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  • 1.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Signoret, Carine
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Dahl, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Effects of cognitive load on neurophysiological activity among persons with tinnitus2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Daltrozzo, Jérôme
    et al.
    Lyon Neuroscience Research Center, CNRS UMR5292, INSERM U1028 , Université de Lyon, Lyon, France.
    Signoret, Carine
    CNRS, France.
    Tillmann, Barbara
    Lyon Neuroscience Research Center, CNRS UMR5292, INSERM U1028 , Université de Lyon, Lyon, France.
    Perrin, Fabien
    Lyon Neuroscience Research Center, CNRS UMR5292, INSERM U1028 , Université de Lyon, Lyon, France.
    Subliminal Semantic Priming in Speech2011In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 6, no 5, article id 20273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Numerous studies have reported subliminal repetition and semantic priming in the visual modality. We transferred thisparadigm to the auditory modality. Prime awareness was manipulated by a reduction of sound intensity level.Uncategorized prime words (according to a post-test) were followed by semantically related, unrelated, or repeated targetwords (presented without intensity reduction) and participants performed a lexical decision task (LDT). Participants withslower reaction times in the LDT showed semantic priming (faster reaction times for semantically related compared tounrelated targets) and negative repetition priming (slower reaction times for repeated compared to semantically relatedtargets). This is the first report of semantic priming in the auditory modality without conscious categorization of the prime.

  • 3.
    Rudner, Mary
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Holmer, Emil
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Signoret, Carine
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Conversation in noise: investigating the effect of signal degradation on response generation2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Rudner, Mary
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Signoret, Carine
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Editorial: The Role of Working Memory and Executive Function in Communication under Adverse Conditions2016In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 7, no 148Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 5.
    Rudner, Mary
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Signoret, Carine
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Holmer, Emil
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Auditory Semantic Illusions: investigating the effect of semantic cues on speech understanding2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Ng, Elaine Hoi Ning
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lidestam, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands; Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Sörqvist, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. University of Gavle, Sweden.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Träff, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Yumba, Wycliffe
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Classon, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Signoret, Carine
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Pichora-Fuller, Kathleen
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. University of Toronto, Canada; University of Health Network, Canada; Baycrest Hospital, Canada.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hearing impairment, cognition and speech understanding: exploratory factor analyses of a comprehensive test battery for a group of hearing aid users, the n200 study2016In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 55, no 11, p. 623-642Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aims of the current n200 study were to assess the structural relations between three classes of test variables (i.e. HEARING, COGNITION and aided speech-in-noise OUTCOMES) and to describe the theoretical implications of these relations for the Ease of Language Understanding (ELU) model. Study sample: Participants were 200 hard-of-hearing hearing-aid users, with a mean age of 60.8 years. Forty-three percent were females and the mean hearing threshold in the better ear was 37.4dB HL. Design: LEVEL1 factor analyses extracted one factor per test and/or cognitive function based on a priori conceptualizations. The more abstract LEVEL 2 factor analyses were performed separately for the three classes of test variables. Results: The HEARING test variables resulted in two LEVEL 2 factors, which we labelled SENSITIVITY and TEMPORAL FINE STRUCTURE; the COGNITIVE variables in one COGNITION factor only, and OUTCOMES in two factors, NO CONTEXT and CONTEXT. COGNITION predicted the NO CONTEXT factor to a stronger extent than the CONTEXT outcome factor. TEMPORAL FINE STRUCTURE and SENSITIVITY were associated with COGNITION and all three contributed significantly and independently to especially the NO CONTEXT outcome scores (R-2 = 0.40). Conclusions: All LEVEL 2 factors are important theoretically as well as for clinical assessment.

  • 7.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre, Denmark.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sörqvist, Patrik
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Signoret, Carine
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Pichora-Fuller, Kathleen
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. 4Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, Canada.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    On the development of a working memory model for Ease-of Language Understanding (ELU)2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Working memory is important for online language processing in a dialogue. We use it to store relevant information, to inhibit or ignore irrelevant information, and to attend to conversation selectively. Working memory helps us keep track of a dialogue while taking turns and following the gist. This paper examines the Ease-of Language Understanding model (i.e., the ELU model, Rönnberg, 2003; Rönnberg et al., 2008) in light of new behavioral and neural findings concerning the role of working memory capacity (WMC) in sound and speech processing. The new ELU model is a meaning prediction system that depends on phonological and semantic interactions in rapid implicit and slower explicit processing mechanisms that both depend on working memory, albeit in different ways. New predictions and clinical implications are outlined.

  • 8.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Sörqvist, Patrik
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Signoret, Carine
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Pichora-Fuller, Kathleen
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. University of Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The Ease of Language Understanding (ELU) model: theoretical, empirical, and clinical advances2013In: Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-5137, E-ISSN 1662-5137, Vol. 7, no 31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Working memory is important for online language processing during conversation. We use it to maintain relevant information, to inhibit or ignore irrelevant information, and to attend to conversation selectively. Working memory helps us to keep track of and actively participate in conversation, including taking turns and following the gist. This paper examines the Ease of Language Understanding model (i.e., the ELU model, Rönnberg, 2003; Rönnberg et al., 2008) in light of new behavioral and neural findings concerning the role of working memory capacity (WMC) in uni-modal and bimodal language processing. The new ELU model is a meaning prediction system that depends on phonological and semantic interactions in rapid implicit and slower explicit processing mechanisms that both depend on WMC albeit in different ways. It is based on findings that address the relationship between WMC and (a) early attention processes in listening to speech, (b) signal processing in hearing aids and its effects on short-term memory, (c) inhibition of speech maskers and its effect on episodic long-term memory, (d) the effects of hearing impairment on episodic and semantic long-term memory, and finally, (e) listening effort. New predictions and clinical implications are outlined. Comparisons with other WMC and speech perception models are made.

    Keywords: working memory capacity, speech in noise, attention, long-term memory, hearing loss, brain imaging analysis, oscillations, language understanding

  • 9.
    Signoret, Carine
    Lyon Neuroscience Research Center, CNRS UMR5292, INSERM U1028 , Université de Lyon, Lyon, France.
    Exploration des mécanismes non conscients de la perception de la parole: approches comportementales et électroencéphalographiques2010Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Although a lot of information is available from our environment at every moment, only a small part gives rise to a conscious percept. It is then legitimate to wonder which mechanisms are involved in the perception phenomenon. On the basis of which processes will a sensory stimulation be perceived consciously? What happens to the stimulations that are not consciously perceived?

    The work presented in this thesis aims to bring some elements of response to these two questions in the auditory modality. Through different behavioral and electroencephalographic studies, we suggest that knowledge could have a top-down facilitatory influence on high-level as well as on low-level (like detection) processing of complex auditory stimulations. The stimulations we have some knowledge about (phonologic or semantic) are more easily detected than the stimulations that contain neither phonologic nor semantic information. We also show that the activation of the knowledge influences the perception of subsequent stimulations, even when the context is not perceived consciously. This is evidenced by a subliminal semantic priming effect and by modifications of the neural oscillations in the beta frequency band associated with lexical processing of stimulations that were not consciously categorized.

    Hence, auditory perception can be considered as the product of the continuous interaction between the context set by the environment and the knowledge one has about specific stimuli. Such an interaction would lead listeners to preferentially perceive what they already know.

  • 10.
    Signoret, Carine
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Learning to learn to expand freedom in choices2013In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 4, no 780Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Learning is related to knowledge that is shared between teacher and students. Whatever the use of traditional or modern teaching-learning methods, the students learn: they have access to new information and can therefore acquire or modify knowledge stored in memory. The goal of this opinion paper is to present what we know about the consequences of this internal change and how this could affect the students' choices. Recent works concerning the influence of knowledge stored in long-term memory (LTM) on the perception of the environment highlight that acquired knowledge could directly and automatically influence our perception of the events in the environment. Indeed, perception is therefore based on acquired knowledge: basically, we perceive what we already know. It is now of the utmost importance to ask how teaching-learning activities chosen by teachers or universities influence the knowledge acquisition and what the consequences of learning are for students' choices. - See more at: http://journal.frontiersin.org/Journal/10.3389/fpsyg.2013.00780/full#sthash.NINCvegB.dpuf

  • 11.
    Signoret, Carine
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Vivre Ensemble: Comprendre et interagir avec son environnement2015Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 12.
    Signoret, Carine
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andin, Josefine
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johnsrude, Ingrid
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Brain and Mind Institute, National Centre for Audiology, School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cumulative effects of prior knowledge and semantic coherence during speech perception: an fMRI study2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Semantic coherence and prior knowledge enhance perceptual clarity of degraded speech. Recent study by our team has shown that these two effects interact such that the perceptual clarity of noise-vocoded speech (NVS) is still enhanced by semantic coherence when prior knowledge is available from text cues and prior knowledge enhances perceptual clarity of NVS even when semantic coherence is low (Signoret et al., 2015). Here, we investigated the neural correlates of this interaction. We predicted 1) an effect of matching cues for both sentences with high and low semantic coherence in left-lateralized perisylvian areas (Zekveld et al., 2012) and right superior temporal gyrus (Wild et al., 2012), but stronger for low than for high coherent sentences since more resources are required to process sentences with low semantic coherence in the left inferior frontal gyrus (Obleser and Kotz, 2010) and 2) an effect of semantic coherence in temporal and inferior frontal cortex (Lau et al., 2008). The additive effect of semantic coherence when matching cues were provided should be observed in the angular gyrus (Obleser and Kotz, 2010). Twenty participants (age; M=25.14, SD=5.01) listened to sentences and performed an unrelated attentional task during sparse-imaging fMRI. The sentences had high or low semantic coherence, and were either clear, degraded (6-band NV) or unintelligible (1-band NV). Each spoken word was preceded (200 ms) by either a matching cue or a consonant string. Preliminary results revealed significant main effects of Cue (F(1,228) = 21.26; p < .05 FWE) in the left precentral gyrus, the left inferior frontal gyrus and the left middle temporal gyrus confirming the results of Zekveld et al (2012), but neither the main effect of Coherence nor the interaction between Cue and Coherence survived FWE correction. In accordance with our predictions, contrasts revealed a greater effect of matching cues for low than for high coherent sentences (t(19) = 6.25; p < .05 FWE) in the left superior temporal gyrus as well as left inferior frontal gyrus (BA 44 and 45), suggesting greater involvement of both top-down and bottom-up processing mechanisms during integration of prior knowledge with the auditory signal when sentence coherence is lower. There was a marginally greater effect of semantic coherence (t(19) = 3.58; p < .001unc) even when matching cues were provided in the left angular gyrus, the left middle frontal gyrus and the right superior frontal gyrus, suggesting greater involvement of top-down activation of semantic concepts, executive processes and the phonological store during integration of prior knowledge with the auditory signal when the semantic content of the speech is more readily available.

  • 13.
    Signoret, Carine
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andin, Josefine
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johnsrude, Ingrid
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Western Ontario, Canada.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The interplay between prior knowledge and semantic coherence during processing of degraded speech: an fMRI study2015In: Abstract book: Third International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication, 2015, p. 181-181Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Degraded speech is rendered more intelligible both by semantic coherence and preceding text cues. Recently, we showed that the perceptual clarity of noise-vo-coded speech (NVS) is still enhanced by semantic coherence when cues are provided and that prior knowledge enhances perceptual clarity of NVS when semantic coherence is low (Signoret et al., 2015). Here, we investigated the neural correlates of this interaction. Twenty participants listened to sentences and performed an unrelated attentional task during sparse-imaging fMRI. The sentences had high or low semantic coherence, and were either clear, degraded (6-band NV) or unintelligible (1-band NV). Each spoken word was preceded (200 ms) by either a matching cue or a consonant string. Preliminary results revealed significant main effects of both Coherence and Cue in the superior temporal gyrus bilaterally and a significant interaction between Coherence and Cue when speech was degraded, in superior and middle temporal gyri bilaterally and left precentral gyrus. Investigation of this interaction revealed greater activation for high compared to low coherent sentences when cues were provided in the left-lateralized regions and greater activation without than with cues when semantic coherence was low in bilateral regions. The opposite contrasts elicited no significant activation. This pattern of results indicates that the increases in perceptual clarity of NVS attributable to semantic coherence and prior knowledge are supported by similar neural mechanisms organized in bilateral temporal regions, but that when perceptual clarity is optimized by both factors, it is supported by left-lateralized mechanisms.

  • 14.
    Signoret, Carine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Blomberg, Rina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Dahlstrom, Orjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Phonological expectations override semantic mismatch during speech in noise perception2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Perception of speech in noise is modulated by stimulus-driven and knowledge-driven processes. In the ELU model, working memory capacity (WM) has been proposed to play a determinant role in the resolution of a mismatch between knowledge-based predictions and stimulus-based processing. However, the neural correlates and the temporal course of the mismatch resolution have not been investigated. After exposure to 48 semantically coherent couplets, 20 normal-hearing participants were tested in a MEG study. Couplet sentences were presented in background noise with 80% intelligibility, except the last word of the couplet that was presented with 50% intelligibility. This last word could be either 1) the word that was in the exposure couplet, or 2) a phonologically related but semantically incorrect word, or 3) a semantically coherent but phonologically incorrect word, or 4) a semantically and phonologically incorrect word. Before the presentation of the last word, participants had time to predict it and their task was to answer if the presented word was the correct one. Behavioural results showed more errors in the condition 2 than conditions 3 or 4, suggesting that phonological compatibility overrides semantic mismatch when intelligibility is poor. Preliminary results of the neural correlates reflecting the role of WM in the mismatch resolution between the knowledge-driven and stimulus-driven processes will be presented.

  • 15.
    Signoret, Carine
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ellis, Rachel
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Persson, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lidestam, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Effects of cognitive ability and top-down support on speech-in-noise perception2013In: Abstract book: Second International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication, 2013, p. 191-191Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As recent results encourage the inclusion of speech in noise (SIN) testing as part of a routine hearing screening test (Arlinger, Lunner, Lyxell, & Pichora-Fuller, 2009), we need to understand exactly which abilities SIN tests are actually indexing. In this study, we investigated the effect of top-down support on speech-in-noi-se perception and the influence of cognitive ability on this relationship by using monosyllabic words presented with stationary background noise in an adaptive threshold procedure. Participants with normal-hearing had to identify (Condition 1) or recognize (Conditions 2 and 3) a target word in noise in descending (Conditions 1 and 3) or ascending (Condition 2) levels of difficulty. Cognitive ability was measured using the reading span and letter memory tests. The results showed a significant effect of top-down support on speech in noise perception thresholds. The magnitude of this effect was predicted by performance on the letter memory test, indicating that good updating ability is, in presence of top-down support, a good predictor of speech in noise perception, in accordance with the Ease of Language Understanding model (Rönnberg, Rudner, Foo, & Lunner, 2008; Rönnberg, 2003; Stenfelt & Rönnberg, 2009). The results of the study highlight the importance of considering that non-auditory factors may play a significant role in speech-in-noise perception. The degree to which non-auditory factors influence speech-in-noise perception is affected by both the test procedure chosen and the cognitive ability of the listener.

  • 16.
    Signoret, Carine
    et al.
    Lyon Neuroscience Research Center, CNRS UMR5292, INSERM U1028 , Université de Lyon, Lyon, France.
    Gaudrain, Etienne
    Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United-Kingdom.
    Perrin, Fabien
    Lyon Neuroscience Research Center, CNRS UMR5292, INSERM U1028 , Université de Lyon, Lyon, France.
    Electrical brain dissociation for consciously and unconsciously categorized auditory stimuli2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Signoret, Carine
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Gaudrain, Etienne
    Centre for the Neural Basis of Hearing, Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.
    Perrin, Fabien
    Auditory Cognition and Psychoacoustics.
    Similarities in the neural signature for the processing of behaviorally categorized and uncategorized speech sounds2013In: European Journal of Neuroscience, ISSN 0953-816X, E-ISSN 1460-9568, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 777-785Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent human behavioral studies have shown semantic and/or lexical processing for stimuli presented below the auditory perceptionthreshold. Here, we investigated electroencephalographic responses to words, pseudo-words and complex sounds, in conditionswhere phonological and lexical categorizations were behaviorally successful (categorized stimuli) or unsuccessful(uncategorized stimuli). Data showed a greater decrease in low-beta power at left-hemisphere temporal electrodes for categorizednon-lexical sounds (complex sounds and pseudo-words) than for categorized lexical sounds (words), consistent with the signatureof a failure in lexical access. Similar differences between lexical and non-lexical sounds were observed for uncategorized stimuli,although these stimuli did not yield evoked potentials or theta activity. The results of the present study suggest that behaviorallyuncategorized stimuli were processed at the lexical level, and provide evidence of the neural bases of the results observed in previousbehavioral studies investigating auditory perception in the absence of stimulus awareness.

  • 18.
    Signoret, Carine
    et al.
    CNRS, France.
    Gaudrain, Etienne
    Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United-Kingdom.
    Tillmann, Barbara
    Lyon Neuroscience Research Center, CNRS UMR5292, INSERM U1028 , Université de Lyon, Lyon, France.
    Grimault, Nicolas
    Lyon Neuroscience Research Center, CNRS UMR5292, INSERM U1028 , Université de Lyon, Lyon, France.
    Perrin, Fabien
    Lyon Neuroscience Research Center, CNRS UMR5292, INSERM U1028 , Université de Lyon, Lyon, France.
    Facilitated auditory detection for speech sounds2011In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 2, no 176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    If it is well known that knowledge facilitates higher cognitive functions, such as visual andauditory word recognition, little is known about the influence of knowledge on detection,particularly in the auditory modality. Our study tested the influence of phonological and lexicalknowledge on auditory detection. Words, pseudo-words, and complex non-phonological sounds,energetically matched as closely as possible, were presented at a range of presentation levelsfrom sub-threshold to clearly audible. The participants performed a detection task (Experiments1 and 2) that was followed by a two alternative forced-choice recognition task in Experiment2. The results of this second task in Experiment 2 suggest a correct recognition of words inthe absence of detection with a subjective threshold approach. In the detection task of bothexperiments, phonological stimuli (words and pseudo-words) were better detected than nonphonologicalstimuli (complex sounds), presented close to the auditory threshold. This findingsuggests an advantage of speech for signal detection. An additional advantage of words overpseudo-words was observed in Experiment 2, suggesting that lexical knowledge could alsoimprove auditory detection when listeners had to recognize the stimulus in a subsequenttask. Two simulations of detection performance performed on the sound signals confirmedthat the advantage of speech over non-speech processing could not be attributed to energeticdifferences in the stimuli.

  • 19.
    Signoret, Carine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Johnsrude, Ingrid
    Univ Western Ontario, Sch Commun Sci & Disorders, London, Canada; Univ Western Ontario, Dept Psychol, London, Canada.
    Classon, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Combined Effects of Form- and Meaning-Based Predictability on Perceived Clarity of Speech2018In: Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, ISSN 0096-1523, E-ISSN 1939-1277, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 277-285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The perceptual clarity of speech is influenced by more than just the acoustic quality of the sound; it also depends on contextual support. For example, a degraded sentence is perceived to be clearer when the content of the speech signal is provided with matching text (i.e., form-based predictability) before hearing the degraded sentence. Here, we investigate whether sentence-level semantic coherence (i.e., meaning-based predictability), enhances perceptual clarity of degraded sentences, and if so, whether the mechanism is the same as that underlying enhancement by matching text. We also ask whether form- and meaning-based predictability are related to individual differences in cognitive abilities. Twenty participants listened to spoken sentences that were either clear or degraded by noise vocoding and rated the clarity of each item. The sentences had either high or low semantic coherence. Each spoken word was preceded by the homologous printed word (matching text), or by a meaningless letter string (nonmatching text). Cognitive abilities were measured with a working memory test. Results showed that perceptual clarity was significantly enhanced both by matching text and by semantic coherence. Importantly, high coherence enhanced the perceptual clarity of the degraded sentences even when they were preceded by matching text, suggesting that the effects of form- and meaning-based predictions on perceptual clarity are independent and additive. However, when working memory capacity indexed by the Size-Comparison Span Test was controlled for, only form-based predictions enhanced perceptual clarity, and then only at some sound quality levels, suggesting that prediction effects are to a certain extent dependent on cognitive abilities. (PsycINFO Database Record

  • 20.
    Signoret, Carine
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johnsrude, Ingrid
    Department of Psychology, Queen's University, Canada.
    Classon, Elisabet
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Does semantic context facilitate perceptual clarity?2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Giving people an opportunity to hear an unintelligible noise-vocoded (NV) sentence after they know its identity produces pop-out, a clearer percept of the NV sentence (Davis, Johnsrude, Hervais-Adelman, Taylor, & McGettigan, 2005), which can be measured using a magnitude-estimation procedure (Wild, Davis, & Johnsrude, 2012). Pop-out appears to occur when the auditory system is able to match input with top-down predictions that can be used to perceptually organize/’explain’ that input. Semantically coherent sentences (e.g. “his new clothes were from France”) are more predictable than matched anomalous sentences (e.g. “his great streets were from Smith”), raising the possibility that semantic information may also give rise to popout. In the present study we investigated how the magnitude of the pop-out effect produced by prior knowledge in the form of identical text cues (100% predictable) compared to that produced by semantic coherence. Twenty normal-hearing native Swedish-speaking participants listened to Swedish NV (1, 3, 6 and 12 bands) and clear sentences, and rated the clarity on a 7-point Likert scale. The sentences were semantically coherent or anomalous. Each spoken word was preceded (200 ms) by either its text equivalent or a consonant string of matched length. We observed the expected main effects of speech quality and text cues on clarity ratings (Wild et al., 2012). Semantically coherent sentences were rated as clearer than anomalous sentences, even when both types of sentences were preceded by identical text cues, suggesting that the effect of semantic context on perceptual clarity is not entirely due to greater predictability.

  • 21.
    Signoret, Carine
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johnsrude, Ingrid
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department of Psychology, Queen’s University, Canada.
    Classon, Elisabet
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lexical access speed determines the role of working memory in pop-out2013In: Abstract book: Second International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication, 2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Prior knowledge about what is going to be said produces a clearer percept ofunintelligible noise-vocoded (NV) sentences. This is called the pop-out effect andcan be measured using a magnitude-estimation procedure. Sentence coherencesubstantially improves intelligibility of NV sentences, suggesting that semanticcontext may produce a pop-out effect. Moreover, understanding speech in challengingconditions is supported by cognitive skills such as working-memorycapacity and inference-making. In the present study, we investigated whether apop-out effect could be identified for sentence coherence and whether such a popouteffect would be additive to the pop-out effect generated by prior knowledge.Twenty normal-hearing native Swedish-speaking participants listened to SwedishNV (1, 3, 6 and 12 bands) and clear sentences, and rated the clarity on a 7-pointscale. The sentences were semantically coherent (e.g. “his new clothes were fromFrance”) or incoherent (e.g. “his great streets were from Smith”). Each spokenword was preceded (200 ms) by either its text equivalent or a consonant string ofmatched length. We found a pop-out effect due to sentence coherence as well asa pop-out effect due to prior knowledge. These two effects interacted, suggestingthat they are supported by different mechanisms. Lexical access speed predictedthe magnitude of pop-out due to prior knowledge. Further, in participants withslow lexical access speed, working memory capacity predicted pop-out magnitudewhile in participants with high lexical access speed, pop-out magnitude was bestpredicted by inference-making ability.

  • 22.
    Signoret, Carine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Ng, Elaine
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    da Silva, Stéphanie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tack, Ayco
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Voss, Ulrikke
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Lidö, Helga H.
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Patthey, Cédric
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; .
    Ericsson, Madelene
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Hadrévi, Jenny
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Balachandran, Chanchal
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Well-Being of Early-Career Researchers: Insights from a Swedish Survey2018In: Higher Education Policy, ISSN 0952-8733, E-ISSN 1740-3863, p. 1-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several studies have documented the importance of optimal work situation and the general well-being of early-career researchers (ECRs) for enhancing the academic performance of universities. Yet, most studies focused on specific categories of ECRs, or on specific academic disciplines as well as on specific outcomes. With this study, we recognize the need for a broader sample encompassing different categories of ECRs across academic disciplines. In a national survey of Swedish universities, the National Junior Faculty of Sweden (NJF) collected data from ECRs in order to study the influence of work situation and well-being on perceived scientific environment. We observed that work situation and well-being are interdependent and jointly influence each other in shaping the conditions for ideal scientific environment. Importantly, we employ structural equation model (SEM) analysis to account for the endogenous relationship between work situation and personal well-being in predicting perceived scientific environment. Results from SEM indicate that support from the university, work time management, job clarity, contract length and quality of life satisfaction were related to the perceived possibility of conducting the best science. Our research also highlighted individual differences across demographic factors and contract length in the perceived work situation and the possibility of conducting the best science. © 2018 International Association of Universities

  • 23.
    Signoret, Carine
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Facilitative effects of prior knowledge and semantic coherence on speech perception for listeners with hearing difficulties: influence of auditory and cognitive abilities.2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Signoret, Carine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Prior knowledge and semantic coherence combine to enhance perceived clarity of degraded speech for listeners with hearing impairment2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Signoret, Carine
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Prior knowledge and semantic coherence make degraded speech seems clearer for hearing-impaired listeners2015In: Abstract book: Third International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication, 2015, p. 180-180Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent work1 suggests that semantic information enhances processing of degraded speech for hearing-impaired (HI) listeners. Based on results from our lab2 showing that prior knowledge influences the perceptual clarity of degraded speech more when semantic coherence is low for normal-hearing listeners, we predicted a similar effect for HI listeners. We investigated here whether prior knowledge enhances the perceived clarity of degraded speech for HI listeners and whether this effect is dependent on semantic coherence. Native Swedish speakers with moderate sensory hearing-loss listened to spoken Swedish sentences that were either clear or degraded by noise-vocoding, and rated their clarity on a 7-point scale. The sentences were semantically high or low coherent. Each spoken word was preceded (200 ms) by either its text equivalent (matching cue) or a consonant string of matched length (non-matching cue). Preliminary results from 8 participants showed that the perceived clarity of degraded sentences was greater when they were coherent, F(1,7) = 6.54; p = .038, and when they were preceded by a matching cues, F(1,7) = 29.96; p < .001. A marginal Cue x Coherence interaction, F(1,7) = 5.16; p = .057, surprisingly indicated that the prior knowledge provided by cues influenced the perceptual clarity of degraded sentences more when coherence was high for HI listeners. Correlations between clarity ratings and independent measures of cognitive abilities will be reported to advance our knowledge of factors that can promote and optimize degraded speech perception for persons with age-related hearing loss.

  • 26.
    Signoret, Carine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    The contribution of phonological and semantic knowledge to the perceptual clarity of degraded speech2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Signoret, Carine
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    The interplay of phonological and semantic knowledge during perception of degraded speech2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The perceptual clarity of speech depends not only on acoustic quality of the sound, but also on linguistic support. In a set of three experiments, we investigated the interplay of phonological and semantic knowledge during speech perception in persons with normal (NH) and impaired hearing (IH). In three experiments, participants listened to grammatically correct spoken Swedish sentences at different sound quality levels (clear or degraded by noise vocoding). The sentences were more or less coherent and each spoken word (matching prime) or consonant strings (non-matching prime) was visually presented 200 ms beforehand. Analysis of variance in rated clarity showed significant interactions between coherence and prime type: a benefit of coherence with and without matching primes for NH but only with matching primes for IH was observed, although three-way interactions including sound quality levels somewhat modified this picture. Preliminary fMRI results from NH suggest that processing of semantic coherence in the absence of matching primes is supported by right middle temporal gyrus. These findings suggest that, when no phonological information is available, NH mobilize long-term semantic representations to successfully utilize the semantic information in spoken sentences that are moderately degraded. Future work should investigate what prevents IH from doing the same.

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