liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 27 of 27
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Alonso-Magdalena, Paloma
    et al.
    Departamento de Biología Aplicada, Universidad Miguel Hernández.
    Rivera, Fransisco J.
    Laboratory of Stem Cells and Neurogeneration, Institute of Anatomy, Histology and Pathology, Facultu of Medicine and Center for INterdiciplinary Studies on the Nervous System (CISNe), Universitad Austral de Chile; Institute for Molecular Regenerative MEdicine and Spinal Cord Injury and Tissue Regeneration Center Salzburg (SCI-TReCS), Paracelsus University, Salzburg, Austira.
    Guerrero Bosagna, Carlos
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bisphenol-A and metabolic diseases: epigenetic developmental and transgenerational basis2016In: Environmental Epigenetics, ISSN 2058-5888, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Exposure to environmental toxicants is now accepted as a factor contributing to the increasing incidence of obesity and metabolic diseases around the world. Such environmental compounds are known as ‘obesogens’. Among them, bisphenol-A (BPA) is the most widespread and ubiquitous compound affecting humans and animals. Laboratory animal work has provided conclusive evidence that early-life exposure to BPA is particularly effective in predisposing individuals to weight gain. Embryonic exposure to BPA is reported to generate metabolic disturbances later in life, such as obesity and diabetes. When BPA administration is combined with a high-fat diet, there is an exacerbation in the development of metabolic disorders. Remarkably, upon BPA exposure of gestating females, metabolic disturbances have been found both in the offspring and later in life in the mothers themselves. When considering the metabolic effects generated by an early developmental exposure to BPA, one of the questions that arises is the role of precursor cells in the etiology of metabolic disorders. Current evidence shows that BPA and other endocrine disruptors have the ability to alter fat tissue development and growth by affecting the capacity to generate functional adipocytes, as well as their rate of differentiation to specific cell types. Epigenetic mechanisms seem to be involved in the BPA-induced effects related to obesity, as they have been described in both in vitro and in vivo models. Moreover, recent reports also show that developmental exposure to BPA generates abnormalities that can be transmitted to future generations, in a process called as transgenerational epigenetic inheritance.

  • 2.
    Bosagna, Carlos Guerrero
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Developmental and Epigenetic Origins of Male Reproductive Pathologies2015In: The Epigenome and Developmental Origins of Health and Disease / [ed] Cheryl Rosenfeld, Elsevier, 2015, 1, p. 171-189Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transgenerational epigenetic inheritance has gained increased attention due to the possibility that exposure to environmental toxicants or other stressors can induce long-lasting changes in lineages of organisms. The mechanism involves exposure of pregnant females and induction of germline epigenetic alterations in their developing embryos. This early developmental exposure generates phenotypic alterations in the adults. The germline epigenomic changes produced are then transmitted to future generations and associate with disease phenotypes in the unexposed individuals of subsequent generations. Exposures to environmental toxicants such as fungicides, pesticides, or plastic compounds have been shown in rodents to produce abnormal reproductive or metabolic phenotypes that are transgenerationally transmitted. These include transgenerational increases in the incidence of obesity, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)-like symptoms, pregnancy defects, or germ cell apoptosis. Importantly, the increased incidence of these transgenerationally transmitted diseases in response to environmental exposures in animal models is sometimes drastic. The current evidence on transgenerational epigenetic inheritance observed in animal models allows predicting that environmental exposures of today's inhabitants of the world may affect the incidence of noninfectious diseases in future generations, which would be correlated with long-lasting alterations in the epigenome. The present chapter summarizes the evidence to date for transgenerational epigenetic inheritance, in both humans and animal models.

  • 3.
    Bélteky, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Agnvall, Beatrix
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bektic, Lejla
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Höglund, Andrey
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jensen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Guerrero Bosagna, Carlos
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Epigenetics and early domestication: differences in hypothalamic DNA methylation between red junglefowl divergently selected for high or low fear of humans2018In: Genetics Selection Evolution, ISSN 0999-193X, E-ISSN 1297-9686, Vol. 50, article id 13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Domestication of animals leads to large phenotypic alterations within a short evolutionary time-period. Such alterations are caused by genomic variations, yet the prevalence of modified traits is higher than expected if they were caused only by classical genetics and mutations. Epigenetic mechanisms may also be important in driving domesticated phenotypes such as behavior traits. Gene expression can be modulated epigenetically by mechanisms such as DNA methylation, resulting in modifications that are not only variable and susceptible to environmental stimuli, but also sometimes transgenerationally stable. To study such mechanisms in early domestication, we used as model two selected lines of red junglefowl (ancestors of modern chickens) that were bred for either high or low fear of humans over five generations, and investigated differences in hypothalamic DNA methylation between the two populations. Results: Twenty-two 1-kb windows were differentially methylated between the two selected lines at p amp;lt; 0.05 after false discovery rate correction. The annotated functions of the genes within these windows indicated epigenetic regulation of metabolic and signaling pathways, which agrees with the changes in gene expression that were previously reported for the same tissue and animals. Conclusions: Our results show that selection for an important domestication-related behavioral trait such as tameness can cause divergent epigenetic patterns within only five generations, and that these changes could have an important role in chicken domestication.

  • 4.
    Frias-Lasserre, Daniel
    et al.
    Univ Metropolitana Ciencias Educ, Chile.
    Villagra, Cristian A.
    Univ Metropolitana Ciencias Educ, Chile.
    Guerrero Bosagna, Carlos
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Stress in the Educational System as a Potential Source of Epigenetic Influences on Childrens Development and Behavior2018In: Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-5153, E-ISSN 1662-5153, Vol. 12, article id 143Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite current advances on the relevance of environmental cues and epigenetic mechanisms in biological processes, including behavior, little attention has been paid to the potential link between epigenetic influences and educational sciences. For instance, could the learning environment and stress determine epigenetic marking, affecting students behavior development? Could this have consequences on educational outcomes? So far, it has been shown that environmental stress influences neurological processes and behavior both in humans and rats. Through epigenetic mechanisms, offspring from stressed individuals develop altered behavior without any exposure to traumatizing experiences. Methylated DNA and noncoding RNAs regulate neurological processes such as synaptic plasticity and brain cortex development in children. The malfunctioning of these processes is associated with several neurological disorders, and these findings open up new avenues for the design of enriched environments for education and therapy. In this article, we discuss current cases of stress and behavioral disorders found in youngsters, and highlight the importance of considering epigenetic processes affecting the development of cognitive abilities and learning within the educational environment and for the development of teaching methodologies.

  • 5.
    Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology.
    DNA Methylation Research Methods2014Other (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Epigenetics, evolution and the survival of the non-unfit2017In: The Biochemist, ISSN 0954-982X, Vol. 39, no 5, p. 8-11Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The transition that occurred in vertebrates moving from water to land was a major step in the evolution of terrestrial animals. This is an evolutionary step that has always fascinated scientists and the general public. The land-to-water vertebrate transition happened around the Devonian period and involved structural changes such as the transition from fin to limb, a reduction of the gill arch, loss of the mid-fin and a reduction in the number of scales, among others. I will use this interesting example to depict how the same evolutionary process can be seen through two different lenses. One view, which is the most widespread way of seeing evolution, is the 'survival of the fittest'. The other is intentionally stated in the title as the double negative 'survival of the non-unfit'. Only semantic differences? Not in my view.

  • 7.
    Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Evolution with No Reason: A Neutral View on Epigenetic Changes, Genomic Variability, and Evolutionary Novelty2017In: BioScience, ISSN 0006-3568, E-ISSN 1525-3244, Vol. 67, no 5, p. 469-476Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Explanations about the origin of evolutionary novelties are generally related to their adaptive value and are therefore based on ultimate causes. However, the current knowledge of genomics allows inquiry into the molecular mechanism involved in the generation of genomic evolutionary novelties, which is an approach based on proximate causes. Recent genomic evidence suggests that adaptive processes may not be as relevant as neutral (i.e., nonadaptive) processes in evolution. Based on the logic of understanding proximate causes of evolution, it is proposed here that environmentally induced germ-line epigenetic changes could be important in generating genomic evolutionary novelty. Moreover, epigenetically induced genetic variability would be in tune with the neutral theory of evolution, because this variability would be produced independent of fitness effects or adaptive value.

  • 8.
    Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    High type II error and interpretation inconsistencies when attempting to refute transgenerational epigenetic inheritance2016In: Genome Biology, ISSN 1465-6906, E-ISSN 1474-760X, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 153Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A recently published article in Genome Biology attempts to refute important aspects of the phenomenon of transgenerational epigenetic inheritance (TEI). An alternative explanation of the data is offered here, showing that TEI is indeed not contradicted.Please see related Correspondence article: www.dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13059-016-0981-5 and related Research article: http://genomebiology.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13059-015-0619-z.

  • 9.
    Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Transgenerational epigenetic inheritance in birds2018In: Environmental Epigenetics, E-ISSN 2058-5888, Vol. 4, no 2, article id dvy008Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While it has been shown that epigenetics accounts for a portion of the variability of complex traits linked to interactions with the environment, the real contribution of epigenetics to phenotypic variation remains to be assessed. In recent years, a growing number of studies have revealed that epigenetic modifications can be transmitted across generations in several animal species. Numerous studies have demonstrated inter- or multi-generational effects of changing environment in birds, but very few studies have been published showing epigenetic transgenerational inheritance in these species. In this review, we mention work conducted in parent-to-offspring transmission analyses in bird species, with a focus on the impact of early stressors on behaviour. We then present recent advances in transgenerational epigenetics in birds, which involve germline linked non-Mendelian inheritance, underline the advantages and drawbacks of working on birds in this field and comment on future directions of transgenerational studies in bird species.

  • 10.
    Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Transgenerational epigenetic inheritance: past exposures, future diseases2016In: The epigenome and developmental origins of health and disease / [ed] Cheryl S. Rosenfeld, Amsterdam: Academic Press, 2016, p. 425-437Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transgenerational epigenetic inheritance has gained increased attention due to the possibility that exposure to environmental toxicants or other stressors can induce long-lasting changes in lineages of organisms. The mechanism involves exposure of pregnant females and induction of germline epigenetic alterations in their developing embryos. This early developmental exposure generates phenotypic alterations in the adults. The germline epigenomic changes produced are then transmitted to future generations and associate with disease phenotypes in the unexposed individuals of subsequent generations. Exposures to environmental toxicants such as fungicides, pesticides, or plastic compounds have been shown in rodents to produce abnormal reproductive or metabolic phenotypes that are transgenerationally transmitted. These include transgenerational increases in the incidence of obesity, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)-like symptoms, pregnancy defects, or germ cell apoptosis. Importantly, the increased incidence of these transgenerationally transmitted diseases in response to environmental exposures in animal models is sometimes drastic. The current evidence on transgenerational epigenetic inheritance observed in animal models allows predicting that environmental exposures of today's inhabitants of the world may affect the incidence of noninfectious diseases in future generations, which would be correlated with long-lasting alterations in the epigenome. The present chapter summarizes the evidence to date for transgenerational epigenetic inheritance, in both humans and animal models.

  • 11.
    Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Jensen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Globalization, climate change, and transgenerational epigenetic inheritance: will our descendants be at risk?2015In: Clinical Epigenetics, E-ISSN 1868-7083, Vol. 7, no 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transgenerational epigenetic inheritance has gained increased attention due to the possibility that exposure to environmental contaminants induce diseases that propagate  across generations through epigenomic alterations in gametes. In laboratory animals,exposure to environmental toxicants such as fungicides, pesticides, or plastic compounds has been shown to produce abnormal reproductive or metabolic phenotypes that are transgenerationally transmitted. Human exposures to environmental toxicants have increased due to industrialization and globalization, as well as the incidence of diseases shown to be transgenerationally transmitted in animal models. This new knowledge poses an urgent call to study transgenerational  consequences of current human exposures to environmental toxicants.

  • 12.
    Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jensen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Optimized method for methylated DNA immuno-precipitation2015In: MethodsX, ISSN 1258-780X, E-ISSN 2215-0161, Vol. 2, p. e432-e439, article id eArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP) is one of the most widely used methods to evaluate DNA methylation on a whole genome scale, and involves the capture of the methylated fraction of the DNA by an antibody specific to methyl-cytosine. MeDIP was initially coupled with microarray hybridization to detect local DNA methylation enrichments along the genome. More recently, MeDIP has been coupled with next generation sequencing, which highlights its current and future applicability. In previous studies in which MeDIP was applied, the protocol took around 3 days to be performed. Given the importance of MeDIP for studies involving DNA methylation, it was important to optimize the method in order to deliver faster turnouts. The present article describes optimization steps of the MeDIP method. The length of the procedure was reduced in half without compromising the quality of the results. This was achieved by:

    • Reduction of the number of washes in different stages of the protocol, after a careful evaluation of the number of indispensable washes.

    • Reduction of reaction times for detaching methylated DNA fragments from the complex agarose beads:antibody.

    • Modification of the methods to purify methylated DNA, which incorporates new devices and procedures, and eliminates a lengthy phenol and chloroform:isoamyl alcohol extraction.

  • 13.
    Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Skinner, Michael K.
    Washington State University, Pullman, USA.
    Environmentally induced epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of male infertility2014In: Current Opinion in Genetics and Development, ISSN 0959-437X, E-ISSN 1879-0380, Vol. 26, p. 79-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Decreasing male fertility has been observed for the past fifty years. Examples of affected reproductive parameters include decreases in sperm count and sperm quality and increases in testicular cancer, cryptorchidism and hypospadias. Exposures to environmental toxicants during fetal development and early postnatal life have been shown to promote infertility. Environmental exposures inducing epigenetic changes related to male infertility range from life style, occupational exposures, environmental toxicants and nutrition. Exposures during fetal gonadal sex determination have been shown to alter the epigenetic programming of the germline that then can transmit this altered epigenetic information to subsequent generations in the absence of any exposures. This environmentally induced epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease will be a component of the etiology of male infertility.

  • 14.
    Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Weeks, Shelby
    Washington State University, Pullman, USA.
    Skinner, Michael K.
    Washington State University, Pullman, USA.
    Identification of genomic features in environmentally induced epigenetic transgenerational inherited sperm epimutations2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 6, p. e100194-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A variety of environmental toxicants have been shown to induce the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease and phenotypic variation. The process involves exposure of a gestating female and the developing fetus to environmental factors that promote permanent alterations in the epigenetic programming of the germline. The molecular aspects of the phenomenon involve epigenetic modifications (epimutations) in the germline (e. g. sperm) that are transmitted to subsequent generations. The current study integrates previously described experimental epigenomic transgenerational data and web-based bioinformatic analyses to identify genomic features associated with these transgenerationally transmitted epimutations. A previously identified genomic feature associated with these epimutations is a low CpG density (<12/100bp). The current observations suggest the transgenerational differential DNA methylation regions (DMR) in sperm contain unique consensus DNA sequence motifs, zinc finger motifs and G-quadruplex sequences. Interaction of molecular factors with these sequences could alter chromatin structure and accessibility of proteins with DNA methyltransferases to alter de novo DNA methylation patterns. G-quadruplex regions can promote the opening of the chromatin that may influence the action of DNA methyltransferases, or factors interacting with them, for the establishment of epigenetic marks. Zinc finger binding factors can also promote this chromatin remodeling and influence the expression of non-coding RNA. The current study identified genomic features associated with sperm epimutations that may explain in part how these sites become susceptible for transgenerational programming.

  • 15.
    Jacobs, Miriam N.
    et al.
    Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards, Public Health England, Chilton, United Kingdom.
    Marczylo, Emma L.
    Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards, Public Health England, Chilton, United Kingdom.
    Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ruegg, Joelle
    Unit of Toxicology Sciences, Swetox, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden / Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden;.
    Marked for Life: Epigenetic Effects of Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals2017In: Annual Review Environment and Resources, ISSN 1543-5938, E-ISSN 1545-2050, Vol. 42, p. 105-160Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The presence of human-made chemical contaminants in the environment has increased rapidly during the past 70 years. Harmful effects of such contaminants were first reported in the late 1950s in wildlife and later in humans. These effects are predominantly induced by endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), chemicals that mimic the actions of endogenous hormones and leave marks at several levels of organization in organisms, from physiological outcomes (phenotypes) to molecular alterations, including epigenetic modifications. Epigenetic mechanisms play pivotal roles in the developmental processes that contribute to determining adult phenotypes, through so-called epigenetic programming. While there is increasing evidence that EDC exposure during sensitive periods of development can perturb epigenetic programming, it is unclear whether these changes are truly predictive of adverse outcomes. Understanding the mechanistic links between EDC-induced epigenetic changes and phenotypic endpoints will be critical for providing improved regulatory tools to better protect the environment and human health from exposure to EDCs.

  • 16.
    Kindgren, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Vastervik Hosp, Sweden; Skaraborg Hosp, Sweden.
    Guerrero Bosagna, Carlos
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Heavy metals in fish and its association with autoimmunity in the development of juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a prospective birth cohort study2019In: Pediatric Rheumatology, ISSN 1546-0096, E-ISSN 1546-0096, Vol. 17, article id 33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundThe etiology of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) is poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to examine the possible influence of early nutrition on later development of JIA.MethodsIn a population-based prospective birth cohort of 15,740 children we collected nutritional data, including fish consumption, and biological samples during pregnancy, at birth and at different ages. 16years after study inclusion we identified 42 children with JIA, of whom 11 were positive for Antinuclear Antibodies (ANA). Heavy metals were analysed in cord blood of all 42 JIA patients and 40 age and sex-matched controls. A multivariable logistic regression model, adjusted for relevant factors, was used as well as Mann-Whitney U-test.ResultsFish consumption more than once a week during pregnancy as well as during the childs first year of life was associated with an increased risk of JIA (aOR 4.5 (1.95-10.4); pamp;lt;0.001 and aOR 5.1 (2.1-12.4) pamp;lt;0.001) and of ANA-positivity (aOR 2.2 (1.4-3.6); p=0.002 and pamp;lt;0.001). Concentrations of Al, Cd, Hg and Li in cord blood were significantly higher in the JIA-group than in controls. The ANA-positive, all of whom had consumed fish amp;gt;once/week their first year, had significantly higher concentrations of Al (pamp;lt;0.001), Cd (p=0.003), and Li (pamp;lt;0.001) in cord blood than controls. Frequency of fish consumption correlated with concentrations of Cd (p=0.003), Li (p=0.015) and Hg (p=0.011).ConclusionsModerate exposure to heavy metals, associated with fish consumption, during pregnancy and early childhood may cause effects on the immune system of the offspring, resulting in ANA positivity and JIA.

  • 17.
    Lind, Lars
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Lind, P. Monica
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Lejonklou, Margareta H.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Dunder, Linda
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Bergman, Ake
    Swedish Toxicol Science Research Centre Swetox, Sweden.
    Guerrero Bosagna, Carlos
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lampa, Erik
    Uppsala Clin Research UCR Centre, Sweden.
    Kyu Lee, Hong
    Eulji University, South Korea.
    Legler, Juliette
    Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Nadal, Angel
    University of Miguel Hernandez Elche, Spain.
    Kim Pak, Youngmi
    Kyung Hee University, South Korea.
    Phipps, Richard P.
    University of Rochester, NY USA.
    Vandenberg, Laura N.
    University of Massachusetts, MA 01003 USA.
    Zalko, Daniel
    INRA, France; University of Toulouse 3, France.
    Agerstrand, Marlene
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Oberg, Mattias
    Swedish Toxicol Science Research Centre Swetox, Sweden.
    Blumberg, Bruce
    University of Calif Irvine, CA 92717 USA.
    Heindel, Jerrold J.
    NIEHS, NC 27709 USA.
    Birnbaum, Linda S.
    NIEHS, NC 27709 USA.
    Uppsala Consensus Statement on Environmental Contaminants and the Global Obesity Epidemic2016In: Journal of Environmental Health Perspectives, ISSN 0091-6765, E-ISSN 1552-9924, Vol. 124, no 5, p. A81-A83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From the lectures presented at the 2nd International Workshop on Obesity and Environmental Contaminants, which was held in Uppsala, Sweden, on 8-9 October 2015, it became evident that the findings from numerous animal and epidemiological studies are consistent with the hypothesis that environmental contaminants could contribute to the global obesity epidemic. To increase awareness of this important issue among scientists, regulatory agencies, politicians, chemical industry management, and the general public, the authors summarize compelling scientific evidence that supports the hypothesis and discuss actions that could restrict the possible harmful effects of environmental contaminants on obesity.

  • 18.
    Mankkam, Mohan
    et al.
    Center for Reproductive Biology, School of Biological Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington, USA.
    Haque, M. Muksitul
    Center for Reproductive Biology, School of Biological Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington, USA.
    Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos
    Center for Reproductive Biology, School of Biological Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington, USA.
    Nilsson, Eric E.
    Center for Reproductive Biology, School of Biological Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington, USA.
    Skinner, Michael K.
    Center for Reproductive Biology, School of Biological Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington, USA.
    Pesticide Methoxychlor Promotes the Epigenetic Transgenerational Inheritance of Adult-Onset Disease through the Female Germline2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 7, p. e102091-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental compounds including fungicides, plastics, pesticides, dioxin and hydrocarbons can promote the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult-onset disease in future generation progeny following ancestral exposure during the critical period of fetal gonadal sex determination. This study examined the actions of the pesticide methoxychlor to promote the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult-onset disease and associated differential DNA methylation regions (i.e. epimutations) in sperm. Gestating F0 generation female rats were transiently exposed to methoxychlor during fetal gonadal development (gestation days 8 to 14) and then adult-onset disease was evaluated in adult F1 and F3 (great-grand offspring) generation progeny for control (vehicle exposed) and methoxychlor lineage offspring. There were increases in the incidence of kidney disease, ovary disease, and obesity in the methoxychlor lineage animals. In females and males the incidence of disease increased in both the F1 and the F3 generations and the incidence of multiple disease increased in the F3 generation. There was increased disease incidence in F4 generation reverse outcross (female) offspring indicating disease transmission was primarily transmitted through the female germline. Analysis of the F3 generation sperm epigenome of the methoxychlor lineage males identified differentially DNA methylated regions (DMR) termed epimutations in a genome-wide gene promoters analysis. These epimutations were found to be methoxychlor exposure specific in comparison with other exposure specific sperm epimutation signatures. Observations indicate that the pesticide methoxychlor has the potential to promote the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease and the sperm epimutations appear to provide exposure specific epigenetic biomarkers for transgenerational disease and ancestral environmental exposures.

  • 19.
    Pertille, Fabio
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. University of Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Brantsaeter, Margrethe
    Norwegian University of Life Science, Norway.
    Nordgreen, Janicke
    Norwegian University of Life Science, Norway.
    Lehmann Coutinho, Luiz
    University of Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Janczak, Andrew M.
    Norwegian University of Life Science, Norway.
    Jensen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Guerrero Bosagna, Carlos
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    DNA methylation profiles in red blood cells of adult hens correlate with their rearing conditions2017In: Journal of Experimental Biology, ISSN 0022-0949, E-ISSN 1477-9145, Vol. 220, no 19, p. 3579-3587Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stressful conditions are common in the environment where production animals are reared. Stress in animals is usually determined by the levels of stress-related hormones. A big challenge, however, is in determining the history of exposure of an organism to stress, because the release of stress hormones can show an acute (and recent) but not a sustained exposure to stress. Epigenetic tools provide an alternative option to evaluate past exposure to long-termstress. Chickens provide a unique model to study stress effects in the epigenome of red blood cells (RBCs), a cell type of easy access and nucleated in birds. The present study investigated whether two different rearing conditions in chickens can be identified by looking at DNA methylation patterns in their RBCs later in life. These conditions were rearing in open aviaries versus in cages, which are likely to differ regarding the amount of stress they generate. Our comparison revealed 115 genomic windows with significant changes in RBC DNA methylation between experimental groups, which were located around 53 genes and within 22 intronic regions. Our results set the ground for future detection of long-term stress in live production animals by measuring DNA methylation in a cell type of easy accessibility.

  • 20.
    Pértille, Fábio
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Univ Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Da Silva, Vinicius H.
    Wageningen Univ and Res, Netherlands; Netherlands Inst Ecol NIOO KNAW, Netherlands; Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Sweden.
    Johansson, Anna M.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Sweden.
    Lindström, Tom
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wright, Dominic
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Coutinho, Luiz L.
    Univ Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Jensen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Guerrero Bosagna, Carlos
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mutation dynamics of CpG dinucleotides during a recent event of vertebrate diversification2019In: Epigenetics, ISSN 1559-2294, E-ISSN 1559-2308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    DNA methylation in CpGs dinucleotides is associated with high mutability and disappearance of CpG sites during evolution. Although the high mutability of CpGs is thought to be relevant for vertebrate evolution, very little is known on the role of CpG-related mutations in the genomic diversification of vertebrates. Our study analysed genetic differences in chickens, between Red Junglefowl (RJF; the living closest relative to the ancestor of domesticated chickens) and domesticated breeds, to identify genomic dynamics that have occurred during the process of their domestication, focusing particularly on CpG-related mutations. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and copy number variations (CNVs) between RJF and these domesticated breeds were assessed in a reduced fraction of their genome. Additionally, DNA methylation in the same fraction of the genome was measured in the sperm of RJF individuals to identify possible correlations with the mutations found between RJF and the domesticated breeds. Our study shows that although the vast majority of CpG-related mutations found relate to CNVs, CpGs disproportionally associate to SNPs in comparison to CNVs, where they are indeed substantially under-represented. Moreover, CpGs seem to be hotspots of mutations related to speciation. We suggest that, on the one hand, CpG-related mutations in CNV regions would promote genomic flexibility in evolution, i.e., the ability of the genome to expand its functional possibilities; on the other hand, CpG-related mutations in SNPs would relate to genomic specificity in evolution, thus, representing mutations that would associate with phenotypic traits relevant for speciation.

  • 21.
    Pértille, Fábio
    et al.
    1Animal Biotechnology Laboratory, Animal Science and Pastures Department, University of São Paulo (USP)/Luiz de Queiroz College of Agriculture (ESALQ), Piracicaba, São Paulo, Brazil.
    Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    da Silva, Vinicius Henrique
    1Animal Biotechnology Laboratory, Animal Science and Pastures Department, University of São Paulo (USP)/Luiz de Queiroz College of Agriculture (ESALQ), Piracicaba, São Paulo, Brazil.
    Boschiero, Clarissa
    1Animal Biotechnology Laboratory, Animal Science and Pastures Department, University of São Paulo (USP)/Luiz de Queiroz College of Agriculture (ESALQ), Piracicaba, São Paulo, Brazil..
    da Silva Nunes, José de Ribamar
    1Animal Biotechnology Laboratory, Animal Science and Pastures Department, University of São Paulo (USP)/Luiz de Queiroz College of Agriculture (ESALQ), Piracicaba, São Paulo, Brazil..
    Corrêa Ledur, Mônica
    Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation (EMBRAPA) Swine & Poultry, Concórdia, Santa Catarina, Brazil.
    Jensen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lehmann Coutinho, Luiz
    1Animal Biotechnology Laboratory, Animal Science and Pastures Department, University of São Paulo (USP)/Luiz de Queiroz College of Agriculture (ESALQ), Piracicaba, São Paulo, Brazil.
    High-throughput and Cost-effective Chicken Genotyping Using Next-Generation Sequencing2016In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, article id 26929Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chicken genotyping is becoming common practice in conventional animal breeding improvement.Despite the power of high-throughput methods for genotyping, their high cost limits large scale use inanimal breeding and selection. In the present paper we optimized the CornellGBS, an efficient and costeffectivegenotyping by sequence approach developed in plants, for its application in chickens. Herewe describe the successful genotyping of a large number of chickens (462) using CornellGBS approach.Genomic DNA was cleaved with the PstI enzyme, ligated to adapters with barcodes identifyingindividual animals, and then sequenced on Illumina platform. After filtering parameters were applied,134,528 SNPs were identified in our experimental population of chickens. Of these SNPs, 67,096 hada minimum taxon call rate of 90% and were considered ‘unique tags’. Interestingly, 20.7% of theseunique tags have not been previously reported in the dbSNP. Moreover, 92.6% of these SNPs wereconcordant with a previous Whole Chicken-genome re-sequencing dataset used for validation purposes.The application of CornellGBS in chickens showed high performance to infer SNPs, particularly inexonic regions and microchromosomes. This approach represents a cost-effective (~US$50/sample)and powerful alternative to current genotyping methods, which has the potential to improve wholegenomeselection (WGS), and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in chicken production.

  • 22.
    Skinner, Michael K.
    et al.
    Washington State University, Pullman, USA.
    Guerrero Bosagna, Carlos
    Washington State University, Pullman, USA.
    Haque, M. Muksitul
    Washington State University, Pullman, USA.
    Nilsson, Eric E.
    Washington State University, Pullman, USA.
    Koop, Jennifer A.H.
    University of Utah, USA.
    Knutie, Sarah A.
    University of Utah, USA.
    Clayton, Dale H.
    University of Utah, USA.
    Epigenetics and the Evolution of Darwin's Finches2014In: Genome Biology and Evolution, ISSN 1759-6653, E-ISSN 1759-6653, Vol. 6, no 8, p. 1972-1989Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The prevailing theory for the molecular basis of evolution involves genetic mutations that ultimately generate the heritable phenotypic variation on which natural selection acts. However, epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of phenotypic variation may also play an important role in evolutionary change. A growing number of studies have demonstrated the presence of epigenetic inheritance in a variety of different organisms that can persist for hundreds of generations. The possibility that epigenetic changes can accumulate over longer periods of evolutionary time has seldom been tested empirically. This study was designed to compare epigenetic changes among several closely related species of Darwin's finches, a well-known example of adaptive radiation. Erythrocyte DNA was obtained from five species of sympatric Darwin's finches that vary in phylogenetic relatedness. Genome-wide alterations in genetic mutations using copy number variation (CNV) were compared with epigenetic alterations associated with differential DNA methylation regions (epimutations). Epimutations were more common than genetic CNV mutations among the five species; furthermore, the number of epimutations increased monotonically with phylogenetic distance. Interestingly, the number of genetic CNV mutations did not consistently increase with phylogenetic distance. The number, chromosomal locations, regional clustering, and lack of overlap of epimutations and genetic mutations suggest that epigenetic changes are distinct and that they correlate with the evolutionary history of Darwin's finches. The potential functional significance of the epimutations was explored by comparing their locations on the genome to the location of evolutionarily important genes and cellular pathways in birds. Specific epimutations were associated with genes related to the bone morphogenic protein, toll receptor, and melanogenesis signaling pathways. Species-specific epimutations were significantly overrepresented in these pathways. As environmental factors are known to result in heritable changes in the epigenome, it is possible that epigenetic changes contribute to the molecular basis of the evolution of Darwin's finches.

  • 23.
    Skinner, Michael K.
    et al.
    Center for Reproductive Biology, School of Biological Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, USA.
    Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos
    Center for Reproductive Biology, School of Biological Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, USA.
    Role of CpG deserts in the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of differential DNA methylation regions2014In: BMC Genomics, ISSN 1471-2164, E-ISSN 1471-2164, Vol. 15, no 692Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Previously a variety of environmental toxicants were found to promote the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease through differential DNA methylation regions (DMRs), termed epimutations, present in sperm. The transgenerational epimutations in sperm and somatic cells identified in a number of previous studies were further investigated.

    RESULTS:

    The epimutations from six different environmental exposures were found to be predominantly exposure specific with negligible overlap. The current report describes a major genomic feature of all the unique epimutations identified (535) as a very low (<10 CpG/100 bp) CpG density in sperm and somatic cells associated with transgenerational disease. The genomic locations of these epimutations were found to contain DMRs with small clusters of CpG within a general region of very low density CpG. The potential role of these epimutations on gene expression is suggested to be important.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Observations suggest a potential regulatory role for lower density CpG regions termed "CpG deserts". The potential evolutionary origins of these regions is also discussed.

  • 24.
    Skinner, Michael K
    et al.
    Center for Reproductive Biology, School of Biological Sciences, Washingston State University, Pullman, WA USA.
    Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos
    Center for Reproductive Biology, School of Biological Sciences, Washingston State University, Pullman, WA USA.
    Haque, M Muksitul
    Center for Reproductive Biology, School of Biological Sciences, Washingston State University, Pullman, WA USA.
    Environmentally induced epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of sperm epimutations promote genetic mutations.2015In: Epigenetics, ISSN 1559-2294, E-ISSN 1559-2308, Vol. 10, no 8, p. 762-771Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A variety of environmental factors have been shown to induce the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease and phenotypic variation. This involves the germline transmission of epigenetic information between generations. Exposure specific transgenerational sperm epimutations have been previously observed. The current study was designed to investigate the potential role genetic mutations have in the process, using copy number variations (CNV). In the first (F1) generation following exposure, negligible CNV were identified; however, in the transgenerational F3 generation, a significant increase in CNV was observed in the sperm. The genome-wide locations of differential DNA methylation regions (epimutations) and genetic mutations (CNV) were investigated. Observations suggest the environmental induction of the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of sperm epimutations promote genome instability, such that genetic CNV mutations are acquired in later generations. A combination of epigenetics and genetics is suggested to be involved in the transgenerational phenotypes. The ability of environmental factors to promote epigenetic inheritance that subsequently promotes genetic mutations is a significant advance in our understanding of how the environment impacts disease and evolution.

  • 25.
    Vargas, Alexander O
    et al.
    Laboratorio de Ontogenia y Filogenia, Departamento de Biología, Facultad de Ciencias Universidad de Chile, Las Palermas, Ñuñoa, Santiago, Chile.
    Krabichler, Quirin
    TUM School of Life Sciences Weihenstephan, Technical University of Munich, Freising, Germany.
    Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    An Epigenetic Perspective on the Midwife Toad Experiments of Paul Kammerer (1880-1926)2017In: Journal of Experimental Zoology Part B: Molecular and Developmental Evolution, ISSN 1552-5007, E-ISSN 1552-5015, Vol. 328, no 1-2, p. 179-192Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Paul Kammerer was the most outstanding neo-Lamarckian experimentalist of the early 20th century. He reported spectacular results in the midwife toad, including crosses of environmentally modified toads with normal toads, where acquired traits were inherited in Mendelian fashion. Accusations of fraud generated a great scandal, ending with Kammerer's suicide. Controversy reignited in the 1970s, when journalist Arthur Koestler argued against these accusations. Since then, others have argued that Kammerer's results, even if real, were not groundbreaking and could be explained by somatic plasticity, inadvertent selection, or conventional genetics. More recently, epigenetics has uncovered mechanisms by which inheritance can respond directly to environmental change, inviting a reanalysis of Kammerer's descriptions. Previous arguments for mere somatic plasticity have ignored the description of experiments showing heritable germ line modification. Alleged inadvertent selection associated with egg mortality can be discarded, since mortality decreased in a single generation, upon repeated exposures. The challenging implications did not escape the attention of Kammerer's noted contemporary, William Bateson, but he reacted with disbelief, thus encouraging fraud accusations. Nowadays, formerly puzzling phenomena can be explained by epigenetic mechanisms. Importantly, Kammerer described parent-of-origin effects, an effect of parental sex on dominance. Epigenetic mechanisms underlie these effects in genomic imprinting and experiments of transgenerational epigenetic inheritance. In the early 20th century, researchers had no reason to link them with the inheritance of acquired traits. Thus, the parent-of-origin effects in Kammerer's experiments specifically suggest authenticity. Ultimate proof should come from renewed experimentation. To encourage further research, we present a model of possible epigenetic mechanisms.

  • 26.
    Willems, Els
    et al.
    KU Leuven, Department of Biosystems, Laboratory of Livestock Physiology, Kasteelpark Arenberg 30 box 2456, 3001 Leuven, Belgium.
    Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Decuypere, Eddy
    KU Leuven, Department of Biosystems, Laboratory of Livestock Physiology, Kasteelpark Arenberg 30 box 2456, 3001 Leuven, Belgium.
    Janssens, Steven
    KU Leuven, Department of Biosystems, Research Group Livestock Genetics, Kasteelpark Arenberg 30 box 2456, 3001 Leuven, Belgium.
    Buyse, Johan
    KU Leuven, Department of Biosystems, Laboratory of Livestock Physiology, Kasteelpark Arenberg 30 box 2456, 3001 Leuven, Belgium.
    Buys, Nadine
    KU Leuven, Department of Biosystems, Research Group Livestock Genetics, Kasteelpark Arenberg 30 box 2456, 3001 Leuven, Belgium.
    Jensen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Everaert, Nadia
    4University of Liège, Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech, Precision Livestock and Nutrition Unit, Passage des Déportés 2, 5030 Gembloux, Belgium.
    Differential Expression of Genes and DNA Methylation associated with Prenatal Protein Undernutrition by Albumen Removal in an avian model2016In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previously, long-term effects on body weight and reproductive performance have been demonstrated in the chicken model of prenatal protein undernutrition by albumen removal. Introduction of such persistent alterations in phenotype suggests stable changes in gene expression. Therefore, a genome-wide screening of the hepatic transcriptome by RNA-Seq was performed in adult hens. The albumen-deprived hens were created by partial removal of the albumen from eggs and replacement with saline early during embryonic development. Results were compared to sham-manipulated hens and non-manipulated hens. Grouping of the differentially expressed (DE) genes according to biological functions revealed the involvement of processes such as 'embryonic and organismal development' and 'reproductive system development and function'. Molecular pathways that were altered were 'amino acid metabolism', 'carbohydrate metabolism' and 'protein synthesis'. Three key central genes interacting with many DE genes were identified: UBC, NR3C1, and ELAVL1. The DNA methylation of 9 DE genes and 3 key central genes was examined by MeDIP-qPCR. The DNA methylation of a fragment (UBC_3) of the UBC gene was increased in the albumen-deprived hens compared to the non-manipulated hens. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that prenatal protein undernutrition by albumen removal leads to long-term alterations of the hepatic transcriptome in the chicken.

  • 27.
    Álvarez-Rodríguez, Manuel
    et al.
    Autonomous University of Barcelona Cerdanyola del Vallès, Barcelona, Spain.
    Rodriguez-Martinez, Heriberto
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Transgenerational and Epigenetic Impacts of Environmental Exposures in Male Reproduction2018In: Encyclopedia of Reproduction (Second Edition) / [ed] Michael K. Skinner, Elsevier, 2018, p. 634-641Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The vertebrate zygote results from the merging of two highly specialized gamete cells, namely the oocyte and the spermatozoon, and has the outstanding potential of creating all cells in the future developing embryo. For this to occur, however, the genome of the gametes is mostly striped of “epigenetic marks,” or proteins and methyl groups attached to the DNA. Epigenetic marks in the genome constitute the so-called epigenome and have the potential for long term regulation of gene expression. Environmental insults during the highly susceptible and delicate period of germ cell development could, by altering the epigenome of spermatozoa, affect the phenotype of future generations (transgenerational epigenetic inheritance). A brief review of how epigenetics can act transgenerationally through the male germline is hereby presented.

1 - 27 of 27
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf