader official objective of benefiting COP participants through providing a shared conceptual basis as well as building institutional capacity and legitimacy. All participant groups, particularly from Africa, G77, and less-developed countries, found these events useful for their work. As a venue for information dissemination, side-events provide an important opportunity for capacity building. Historically, new items were introduced at COP side-events before being discussed in the formal negotiations. Side-events also provide a process for creating a shared vision. By providing a forum that includes more organizations and actors in conjunction with the negotiations, side-events have the potential to increase the input legitimacy of the international policy process. A significant challenge will be the inclusion of a wider range of stakeholder groups and geographical, socioeconomic and epistemic communities, in order to avoid favouring the hegemony of NGOs and other organisations based in industrialized countries, as well as Annex 1 Parties.

  • 29.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Synergier mellan världshandels-och klimatpolitik: Exemplet ökad användning av biodrivmedel2009Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Biodrivmedel är ett av de tydligaste exemplen på synergi mellan världshandeloch klimatpolitik. Inom de pågående WTO-förhandlingarna har Brasilien harföreslagit att etanol ska tas upp som en av de miljövaror för vilka tullargradvis ska avskaffas. Gradvis liberalisering av handel med biodrivmedel,som en jordbruks- eller industrivara, är i linje med WTO:s mål samtidigt somökad användning av biodrivmedel är en verkningsfull åtgärd för att minskautsläppen av växthusgaser från trafiken – klimatpolitikens sorgebarn. Föreuropeisk del är denna fråga av särskilt intresse, på grund av dengemensamma skyddstullen för import av etanol.Rapporten har kartlagt olika konsekvenser som en ökad sammanlänkningmellan internationella avtal om världshandel och klimatförändringar kan fåför svensk politik för att öka användningen av biodrivmedel.Uppfattningarna varierar bland forskare och beslutsfattare om vilka effekteren ökad grad av interaktion mellan de handels- och klimatpolitiska områdenskulle få. Även om det ännu inte uppstått någon formell konflikt mellanregelverken inom FN:s klimatkonvention och WTO finns det problem som kanhämma åtaganden och genomförande på sikt, t.ex. subventioner och tullargällande biobränslen. Avsaknaden av tvist ger en indikation på att ingetmedlemsland ännu ansett att de klimatpolitiska styrmedlen försvåratgränsöverskridande handel nämnvärt eller skapat nya handelshinder förutländska företagDe flesta bedömare är överens om att bestämmelserna i WTO:s olika avtaloch klimatkonventionen och Kyotoprotokollet kan vara kompatibla medvarandra. Det handlar om att utforma handlingsprogram och åtgärder på rättsätt.Under det senaste decenniet har WTO:s avtal kommit att täcka ett allt vidareområde och accelererat liberaliseringen av den gränsöverskridande handelnmed varor och tjänster. Klimatavtalen har fokuserat på att minska eller i vartfall minska ökningstakten för utsläppen av växthusgaser, i första steget frånde rika länderna. Avtalen pekar också ut en rad områden inom vilka staternaförväntas genomföra sådana åtgärder, t.ex. främja energieffektivisering ochuthålligt jordbruk samt ökad användning av nya och förnyelsebaraenergikällor.Några områden för vilka förhållandet mellan regelsystemen bedöms vara merproblematiska är: Frågan om produktionsprocesser och produktionsmetoder somexempelvis försvårar användandet av kriterier för val av klimatvänligaalternativ i offentlig upphandling, Exportsubventioner som aldrig är tillåtna, Obligatoriska standarder och certifieringssystem: statlig inblandningoch förtäckta handelshinder.3Det finns också en osäkerhet, eftersom inga formella tvister ännu har gälltnågra av de klimatpolitiska styrmedel som utvecklats och just tagits i drift,men tidigare tillämpningar i liknande fall anses ge ett ganska gott underlagför bedömning. Utifrån en sådan bedömning anses exempelvis den modellmed garanterat pris för elektricitet framställd av förnybara råvaror somanvänds i Tyskland och det system med gröna drivmedelscertifikat somhåller på att utvecklas i Storbritannien vara kompatibla med WTO:s regler.

    I framtiden väntas klimatregionen såväl skärpas inom utsläppsområdet somvidgas till att innefatta andra områden, såsom anpassning och koppling tillutvecklingsmål. Detta kommer sannolikt att öka risken för effekter påinternationell handel. Inom handelsregimen är det inte osannolikt attförhandlingarna inom jordbruksavtalet (och GATT) kommer att påbörja enliberalisering av handel med produkter för framställning av biobränslenoch/eller med de färdiga bränslena. Detta skapar ett tryck på att minskaeller avskaffa EU:s skyddstull för etanol. Det skapar också nya möjligheterför den svenska miljöteknikindustrin och för svenska lantbruksföretaggenom att snabbt kunna dra nytta av den förändrademarknadsförutsättningarna. Biodrivmedel är ett tydligt exempel på enpotentiell synergi mellan handel och klimat, eftersom handel i dagsläget ärmycket liten.Viktiga områden i den närmaste framtiden kan vara: Stöd för införande av miljöteknik (lika för alla företag mm) Subventioner till odling av biogrödor (påverkar detproduktionsvolymen?) Bristande harmonisering, dvs. länder inför olika typer av åtgärder ochpå skild sätt, vilket ökar risken för ojämlika konkurrensförhållanden.Rapporten diskuterar fyra sätt att främja användningen av biobränslen: skärpning av befintlig bränsle- och fordonsbeskattning gröna drivmedelscertifikat bilar som kan drivas med alternativa drivmedel som standard transportsektorn med i handel med utsläppsrätter.Samtliga system är eller kan göras kompatibla med WTO:s regelsystem (t.ex.genom att fler tillverkare tillhandahåller bilar som kan drivas medbiobränslen) och skulle därför gå att använda. De får dock olika effekter förmarkandens aktörer.

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    Synergier mellan världshandels- och klimatpolitik : Exemplet ökad användning av biodrivmedel
  • 30.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The arenas of environmental management,2006Report (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Utopian thought as a missed opportunity and leverage point for systemic change2012In: Climate Change and the Crisis of Capitalism: A chance to reclaim self, society and nature / [ed] Mark Pelling, David Manuel-Navarrete and Michael Redclift, Kings College, London, UK, London: Routledge , 2012, p. 159-172Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Are established economic, social and political practices capable of dealing with the combined crises of climate change and the global economic system? Will falling back on the wisdoms that contributed to the crisis help us to find ways forward or simply reconfigure risk in another guise? This volume argues that the combination of global environmental change and global economic restructuring require a re-thinking of the priorities, processes and underlying values that shape contemporary development aspirations and policy.

    This volume brings together leading scholars to address these questions from several disciplinary perspectives: environmental sociology, human geography, international development, systems thinking, political sciences, philosophy, economics and policy/management science. The book is divided into four sections that examine contemporary development discourses and practices. It bridges geographical and disciplinary divides and includes chapters on innovative governance that confront unsustainable economic and environmental relations in both developing and developed contexts. It emphasises the ways in which dominant development paths have necessarily forced a separation of individuals from nature, but also from society and even from ‘self’. These three levels of alienation each form a thread that runs through the book. There are different levels and opportunities for a transition towards resilience, raising questions surrounding identity, governance and ecological management. This places resilience at the heart of the contemporary crisis of capitalism, and speaks to the relationship between the increasingly global forms of economic development and the difficulties in framing solutions to the environmental problems that carbon-based development brings in its wake.. Existing social science can help in not only identifying the challenges but also potential pathways for making change locally and in wider political, economic and cultural systems, but it must do so by identifying transitions out of carbon dependency and the kind of political challenges they imply for reflexive individuals and alternative community approaches to human security and wellbeing

  • 32.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Simonsson, Louise
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wråke, Markus
    IVL, Swedish Environmental Research Institute Ltd..
    Zetterberg, Lars
    IVL, Swedish Environmental Research Institute Ltd..
    The function of side events at the Conference of the Parties to The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change2008Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Civil society involvement has grown to become an integral part of the UN negotiatingprocess. The side events at the Conference of the Parties (COP) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) are today the most visible componentof and the only formal avenue of civil society involvement in international climate negotiations. This study assesses the extent to which side events effectively: a) provide input to the negotiations and b) contribute to the construction of the climate regime. Through surveying organisers of and participants in side events as well as COP delegates, we have analysed i) who attends side events, ii) why they attend them, iii) why organisations arrange side events, and iv) the outcome of side events.

    We distributed a questionnaire to all organisers of side events at COP 13 and the participants in twenty of the 200 side events held in Bali in November 2007. In addition, we also surveyed a strategic sample of the 10,800 participants at COP 13, receiving a total of nearly 1,100 responses.

    This report concludes that the side events fulfil the broader official objective of benefitingCOP participants, as these events are rated of high value across all participant groups and geographical categories. Negotiators were by far the most important target audience of all categories of side events, followed by representatives of UN organisations and researchers. Organisers considered the G77 plus China to be the most important Party groupings to reachin all categories of side events.

    The average number of side event participants was 82. The attendance at mitigation side events was 42% higher than at adaptation events. However, more negotiators and governmentrepresentatives attended adaptation side events, whereas there was very little media andbusiness and even less NGO and researcher presence at adaptation compared with mitigationevents. If we up-scale the results of this survey, approximately 1,400 of the 3,500 Party participants attended side events.

    The study indicates high side event participation from countries with large economies,countries near the COP venue, and the host country. Three of eight side event participants were NGO representatives. About one quarter of the participantsconsisted of negotiators or government representatives. Each side event was attended by anaverage of seven negotiators, 14 government representatives, eight business representatives, seven UN/IGO representatives, and three media representatives. Business representatives.

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    The function of side events at the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change
  • 33.
    Jernnäs, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Stockholm Environm Inst, Sweden; Univ Oxford, England.
    A discursive cartography of nationally determined contributions to the Paris climate agreement2019In: Global Environmental Change, ISSN 0959-3780, E-ISSN 1872-9495, Vol. 55, p. 73-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The 2015 Paris Agreement was adopted in a geopolitical context that is very different from the post-Cold War era when the Climate Convention was negotiated. This new global climate deal responds to a more fragmented and multipolar world signified by the rise of major economies in the South. This paper examines the geopolitical landscape in which the Paris Agreement is enacted and implemented. We conduct a discursive analysis of the Nationally Determined Contributions submitted by parties to the Paris Agreement. We ask what policy discourses emerge in these national climate plans, which states cluster around them and how they compare to UNFCCC annex, geographical location, income group, and negotiation coalitions. Our findings suggest that liberal environmentalism retains a strong hold over the political imagination in the post-Paris landscape. However, we see points of diffraction and tensions that might give rise to conflict. While liberal environmentalism is only challenged in Nationally Determined Contributions from the global South, we conclude that conventional geopolitical patterns only partly explain the formation of discourse coalitions. In the Paris Agreements implementation stage discursive struggles are likely to become increasingly prominent. Discourse analysis facilitates understanding of disagreements on the Paris rulebook and the global stocktake.

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  • 34.
    Jernnäs, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Nilsson, Jens
    Lulea Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Duit, Andreas
    Lulea Univ Technol, Sweden; Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Cross-national patterns of governance mechanisms in nationally determined contributions (NDCs) under the Paris Agreement2019In: Climate Policy, ISSN 1469-3062, E-ISSN 1752-7457, Vol. 19, no 10, p. 1239-1249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The continuous submission and scaling-up of Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) constitutes a key feature of the Paris Agreement. In their NDCs, states propose governance mechanisms for implementation of climate action, in turn distinguishing appropriate roles for the state in climate governance. Clarity on Parties suggested roles for the state makes explicit assumptions on the premise of climate policy, in turn contributing to enhanced transparency in negotiations on the scaling-up of NDCs. This also speaks to ongoing debates on roles for the state in climate governance literature. This article identifies the governance mechanisms proposed by states in their NDCs and the roles for the state envisioned by those governance mechanisms, and also examines how cross-national patterns of roles for the state break or converge with conventional patterns of international politics. The analysis shows that states propose a plurality of roles, which to different extents may be complementary or conflictual. We conclude that income, region, and the Annexes under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) are important for understanding suggested roles for the state, but that there are nuances to be further explored. We argue that this paper has three key findings: i) a majority of states rely on market mechanisms to implement their NDCs while rules on implementation and assessment of market mechanisms are still an outstanding issue in the negotiations, meaning that resolving this issue will be essential; ii) the process for evaluating and assessing qualitative governance mechanisms needs to be specified; and iii) increased awareness of differing views on the states roles makes explicit different perspectives on what constitutes an ambitious and legitimate contribution to combating climate change. Key policy insights A majority of states (amp;gt; 75%) envision the state as regulator (creating and strengthening legislation), market facilitator (creating and maintaining market structures), or facilitator (creating more favourable material conditions for climate-friendly behaviour). Greater awareness of differing views on roles for the state can increase understanding of different perspectives on ambition and legitimacy of contributions, in turn facilitating trust in negotiations. A distinction between substantive and procedural qualitative governance mechanisms and their function and interaction would facilitate the stocktaking dialogues.

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  • 35.
    Johansson, Jimmy
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Navarra, Carlo
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Neset, Tina
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Erik, Glaas
    Tomasz, Opach
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    VisAdapt—Increasing Nordic Houseowners' Adaptive Capacity to Climate Change2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Johansson, Jimmy
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Navarra, Carlo
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Schmid Neset, Tina
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Glaas, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Opach, Tomasz
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Björn-Ola, Linnér
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    VisAdapt-Increasing Nordic Houseowners' Adaptive Capacity to Climate Change2014In: 2014 IEEE Conference on Visual Analytics Science and Technology (VAST) / [ed] Min Chen, David Ebert, Chris North, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2014, p. 255-256Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This poster presents the design and implementation of the web-based visual analytics tool VisAdapt which allows houseowners in the Nordic countries to assess potential climate related risk factors that may have an impact on their living conditions, and to get an overview of existing guidelines of how to adapt to climate change and extreme weather effects.

  • 37.
    Johansson, Jimmy
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Schmid Neset, Tina
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Evaluating Climate Visualization: An Information Visualization Approach2010In: Proceedings of the 14th IEEE International Conference on Information Visualization, IV10, IEEE Communications Society, 2010, p. 156-161Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To meet the growing demand of communicating climate science and policy research, the interdisciplinary field of climate visualization has increasingly extended its traditional use of 2D representations and techniques from the field of scientific visualization to include information visualization for the creation of highly interactive tools for both spatial and abstract data. This paper provides an initial discussion on the need and design of evaluations for climate visualization. We report on previous experiences and identify how evaluation methods commonly used in information visualization can be used in climate visualization to increase our understanding of visualization techniques and tools.

  • 38.
    Johansson, Jimmy
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tomasz, Opach
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
    Glaas, Erik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change.
    Navarra, Carlo
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rød, Jan Ketil
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    VisAdapt: A Visualization Tool to Support Climate Change Adaptation2017In: IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications, ISSN 0272-1716, E-ISSN 1558-1756, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 54-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Web-based visualization VisAdapt tool was developed to help laypeople in the Nordic countries assess how anticipated climate change will impact their homes. The tool guides users through a three-step visual process that helps them explore risks and identify adaptive actions specifically modified to their location and house type. This article walks through the tool's multistep, user-centered design process. Although VisAdapt's target end users are Nordic homeowners, the insights gained from the development process and the lessons learned from the project are applicable to a wide range of domains.

  • 39.
    Juhola, Sirkku
    et al.
    University of Helsinki, Finland; Aalto University, Finland.
    Glaas, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Neset, Tina Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Redefining maladaptation2016In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 55, no 1, p. 135-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As experiences of implementation of climate change adaptation are accumulating, there is a need toincrease the understanding of the potential negative consequences of adaptation actions that mightoccur, and the capacity of research to assess them. Maladaptation used in this context has remainedelusively defined and sparingly used, and therefore difficult to apply. Based on a literature review, wediscuss the conceptual boundaries of maladaptation and how it can be used to analyse negativeoutcomes of adaptation and propose a refined definition. We present a typology of maladaptation thatdistinguishes between three types of maladaptive outcomes – rebounding vulnerability, shiftingvulnerability and eroding sustainable development, and argue that maladaptation can be defined as a resultof an intentional adaptation policy or measure directly increasing vulnerability for the targeted and/orexternal actor(s), and/or eroding preconditions for sustainable development by indirectly increasing society’svulnerability. We note that the recognition of adaptation as an intentional action and the importance ofsetting clear spatial and temporal boundaries, as well as thresholds, are key to analysing negativeoutcomes.

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  • 40.
    Juhola, Sirkku
    et al.
    Helsinki University, Finland.
    Goodsite, M.E.
    University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Davis, M.
    Stockholm Environment Institute US Centre, USA.
    Klein, Richard J.T.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Stockholm Environment Institute, Sweden.
    Davídsdóttir, B.
    University of Iceland, Iceland.
    Atlason, R.
    University of Iceland, Iceland.
    Landauer, Mia
    Aalto University, Finland.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research.
    Neset, Tina Schmid
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research.
    Glaas, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research.
    Eskeland, Gunnar
    Norwegian School of Economics, Norway.
    Gammelgaard Ballantyne, Anne
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Adaptation decision-making in the Nordic countries: assessing the potential for joint action2014In: Environment Systems and Decisions, ISSN 2194-5403, E-ISSN 2194-5411, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 600-611Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a global context, the outlook for the Nordic region is relatively favourable, given its relatively stronger resiliency to climate change impacts in comparison to many other geo-political regions of the world. Overall, the projected climatic changes include increases in mean temperatures and in precipitation, although regional variations can be significant. The countries’ robust institutions and economies give them a strong capacity to adapt to these changes. Still, the need for adaptation to the changing climate has been and still is substantial, and in most of the region, there has been progress on the issue. This paper explores the potential for Nordic cooperation on adaptation; specifically, for the development of a regional adaptation strategy. In particular, it addresses two questions (1) What is the current state of adaptation in the Nordic countries? and (2) What are the potential benefits and weaknesses of a Nordic strategy for adaptation? In order to answer these two questions, this paper examines reviews the current national adaptation policies of each Nordic country and discusses the challenges facing a Nordic strategy and finally assesses the potential for common Nordic adaptation policy and further cooperation.

  • 41.
    Karlsson, Christer
    et al.
    Uppsala Universitet, Sweden.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Parker, Charles
    Uppsala Universitet, Sweden.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The Legitimacy of Leadership in International Climate Change Negotiations2012In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 41, no S1, p. 46-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Leadership is an essential ingredient in reaching international agreements and overcoming the collective action problems associated with responding to climate change. In this study, we aim at answering two questions that are crucial for understanding the legitimacy of leadership in international climate change negotiations. Based on the responses of three consecutive surveys distributed at COPs 14–16, we seek first to chart which actors are actually recognized as leaders by climate change negotiation participants. Second, we aim to explain what motivates COP participants to support different actors as leaders. Both these questions are indeed crucial for understanding the role, importance, and legitimacy of leadership in the international climate change regime. Our results show that the leadership landscape in this issue area is fragmented, with no one clear-cut leader, and strongly suggest that it is imperative for any actor seeking recognition as climate change leader to be perceived as being devoted to promoting the common good.

  • 42.
    Karlsson, Christer
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Sverige.
    Parker, Charles
    Uppsala universitet; Sverige.
    Hjerpe, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Looking for Leaders: Perceptions of Climate Change Leadership among Climate Change Negotiation Participants2011In: Global Environmental Politics, ISSN 1526-3800, E-ISSN 1536-0091, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 89-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is widespread consensus that effective leadership will be required in order to successfully address the climate change challenge. Presently there are a number of self-proclaimed climate change leaders, but leadership is a relationship between leaders and followers. An actor aspiring to be a leader needs to be recognized as such. Despite its fundamental importance for leadership relationships, the demand side of the leadership equation has been comparatively neglected by past research. In this study we are looking for leaders by analyzing the perceptions of climate change leadership among UNFCCC COP-14 participants. Our results show that the climate change leadership mantle will have to be worn by more than one actor. Among the leadership candidates the EU was most widely recognized as a leader, however, only a small minority reported that they saw the EU as the only leader. The data also show that the US and the G77 thus far have failed to impress potential followers and it was China that clearly emerged as the second strongest leadership candidate.

  • 43.
    Kuchler, Magdalena
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Challenging the food vs. fuel dilemma: genealogical analysis of the biofuel discourse pursued by international organizations2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Kuchler, Magdalena
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Challenging the food vs. fuel dilemma: genealogical analysis of the biofuel discourse pursued by international organizations2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Kuchler, Magdalena
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Challenging the food vs. fuel dilemma: Genealogical analysis of the biofuel discourse pursued by international organizations2012In: Food Policy, ISSN 0306-9192, E-ISSN 1873-5657, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 581-588Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper looks critically at how food and agriculture-, energy security-, and climate change-oriented international organizations have consolidated and modified the biofuel discourse in relation to the agricultural system. Using Foucault-based genealogical analysis of discursive formations, the paper traces the last 20 years of institutions’ biofuel debate in relation to rural production. We find that the prevalent motive is an aspiration to combine the agriculture and energy markets into one, which prompts structural changes and challenges in the rural sector. This has implications for the future role and shape of global agriculture and – contrary to the food vs. fuel perspective – calls for re-conceptualizing the biofuel debate as the food vs. food dilemma.

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  • 46.
    Kuchler, Magdalena
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research . Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Pros and Cons of International Biofuel Production: An overview of research and policy reports 20082008Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This briefing from the Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research presents a summary of

    research and policy reports on positive and negative aspects of liquid biofuels. It covers three areas:  economic  and  energy  security,  rural  development  and  agricultural  production  and environmental challenges. It will also shortly depict the cases of Brazilian ethanol as a model of processing agricultural crops to liquid fuels for transport, and finally cover the future bioenergy production potential in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). The purpose of this briefing is to provide an overview of present discussions and to present arguments from a variety of organisations  and  scholars.  As  a  service  to  a  reader,  the  briefing  contains  an  extensive reference list for further studies.

    The reports and research covered in this briefing are quite disparate. Nevertheless, ten significant conclusions can be observed:

    •  Biofuels cannot solely substitute oil in meeting the expected future energy demand in transportation.

    •  Development of next-generation biofuels can ease the food vs. fuel competition since they can be processed from other sources of biomass than the major food crops.

    •  Countries in tropical regions are more suited for biomass production. However,  we lack sufficient research on future stresses compounded due to climate change  and economic globalisation.

    •  International trade rules, particularly governing agricultural commodities, as well  as development of standards and certifications will play a significant role in  shaping global, as well as local conditions of future biofuel production. Thus, the outcomes of trade  agreement  and  policies  will  impinge  on  development  goals  and  livelihood security in developing countries.

    •  An  important  factor  for  developing  countries  will  be  whether  biofuels  will  be considered as an agricultural or non-agricultural good by WTO. If they are classified as agricultural commodities they can be eligible for special measures such as subsidies for environmental reasons. But this may also be used to uphold agricultural subsidies in industrialised countries.

    •  Liquid  biofuel  production  can  be  beneficial  for  developing  countries  in  tropical regions. Present research indicates that rural communities in SSA may benefit if they hold control over the local or regional production conditions.

    •  Taking into account present conditions, food security of several SSA countries could be under strain caused by increased biofuel production.

    •  Depending on production conditions, SSA countries can stand to gain in the future.

    However,  we  lack  comprehensive  research  on  the  conditions  for  a  sustainable development of biofuel production which will benefit development aspirations.

    •  Although economies of scale is one factor to consider, sustainable development  in SSA can benefit from small-scale production since this type of agriculture can put less stress on environment, in contrast to large-scale production projects.

    •  The production of liquid biofuels in SSA should be directed to meet other important needs in addition to transports (in contrast to the Brazilian example)  like  heating, cooking and electricity generation.

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    Pros and Cons of International Biofuel Production: An overview of research and policy reports 2008
  • 47.
    Kuyper, Jonathan
    et al.
    Univ Oslo, Norway; Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Schroeder, Heike
    Univ East Anglia, England.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR. Univ Oxford, England; Stockholm Environm Inst, Sweden.
    The Evolution of the UNFCCC2018In: ANNUAL REVIEW OF ENVIRONMENT AND RESOURCES, ISSN 1543-5938, Vol. 43, p. 343-368Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article takes stock of the evolution of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) through the prism of three recent shifts: the move away from targeting industrial country emissions in a legally binding manner under the Kyoto Protocol to mandating voluntary contributions from all countries under the Paris Agreement; the shift from the top-down Kyoto architecture to the hybrid Paris outcome; and the broadening out from a mitigation focus under Kyoto to a triple goal comprising mitigation, adaptation, and finance under Paris. This review discusses the implications of these processes for the effectiveness, efficiency, and equity of the UNFCCCs institutional and operational settings for meeting the conventions objectives. It ends by sketching three potential scenarios facing the UNFCCC as it seeks to coordinate the Paris Agreement and its relationship to the wider landscape of global climate action.

  • 48.
    Kuyper, Jonathan W.
    et al.
    University of Oslo, Norway; Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Schroeder, Heike
    University of East Anglia, England.
    Non-state actors in hybrid global climate governance: justice, legitimacy, and effectiveness in a post-Paris era2018In: Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Climate Change, ISSN 1757-7780, E-ISSN 1757-7799, Vol. 9, no 1, article id UNSP e497Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we outline the multifaceted roles played by non-state actors within the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and place this within the wider landscape of global climate governance. In doing so, we look at both the formation and aftermath of the 2015 Paris Agreement. We argue that the Paris Agreement cements an architecture of hybrid multilateralism that enables and constrains non-state actor participation in global climate governance. We flesh out the constitutive features of hybrid multilateralism, enumerate the multiple positions non-state actors may employ under these conditions, and contend that non-state actors will play an increasingly important role in the post-Paris era. To substantiate these claims, we assess these shifts and ask how non-state actors may affect the legitimacy, justice, and effectiveness of the Paris Agreement. (c) 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  • 49.
    Linnér, Alva
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Handelns geopolitik i en klimatförändrad värld2022In: Klimatet och den nya världsordningen / [ed] Anna Willman, Stockholm: Tankesmedjan Fores , 2022, p. 137-157Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 50.
    Linnér, Björn Ola
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Water and Environmental Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Att lära för överlevnad: utbildningsprogrammen och miljöfrågorna 1962 - 20022005 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Hur påverkar återkommande budskap om miljöhot barn och ungdomar? Tappar de hoppet om framtiden och tilltron till vuxna, till politiken, vetenskapen och utbildningen? Många bedömare har uttryckt sin oro och hävdat att utbildningssektorn har förmedlat en alltför pessimistisk bild av miljöhoten och vetenskapens möjligheter att komma till rätta med problemen. Å andra sidan ger många opinionsbildare utbildningen en nyckelroll i att vända den negativa miljöutvecklingen, om den lyckas engagera de unga i miljöarbetet.Denna bok handlar om hur utbildningsprogrammen har förmedlat miljöfrågorna, vad de har pekat ut som samtida och framtida hotbilder och som möjligheter att lösa miljöproblemen Undersökningen sträcker sig över fyrtio år av skiftande hotbilder, lösningsmedel och samhällsvisioner vid sidan om nyhetsredaktionerna, de politiska kamrarna och miljöaktivisternas aktioner.Framtidsbilder och synen på miljöfrågorna i utbildningsprogrammen har förändrats tydligt under de senaste fyrtio åren. Generationer av elever har fått ta del av ett spektrum av miljöbudskap, från mörkaste framtidsoro till ljusaste förtröstan. Men som en röd tråd genom programutbudet går tendensen att lägga på barnen och ungdomarna ansvaret för att lösa de miljöproblem som de vuxna orsakat. Boken mynnar ut i en diskussion om hur utbildningsprogrammen kan ha påverkat barns, ungdomars och vuxnas miljöengagemang och framtidssyn."En intressant miljöhistorisk tillbakablick som ökar förståelsen för varför man agerat på olika sätt beträffande miljön genom åren." --  Ingela Frost i BTJ:s sambindningshäfte

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