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  • 1.
    Ekström, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ferm, Ulrika
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Speech language pathology, Audiology and Otorhinolaryngology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Digital communication support and Alzheimer’s disease2017In: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 711-731Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Communication is one of the areas where people with dementia and their caregivers experience most challenges. The purpose of this study is to contribute to the understanding of possibilities and pitfalls of using personalized communication applications installed on tablet computers to support communication for people with dementia and their conversational partners. The study is based on video recordings of a woman, 52 years old, with Alzheimer’s disease interacting with her husband in their home. The couple was recorded interacting with and without a tablet computer including a personalized communication application. The results from the present study reveal both significant possibilities and potential difficulties in introducing a digital communication device to people with dementia and their conversational partners. For the woman in the present study, the amount of interactive actions and the number of communicative actions seem to increase with the use of the communication application. The results also indicate that problems associated with dementia are foregrounded in interaction where the tablet computer is used.

  • 2.
    Ekström, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Speech language pathology, Audiology and Otorhinolaryngology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lindholm, Camilla
    Finskugriska och nordiska avdelningen, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Majlesi, Ali Reza
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Speech language pathology, Audiology and Otorhinolaryngology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Communication and collaboration in dementia2017In: Living with dementia: relations, responses and agency in everyday life / [ed] Lars-Christer Hydén och Eleonor Antelius, Palgrave Macmillan, 2017, p. 93-115Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 3.
    From, Asa
    et al.
    Blekingesjukhuset, Sweden.
    Sundström, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Differences in phonologic and prosodic abilities in children with phonological language impairment and phonological-grammatical language impairment assessed with non-word repetition2016In: Logopedics, Phoniatrics, Vocology, ISSN 1401-5439, E-ISSN 1651-2022, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 66-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prosody can be described as the rhythmic, dynamic, and melodic aspects of language. Swedish has a relatively complex prosodic system compared to, for example, English. A large percentage of Swedish children with language impairment show prosodic problems to some extent. In the present study, non-word repetition was used to assess the phonological and prosodic abilities in children with phonological language impairment and children with phonological-grammatical language impairment. In the study, 10 children with phonological language impairment and 14 children with phonological-grammatical language impairment from 4;3 to 6;2 years of age participated. All children heard the same recorded non-words and words. The group with phonological language impairment received higher scores in all variables, compared to the group with phonological-grammatical language impairment. The results showed significant differences between the groups regarding production of vowels correct in words and production of phonemes correct in non-words as well as production of unstressed syllables in non-words and production of correct stress in non-words. Percent correctly produced vowels in words, but not in non-words, correlated significantly with grammatical ability.

  • 4.
    Gustafson, Stefan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Elinor
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Wallman, Julia
    Danderyd Hospital, Sweden.
    How Simple is the Simple View of Reading?2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 57, no 3, p. 292-308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to the Simple View of Reading, reading ability can be divided into decoding and language comprehension. In the present study, decoding and comprehension's contribution to reading ability was studied both in children with reading difficulties and in children with typical reading ability. Decoding and comprehension was further divided into sub-components, and the contribution from non-verbal ability and general processing speed was also studied. The results demonstrated that decoding made the largest contribution to reading ability for children with reading difficulties, while language comprehension contributed the most for children with typical reading ability. The contribution of non-verbal ability was not significant, and general processing speed only made a significant contribution to decoding for typical children. The two factors in the Simple View of Reading, decoding and comprehension, together explained less of the variance in reading ability for children with reading difficulties than for children with typical reading ability.

  • 5.
    Hjalmarsson Österholm, Johannes
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Orally positioning persons with dementia in assessment meetings2015In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 367-388Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper the authors study if and how persons with dementia are orally positioned by others, and how they position themselves while participating in assessment meetings held in order to discuss access to supportive services. We analysed five assessment meetings where two older persons (one diagnosed with dementia and one without a dementia diagnosis) participated to investigate whether the person with dementia is positioned differently than the other old person. Interactional phenomena used to position the person with dementia were identified by interactional analysis.

    The paperidentifies six phenomena that positioned the person with dementia as an individual with less interactional competence than the other participants: ignoring the person with dementia; voicing the feelings, capacity or opinion of the person with dementia; posing questions implying lack of competence; others' use of diagnosis; self-(re)positioning; and elderspeak. Persons with dementia are often orally positioned as less competent, indicating that they suffer further from discrimination than other older persons. We suggest that this has an impact on the participation of people with dementia in negotiations regarding their future care. The results indicate that social workers should be made aware that negative positioning exists and how it may affect the ability of people with dementia to contribute to discussions about their everyday life. Social workers should be encouraged to find strategies to reduce negative positioning in interaction.

  • 6.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Plejert, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Örulv, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Feedback and common ground in conversational storytelling involvning people with Alzheimer's disease2012In: Journal of Interactional Research in Communication Disorders/Equinox, ISSN 2040-5111, E-ISSN 2040-512X, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 211-247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present article focuses on feedback in storytelling involving people with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), and how feedback is related to the ways participants establish a common ground (Clark 1996) in interaction. The establishment of common ground is important in all kinds of interaction and becomes an especially intricate process if participants have AD, since the achievement of common ground requires the ability to draw from knowledge and experiences relating to past as well as present events; an ability that is often hampered by the disease. Analyses show that other aspects than the actual content of the conversation are important for the participants – for instance being together, supporting the positive identities both presented in the story and embodied in the socially rewarding activity that they manage to engage in, implying that the participants create and sustain a common ground not so much about the story-layer as of the storytelling activity.

  • 7.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Speech language pathology, Audiology and Otorhinolaryngology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    So they are not alive?2019In: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684, Vol. 18, no 7-8, p. 2662-2678Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In some conversations involving persons with Alzheimers disease, the participants may have to deal with the difficulty that they do not share a common ground in terms of not only who is alive or dead, but even more, who could possibly be alive. It is as if the participants face a reality disjunction. There are very few empirical studies of this difficulty in conversations involving persons with Alzheimers disease or other kinds of dementia diagnoses. Often studies of confabulation have a focus on the behavior and experience of the healthy participants, but rarely on the interaction and the collaborative contributions made by the person with dementia. In the present article, we discuss various strategies used by all participants in an everyday conversation. The material consists of an hour long everyday conversation between a woman with Alzheimers disease and two healthy participants (relatives). This conversation is analyzed by looking at the organization of the interaction with an emphasis on how the participants deal with instances of reality disjunctions. The result from the analysis demonstrates that both the healthy participants as well as the person with dementia together skillfully avoid the face threats posed by reality disjunctive contributions by not pursuing argumentative lines that in the end might jeopardize both the collaborative and the personal relations.

  • 8.
    Johansson, Inga-Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Speech language pathology, Audiology and Otorhinolaryngology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Speech language pathology, Audiology and Otorhinolaryngology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Müller, Nicole
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Speech language pathology, Audiology and Otorhinolaryngology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Patients’ and communication partners’ experiences of communicative changes in Parkinson’s disease2019In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was to investigate the experiences of people with Parkinson’s disease and their close communication partners regarding disease-related communicative changes and participation in everyday conversations.

    Materials and methods: Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with six dyads consisting of a person with Parkinson’s disease and a close communication partner. The interview material was analysed through thematic analysis.

    Results: The main theme was the experiences of barriers and facilitators for participation in conversations. Subthemes were experiences related to changes in voice and articulation, language and cognition, body language and facial expressions, fatigue, self-image, communicative initiative, and familiarity with conversation partner. The results show individual variation. A change observed in almost all dyads was the person with Parkinson’s disease participating less in conversations.

    Conclusions: Assessment and interventions should be based on a broad perspective on communication, and individuals’ priorities should be foregrounded in intervention planning. Both the person with Parkinson’s disease and communication partners need to make adjustments for communication to work. Therefore, close communication partners should be included in assessment and intervention of communicationin Parkinson’s disease from an early stage.

  • 9.
    Larsson, Elias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ekström, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Speech language pathology, Audiology and Otorhinolaryngology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Speech language pathology, Audiology and Otorhinolaryngology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Recycling narratives as a joint accomplishment in interaction with people with dementia2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This presentation focuses on recycling of stories in conversations involving people with dementia. In dementia, communicative ability gradually deteriorates as the disease progresses typically leading to profound decline of communicative skills in the late stage. Of all of the domains affected by dementia diseases, communication is one of the areas where people with dementia and their caregivers experience most challenges. A significant characteristic for persons with dementia is a tendency to tell the same stories over and over (e.g. Hydén et al., 2013). While the significance conversational partners have on the organization of stories told by people with dementia are highly recognized (e.g. Hydén, et al., 2013; Hydén, 2011), how conversational partners to people with dementia orient toward recycling of stories are still in need of further investigation. In previous research, the phenomenon of recycling stories is mainly credited to the person with dementia. In our present study, we would like to propose another parallel point of view in which caregivers also tend to recycle stories repetitively in conversation with persons with dementia. We argue that recycling of stories in interaction involving people with dementia is a highly collaborative activity, and sometimes even initiated by conversational partners to people with dementia. In this presentation, we focus on how recycling of stories are sequentially organized is ordinary interaction between people with dementia and professional caregivers. The data consist of video recordings of 4 dyads (one person diagnosed with dementia and a professional caregiver in each dyad) totaling approximately 2,5 hours of recordings. In the analyses, we have focused specifically on how the telling of recycled stories is initiated in conversation, and what kind of feedback such stories receive. Our analyses show that recycled stories told by persons with dementia receive strong interactional support from conversational partners by, for example, the use of responses signaling newness and surprise (cf. Hydén et al., 2013). Conversational partners are also actively involved in the telling of recycled stories by, for example, asking guiding questions expanding the stories and use prompting techniques in cases where the person with dementia seem to have difficulties telling the whole story. In our analyses, we have also seen examples where conversational partners to people with dementia not only support the telling of recycled stories, but actually initiate such stories by instructing the person with dementia to talk about a specific topic.

  • 10.
    Lina Krummheuer, Antonia
    et al.
    Aalborg University, Denmark.
    Klippi, Anu
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Liisa Raudaskoski, Pirkko
    Aalborg University, Denmark.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Participating with limited communication means: Conversation analytical perspectives on the interactional management of participation structures INTRODUCTION2016In: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076, Vol. 30, no 10, p. 721-729Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 11.
    Lundeborg, Inger
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    McAllister, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Hultcrantz, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Phonological development in children with obstructive sleep-disordered breathing2009In: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076, Vol. 23, no 10, p. 751-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adeno-tonsillar hypertrophy with obstructive sleep disordered breathing (OSDB) is known to affect oral-motor function, behaviour, and academic performance. Adeno-tonsillectomy is the most frequently performed operation in children, with total tonsillectomy (TE) being more common than partial resection, 'tonsillotomy' (TT). In the present study 67 children, aged 50-65 months, with OSBD were randomized to TE or TT. The children's phonology was assessed pre-operatively and 6 months post-operatively. Two groups of children served as controls. Phonology was affected in 62.7% of OSBD children before surgery, compared to 34% in the control group (p < .001). Also, OSBD children had more severe phonological deficits than the controls (p < .001). Phonology improved 6 months equally after both surgeries. Despite improvement post-operatively, the gap to the controls increased. Other functional aspects, such as oral motor function, were normalized regardless of surgical method--TE or TT. The impact of OSBD should be considered as one contributing factor in phonological impairment.

  • 12.
    Lyxell, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lunds universitet, Institutionen för kliniska vetenskaper.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Asker-Arnason, Lena
    Lunds universitet, Institutionen för kliniska vetenskaper.
    Ibertsson, Tina
    Lunds universitet, Institutionen för kliniska vetenskaper.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cognitive development, reading and prosodic skills in children with cochlear implants.2009In: Scandinavian journal of psychology, ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 50, no 5, p. 463-474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This report summarizes some of the results of studies in our laboratory exploring the development of cognitive, reading and prosodic skills in children with cochlear implantation (CI). The children with CI performed at significantly lower levels than the hearing comparison group on the majority of cognitive tests, despite showing levels of nonverbal ability. The differences between children with CI and hearing children were most pronounced on tasks with relatively high phonological processing demands, but they were not limited to phonological processing. Impairment of receptive and productive prosody was also evident in children with CI. Despite these difficulties, 75% of the children with CI reached a level of reading skill comparable to that of hearing children. The results are discussed with respect to compensation strategies in reading.

  • 13.
    Lyxell, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lunds Universitet, Lund, Sweden.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Asker-Arnason, Lena
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lunds Universitet, Lund, Sweden.
    Ibertsson, Tina
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lunds Universitet, Lund, Sweden.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Development of cognitive and reading skills in deaf children with CIs2011In: Cochlear Implants International, ISSN 1467-0100, E-ISSN 1754-7628, Vol. 12, no Suppl 1, p. 98-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 14.
    McAllister, Anita
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Aanstoot, Janna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundeborg Hammarström, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johannesson, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sandström, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Berglind, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Learning in the tutorial group: A balance between individual freedom and institutional control2014In: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076, Vol. 28, no 1-2, p. 47-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study investigates factors in problem-based learning tutorial groups which promote or inhibit learning. The informants were tutors and students from speech-language pathology and physiotherapy programmes. Semi-structured focus-group interviews and individual interviews were used. Results revealed three themes: Responsibility, Time and Support. Under responsibility, the delicate balance between individual and institutional responsibility and control was shown. Time included short and long-term perspectives on learning. Under support, supporting documents, activities and personnel resources were mentioned. In summary, an increased control by the program and tutors decreases students motivation to assume responsibility for learning. Support in tutorial groups needs to adapt to student progression and to be well aligned to tutorial work to have the intended effect. A lifelong learning perspective may help students develop a meta-awareness regarding learning that could make tutorial work more meaningful.

  • 15.
    McAllister, Anita
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Röst, tal och språk ur ett genusperspektiv2010In: Genus och kön inom medicin och vårdutbildningar / [ed] Wijma B, Smirthwaite G, Swahnberg K, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2010, 1:1, p. 429-439Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 16.
    Myrberg, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Speech language pathology, Audiology and Otorhinolaryngology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Speech language pathology, Audiology and Otorhinolaryngology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Different approaches in aphasia assessments: a comparison between test and everyday conversations2018In: Aphasiology, ISSN 0268-7038, E-ISSN 1464-5041, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 417-435Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: When it comes to aphasia assessments, many speech and language pathologists (SLPs) rely heavily on norm-referenced language tests, even though they are aware that certain important language skills can only be evaluated by analysis of conversational discourse. The formalized aphasia test situation is a typical example of institutional interaction, which differs in systematic ways from everyday conversations. This article examines conversations between persons with aphasia (PWAs) and SLPs in the two different contexts, a topic where previous research is limited. Aims: The aim is to compare the interactions between PWAs and SLPs in test conversations and in more everyday-like conversations and to relate the interactional data to the participants performance on the aphasia test battery. Methods amp; Procedures: Ten PWAs and three SLPs participated in the study. Each PWA participated in two conversations with an SLP, a test conversation, while performing tasks targeting the ability to produce sentences and narratives from an aphasia test battery, and a more everyday-like conversation. The conversations were audio and video recorded and thereafter transcribed. Three main observations considered to be important mechanisms for interaction organization were identified and calculated in the transcriptions. The test results were summarized and analyzed. Outcomes amp; results: The results demonstrated that there were a larger number of turns produced by the PWAs in the everyday conversations compared to the test conversations. Furthermore, there were more communicative initiatives and nonverbal contributions in the everyday conversations. The number of repairs initiated by the PWAs were equivalent, but looking at repair characteristics, it was found that repairs resolved within the same turn were found in the test conversations while repairs stretching over several turns were more frequent in the everyday conversations. Conclusions: The results of the present study demonstrated differences of the interaction between PWAs and SLPs in test conversations and in more everyday-like conversations. Furthermore, there seemed to be no obvious relationship between the participants actual test scores on the aphasia test battery and aspects of conversation that can be related to being a competent speaker.

  • 17. Nettelbladt, Ulrika
    et al.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Speech and Language Pathology.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Hansson, Kristina
    Språkstörning hos barn utan andra funktionshinder2007In: Logopedi / [ed] Lena Hartelius, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2007, 1, p. 139-149Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Logopedi definieras som läran om språk-, röst- och talstörningar och deras behandling. Detta är den första heltäckande läroboken i logopedi på svenska och består av 40 kapitel av 44 olika författare. I en introducerande del beskrivs funktion och utveckling med anknytning till de fyra logopediska huvudområdena röst, språk, tal och sväljning. Därefter beskrivs karakteristik, diagnostik och intervention vid språkstörningar, röststörningar och talstörningar hos barn, ungdomar och vuxna. Vidare behandlas alternativ och kompletterande kommunikation samt sväljningsstörningar. Boken avslutas med en del som beskriver logopedi ur ett historiskt perspektiv, i nutid och med utblickar mot framtiden. Boken är avsedd för studerande på logopedprogrammen. Den vänder sig även till verksamma logopeder i Sverige och övriga Norden. Boken kan också tjäna som uppslagsverk för personer med intresse för logopedi från andra discipliner inom såväl sjukvården som universitetsvärlden och kanske också för den intresserade allmänheten.

  • 18. Nettelbladt, Ulrika
    et al.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Speech and Language Pathology.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Ors, Marianne
    Språkstörningar hos barn och ungdomar2007In: Logopedi / [ed] Lena Hartelius, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2007, 1, p. 125-139Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Logopedi definieras som läran om språk-, röst- och talstörningar och deras behandling. Detta är den första heltäckande läroboken i logopedi på svenska och består av 40 kapitel av 44 olika författare. I en introducerande del beskrivs funktion och utveckling med anknytning till de fyra logopediska huvudområdena röst, språk, tal och sväljning. Därefter beskrivs karakteristik, diagnostik och intervention vid språkstörningar, röststörningar och talstörningar hos barn, ungdomar och vuxna. Vidare behandlas alternativ och kompletterande kommunikation samt sväljningsstörningar. Boken avslutas med en del som beskriver logopedi ur ett historiskt perspektiv, i nutid och med utblickar mot framtiden. Boken är avsedd för studerande på logopedprogrammen. Den vänder sig även till verksamma logopeder i Sverige och övriga Norden. Boken kan också tjäna som uppslagsverk för personer med intresse för logopedi från andra discipliner inom såväl sjukvården som universitetsvärlden och kanske också för den intresserade allmänheten.

  • 19.
    Norén, Niklas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Samuelsson, ChristinaLinköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.Plejert, CharlottaLinköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Aided Communication in Everyday Interaction2013Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book argues for the importance of the participants' perspective within both theory and practice on the function of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) aids in everyday talk-in-interaction. Interactional approaches such as Conversation Analysis (CA) and Topical episode analysis are used to analyze and demonstrate.

  • 20.
    Plejert, Charlotta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Language development in normal children and in disease: An interactional approach to typical language development and children with language impairment2012In: Handbook of growth and growth monitoring in health and disease / [ed] Victor R. Preedy, New York: Springer , 2012, 1, p. 1363-1378Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Growth is one of the human body’s most intricate processes: each body part or region has its own unique growth patterns. Yet at the individual and population levels, growth patterns are sensitive to adverse conditions, genetic predispositions, and environmental changes. And despite the body’s capacity to compensate for these developmental setbacks, the effects may be far-reaching, even life-long. The Handbook of Growth and Growth Monitoring in Health and Disease brings this significant and complex field together in one comprehensive volume: impact of adverse variables on growth patterns; issues at different stages of prenatal development, childhood, and adolescence; aspects of catch-up growth, endocrine regulation, and sexual maturation; screening and assessment methods; and international perspectives. Tables and diagrams, applications to other areas of health and disease, and summary points help make the information easier to retain. Together, over 180 self-contained chapters in 15 sections cover every area of human growth, including:

    • Intrauterine growth retardation.
    • Postnatal growth in normal and abnormal situations.
    • Cells and growth of tissues.
    • Sensory growth and development.
    • Effects of disease on growth.
    • Methods and standards for assessment of growth, and more.
  • 21.
    Plejert, Charlotta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Recycling in clinical interaction involving children with and without language impairment.2008In: Communication & Medicine, ISSN 1612-1783, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 35-64Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Plejert, Charlotta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Anward, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Att få sista ordet: Om avslutande sekvenser i samtal med personer med kommunikativa funktionshinder2010In: Språk och interaktion, ISSN 1795-4428, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 249-263Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Plejert, Charlotta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Anward, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Enhanced patient involvement in Swedish aphasia intervention2016In: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076, Vol. 30, no 10, p. 730-748Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present article is a case study in which participation is investigated in terms of the use of interactional practices that enhance the involvement of a man with severe aphasia in activities that aim to capture his and his wifes experiences of everyday communication, and their views of his speech and language intervention. Five practices are identified: 1) collaborative telling, 2) formulations, 3) yes/no questions, 4) declaratives and 5) hint-and-guess strategies. It is demonstrated how participants (wife, a speech and language pathologist, and two research assistants) use of these practices are beneficial for making the viewpoints of the man with aphasia come across, despite his communication difficulties. Results are discussed in light of the importance of finding ways to make patients influence their own intervention, both in terms of a raised awareness of facilitative interactional practices and of activities such as interviews and retrospection sessions with patients and their significant others.

  • 24. Ramberg, Chris
    et al.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Speech and Language Pathology.
    Stamning och skenande tal hos vuxna och ungdomar2008In: Logopedi / [ed] Chris Ramberg & Christina Samuelsson, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2008, p. 445-457Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Samuelsson , Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Using conversation analysis to study prosodic problems in a child with language impairment2009In: CHILD LANGUAGE TEACHING and THERAPY, ISSN 0265-6590 , Vol. 25, no 1, p. 59-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prosody carries a lot of information relevant for our understanding of spoken messages. In addition, prosody plays an important role in signalling attitudes and emotions. Prosodic features also constitute an important resource that participants use to achieve mutual understanding in interaction. The aim of this study was to point to possible recurring patterns in the prosodic structure of language testing activities. A further aim was to discuss similarities between English and Swedish in these patterns.

    The main findings indicated a systematic use of prosody in the language testing activity Questions are mainly posed with rising intonation and answers are produced with rising intonation. Evaluations are produced with a final fall in the intonation. There was also some support for the assumption that this pattern occurs within a similar activity involving an English-speaking child and his SLT.

    The results of the present study showed that analysis of conversation and prosody in its conversational context is useful in order to reveal possible functions of features that would have been overlooked with a more deficit driven perspective.

  • 26.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Speech and Language Pathology.
    Conversations in speech language clinics - are there routinized patterns?2007In: 25th European Child Language Disorders Conference,2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Speech and Language Pathology.
    Prosody in clinical conversations - is there a systematic use of prosodic patterns within a particular clinical setting?2007In: Speech Prosody in Atypical Populations,2007, 2007, p. 19-19Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 28.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Prosody intervention: A single subject study of a Swedish boy with prosodic problems2011In: CHILD LANGUAGE TEACHING and THERAPY, ISSN 0265-6590, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 56-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish has a complicated prosodic system, compared, for example, with English. A large proportion of Swedish children with language impairment (LI) have prosodic problems to some extent. There are few descriptions in the literature of prosody intervention, which means that clinicians must rely on their overall linguistic and therapeutic knowledge when designing intervention for prosodic problems. The aim of the present study is to design an intervention package for prosodic problems in children and to evaluate this intervention. The article reports a single subject multiple baselines case study. The participant was a boy (aged 4 years and 6 months) with prosodic problems, mainly on word level but also on phrase and discourse level. The intervention was devised to address his problems and focused on word level prosody. The intervention was carried out over 6 weeks, comprising six 60-minute sessions. Post-intervention assessments were carried out immediately after intervention and 9 weeks later. The participant improved his overall prosodic skills significantly, as assessed by a procedure designed to capture prosody at word, phrase and discourse level. An evaluation of a spontaneous speech sample was also made by a panel of three experienced listeners, and they found some improvement in the participants prosody in connected speech, although this was not significant.

  • 29.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Prosody intervention for children2010In: Embedding Evidence practice in Speech and Language Therapy: International Examples / [ed] Hazel Roddam & Jemma Skeat, Chchester: Wiley-Blackwell , 2010, 1, p. 189-195Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Like all health professionals, speech and language therapists (SLTs) need to keep themselves up-to-date with the research evidence base that is relevant to their field of practice and be able to show how this contributes to their clinical decision-making. However, it is not always clear to practitioners how evidence-based practice (EBP) can be properly embedded in their day-to-day activities. In this valuable book, Hazel Roddam and Jemma Skeat present a wealth of instructive examples by SLT contributors from around the world, showing how clinicians, educators, and researchers have risen to the EBP challenge.  Embedding evidence-based practice in speech and language therapy  showcases the creative ways that SLTs are developing knowledge and skills for EBP, creating contexts that support the use of evidence in practice, and working towards making evidence easily accessible and usable. It includes real-life examples of how SLTs have encountered a clinical problem or situation and have accessed and used the evidence within their day-to-day practice.The contributors come from a wide range of work settings, from services situated within large organizations to those in independent practice, and represent a range of clinical areas, from paediatric to adult and across speech, language, voice, fluency, Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC), and dysphagia. This book is written for an audience of clinical practitioners, at any stage of their career, and is additionally a valuable resource for SLT students and lecturers.

  • 30.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Adolfsson, Elin
    Linköping Community, Sweden.
    Persson, Hanna
    Kiruna Hospital, Sweden.
    The use and characteristics of elderspeak in Swedish geriatric institutions2013In: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076, Vol. 27, no 8, p. 616-631Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to investigate the occurrence of elderspeak in a Swedish context and to describe its characteristics. Elderspeak refers to adjustments made in communication with elderly people; adjustments similar to those made in interaction with infants. Previous findings show that adjustments of communication are made within several linguistic domains, and are a part of the communicative environment of elderly people. Five people working in different forms of geriatric institutions participated in this study, and data consist of recordings of interactions between caregivers and residents (without dementia) and interactions between caregivers and colleagues. The recordings were transcribed and analyzed by means of perceptual, semantic and acoustic analyses. The findings demonstrate that caregivers, to a varying extent, adjusted their communication within several linguistic domains. The adjustments were mainly made within the prosodic domain, but there were also adjustments made within other language domains.

  • 31.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Speech language pathology, Audiology and Otorhinolaryngology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ekström, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Speech language pathology, Audiology and Otorhinolaryngology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Digital communication support in interaction involving people with dementia2019In: Logopedics, Phoniatrics, Vocology, ISSN 1401-5439, E-ISSN 1651-2022, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 41-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: People with dementia frequently suffer from communication disabilities, which usually influence their quality of life. The communication disabilities may affect a persons possibility to participate in interaction as a result of reduced ability to initiate new topics and difficulties in contributing new information to maintain the conversational topic. Technical aids have been proved useful to facilitate communicative activities by supporting memory and stimulating communicative initiatives. Purpose: The aim of the present study is to further understandings of how digital communication support may be used in interaction involving people with dementia. A further aim is to investigate how participants experience communication with and without the use of communication aids. Methods: The study is carried out in a Swedish context, and three dyads of older women with dementia and professional carers participated in the study. The dyads interact in the home environments of the persons with dementia using tablet computers and two web-based applications with generic pictures, videos, and music files (Computer Interactive Reminiscence and Communication Aid, CIRCA) and personalised pictures and films (Computer Interactive Reminiscence and Communication University of Sheffield, CIRCUS). The data include twenty-one video recorded activities. Results and Conclusion: The applications appear to provide support for the dyads in finding things to talk about. The participants talk both about the material and memories associated with the material. The participants experience the use of communication aids as positive.

  • 32.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ekström, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Majlesi, Ali Reza
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Plejert, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kommunikation vid demenssjukdom2016In: Att leva med demens / [ed] Ingrid Hellström & Lars-Christer Hydén, Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2016, 1, p. 63-70Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ferreira, Janna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Recycling in communication involving a boy with autism using picture exchange system (PECS)2013In: Aided communication in everyday interaction / [ed] Niklas Norén, Christina Samuelsson and Charlotta Plejert, Guildford: J & R Press , 2013, p. 324-Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book argues for the importance of the participants' perspective within both theory and practice on the function of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) aids in everyday talk-in-interaction. Interactional approaches such as Conversation Analysis (CA) and Topical episode analysis are used to analyze and demonstrate.

  • 34.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hjalmarsson Österholm, Johannes
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Orally Positioning Older People in Assessment Meetings2015In: Educational gerontology, ISSN 0360-1277, E-ISSN 1521-0472, Vol. 41, no 11, p. 767-785Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has been demonstrated that persons with dementia may be positioned as less competent than participants of the same age without dementia, and that persons with dementia possibly also are positioned as less competent than other older persons without dementia. In the present study, we aim to explore this further by analysing Swedish assessment meetings, in which needs and preferences are investigated for older persons without dementia. The material consists five audio-recorded assessment meetings, where there were at least two conversational partners present (a spouse and/or a child) and where the older person applying for social services was not diagnosed with dementia. The ages of the older persons ranged from 81 to 88, while the age of the relatives ranged from 46 to 93. The results of the present study demonstrate that older persons without dementia mainly are positioned as competent. However, it may be related to the degree of frailty, since the frailest person in the present study appears to be positioned as less competent than the other participants. The present paper adds to existing knowledge on how professionals in assessment meetings contribute to the positioning of older persons as competent and capable of making decisions. The results of the present article may be useful to promote development of education and training of communication skills for care mangers in assessments in order to further ensure that older persons with and without cognitive impairments can be actively involved in the creation and interpretation of their applications for social services.

  • 35.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Speech language pathology, Audiology and Otorhinolaryngology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Collaboration, trouble and repair in multiparty interactions involving couples with dementia or aphasia2017In: International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, ISSN 1754-9507, E-ISSN 1754-9515, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 454-464Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was to identify problems with communication with persons with aphasia and persons with dementia in a collaborative interview setting with their significant others. In particular, to compare interactional practices used in order to resolve problems caused by specific symptoms. Method: Five persons with aphasia and five persons with dementia and their spouses participated in the study. Interviews were carried out couple by couple, and the interviews had a task-oriented character. The interviews were video and audio recorded. All interviews were transcribed. From the transcriptions categorisations according to previous literature were made. Result: The results demonstrated that repair sequences were frequent in interaction involving people with aphasia (PWA), and even more so in interaction involving persons with dementia (PWD). In general, it was the PWA/PWD that initiated the repair sequence more often than the spouse, thus keeping the general rule of a preference for self-initiated repair compared to other-initiated repair. Conclusion: The active involvement of the conversational partners in trouble solving sequences in interaction with PWA/PWD demonstrated in the present study indicates that the interactional style of the conversational partner to PWA/PWD important. This implies that conversation partner training programmes would be useful both for PWA and for PWD.

  • 36.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Intonational Patterns of Nonverbal Vocalizations in People With Dementia2011In: American Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Dementia, ISSN 1533-3175, E-ISSN 1938-2731, Vol. 26, no 7, p. 563-572Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nonverbal vocalizations in dementia are important clinically since they generally have been regarded as disruptive behavior that is disturbing. The aim of the present study is to describe the interactional pattern, including the prosodic package, of nonverbal vocalizations in a participant in a late stage of dementia. The acoustic analysis shows that the vocalizations do not differ significantly from the verbal utterances regarding mean fundamental frequency or pitch range. The mean fundamental frequency, F(0), of the utterances from Anna was significantly higher than the mean F(0) from the other elderly participants. The analysis demonstrates that there is a singing-like type of vocalizations that does not resemble the previously described patterns of nonverbal vocalizations. This pattern of the nonverbal vocalization does not resemble the intonation of Annas verbal utterances. The other participants perceive Annas vocalizations as potentially meaningful turns. Nonverbal vocalizations in clinical settings should be taken as communicative contributions.

  • 37.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lundeborg Hammarström, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Plejert, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Video Recording as a Tool for Assessing Children’s Everyday Use of Features Targeted in Phonological Intervention2016In: Journal of Interactional Research in Communication Disorders/Equinox, ISSN 2040-5111, E-ISSN 2040-512X, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 27-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The last decades, speech and language pathology services have been subject to changes, and there has been a growing demand for intervention activities to be effective and evidence-based. The aim of the present study was to investigate if and how video recording can be used to assess the use of features targeted in phonological intervention, in everyday talk by children with LI. Three five-year-old girls with phonological problems participated in the study, and data consist of video recordings of intervention sessions and of interaction at home. Three different paths of development were identified: Some targeted speech sounds are displayed in everyday interaction; Targeted speech sound is present in intervention-like activity; No displays of targeted sounds. The results of the present study clearly demonstrate that the use of video recordings, transcriptions and analysis of interaction outside of the clinical setting contribute important information that may guide planning, goal-setting and evaluation of intervention.

  • 38.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundeborg, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    McAllister, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Experiences from Two Swedish Speech and Language Pathology Education Programmes Using Different Approaches to Problem-Based Learning2012In: Problem-Based Learning in Clinical Education: The Next Generation / [ed] Susan Bridges, Colman McGrath and Tara L. Whitehill, Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands, 2012, p. 47-58Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In many programmes within higher education, including speech language pathology (SLP) education, students are expected to develop collaborative skills alongside acquisition of theoretical knowledge. The focus of the present chapter is to evaluate SLP graduates’ opinions on how well prepared for the professional life they feel after their education. A questionnaire, focusing on perceived professional skills in relation to education, was distributed to former SLP students from two programmes with different applications of problem-based learning (PBL). A total of 55 students (69%) completed the questionnaire. PBL has been identified as one efficient way to facilitate the development of speech and language pathology students’ abilities to meet the demands of self-directed learning in everyday worklife. Moreover, it has been shown that the use of PBL throughout the programme is beneficial to the perception of attaining general competencies. It is also demonstrated that the students from both the PBL throughout and the semi-PBL curricula rated themselves high on many specific competencies.

  • 39.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology .
    LundeborgHammarström, Inger
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology .
    McAllister, Anita
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Specific and general competencies of graduates from Swedish speech and language pathology education2008In: The Second International Conference on PBL in Speech-Language Pathology,2008, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

      The topic of the present study is the relationship between the pedagogical philosophy of education and the professional outcome, mainly regarding general competencies. The overall purpose of the study is to evaluate postgraduates- opinions on how well prepared for the professional life they feel after their speech and language pathology education. Previous research have shown differences in professional skills between problem-based learning (PBL) and non-PBL graduates (Prince, van Eijs, Boshuzien, van der Vleuten & Scherpbier, 2005). Those differences mainly concern general competencies such as organizational skills and teamwork. These findings get further support from the evaluation of the Swedish medical education programmes, where PBL-graduates report better communicational, co-operational and leadership skills than non-PBL graduates (Grundutbildningsenkäten, 2006). PBL is a student centred pedagogical philosophy where students are encouraged to be very active. In PBL real-life problems become the context in which students learn academic content as well as professional skills (Biggs, 2003). The first Swedish speech language pathology program using PBL throughout the program was completed in 2007, and the graduate students have participated in an evaluation of the program. A comprehensive questionnaire, focusing on perceived professional skills in relation to education, was distributed to the students of this program, to students from a partial PBL curriculum who graduated the same year and to students from a partial PBL curriculum who finished in 2002. Preliminary results indicate that the PBL graduates feel well prepared for meeting the demands of the professional life. The results also suggest that the students who finished their education six years ago feels more able to evaluate their education. These students also seem more satisfied. The present study adds further knowledge concerning outcomes of higher medical education. It also points to differences between PBL graduates and non-PBL graduates regarding professional experiences. The study also provides information on how the opinions of the educational experience changes over time.

  • 40.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Clarification requests in everyday interaction involving children with cochlear implants2014In: Logopedics, Phoniatrics, Vocology, ISSN 1401-5439, E-ISSN 1651-2022, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 130-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study is to explore the form and function of clarification request sequences in interaction involving children with cochlear implants. Clarification request sequences are investigated in everyday interaction, and it is demonstrated that children with CI use both general/open and specific requests for clarification. It is also shown that there is relatively lower frequency of requests for clarification in interactions involving children with CI with high intelligibility scores. The results may be useful in clinical assessment and intervention demonstrating the importance of assessing interactional ability in everyday interaction.

  • 41.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Prosody and working memory in children with cochlear implants2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Prosody, Grammar and Working Memory in Children with Cochlear Implants2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Löfqvist, Anders
    Lund University.
    The role of Swedish tonal word accents in children with language impairment2006In: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 231-248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study was designed to examine the production of the Swedish tonal accents in children with language impairment and normal controls in order to verify previous findings. The productions of 25 children with linguistic impairment and their matched controls, aged 4;4-10;0 (mean age 5;11) were evaluated by ratings of fundamental frequency patterns, and by perceptual analysis by ten linguistically naive listeners to assess the distinctiveness of the accents. These methods give a more detailed description of the children's productions of tonal word accents. The results show that 60.8% of the children with language impairment have difficulties to produce the contrast of tonal word accents according to the F(0) patterns. The difference in the rating of the F(0) curves between the children with LI and their matched controls was significant. There is a significant positive correlation between the perceptual results and the F(0)-rating, indicating that the better a child was perceived, the better his/her F(0) production was rated. We conclude that the distinction between the tonal word accents is a difficult feature to acquire for Swedish children, which is shown both by acoustic and perceptual evaluations.

  • 44.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Speech and Language Pathology.
    Nettelbladt, U
    Löfqvist, A
    On the relationship between prosody and pragmatic ability in Swedish children with language impairment2005In: Child Language Teaching and Therapy, ISSN 0265-6590, E-ISSN 1477-0865, Vol. 21, p. 279-304Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Speech and Language Pathology.
    Nettelbladt, Ulrika
    Logopedi i ett historiskt perspektiv2007In: Logopedi / [ed] Lena Hartelius, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2007, 1, p. 513-521Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Logopedi definieras som läran om språk-, röst- och talstörningar och deras behandling. Detta är den första heltäckande läroboken i logopedi på svenska och består av 40 kapitel av 44 olika författare. I en introducerande del beskrivs funktion och utveckling med anknytning till de fyra logopediska huvudområdena röst, språk, tal och sväljning. Därefter beskrivs karakteristik, diagnostik och intervention vid språkstörningar, röststörningar och talstörningar hos barn, ungdomar och vuxna. Vidare behandlas alternativ och kompletterande kommunikation samt sväljningsstörningar. Boken avslutas med en del som beskriver logopedi ur ett historiskt perspektiv, i nutid och med utblickar mot framtiden. Boken är avsedd för studerande på logopedprogrammen. Den vänder sig även till verksamma logopeder i Sverige och övriga Norden. Boken kan också tjäna som uppslagsverk för personer med intresse för logopedi från andra discipliner inom såväl sjukvården som universitetsvärlden och kanske

  • 46.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Nettelbladt, Ulrika
    Lund University.
    Prosodic problems in Swedish children with language impairment: Towards a classification of subgroups.2004In: International journal of language and communication disorders, ISSN 1368-2822, E-ISSN 1460-6984, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 325-344Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Symptoms of prosodic problems have been found in Swedish children with language impairment at word and phrase level and possibly also at discourse level.

    AIMS: The aim was twofold. First, to characterize a group of children with prosodic problems compared with children with normal language development. Second, to investigate the possibilities to classify subgroups of prosodic problems.

    METHODS & PROCEDURES: A new Swedish assessment procedure for prosody that captures prosodic features at word, phrase and discourse level was used. Twenty-five children with prosodic problems and 25 children with typically developing language matched by age, gender and regional dialect participated in the study. Pretesting included tests of language comprehension, grammatical skills and oral motor skills.

    OUTCOMES & RESULTS: The difference between the experimental and control groups was highly significant in all parts of the procedure. The total score of the procedure significantly correlated with grammatical abilities measured in the pretesting procedure, but there was no correlation with the other linguistic abilities measured in the pretesting procedure.

    CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate a possible differentiation into two different subgroups, one with primarily phonetic and/or linguistic problems, the other with prosodic problems at discourse level possibly related to pragmatic problems.

  • 47.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nettelbladt, Ulrika
    Institutionen för kliniska vetenskaper, avdelningen för logopedi, foniatri och audiologi, Lunds universitet, Lund.
    Studiet av talrubbningar hos barn ur ett historisktperspektiv.: Om ämnets etablering i Sverige.1998In: Svensk medicinhistorisk tidskrift, ISSN 1402-9871, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 115-137Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 48.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Plejert, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    On the use of Conversation Analysis and retrospection in intervention for children with language impairment2015In: Child Language Teaching and Therapy, ISSN 0265-6590, E-ISSN 1477-0865, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 19-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Models of speech and language intervention for communicative disabilities vary from structured programmes to more interactive and ecological methods (Fey, 1986). Ideally, a model for intervention should fit the interests and personality of the patient, focus on crucial aspects of speech and language, and be suited to the patients everyday communication needs (Johnston, 2006). The present article addresses how features of everyday interaction and speech and language intervention may be captured and used for children with language impairment (LI), their caretakers, and speech and language therapists (SLTs), within and outside of clinical practice. Specifically, the aim of the study is to explore the use of retrospection (Erickson and Schultz, 1982), based on Conversation Analytical (CA) methodology (e.g. Schegloff, 2007), and to establish if and how CA-based retrospection may contribute to raising participants awareness of their own and others interactional behaviours. Retrospection here refers to sessions where participants watch and comment on sequences of video-recordings from intervention, as well as from situations captured in a variety of everyday settings. Four children with LI and three speech and language therapists participated, as well as parents of the children. The procedure comprised analysis and transcription of video-recordings of everyday interaction and intervention involving the children, retrospections with the children, the parents of the children with LI, and the SLTs, and analysis and transcription of the recordings made of the retrospections. The analysis of the retrospections generated four categories of phenomena relevant for intervention and everyday interaction: (I) Observations of well-functioning interaction strategies; (2) Observations of less well-functioning interaction strategies; (3) Assessment of positive performance; and (4) Comments relating to intervention. The results show that CA-based retrospection may be used to raise the participants awareness of their own interactional behaviours, and provide the opportunity to discuss strategies relevant for both intervention and everyday interaction for children with LI.

  • 49.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Plejert, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Anward, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Defusing practices as mitigation in speech and language intervention.2014In: Communication & Medicine: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Healthcare, Ethics and Society, ISSN 1612-1783, E-ISSN 1613-3625, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 299-312Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present paper, speech and language intervention was investigated in order to explore the use and function of defusing practices. Defusing practices may be viewed as a special form of mitigation. In previous research, including studies on clinical interaction, mitigation has been described mainly as devices used in order to reduce the unwelcome effects of an utterance, or reduce the discomfort of bad news. Defusing practices, however, appear to serve somewhat different functions, which are examined here. Data comprises video and audio recordings of eight intervention sessions with children with language impairment (LI), and six intervention sessions with adults with aphasia, The analysis revealed the following kinds of defusing practices: circumscriptions/figurative language, diminutive words, words like ‘try’ or ‘test’, placing the problem outside of the patient, collective pronouns, diminishing the speech and language pathologist’s own competence, encouragement, and references to well-known phenomena. If speech and language therapists (SLPs) are made aware of the practice and function of defusing, they may make conscious use of these practices in order to reduce face-threatening situations in intervention

  • 50.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Plejert, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nettelbladt, Ulrika
    Lunds universitet.
    Anward, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The Role of Interactional Prosody in Language testing Activities in Swedish.2011In: Speech Prosody in Atypical Populations: Assessment and Remediation / [ed] Vesna Stojanovik & Jane Setter, London: J&R Press , 2011, 1Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book is based on recent findings and will report current original research in the field of speech prosody in atypical populations.

    With contributions from experts working on the prosody of a specific client group, the book will cover both paediatric and adult groups within a single volume, and will promote this often neglected area of clinical assessment and management.

    As well as being a key reference for those who are conducting research in this area, the book will be an invaluable tool for speech and language therapists who currently rarely assess prosody because of the lack of information relevant to them.

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