liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Charlotta, Nordlöf
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Tekniklärares attityder till teknikämnet och teknikundervisningen2018Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Teachers are important for students’ achievement and students’ attitudes in education in general; actually, the teacher is seen as one of the most important factors for student achievement. The teacher is important, for both the students’ achievements and mind-sets. Attitudes matters in teaching and education, which is known from previous attitude research. In technology education, teachers’ attitudes to technology education needs to be further investigated, and that is where this licentiate thesis, based on two studies, is contributing. The main research question was; What are Swedish technology teachers’ attitudes to the technology subject and to technology teaching? In this licentiate thesis, technology teachers’ attitudes were investigated by mixed methods, in two studies. The first study was based on quantitative research and an inquiry based on 1153 technology teachers in Sweden. The second study is qualitative and is based on ten interviews with Swedish technology teachers. In the first study four dimensions of attitude were found in the material; Technology education is important, Conditions are favourable for technology education, Curriculum is in focus in technology education and Confidence, interest and knowledge of the teacher is high. Further, three teacher clusters were identified, Positive, Negative and Mixed, based on teachers’ attitudes towards technology education. Predictors for cluster belonging were identified, and for a positive attitude, education in technology was identified to be the most influential predictor. In the second study, teachers’ perceived control, as a part of attitude, was studied in particular. Perceived control consist of two attitude components: self-efficacy and context dependency. Three sub-themes of self-efficacy were found; Experience, education and interest, Subject knowledge, and Preparation. Further, four sub-themes of context dependency were found; Collegial support, Syllabus, Resources and Status. Teachers in this study have different attitudes to different parts of technology education, but teachers educated in technology generally seem to have advantages, when it comes to attitudes. The results further tells that contextual factors both can limit and boost technology education.

    Time for teaching technology, time for technology teachers to meet and time for education of technology teachers, seems to be a key to how to find ways forward and how to improve teachers’ attitudes towards technology teaching. 

    List of papers
    1. Swedish Technology Teachers’ Attitudes to their Subject and its Teaching
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Swedish Technology Teachers’ Attitudes to their Subject and its Teaching
    2017 (English)In: Research in Science & Technological Education, ISSN 0263-5143, E-ISSN 1470-1138, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 195-214Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: From previous research among science teachers itis known that teachers’ attitudes to their subjects affect important aspects of their teaching, including their confidence and the amount of time they spend teaching the subject. In contrast, less is known about technology teachers’ attitudes.

    Purpose: Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate Swedish technology teachers’ attitudes toward their subject, and how these attitudes may be related to background variables.

    Sample: Technology teachers in Swedish compulsory schools(n = 1153) responded to a questionnaire about teachers’ attitudes,experiences, and background.

    Methods: Exploratory factor analysis was used to investigate attitude dimensions of the questionnaire. Groupings of teachers based on attitudes were identified through cluster analysis, and multinomial logistic regression was performed to investigate the role of teachers’ background variables as predictors for cluster belonging.

    Results: Four attitudinal dimensions were identified in the questionnaire, corresponding to distinct components of attitudes.Three teacher clusters were identified among the respondents characterized by positive, negative, and mixed attitudes toward the subject of technology and its teaching, respectively. The most influential predictors of cluster membership were to be qualified for teaching technology, having participated in in-service-training, teaching at a school with a proper overall teaching plan for the subject of technology and teaching at a school with a defined number of teaching hours for the subject.

    Conclusions: The results suggest that efforts to increase technology teachers’ qualifications and establishing a fixed number of teaching hours and an overall teaching plan for the subject of technology may yield more positive attitudes among teachers toward technology teaching. In turn, this could improve the status of the subject as well as students’ learning.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    London: Taylor & Francis Group, 2017
    Keywords
    Attitudes; technology education; technology teachers
    National Category
    Didactics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-135311 (URN)10.1080/02635143.2017.1295368 (DOI)000400179000005 ()
    Available from: 2017-03-13 Created: 2017-03-13 Last updated: 2018-05-14Bibliographically approved
    2. Self-efficacy or context dependency?: Exploring teachers’ perceptions of and attitudes towards technology education
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-efficacy or context dependency?: Exploring teachers’ perceptions of and attitudes towards technology education
    2019 (English)In: International journal of technology and design education, ISSN 0957-7572, E-ISSN 1573-1804, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 123-141Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Educational research on attitudes shows that both teaching and student learningare affected by the attitudes of the teacher. The aim of this study is to examine technologyteachers’ perceptions of and attitudes towards teaching technology in Swedish compulsoryschools, focusing on teachers’ perceived control. The following research question is posed:How do the teachers perceive self-efficacy and context dependency in teaching technology?Qualitative interviews were performed with 10 technology teachers in the compulsoryschool (ages 7–16), and the data was analysed using thematic analysis. Based on an attitudeframework, three sub-themes of self-efficacy were found: experience, education andinterest, subject knowledge, and preparation. Furthermore, four sub-themes of contextdependency were found; collegial support, syllabus, resources and status. The results showthat, according to the teachers in this study, self-efficacy mainly comes from experience,education and interest. Moreover, contextual factors can both limit and boost the teachers,but overall there are negative attitudes because of a lack of support and resources, whichimpedes the teaching. Teachers educated in technology education generally express morepositive attitudes and thus seem to have advantages in relation to technology teaching, butstill they sometimes express negative attitudes in the field of perceived control. Someimplications of this study are that it is necessary to promote teacher education in technologyand to reserve resources for technology education in schools, thereby supportingteachers in controlling contextual and internal factors that affect their teaching. Thissupport to teachers is especially important if there is an intention for the subject to developin new directions.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Dordrecht: Springer Science+Business Media B.V., 2019
    Keywords
    Technology education; Technology teachers; Attitudes; Self-efficacy; Context dependency
    National Category
    Didactics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-143310 (URN)10.1007/s10798-017-9431-2 (DOI)000456950800007 ()2-s2.0-85035778879 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2017-12-03 Created: 2017-12-03 Last updated: 2019-02-27Bibliographically approved
  • 2.
    Nordlöf, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Tid för teknik – om tekniklärares attityder till sin undervisning2018In: Teknikdidaktisk forskning för lärare: Bidrag från en forskningsmiljö / [ed] Karin Stolpe och Gunnar Höst, Linköping: NATDID, Nationellt centrum för naturvetenskapernas och teknikens didaktik , 2018, 1, p. 23-29Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    För lärare innebär attityder till teknikundervisning mer än bara inställning till undervisningen. Det handlar också om lärarnas uppfattningar om ämnets betydelse för eleverna och för samhällsutvecklingen, om ämnets status jämfört med andra ämnen, om upplevd självförmåga hos lärarna och om upplevda förutsättningar för att kunna undervisa -alltså ett antal aspekter av attityd

    som påverkar undervisningen. Forskning visar att attityd till teknikämnet hos en lärare ser olika ut för olika delar av undervisningen. Sannolikheten att en lärare har en mer positiv attityd ökar om han eller hon är utbildad tekniklärare, har deltagit i fortbildningar samt om läraren jobbar på en skola där man låter ämnet synas och ta plats. Tid kan vara en nyckel till mer positiva attityder hos tekniklärare, men frågan om tid ägs till stor del av andra än lärarna själva.

  • 3.
    Nordlöf, Charlotta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Hallström, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Höst, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Self-efficacy or context dependency?: Exploring teachers’ perceptions of and attitudes towards technology education2019In: International journal of technology and design education, ISSN 0957-7572, E-ISSN 1573-1804, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 123-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Educational research on attitudes shows that both teaching and student learningare affected by the attitudes of the teacher. The aim of this study is to examine technologyteachers’ perceptions of and attitudes towards teaching technology in Swedish compulsoryschools, focusing on teachers’ perceived control. The following research question is posed:How do the teachers perceive self-efficacy and context dependency in teaching technology?Qualitative interviews were performed with 10 technology teachers in the compulsoryschool (ages 7–16), and the data was analysed using thematic analysis. Based on an attitudeframework, three sub-themes of self-efficacy were found: experience, education andinterest, subject knowledge, and preparation. Furthermore, four sub-themes of contextdependency were found; collegial support, syllabus, resources and status. The results showthat, according to the teachers in this study, self-efficacy mainly comes from experience,education and interest. Moreover, contextual factors can both limit and boost the teachers,but overall there are negative attitudes because of a lack of support and resources, whichimpedes the teaching. Teachers educated in technology education generally express morepositive attitudes and thus seem to have advantages in relation to technology teaching, butstill they sometimes express negative attitudes in the field of perceived control. Someimplications of this study are that it is necessary to promote teacher education in technologyand to reserve resources for technology education in schools, thereby supportingteachers in controlling contextual and internal factors that affect their teaching. Thissupport to teachers is especially important if there is an intention for the subject to developin new directions.

  • 4.
    Nordlöf, Charlotta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Höst, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hallström, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Swedish Technology Teachers’ Attitudes to their Subject and its Teaching2017In: Research in Science & Technological Education, ISSN 0263-5143, E-ISSN 1470-1138, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 195-214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: From previous research among science teachers itis known that teachers’ attitudes to their subjects affect important aspects of their teaching, including their confidence and the amount of time they spend teaching the subject. In contrast, less is known about technology teachers’ attitudes.

    Purpose: Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate Swedish technology teachers’ attitudes toward their subject, and how these attitudes may be related to background variables.

    Sample: Technology teachers in Swedish compulsory schools(n = 1153) responded to a questionnaire about teachers’ attitudes,experiences, and background.

    Methods: Exploratory factor analysis was used to investigate attitude dimensions of the questionnaire. Groupings of teachers based on attitudes were identified through cluster analysis, and multinomial logistic regression was performed to investigate the role of teachers’ background variables as predictors for cluster belonging.

    Results: Four attitudinal dimensions were identified in the questionnaire, corresponding to distinct components of attitudes.Three teacher clusters were identified among the respondents characterized by positive, negative, and mixed attitudes toward the subject of technology and its teaching, respectively. The most influential predictors of cluster membership were to be qualified for teaching technology, having participated in in-service-training, teaching at a school with a proper overall teaching plan for the subject of technology and teaching at a school with a defined number of teaching hours for the subject.

    Conclusions: The results suggest that efforts to increase technology teachers’ qualifications and establishing a fixed number of teaching hours and an overall teaching plan for the subject of technology may yield more positive attitudes among teachers toward technology teaching. In turn, this could improve the status of the subject as well as students’ learning.

  • 5.
    Schooner, Patrick
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Nordlöf, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Klasander, Claes
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Hallström, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Design, system, value: The role of problem-solving and critical thinking capabilities in technology education, as perceived by teachers2017In: Design and Technology Education: An International Journal, ISSN 1360-1431, E-ISSN 2040-8633, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 60-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD, 2013) defines its views on necessary skills for 21st century citizenship and life-long learning, advocating a generic skill set of literacy, numeracy, and problem-solving in technology-rich environments. Other sources also include critical thinking as a vital 21st century skill. There are also those who question the concept of 21st century skills, claiming that, although very important, these skills are in fact old and have been around for decades, or even centuries. Therefore, in many countries, skills such as critical thinking and problem-solving are already addressed in technology education as part of the core subject matter, especially regarding competencies connected to technological literacy. Critical thinking and particularly problem-solving have been well researched in technology education, but seldom from the teacher’s point of view. 

    The aim of this article is to investigate Swedish compulsory school technology teachers’ views on problem-solving and critical thinking as curriculum components and as skills addressed in teaching. Twenty-one teachers were subjected to in-depth qualitative interviews. The findings of the study show that the interviewed teachers can be said to express three approaches to teaching about technology in a critical thinking and problem-solving mode: (1) the design approach, (2) the system approach, and (3) the value approach. Even though the present Swedish technology curriculum does not explicitly mention these skills, the teachers say they incorporate critical thinking and problem-solving in different settings within the subject of technology. Problem-solving and critical thinking are not seen as generic capabilities but they are always connected to and integrated with subject content in technology by the teachers. The teachers mix the approaches depending on the teaching content, especially when teaching about complex technology, although there is a tendency to disregard critical thinking capabilities when dealing with design, and neglect problem-solving skills when addressing values.

  • 6.
    Schooner, Patrick
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Nordlöf, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Klasander, Claes
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Hallström, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Developing 21st Century Skills in Swedish Compulsory School Technology Education: Three Teacher Perspectives2016In: PATT 32 Proceedings: Technology Education for 21st Century Skills / [ed] Marc J. de Vries, Arien Bekker-Holtland and Gerald van Dijk, Utrecht, 2016, p. 411-418Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of 21st century skills has several definitions. Sweden, as well as other countries, address 21st century skills under various labels in technology education, especially in terms of competencies connected to technological literacy. However, regardless of used definition, two of the most occurring items concern problem solving and critical thinking. Previous research in the field of technology education lacks descriptions of the relationship between 21st century skills and teaching about technology within the compulsory school system. By investigating Swedish compulsory school technology teachers’ views on problem solving and critical thinking capabilities, this study aims at identifying different aspects of the relationship between technology education and 21st century skills. Through the use of in-depth qualitative interviews, this study was able to determine different teacher perspectives addressing problem-solving and critical thinking activities in a classroom environment. The study also explored how the 21st century skills of critical thinking and problem solving were dealt by the teachers and how they perceived that the skills were implemented in their teaching. Additionally, the study shows that the interviewed teachers expressed utilised three perspectives on teaching about technology in a critical thinking and problem solving mode. These were; (1) the artefact driven perspective, (2) the system perspective, and (3) the holistic perspective. In conclusion, even though the present Swedish curriculum does not explicitly mention 21st century skills, the teachers incorporate critical thinking and problem-solving in different settings within the subject of technology. The authors found that the teachers mix the perspectives depending on the teaching content, especially when teaching about complex technology.

1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf