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  • 1.
    Charalambous, Andreas
    et al.
    Cyprus Univ Technol, Cyprus; Cyprus Univ Technol, Cyprus; Univ Turku, Finland.
    Papastavrou, E.
    Cyprus Univ Technol, Cyprus.
    Valkeapaa, K.
    Univ Turku, Finland; Finnish Def Res Agcy, Finland; Lahti Univ Appl Sci, Finland.
    Zabalegui, A.
    Hosp Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Ingadottir, Brynja
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Univ Iceland, Iceland.
    Lemonidou, C.
    Univ Athens, Greece.
    Fatkulina, N.
    Klaipeda Univ, Lithuania; Vilnius Univ, Lithuania.
    Jouko, K.
    Univ Turku, Finland.
    Leino-Kilpi, H.
    Univ Turku, Finland; Turku Univ Hosp, Finland.
    Content of Orthopedic Patient Education Provided by Nurses in Seven European Countries2018In: Clinical Nursing Research, ISSN 1054-7738, E-ISSN 1552-3799, Vol. 27, no 7, p. 770-789Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients and their significant others education during the perioperative phase is an important and challenging aspect of care. This study explored the content of education provided by nurses to arthroplasty patients and their significant others. Data were collected with the Education of Patients-NURSE content (EPNURSE-Content), Received Knowledge of Hospital Patient (RKhp), and Received Knowledge of Significant Other (RKso) scales. The results showed that the content of education emphasized biophysiological and functional needs, differed between countries, and was related to how physically demanding nurses found their job to be and the amount of education provided. There is congruence between the received knowledge of patients and their significant others in relation to the content of education provided by nurses. The findings can support nurses in developing aid material for patients and significant others explaining the nature of education and advising them what to expect and how to optimize their participation in the process.

  • 2.
    Ingadottir, Brynja
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Blondal, Katrin
    University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science.
    Thylen, Ingela
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science.
    Perceptions about traditional and novel methods to learn about post-operative pain management: - a qualitative study.2016In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 72, no 11, p. 2672-2683Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To explore the perceptions of surgical patients about traditional and novel methods to learn about post-operative pain management.Background: Patient education is an important part of post-operative care. Contemporary technology offers new ways for patients to learn about self-care, although face-to-face discussions and brochures are the most common methods of delivering education in nursing practice.Design: A qualitative design with a vignette and semi-structured interviews used for data collection.Methods: A purposeful sample of 13 post-surgical patients, who had been discharged from hospital, was recruited during 2013 - 2014. The patients were given a vignette about anticipated hospital discharge after surgery with four different options for communication (face-to-face, brochure, website, serious game) to learn about post-operative pain management. They were asked to rank their preferred method of learning and thereafter to reflect on their choices. Data were analysed using an inductive content analysis approach.Findings: Patients preferred face-to-face education with a nurse, followed by brochures and websites, while games were least preferred. Two categories, each with two sub-categories, emerged from the data. These conceptualised the factors affecting patients' perceptions: 1) 'Trusting the source', sub-categorised into 'Being familiar with the method' and 'Having own prejudgments'; and 2) 'Being motivated to learn' sub-categorised into 'Managing an impaired cognition' and 'Aspiring for increased knowledge'.Conclusion: In order to implement successfully novel educational methods into post-operative care, healthcare professionals need to be aware of the factors influencing patients' perceptions abouthow to learn, such as trust and motivation.

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    fulltext
  • 3.
    Ingadottir, Brynja
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. National University Hospital of Iceland, Surgical Services, Reykjavik, Iceland, Faculty of Nursing, School of Health Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Blondal, Katrin
    Faculty of Nursing, School of Health Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Thue, David
    School of Computer Science, Reykjavik University, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Zoega, Sigridur
    National University Hospital of Iceland, Surgical Services, Faculty of Nursing, School of Health Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland .
    Thylén, Ingela
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Development, Usability, and Efficacy of a Serious Game to Help Patients Learn About Pain Management After Surgery: An Evaluation Study.2017In: JMIR Serious Games, E-ISSN 2291-9279, Vol. 5, no 2, article id e10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Postoperative pain is a persistent problem after surgery and can delay recovery and develop into chronic pain. Better patient education has been proposed to improve pain management of patients. Serious games have not been previously developed to help patients to learn how to manage their postoperative pain.

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to describe the development of a computer-based game for surgical patients to learn about postoperative pain management and to evaluate the usability, user experience, and efficacy of the game.

    METHODS: A computer game was developed by an interdisciplinary team following a structured approach. The usability, user experience, and efficacy of the game were evaluated using self-reported questionnaires (AttrakDiff2, Postoperative Pain Management Game Survey, Patient Knowledge About Postoperative Pain Management questionnaire), semi-structured interviews, and direct observation in one session with 20 participants recruited from the general public via Facebook (mean age 48 [SD 14]; 11 women). Adjusted Barriers Questionnaire II and 3 questions on health literacy were used to collect background information.

    RESULTS: Theories of self-care and adult learning, evidence for the educational needs of patients about pain management, and principles of gamification were used to develop the computer game. Ease of use and usefulness received a median score between 2.00 (IQR 1.00) and 5.00 (IQR 2.00) (possible scores 0-5; IQR, interquartile range), and ease of use was further confirmed by observation. Participants expressed satisfaction with this novel method of learning, despite some technological challenges. The attributes of the game, measured with AttrakDiff2, received a median score above 0 in all dimensions; highest for attraction (median 1.43, IQR 0.93) followed by pragmatic quality (median 1.31, IQR 1.04), hedonic quality interaction (median 1.00, IQR 1.04), and hedonic quality stimulation (median 0.57, IQR 0.68). Knowledge of pain medication and pain management strategies improved after playing the game (P=.001).

    CONCLUSIONS: A computer game can be an efficient method of learning about pain management; it has the potential to improve knowledge and is appreciated by users. To assess the game's usability and efficacy in the context of preparation for surgery, an evaluation with a larger sample, including surgical patients and older people, is required.

  • 4.
    Ingadottir, Brynja
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson Stark, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Leino-Kilpi, Helena
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Sigurdardottir, Arun K
    University of Akureyri, Iceland .
    Valkeapää, Kirsi
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The fulfilment of knowledge expectations during the perioperative period of patients undergoing knee arthroplasty - a Nordic perspective2014In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 23, no 19-20, p. 2896-2908Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To describe the possible differences between knowledge expectations and received knowledge of patients undergoing elective knee arthroplasty in Iceland, Sweden and Finland and also to determine the relationship between such a difference and both background factors and patient satisfaction with care.

    BACKGROUND: Knee arthroplasty is a fast-growing and a successful treatment for patients with osteoarthritis. Patient education can improve surgery outcomes, but it remains unknown what knowledge patients expect to receive and actually acquire during the perioperative period and what factors are related to that experience.

    DESIGN: Descriptive, prospective survey.

    METHODS: In total, 290 patients answered questionnaires about their expectations (Knowledge Expectations of hospital patients - scale) before surgery and about received knowledge (Received Knowledge of hospital patients - scale) and satisfaction with hospital care (Patient Satisfaction Scale) at discharge. Sociodemographics, clinical information, accessibility to knowledge from healthcare providers (Access to Knowledge Scale), and preferences for information and behavioural control (Krantz Health Opinion Survey) were collected as background data.

    RESULTS: Patients` knowledge expectations were higher (mean 3·6, SD 0·4) than their perception of received knowledge (mean 3·0, SD 0·7). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that access to knowledge, information preferences and work experience within health- or social care explained 33% (R²) of the variation in the difference between received and expected knowledge. Patients reported high satisfaction with their care except regarding how their family was involved.

    CONCLUSION: Patients undergoing knee arthroplasty receive less knowledge than they expect, and individual factors and communication with healthcare providers during hospitalisation are related to their experience. The content of patient education and family involvement should be considered in future care.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The results strengthen the knowledge base on the educational needs of knee arthroplasty patients and can be used to develop and test new interventions.

  • 5. Order onlineBuy this publication >>
    Ingadóttir, Brynja
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Learning as a patient: What and how individuals want to learn when preparing for surgery, and the potential use of serious games in their education2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Surgical patients need knowledge to participate in their own care and to engage in self-care behaviour in the perioperative period which is important for their recovery. Patient education facilitates such knowledge acquisition and several methods can be used to facilitate it, for example, face-to-face education and brochures or using information technology such as website or computer games. Healthcare professionals have been slow to seize the possibilities that information technology has to offer within the field, including the use of serious games. To optimise patient education, the information is needed on the patients’ needs and preferences and what they think about the idea of using a serious game to learn about self-care.

    Aim: The overall aims of this thesis were to describe the knowledge expectations of surgical patients, to describe how surgical patients want to learn, and to explore the potential use of serious games in patient education.

    Methods: This thesis includes four studies that used both quantitative and qualitative data to describe aspects of patient learning in relation to surgery. Study I has a prospective and comparative design with survey data collected before surgery and before hospital discharge from 290 patients with osteoarthritis undergoing knee arthroplasty. Data was collected on fulfilment of knowledge expectations and related factors. Study II is a cross-­‐sectional study in 104 patients with heart failure who had been scheduled for cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) device implantation. Data was collected on knowledge expectations and related factors. In Study III the perceptions of 13 surgical patients towards novel and traditional methods to learn about post-operative pain management are explored in a qualitative interview study using content analysis. Study IV describes the development and evaluation of a serious game to learn about pain management with the participation of 20 persons recruited from the public. The game was developed by an interdisciplinary team following a structured approach. Data on the efficacy and usability of the game was collected in one session with questionnaires, observations and interviews.

    Results: Participants reported high knowledge expectations. Knowledge expectations were highest within the bio-physiological knowledge dimension on disease, treatment and complications and the functional dimension on how daily activities are affected, both of which include items on self-care. Most participants wanted to know about the possible complications related to the surgery procedure. In none of the knowledge dimensions the expectations of participants were fulfilled. Participants received most knowledge on the physical and functional issues and received least on the financial and social aspects of their illness. The main predictor of fulfilment of knowledge expectations was having access to knowledge in the hospital from doctors and nurses. Trust in the information source and own motivation to learn shaped how the participants thought about different learning methods. Although the participants were open to using novel learning methods such as websites or games they were also doubtful about their use and called for advice by healthcare professionals. To develop a serious game with the goal to learn about pain management, theories of self-care and adult learning, evidence on the educational needs of patients about pain management and principles of gamification were found useful. The game character is a surgical patient just discharged home from hospital who needs to attend to daily activities while simultaneously managing post-operative pain with different strategies. Participants who evaluated a first version of the serious game improved their knowledge and described usability of the game as high. They were positive towards this new learning method and found it suitable for learning about pain management after surgery in spite of some technical obstacles.

    Conclusions: Surgical patients have high knowledge expectations about all aspects of their upcoming surgery and although they prefer direct communication with healthcare professionals as a source for knowledge they might be open to try using more novel methods such as games. Preliminary short-­‐term results demonstrate that a serious game can help individuals to learn about pain management, and has the potential to improve knowledge. A careful introduction, recommendation, and support from healthcare professionals is needed for implementation of such a novel method in patient education.

    List of papers
    1. The fulfilment of knowledge expectations during the perioperative period of patients undergoing knee arthroplasty - a Nordic perspective
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The fulfilment of knowledge expectations during the perioperative period of patients undergoing knee arthroplasty - a Nordic perspective
    Show others...
    2014 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 23, no 19-20, p. 2896-2908Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To describe the possible differences between knowledge expectations and received knowledge of patients undergoing elective knee arthroplasty in Iceland, Sweden and Finland and also to determine the relationship between such a difference and both background factors and patient satisfaction with care.

    BACKGROUND: Knee arthroplasty is a fast-growing and a successful treatment for patients with osteoarthritis. Patient education can improve surgery outcomes, but it remains unknown what knowledge patients expect to receive and actually acquire during the perioperative period and what factors are related to that experience.

    DESIGN: Descriptive, prospective survey.

    METHODS: In total, 290 patients answered questionnaires about their expectations (Knowledge Expectations of hospital patients - scale) before surgery and about received knowledge (Received Knowledge of hospital patients - scale) and satisfaction with hospital care (Patient Satisfaction Scale) at discharge. Sociodemographics, clinical information, accessibility to knowledge from healthcare providers (Access to Knowledge Scale), and preferences for information and behavioural control (Krantz Health Opinion Survey) were collected as background data.

    RESULTS: Patients` knowledge expectations were higher (mean 3·6, SD 0·4) than their perception of received knowledge (mean 3·0, SD 0·7). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that access to knowledge, information preferences and work experience within health- or social care explained 33% (R²) of the variation in the difference between received and expected knowledge. Patients reported high satisfaction with their care except regarding how their family was involved.

    CONCLUSION: Patients undergoing knee arthroplasty receive less knowledge than they expect, and individual factors and communication with healthcare providers during hospitalisation are related to their experience. The content of patient education and family involvement should be considered in future care.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The results strengthen the knowledge base on the educational needs of knee arthroplasty patients and can be used to develop and test new interventions.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley-Blackwell, 2014
    Keywords
    Knee arthroplasty, osteoarthritis, patient education, patient expectations, patient satisfaction, surgery
    National Category
    Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-105225 (URN)10.1111/jocn.12552 (DOI)000343857700020 ()24476393 (PubMedID)
    Projects
    EEPO
    Available from: 2014-03-13 Created: 2014-03-13 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
    2. Knowledge expectations, self-care, and health complaints of heart failure patients scheduled for cardiac resynchronization therapy implantation
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Knowledge expectations, self-care, and health complaints of heart failure patients scheduled for cardiac resynchronization therapy implantation
    2015 (English)In: Patient Preference and Adherence, E-ISSN 1177-889X, Vol. 9, p. 913-921Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To describe what knowledge heart failure patients expect to acquire in relation to their upcoming cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) device implantation, to describe their self-care and health complaints, and to explore the relationship between knowledge expectations and self-care, health complaints, and background factors. Patients and methods: Cross-sectional multicenter study with 104 patients scheduled for a first-time, elective CRT implantation in Swedish and Icelandic hospitals. Data were collected with the Knowledge Expectations of hospital patient Scale, European Heart Failure Self-care Behavior Scale, and Adjusted Postoperative Recovery Profile. Results: Patients expected most knowledge related to their disease and its treatment (median 4.0, interquartile range 0.13) and least on social issues (median 3.5, interquartile range 0.83). Their self-care was average (standardized mean 51.0 +/- 19.6) before the procedure. Patients had on average 8.2 (+/- 4.7) health complaints and rated fatigue and sexual problems as the most severe. Age was independently associated with knowledge expectations (Exp beta 0.049, P= 0.033). Conclusion: Heart failure patients waiting for a CRT device implantation have high expectations for multiple aspects of knowledge, including self-care issues, before their procedure. These expectations are similar to those of other surgical patients and they increase with age.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Dove Medical Press, 2015
    Keywords
    cardiac devices; CRT treatment; patient education
    National Category
    Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-120368 (URN)10.2147/PPA.S83069 (DOI)000357535000001 ()26170641 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Landspitali University Hospital Research Fund, Landspitali - The National University Hospital of Iceland; Icelandic Nurses Association Research Fund; Ingibjorg Magnusdottir in Iceland; Medtronic-Vingmed AB; St. Jude Medical Sweden AB in Sweden

    Available from: 2015-07-31 Created: 2015-07-31 Last updated: 2024-01-17
    3. Perceptions about traditional and novel methods to learn about post-operative pain management: - a qualitative study.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perceptions about traditional and novel methods to learn about post-operative pain management: - a qualitative study.
    2016 (English)In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 72, no 11, p. 2672-2683Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To explore the perceptions of surgical patients about traditional and novel methods to learn about post-operative pain management.Background: Patient education is an important part of post-operative care. Contemporary technology offers new ways for patients to learn about self-care, although face-to-face discussions and brochures are the most common methods of delivering education in nursing practice.Design: A qualitative design with a vignette and semi-structured interviews used for data collection.Methods: A purposeful sample of 13 post-surgical patients, who had been discharged from hospital, was recruited during 2013 - 2014. The patients were given a vignette about anticipated hospital discharge after surgery with four different options for communication (face-to-face, brochure, website, serious game) to learn about post-operative pain management. They were asked to rank their preferred method of learning and thereafter to reflect on their choices. Data were analysed using an inductive content analysis approach.Findings: Patients preferred face-to-face education with a nurse, followed by brochures and websites, while games were least preferred. Two categories, each with two sub-categories, emerged from the data. These conceptualised the factors affecting patients' perceptions: 1) 'Trusting the source', sub-categorised into 'Being familiar with the method' and 'Having own prejudgments'; and 2) 'Being motivated to learn' sub-categorised into 'Managing an impaired cognition' and 'Aspiring for increased knowledge'.Conclusion: In order to implement successfully novel educational methods into post-operative care, healthcare professionals need to be aware of the factors influencing patients' perceptions abouthow to learn, such as trust and motivation.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley-Blackwell, 2016
    Keywords
    Content analysis; educational methods; nursing; patient education; patient learning; post-operative self-care; vignettes
    National Category
    Nursing
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-129199 (URN)10.1111/jan.13021 (DOI)000386079500010 ()27205900 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding agencies: Landspitali University Hospital Research Fund; Icelandic Nurses Association Research Fund

    Available from: 2016-06-13 Created: 2016-06-13 Last updated: 2019-06-27
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    Learning as a patient: What and how individuals want to learn when preparing for surgery, and the potential use of serious games in their education
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  • 6.
    Johansson Stark, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ingadottir, Brynja
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Salanterä, Sanna
    Turku University, Finland.
    Sigurdardottir, Arun K
    University of Akureyri, Iceland.
    Valkeapää, Kirsi
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Bachrach-Lindström, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fulfilment of knowledge expectations and emotional state among people undergoing hip replacement: A multi-national survey2014In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 51, no 11, p. 1491-1499Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Patient education in connection with hip replacement is intended to prepare patients for surgery, discharge and postoperative recovery. Patients experience symptoms and emotions due to disease or upcoming surgery which can affect how their knowledge expectations are fulfilled.

    OBJECTIVES:

    To describe the differences between received and expected knowledge in patients undergoing elective hip replacement in three Nordic countries, and to analyse how these differences are related to patients' characteristics, preoperative symptoms and emotions.

    DESIGN:

    A descriptive, prospective survey with two data collection points; before admission and at hospital discharge after surgery.

    SETTINGS:

    Two Finnish, three Icelandic and two Swedish hospitals.

    PARTICIPANTS:

    The population consisted of patients on a waiting list for hip replacement. Of the consecutively included patients, 320 answered questionnaires both before admission and at discharge and were included in the study. The mean age of the patients was 64 years, and 55% were women.

    METHODS:

    Structured questionnaires were used; the knowledge expectations of hospital patients scale and self-reported scales for symptoms and emotions before admission and received knowledge of hospital patients scale at discharge. Fulfilment of knowledge expectation was assessed by calculating the difference between received and expected knowledge with a paired sample t-test. A multiple stepwise regression model was used to explain the variance of fulfilled knowledge expectations.

    RESULTS:

    Patients expected more knowledge than they received (p<0.001) and 77% of them had unfulfilled knowledge expectations. Patients with a higher level of education were more likely to have unfulfilled knowledge expectations. A higher level of education was also related to a greater difference between received and expected knowledge. The difference was more correlated with patients' emotions than their symptoms. A depressive state was the major predictor of the variance in the difference between received and expected knowledge.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    In order to better support patients by education it is necessary to assess their emotional state, educational level and knowledge expectations before surgery.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 7.
    Johansson Stark, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ingadottir, Brynja
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sigurdardottir, Arun K
    University of Akureyri, Iceland.
    Valkeapää, Kirsi
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Bachrach-Lindström, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fulfilment of patients’ knowledge expectations in connection with hip or knee replacement – a Nordic perspective2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To describe and compare the differences between received and expected knowledge in patients undergoing elective hip or knee replacement in three Nordic countries, and to analyse if these differences are related to patients’ characteristics.

    Method: A descriptive, prospective and comparative survey of patients with osteoarthritis treated at two Finnish, three Icelandic and two Swedish hospitals (n=612). Patients answered questionnaires about their knowledge expectations (KEhp) before surgery and about received knowledge (RKhp) at discharge. These two parallel instruments include: bio-physiological, functional, experiential, ethical, social and financial dimensions of knowledge.

    Results: Among the 29% Finnish, 34% Icelandic and 37% Swedish patients (hip: 53%, knee: 47%) were 54% females and the mean age was 65 years. Patients` knowledge expectations were higher, mean: 3.6 (±SD 0.5), than their perception of received knowledge 3.0 (0.7). The difference between expected and received knowledge was larger in Sweden -0.9(0.8) compared with Finland -0.4(0.8) and Iceland -0.5(0.7) (p<0.001) but not statistically different between patients having hip or knee replacement. Patients perceived having received most bio-physiological -0.3(0.6) and functional -0.3(0.6) knowledge but least financial -1.2(1.2) knowledge. A relationship was found between the difference of expected and received knowledge and whether the hospital stay was as expected. For patients undergoing hip replacement this difference was also related to the level of education, for knee replacement patients if they had their first arthroplasty and employment in social or health care.

    Conclusions: Patients expect multidimensional knowledge during hospital stay which was inadequately met. Assessing patients’ knowledge needs could improve patient education.

  • 8.
    Klemetti, Seija
    et al.
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Leino-Kilpi, Helena
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Cabrera, Esther
    Health Science School, Tecno Campus, Mataró-Maresme, Spain.
    Copanitsanou, Panagiota
    University of Athens, Greece.
    Ingadottir, Brynja
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Istomina, Natalja
    Klaipeda University, Lithuania.
    Katajisto, Jouko
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Papastavrou, Evridiki
    Cyprus University of Technology .
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Valkeapää, Kirsi
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Difference Between Received and Expected Knowledge of Patients Undergoing Knee or Hip Replacement in Seven European Countries.2015In: Clinical Nursing Research, ISSN 1054-7738, E-ISSN 1552-3799, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 624-643Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the study was to examine received and expected knowledge of patients with knee/hip arthroplasty in seven European countries. The goal was to obtain information for developing empowering patient education. The data were collected (during 2009-2012) from patients (n = 943) with hip/knee arthroplasty prior to scheduled preoperative education and before discharge with the Received Knowledge of hospital patient scale (RKhp) and Expected Knowledge of hospital patient scale (EKhp). Patients' knowledge expectations were high but the level of received knowledge did not correspond to expectations. The difference between received and expected knowledge was higher in Greece and Sweden compared with Finland (p < .0001, p < .0001), Spain (p < .0001, p = .001), and Lithuania (p = .005, p = .003), respectively. Patients' knowledge expectations are important in tailoring patient education. To achieve high standards in the future, scientific research collaboration on empowering patient education is needed between European countries.

  • 9.
    Klemetti, Seija
    et al.
    Department of Nursing Science, University of Turku, Finland; Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Turku University Hospital, Finland.
    Leino-Kilpi, Helena
    Department of Nursing Science, University of Turku, Finland; Turku University Hospital, Finland.
    Charalambous, Andreas
    Cyprus University of Technology, Cyprus; Department of Nursing Science, University of Turku, Finland.
    Copanitsanou, Panagiota
    General Hospital of Piraeus Tzaneio, Department of Orthopaedics, Piraeus, Greece.
    Ingadottir, Brynja
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Department of Surgery, Landspitali-the National University Hospital of Iceland; Faculty of Nursing, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Istomina, Natalja
    Department of Nursing, Klaipeda University, Lithuania.
    Katajisto, Jouko
    Department of Statistics, University of Turku, Finland.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Zabalegui, Adelaida
    Nursing, Hospital Clinic of Barcelona, Spain.
    Valkeapää, Kirsi
    Department of Nursing Science, University of Turku, Finland; Faculty of Social and Health Care, Lahti University of Applied Sciences, Finland.
    Information and Control Preferences and Their Relationship With the Knowledge Received Among European Joint Arthroplasty Patients.2016In: Orthopedic Nursing, ISSN 0744-6020, E-ISSN 1542-538X, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 174-182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The prevalence of joint arthroplasties is increasing internationally, putting increased emphasis on patient education. PURPOSE: This study describes information and controlpreferences of patients with joint arthroplasty in seven European countries, and explores their relationships with patients' received knowledge. METHODS: The data (n = 1,446) were collected during 2009-2012 with the Krantz Health Opinion Survey and the Received Knowledge of Hospital Patient scale. RESULTS: European patients with joint arthroplasty had low preferences. Older patients had less information preferences than younger patients (p = .0001). In control preferences there were significant relationships with age (p = .021), employment in healthcare/social services (p = .033), chronic illness (p = .002), and country (p = .0001). Received knowledge of the patients did not have any relationships with information preferences. Instead, higher control preferences were associated with less received knowledge. CONCLUSION: The relationship between European joint arthroplasty patients' preferences and the knowledge they have received requires further research. 

  • 10.
    Valkeapää, Kirsi
    et al.
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Klemetti, Seija
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Cabrera, Esther
    Health Science School, Tecno Campus, Mataró-Maresme, Spain.
    Cano, Sara
    General Hospital of Catalonia, Spain.
    Charalambous, Andreas
    Cyprus University of Technology.
    Copanitsanou, Panagiota
    University of Athens, Greece.
    Ingadottir, Brynja
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Istomina, Natalja
    Klaipeda University, Lithuania.
    Johansson Stark, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Katajisto, Jouko
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Lemonidou, Chryssoula
    University of Athens, Greece.
    Papastavrou, Evridiki
    Cyprus University of Technology.
    Sigurdardottir, Arun K
    University of Akureyri, Iceland.
    Sourtzi, Panayota
    University of Athens, Greece.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Zabalegui, Adelaida
    Hospital Clinic of Barcelona, Spain.
    Leino-Kilpi, Helena
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Knowledge expectations of surgical orthopaedic patients: A European survey2014In: International Journal of Nursing Practice, ISSN 1322-7114, E-ISSN 1440-172X, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 597-607Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ageing population entails a growing international problem of osteoarthritis. Best practices for education of these patients are lacking. This study focused on empowering education in Northern (Finland, Iceland, Lithuania and Sweden) and Southern Europe (Cyprus, Greece and Spain). The aim was to analyse associations between expected knowledge and background factors. The data were collected from European arthroplasty patients with the Knowledge Expectations of hospital patients- scale, (KEhp - scale), including bio-physiological, functional, experiential, ethical, social and financial dimensions. Patients had essential bio-physiological and functional knowledge expectations. Women expected more than men, employed less than retired, unemployed or who worked at home. Generally, patients in Northern countries expected more than in Southern countries. However, highest expectations were found in Sweden and Greece, lowest in Spain and Cyprus. There are differences in knowledge expectations based on patients' backgrounds. Development of common standards in European patient education needs further research.

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