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  • 1.
    Cardemil, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit.
    Bisfosfonatinducerad käkbensnekros (ONJ)2016Other (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Cardemil, Carina
    Department of Biomaterials, Institute of Clinical Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Effects of antiresorptive agents on inflammation and bone regeneration in different osseous sites - experimental and clinical studies2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The biological mechanisms involved in bone regeneration in osteoporotic bone and the effect of antiresorptive drugs in relation to surgically inserted biomaterials are not fully understood. Improved osseointegration of titanium implants but also adverse effects of antiresorptive therapies, such as osteonecrotic jaw have been described in the literature. The aims of this research project were, firstly, to investigate and to understand the biological events determining bone regeneration and implant integration, after administration of antiresorptive agents; secondly, to determine the cellular and molecular patterns of bone regeneration at implants and synthetic bone substitutes under osteoporotic conditions and, thirdly, to determine how different skeletal sites are affected. The present research included a study of jawbone morphology and gene expression in patients treated with systemic bisphosphonates. When compared to controls, higher gene expression levels of IL-1β was observed in bisphosphonate treated patients with osteonecrosis while bisphosphonate treated patients without necrosis showed lower expression levels of caspase 8, an apoptosis marker involved in the immune response. In ovariectomised rats, zoledronic acid resulted in site-specific differences in the rate of osseointegration and also of gene expression involved in bone healing and regeneration. Strontium-doped calcium phosphate inserted in the rat femur induced lower expression of osteoclastic markers compared to hydroxyapatite and higher bone formation in the periphery of the defects. Whereas major structural changes were demonstrated in the long bones of the ovariectomised rat, less structural alterations were shown in the mandible. However, ovariectomy resulted in lower expression of genes coding for bone formation and angiogenesis in the mandible. In conclusion, the present study shows that the mandible is differently affected by experimentally induced estrogen deficiency than the long bones. Bisphosphonates, administered systemically to estrogen deficient animals, impair osseointegration in the mandible, at least partly related to a downregulation of genes important for the osteogenic process. These observations may have implications for understanding the mechanisms involved in the deranged bone healing observed in the jawbone of bisphosphonate treated patients.

    List of papers
    1. The effects of a systemic single dose of zoledronic acid on post-implantation bone remodelling and inflammation in an ovariectomised rat model.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effects of a systemic single dose of zoledronic acid on post-implantation bone remodelling and inflammation in an ovariectomised rat model.
    Show others...
    2013 (English)In: Biomaterials, ISSN 0142-9612, E-ISSN 1878-5905, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 1546-1561Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Bisphosphonates reverse the negative effects of ovariectomy on bone, but they have also been associated with adverse processes in human jawbone. The molecular events determining bone regeneration and implant integration in osteoporotic conditions, with and without bisphosphonate treatment, are unclear. In this study, ovariectomised rats, to which a single dose of saline (NaCl) or zoledronic acid (Zol) was administered, received titanium alloy implants in their tibiae and mandibles. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, gene expression analysis and histomorphometry were performed. The results show that ovariectomy, per se, upregulated the expression of genes denoting bone formation in the tibia, bone remodelling in the mandible and apoptosis in the tibia and mandible. Zoledronic acid administration resulted in lower levels of a remodelling marker in serum and downregulated gene expression for inflammation, bone formation, angiogenesis and apoptosis, mainly in the mandible, after 28 d of healing. Histomorphometry revealed improved bone-to-implant contact in the tibia, while the opposite was observed in the mandible. The present data show that a systemic single dose of zoledronic acid, in ovariectomised animals, results in site-specific differences in the regulation of genes involved in bone healing and regeneration in association with implant installation. These events occur in parallel with site-specific differences in the rate of osseointegration, indicating diverse tissue responses in the tibia and mandible after zoledronic acid treatment. The zoledronic acid effect on gene expression, during the late phase of healing in the mandible, suggests negative effects by the anti-resorptive agent on osseointegration at that particular site.

    National Category
    Basic Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-135755 (URN)10.1016/j.biomaterials.2012.11.003 (DOI)23182921 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2017-03-21 Created: 2017-03-21 Last updated: 2018-01-13
    2. Strontium-doped calcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite granules promote different inflammatory and bone remodelling responses in normal and ovariectomised rats
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Strontium-doped calcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite granules promote different inflammatory and bone remodelling responses in normal and ovariectomised rats
    Show others...
    2013 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 12, article id e84932Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The healing of bone defects may be hindered by systemic conditions such as osteoporosis. Calcium phosphates, with or without ion substitutions, may provide advantages for bone augmentation. However, the mechanism of bone formation with these materials is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the healing process in bone defects implanted with hydroxyapatite (HA) or strontium-doped calcium phosphate (SCP) granules, in non-ovariectomised (non-OVX) and ovariectomised (OVX) rats. After 0 (baseline), six and 28d, bone samples were harvested for gene expression analysis, histology and histomorphometry. Tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), at six days, was higher in the HA, in non-OVX and OVX, whereas interleukin-6 (IL-6), at six and 28d, was higher in SCP, but only in non-OVX. Both materials produced a similar expression of the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL). Higher expression of osteoclastic markers, calcitonin receptor (CR) and cathepsin K (CatK), were detected in the HA group, irrespective of non-OVX or OVX. The overall bone formation was comparable between HA and SCP, but with topological differences. The bone area was higher in the defect centre of the HA group, mainly in the OVX, and in the defect periphery of the SCP group, in both non-OVX and OVX. It is concluded that HA and SCP granules result in comparable bone formation in trabecular bone defects. As judged by gene expression and histological analyses, the two materials induced different inflammatory and bone remodelling responses. The modulatory effects are associated with differences in the spatial distribution of the newly formed bone.

    National Category
    Biomaterials Science Medical Materials Medical Biotechnology Cell and Molecular Biology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-136113 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0084932 (DOI)24376855 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2017-03-28 Created: 2017-03-28 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
  • 3.
    Cardemil, Carina
    et al.
    Department of Biomaterials, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden, BIOMATCELL VINN Excellence Center of Biomaterials and Cell Therapy, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Elgali, Ibrahim
    Department of Biomaterials, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden, BIOMATCELL VINN Excellence Center of Biomaterials and Cell Therapy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Xia, Wei
    Applied Materials Science, Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden, BIOMATCELL VINN Excellence Center of Biomaterials and Cell Therapy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Emanuelsson, Lena
    Department of Biomaterials, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden, BIOMATCELL VINN Excellence Center of Biomaterials and Cell Therapy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Norlindh, Birgitta
    Department of Biomaterials, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden, BIOMATCELL VINN Excellence Center of Biomaterials and Cell Therapy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Omar, Omar
    Department of Biomaterials, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden, BIOMATCELL VINN Excellence Center of Biomaterials and Cell Therapy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Thomsen, Peter
    Department of Biomaterials, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden, BIOMATCELL VINN Excellence Center of Biomaterials and Cell Therapy, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Strontium-doped calcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite granules promote different inflammatory and bone remodelling responses in normal and ovariectomised rats2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 12, article id e84932Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The healing of bone defects may be hindered by systemic conditions such as osteoporosis. Calcium phosphates, with or without ion substitutions, may provide advantages for bone augmentation. However, the mechanism of bone formation with these materials is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the healing process in bone defects implanted with hydroxyapatite (HA) or strontium-doped calcium phosphate (SCP) granules, in non-ovariectomised (non-OVX) and ovariectomised (OVX) rats. After 0 (baseline), six and 28d, bone samples were harvested for gene expression analysis, histology and histomorphometry. Tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), at six days, was higher in the HA, in non-OVX and OVX, whereas interleukin-6 (IL-6), at six and 28d, was higher in SCP, but only in non-OVX. Both materials produced a similar expression of the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL). Higher expression of osteoclastic markers, calcitonin receptor (CR) and cathepsin K (CatK), were detected in the HA group, irrespective of non-OVX or OVX. The overall bone formation was comparable between HA and SCP, but with topological differences. The bone area was higher in the defect centre of the HA group, mainly in the OVX, and in the defect periphery of the SCP group, in both non-OVX and OVX. It is concluded that HA and SCP granules result in comparable bone formation in trabecular bone defects. As judged by gene expression and histological analyses, the two materials induced different inflammatory and bone remodelling responses. The modulatory effects are associated with differences in the spatial distribution of the newly formed bone.

  • 4.
    Cardemil, Carina
    et al.
    Department of Biomaterials, Institute of Clinical Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden; Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; BIOMATCELL VINN Excellence Center of Biomaterials and Cell Therapy, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Omar, Omar M.
    Department of Biomaterials, Institute of Clinical Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden; BIOMATCELL VINN Excellence Center of Biomaterials and Cell Therapy, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Norlindh, Birgitta
    Department of Biomaterials, Institute of Clinical Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden; BIOMATCELL VINN Excellence Center of Biomaterials and Cell Therapy, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Wexell, Cecilia L.
    Department of Biomaterials, Institute of Clinical Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden; BIOMATCELL VINN Excellence Center of Biomaterials and Cell Therapy, Göteborg, Sweden; Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Institute of Odontology, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Thomsen, Peter
    Department of Biomaterials, Institute of Clinical Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden; Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; BIOMATCELL VINN Excellence Center of Biomaterials and Cell Therapy, Göteborg, Sweden.
    The effects of a systemic single dose of zoledronic acid on post-implantation bone remodelling and inflammation in an ovariectomised rat model.2013In: Biomaterials, ISSN 0142-9612, E-ISSN 1878-5905, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 1546-1561Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bisphosphonates reverse the negative effects of ovariectomy on bone, but they have also been associated with adverse processes in human jawbone. The molecular events determining bone regeneration and implant integration in osteoporotic conditions, with and without bisphosphonate treatment, are unclear. In this study, ovariectomised rats, to which a single dose of saline (NaCl) or zoledronic acid (Zol) was administered, received titanium alloy implants in their tibiae and mandibles. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, gene expression analysis and histomorphometry were performed. The results show that ovariectomy, per se, upregulated the expression of genes denoting bone formation in the tibia, bone remodelling in the mandible and apoptosis in the tibia and mandible. Zoledronic acid administration resulted in lower levels of a remodelling marker in serum and downregulated gene expression for inflammation, bone formation, angiogenesis and apoptosis, mainly in the mandible, after 28 d of healing. Histomorphometry revealed improved bone-to-implant contact in the tibia, while the opposite was observed in the mandible. The present data show that a systemic single dose of zoledronic acid, in ovariectomised animals, results in site-specific differences in the regulation of genes involved in bone healing and regeneration in association with implant installation. These events occur in parallel with site-specific differences in the rate of osseointegration, indicating diverse tissue responses in the tibia and mandible after zoledronic acid treatment. The zoledronic acid effect on gene expression, during the late phase of healing in the mandible, suggests negative effects by the anti-resorptive agent on osseointegration at that particular site.

  • 5.
    Cardemil, Carina
    et al.
    Department of Biomaterials, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden; Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; BIOMATCELL VINN Excellence Center of Biomaterials and Cell Therapy, Göteborg, Sweden .
    Omar, Omar
    Department of Biomaterials, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Box 412, SE-405 30 Göteborg, Sweden; BIOMATCELL VINN Excellence Center of Biomaterials and Cell Therapy, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Norlindh, Birgitta
    Department of Biomaterials, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Box 412, SE-405 30 Göteborg, Sweden; BIOMATCELL VINN Excellence Center of Biomaterials and Cell Therapy, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Larsson Wexell, Cecilia
    Department of Biomaterials, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden; Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Institute ofOdontology, Sahlgrenska Academy at t he University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Thomsen, Peter
    Department of Biomaterials, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden; Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; BIOMATCELL VINN Excellence Center of Biomaterials and Cell Therapy, Göteborg, Sweden .
    A SINGLE SYSTEMIC DOSE OF ZOLEDRONIC ACID RESULTS IN SITESPECIFIC BONE RESPONSE TO TITANIUM IMPLANTS IN A RAT MODEL OFOSTEOPENIA2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Cardemil, Carina
    et al.
    Department of Oral Maxillofacial Surgery, NÄL Medical Centre Hospital, Trollhättan, Sweden; Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, The Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Ristevski, Zoran
    Department of Oral Maxillofacial Surgery, NÄL Medical Centre Hospital, Trollhättan, Sweden, and Department of Oral; Maxillofacial Surgery, Head & Neck Oncology Center, University Hospital Örebro, Örebro, Sweden.
    Alsén, Bengt
    Department of Oral Maxillofacial Surgery, NÄL Medical Centre Hospital, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Dahlin, Christer
    Department of Oral Maxillofacial Surgery, NÄL Medical Centre Hospital, Trollhättan, Sweden; Department of Biomaterials Science, Institute for Surgical Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Influence of different operatory setups on implant survival rate: a retrospective clinical study2009In: Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research, ISSN 1523-0899, E-ISSN 1708-8208, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 288-291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Surgery performed under sterile operating conditions, as well as atraumatic surgery, has been stated to be among the most important requirements for successful osseointegration. However, there are few reports concerning the sterile surgical technique in association with implant placement, and the appropriate level of operatory setup is not fully known.

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to analyze implant survival rate using a simplified surgical operatory setup compared with the use of the original Brånemark System (Nobel Biocare AB, Göteborg, Sweden) protocol.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 1,285 consecutively treated patients were included in the study. Four thousand implants were placed during the period of 1985 to 2003. Group A (using the Brånemark System protocol) comprised of 654 patients and 2,414 implants. Group B (using a simplified operatory setup) comprised of 631 patients and 1,586 implants. Healing was evaluated after 6 months of clinical function. Failure was defined as the removal of implants because of nonosseointegration. Statistic analysis was performed using t-test for paired data. The level of significance was set at 5% for comparison of data.

    RESULTS: No significant difference with regard to complications and implant survival rate was found in the study.

    CONCLUSION: The result from the present study suggests that a simplified operatory setup does not affect the survival rate of oral implant treatment.

  • 7.
    Herlofson, B.B.
    et al.
    Department of Oral Surgery and Oral Medicine, Faculty of Dentistry- University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Wexell, C.L.
    Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Southern Alvsborg Hospital, Borås; Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Nørholt, S.E.
    Aarhus University, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Igland, E.
    Department of Oral Surgery and Oral Medicine, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Cardemil, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit. Department of Biomaterials, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ehrenstein, V.
    Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Schiødt, V.
    Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    THE SCANDINAVIAN OSTEONECROSIS COHORT STUDY - REPORT ON THE FIRST 4 YEARS OF RESEARCH COLLABORATION2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Larsson Wexell, Cecilia
    et al.
    Södra Älvsborgs Sjukhus; Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg.
    Brokstad Herlofson, Bente
    Inst for klinisk odontologi, Universitet i Oslo; Radiumhospitalet, Oslo Universitetssykehus, Norge.
    Norholt, Sven Erik
    Aarhus universitetshospital; Inst för Odentologi, Health, Aarhus Universitet, Danmark.
    Cardemil, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit. Avd för biomaterialvetenskap, Inst för kliniska vetenskaper, Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg.
    Schlodt, Morten
    Rigshospitalet, Köpenhamn, Danmark.
    Läkemedelsrelaterad osteonekros i käkarna, del 1: Översikt och riktlinjer2015In: Tandläkartidningen, ISSN 0039-6982, Vol. 12Article, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Shah, Furqan A.
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; BIOMATCELL VINN Excellence Ctr Biomat and Cell Ther, Sweden.
    Stoica, Adrian
    Masaryk Univ, Czech Republic.
    Cardemil, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Maxillofacial Unit. Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; BIOMATCELL VINN Excellence Ctr Biomat and Cell Ther, Sweden.
    Palmquist, Anders
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; BIOMATCELL VINN Excellence Ctr Biomat and Cell Ther, Sweden.
    Multiscale characterization of cortical bone composition, microstructure, and nanomechanical properties in experimentally induced osteoporosis2018In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part A, ISSN 1549-3296, E-ISSN 1552-4965, Vol. 106, no 4, p. 997-1007Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cortical bone plays a vital role in determining overall bone strength. We investigate the structural, compositional, and nanomechanical properties of cortical bone following ovariectomy (OVX) of 12-week-old Sprague Dawley rats, since this animal model is frequently employed to evaluate the performance of implantable biomaterials in compromised bone healing conditions. Morphological parameters and material properties of bone in the geometrical center of the femoral cortex were investigated four and eight weeks post-OVX and in unoperated controls (Ctrl), using X-ray micro-computed tomography, backscattered electron scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and nanoindentation. The OVX animals showed increase in body weight, diminished bone mineral density, increased intracortical porosity, but increased bone mass through periosteal apposition (e.g., increases in periosteal perimeter, cortical cross-sectional thickness, and cross-sectional area). However, osteocyte densities, osteocyte lacunar dimensions, and the nanomechanical behavior on the single mineralized collagen fibril level remained unaffected. Our correlative multiscale investigation provides structural, chemical, and nanomechanical evidence substantiating earlier reports suggesting that rats ovariectomized at 12 weeks undergo simultaneous bone loss and growth, resulting in the effects of OVX being less obvious. Periosteal apposition contradicts the conventional view of bone loss in osteoporosis but appears advantageous for the greater functional demand imposed on the skeleton by increased body weight and fragility induced by increased intracortical porosity. Through a variety of morphological changes, it is likely that 12-week-old rats are able to adapt to OVX-related microstructural and compositional alterations. (c) 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 106A: 997-1007, 2018.

  • 10.
    Silva, I.
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Cardemil, Carina
    Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Kashani, H.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bazargani, F.
    Postgrad Dent Educ Centre, Sweden.
    Tarnow, P.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rasmusson, L.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Suska, F.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Quality of life in patients undergoing orthognathic surgery - A two-centered Swedish study2016In: Journal of Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 1010-5182, E-ISSN 1878-4119, Vol. 44, no 8, p. 973-978Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Surgical corrections of dentofacial deformities have both physical and psychological impact on quality of life (QoL). The objectives of the present study were to evaluate the impact of oral health related problems on QoL before and after a combination of orthodontic treatment and orthognathic surgery. Additionally, the study aimed to identify correlations between different dentofacial patterns and possible improvements due to treatment. Material and methods: In a prospective study, we evaluated fifty patients before start of treatment, 6 weeks and 6 months postoperatively. The questionnaires used were: OHIP-14 (Short Form Oral Health Impact Profile), a condition-specific QOL approach (Orthognathic Quality of Life Questionnaires; OQLQ) and a social-demographic questionnaire. Results: There was a statistically significant improvement in the OHIP domains from baseline to 6 months follow-up and for the OQLQ the improvement was significant both at 6 weeks and 6 months in relation to the baseline data. Conclusion: Significant improvement of quality of life over time is proved by both OHIP-14 and OQLQ in the present study. Socio-demographic and holistic considerations are important when evaluating treatment outcome after combined orthodontic and orthognatic surgery. However, longer follow-up would be beneficial. (C) 2016 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 11.
    Silva, Ingrid
    et al.
    Dept of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Suska, Felicia
    Dept of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Cardemil, Carina
    Dept Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Rasmusson, Lars
    Dept of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Stability after maxillary segmentation for correction of anterior open bite: a cohort study of 33 cases.2013In: Journal of Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 1010-5182, E-ISSN 1878-4119, Vol. 41, no 7, p. e154-e158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this cohort study was to evaluate the stability after multi-segmentation of the maxilla for correction of anterior open bite deformities. A total of 33 patients who underwent segmented maxillary osteotomy between 1994 and 2006 were included in the study. Rigid fixation with plates and postsurgical intermaxillary fixation for 6 weeks was applied to each patient. All patients were then followed in a standardized examination procedure at months 6, 12, 18 and up to 30 months postoperatively. Vertical and horizontal relation of the incisors was measured both clinically and on cast models. The main finding was that statistically significant relapse was found vertically, whereas the horizontal relationship to the mandible was unchanged. The vertical relapses were predominantly seen in patients with severe open bite evident preoperatively.less thanbr /greater than (Copyright © 2012 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.)

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