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  • 1.
    Babarro, Javier Martín
    et al.
    Complutense University of Madrid, Spain.
    Díaz-Aguado, María José
    Complutense University of Madrid, Spain.
    Martínez Arias, Rosario
    Complutense University of Madrid, Spain.
    Steglich, Christian
    University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Power Structure inthe Peer Group: The Role of Classroom Cohesion and Hierarchy in Peer Acceptance and Rejection of Victimized and Aggressive Students2017In: Journal of Early Adolescence, ISSN 0272-4316, E-ISSN 1552-5449, Vol. 37, no 9, p. 1197-1220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study addresses the interacting effects of classroom cohesion and hierarchy on the relationships between victimization and aggression withpeer acceptance and rejection. Classroom cohesion and hierarchy were constructed from friendship nominations. Multilevel analysis conducted in asample of seventh- and eighth-grade students from the Sociescuela programin Spain (N = 6,600) showed that in cohesive and hierarchical classrooms, a higher level of victimization was found; peer rejection was more strongly associated with victimization. In contrast to previous research, for males, aggression was more strongly associated with peer acceptance in less hierarchized classrooms.

  • 2.
    Block, Per
    et al.
    ETH Zurich, Switzerland.
    Koskinen, Johan
    University of Manchester, UK.
    Hollway, James
    Geneva University, Switzerland.
    Steglich, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Stadtfeld, Christoph
    ETH Zurich, Switzerland.
    Change we can believe in: Comparing longitudinal network modelson consistency, interpretability and predictive power2018In: Social Networks, ISSN 0378-8733, E-ISSN 1879-2111, Vol. 52, p. 180-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While several models for analysing longitudinal network data have been proposed, their main differ-ences, especially regarding the treatment of time, have not been discussed extensively in the literature.However, differences in treatment of time strongly impact the conclusions that can be drawn from data.In this article we compare auto-regressive network models using the example of TERGMs – a temporalextensions of ERGMs – and process-based models using SAOMs as an example. We conclude that theTERGM has, in contrast to the ERGM, no consistent interpretation on tie-level probabilities, as well as noconsistent interpretation on processes of network change. Further, parameters in the TERGM are stronglydependent on the interval length between two time-points. Neither limitation is true for process-basednetwork models such as the SAOM. Finally, both compared models perform poorly in out-of-sampleprediction compared to trivial predictive models.

  • 3.
    Brouwer, Jasperina
    et al.
    University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Flache, Andreas
    University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Jansen, Ellen
    University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Hofman, Adriaan
    University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Steglich, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Emergent achievement segregation in freshmenlearning community networks2018In: Higher Education, ISSN 0018-1560, E-ISSN 1573-174X, Vol. 76, no 3, p. 483-500Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A common assumption about Freshmen Learning Communities (FLCs) is that academic relationships contribute to students’ success. This study investigates how students inlearning communities connect with fellow students for friendship and academic support. Longitudinal social network data across the first year, collected from 95 Dutch students in eight FLCs, measure both social and academic relational choices within and beyond the FLCs. Using stochastic actor-based models, the study tests two competing hypotheses. The alignment hypothesis states that students connect with their similar-achieving friends for both academic and social support, leading to an alignment of both types of networks over time. In contrast, the duality hypothesis states dissimilarity between academic support networks and friendship networks: students should connect with better-achieving fellow students for academic support and to more similar peers for friendship. The data support the alignment hypothesis but not the duality hypothesis; in addition, they show evidence of achievement segregation in FLCs: the higher the students’ achievement level, the more they connect with other students for both academic support and friendship, relating in particular to peers with a similarly high achievement level. The results suggest that lower-achieving students are excluded from the support provided by higher achieving students and instead ask similar lower achievers for support. They thus cannot benefit optimally from the academic integration FLC offer. The article concludes with recommendations of how to support students in an FLC so that they can reach optimal achievement potential.

  • 4.
    Franken, Aart
    et al.
    Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Moffitt, Terrie
    Duke University, Durham, USA; King’s College London, London, UK.
    Steglich, Christian
    University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Dijkstra, Jan Kornelis
    University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Harakeh, Zeena
    Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Vollebergh, Wilma
    Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    The role of self-control and early adolescents’ friendships in the development of externalizing behavior: The SNARE study2016In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, ISSN 0047-2891, E-ISSN 1573-6601, Vol. 45, no 9, p. 1800-1811Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This social network study investigated themoderating role of self-control in the association betweenfriendship and the development of externalizing behavior: Antisocial behavior, alcohol use, tobacco use. Previous studies have shown inconsistent findings, and did not control for possible friendship network or selection effects. We tested two complementary hypotheses: (1) That early adolescents with low self-control develop externalizing behavior regardless of their friends’ behavior, or (2) as aresult of being influenced by their friends’ externalizing behavior to a greater extent. Hypotheses were investigated using data from the SNARE (Social Network Analysis of Risk behavior in Early adolescence) study (N = 1144,50 % boys, Mage 12.7, SD = 0.47). We controlled for selection effects and the network structure, using a data analysis package called SIENA. The main findings indicate that personal low self-control and friends’ externalizing behaviors both predict early adolescents’ increasing externalizing behaviors, but they do so independently. Therefore, interventions should focus on all early adolescents’with a lower self-control, rather than focus on those adolescents with a lower self-control who also have friendswho engage in externalizing behavior.

  • 5.
    Franken, Aart
    et al.
    Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Prinstein, Mitch
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.
    Dijkstra, Jan Kornelis
    University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.
    Steglich, Christian
    University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.
    Harakeh, Zeena
    Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Vollebergh, Wilma
    Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Early Adolescent Friendship Selection Based on Externalizing Behavior: the Moderating Role of Pubertal Development. The SNARE Study2016In: Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, ISSN 0091-0627, E-ISSN 1573-2835, Vol. 44, p. 1647-1657Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined friendship (de-)selection processes in early adolescence. Pubertal development was examined as a potential moderator. It was expected that pubertal development would be associated with an increased tendency for adolescents to select their friends based on their similarities in externalizing behavior engagement (i.e., delinquency, alcohol use, and tobacco use). Data were used from the first three waves of the SNARE (Social Network Analysis of Risk behaviorin Early adolescence) study (N= 1144; 50 % boys;Mage=12.7; SD= 0.47), including students who entered the first year of secondary school. The hypothesis was tested using Stochastic Actor-Based Modeling in SIENA. While taking the network structure into account, and controlling for peer influence effects, the results supported this hypothesis. Early adolescents with higher pubertal development were as likely as their peers to select friends based on similarity in externalizing behavior and especially likely to remain friends with peers who had a similar level of externalizing behavior, andthus break friendship ties with dissimilar friends in this respect. As early adolescents are actively engaged in reorganizing their social context, adolescents with a higher pubertal development are especially likely to lose friendships with peers who do not engage in externalizing behavior, thus losing an important source of adaptive social control (i.e.,friends who do not engage in externalizing behavior).

  • 6.
    Gremmen, Mariola
    et al.
    University of Groningen.
    Berger, Christian
    Pontifical Catholic University of Chile.
    Ryan, Alison
    University of Michigan.
    Steglich, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Veenstra, René
    University of Groningen.
    Dijkstra, Jan Kornelis
    University of Gronigen.
    Adolescents’ Friendships, Academic Achievement, and Risk Behaviors: Same-Behavior and Cross-Behavior Selection and Influence Processes2019In: Child Development, ISSN 0009-3920, E-ISSN 1467-8624, Vol. 90, no 2, p. E192-E211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined to what extent adolescents’ and their friends’ risk behaviors (i.e., delinquency and alcohol use) hinder or promote their academic achievement (grade point average [GPA]), and vice versa. Longitudinal data were used (N = 1,219 seventh- to ninth-grade adolescents; Mage = 13.69). Results showed that risk behaviors negatively affected adolescents’ GPA, whereas GPA protected against engaging in risk behaviors. Moreover, adolescents tended to select friends who have similar behaviors and friends’ behaviors became more similar over time (same-behavior selection and influence). Furthermore, although same-behavior effects seemed to dominate, evidence was found for some cross-behavior selection effects and a tendency in seventh grade for cross-behavior influence effects. Concluding, it is important to investigate the interplay between different behaviors with longitudinal social network analysis.

  • 7.
    Gremmen, Mariola C.
    et al.
    Univ Groningen, Netherlands.
    Van den Berg, Yvonne H. M.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Steglich, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Univ Groningen, Netherlands.
    Veenstra, Rene
    Univ Groningen, Netherlands.
    Dijkstra, Jan Kornelis
    Univ Groningen, Netherlands.
    The importance of near-seated peers for elementary students academic engagement and achievement2018In: Journal of applied developmental psychology, ISSN 0193-3973, E-ISSN 1873-7900, Vol. 57, p. 42-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although students are part of a group of classmates, they spend the majority of time during lessons with students who are seated next or close to them. Therefore, near-seated peers in elementary school classrooms might play a crucial role in students academic development. It was hypothesized that near-seated peers influence students academic engagement and achievement, especially when they are also friends. Participants were 559 fourth sixth grade students (21 classrooms; 51.9% boys; Mage = 10.65 years, range = 8-12). Longitudinal social network analysis (RSiena) showed that students academic engagement and achievement got better when friends scored better, and vice versa, regardless of their physical position in the classroom. In contrast, near-seated peers who were not befriended got more diverse scores over time. These results imply that teachers should consider students friendships and academic engagement and achievement in designing seating arrangements. Moreover, it is recommended to actively monitor ongoing peer influence processes.

  • 8.
    Gremmen, Mariola
    et al.
    University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Dijkstra, Jan Kornelis
    University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Steglich, Christian
    University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Veenstra, René
    University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    First selection, then influence: Developmental differences in friendship dynamics regarding academic achievement2017In: Developmental Psychology, ISSN 0012-1649, E-ISSN 1939-0599, Vol. 53, no 7, p. 1356-1370Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study concerns peer selection and influence dynamics in early adolescents' friendships regarding academic achievement. Using longitudinal social network analysis (RSiena), both selection and influence processes were investigated for students' average grades and their cluster-specific grades (i.e., language, exact, and social cluster). Data were derived from the SNARE (Social Network Analysis of Risk behavior in Early adolescence) study, using 6 waves (N = 601; Mage = 12.66, 48.9% boys at first wave). Results showed developmental differences between the first and second year of secondary school (seventh and eighth grade). Whereas selection processes were found in the first year on students' cluster-specific grades, influence processes were found in the second year, on both students' average and cluster-specific grades. These results suggest that students initially tend to select friends on the basis of similar cluster-based grades (first year), showing that similarity in achievement is attractive for friendships. Especially for low-achieving students, similar-achieving students were highly attractive as friends, whereas they were mostly avoided by high-achieving students. Influence processes on academic achievement take place later on (second year), when students know each other better, indicating that students' grades become more similar over time in response to their connectedness. Concluding, this study shows the importance of developmental differences and specific school subjects for understanding peer selection and influence processes in adolescents' academic achievement.

  • 9.
    Labun, Alona
    et al.
    University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.
    Wittek, Rafael
    University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.
    Steglich, Christian
    University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.
    The Co-evolution of Power and Friendship Networks in an Organization2016In: Network Science, ISSN 2050-1242, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 364-384Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the pivotal role that both power and interpersonal trust play in a multitude of social exchange situations, relatively little is known about their interplay. Moreover, previous theorizing makes competing claims. Do we consider our relatively more powerful exchange partners to be less trustworthy, as rational choice reasoning would suggest? Or do more complex psychological mechanisms lead us to trust them more, as motivated cognition reasoning implies? Extending the latter approach, we develop and empirically test three hypotheses on the interrelation between perceptions of interpersonal trust and power. According to the status value hypothesis, individuals are more likely to befriend those whom they or others perceive as powerful. The status signaling hypothesis states that the friends of people one perceives as powerful will also be seen as powerful. According to the self-monitoring hypothesis, high self-monitors are more likely than low self-monitors to befriend those they or others perceive as powerful. We use multiplex stochastic actor-based models to analyze the co-evolution of trust and power relations among n=49 employees in a Dutch Youth Care organization. Data covers three waves of a longitudinal sociometric network survey collected over a period of 18 months in the years 2009–2010. In general, we find some support for all three hypotheses, though the effects are weak. Being one of the first organizational field studies on the co-evolution of power and trust, we conclude with discussing the implications of these findings for the study of social exchange processes.

  • 10.
    Laninga, Lydia
    et al.
    Utrecht University, The Netherlands.
    Harakeh, Zeena
    Utrecht University, The Netherlands.
    Steglich, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Dijkstra, Jan Kornelis
    University of Groningen.
    Veenstra, René
    University of Groningen.
    Vollebergh, Wilma
    Utrecht University.
    Populaire jongeren zetten een norm voor vriendschappen en agressie inde klas2017In: Kind en Adolescent, ISSN 0167-2436, Vol. 38, p. 212-232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [nl]

    In deze studie onderzoeken wij of agressieve peer-normen, meer specifiek populariteitsnormen en descriptieve normen, een versterkende rol spelen in de mate waarin jongeren hun vrienden uitkiezen op basis van agressief gedrag en in de mate waarin jongeren door hun vrienden worden beïnvloed in agressie (N=1.134 eerstejaars leerlingen van middelbare school; leeftijd M=12,66 jaar). Zoals verwacht kwam uit longitudinale sociale-netwerkanalyses met peer-nominatie data naar voren dat vooral populaire jongeren in de klas een norm kunnen zetten voor de ontwikkeling van vriendschappen en agressie. In klassen met agressieve populaire jongeren blijken jongeren hun vrienden te selecteren op basis van gelijkheid in agressie, terwijl dit niet gebeurt in klassen met niet agressieve populaire jongeren. Daarnaast is de vriendschapsinvloed op agressie significant groter in klassen met agressieve populaire jongeren. Descriptieve normen spelen geen rol in vriendschapsprocessen omtrent agressie. Blijkbaar wordt agressie enkel en alleen als een belangrijk, waardevol kenmerk voor vriendschapsprocessen gezien als zij geassocieerd is met populariteit in de klas.

  • 11.
    Laninga, Lydia
    et al.
    Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Steglich, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Harakeh, Zeena
    Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands; TNO, Leiden, The Netherlands.
    Vollebergh, Wilma
    Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Veenstra, René
    University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Dijkstra, Jan Kornelis
    University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
    The Role of Prosocial and Aggressive Popularity Norm Combinations in Prosocial and Aggressive Friendship Processes’2019In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, ISSN 0047-2891, E-ISSN 1573-6601Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prior work has shown that popular peers can set a powerful norm for the valence and salience of aggression in adolescent classrooms, which enhances aggressive friendship processes (selection, maintenance, influence). It is unknown, however, whether popular peers also set a norm for prosocial behavior that can buffer against aggressive friendship processes and stimulate prosocial friendship processes. This study examined the role of prosocial and aggressive popularity norm combinations in prosocial and aggressive friendship processes. Three waves of peer-nominated data were collected in the first- and second year of secondary school (N = 1816 students; 81 classrooms; Mage = 13.06; 50.5% girl). Longitudinal social network analyses indicate that prosocial popularity norms have most power to affect both prosocial and aggressive friendship processes when aggressive popularity norms are non-present. In prosocial classrooms (low aggressive and high prosocial popularity norms), friendship maintenance based on prosocial behavior is enhanced, whereas aggressive friendship processes are largely mitigated. Instead, when aggressive popularity norms are equally strong as prosocial norms (mixed classrooms) or even stronger than prosocial norms (aggressive classrooms), aggression is more important for friendship processes than prosocial behavior. These findings show that the prosocial behavior of popular peers may only buffer against aggressive friendship processes and stimulate prosocial friendship processes if these popular peers (or other popular peers in the classroom) abstain from aggression.

  • 12.
    Laninga-Wijnen, Lydia
    et al.
    Utrecht University. The Netherlands.
    Harakeh, Zeena
    Utrecht University, The Netherlands.
    Steglich, Christian
    University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Dijkstra, Jan Kornelis
    University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Veenstra, René
    University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Vollebergh, Wilma
    Utrecht University, The Netherlands.
    The Norms of Popular Peers Moderate Friendship Dynamics of Adolescent Aggression2017In: Child Development, ISSN 0009-3920, E-ISSN 1467-8624, Vol. 88, no 4, p. 1265-1283Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined whether peer norms for aggression within the classroom impact friendship selection, maintenance, and socialization processes related to aggression across the 1st year of secondary school (N = 1,134 students from 51 classes, Mage = 12.66). As hypothesized, longitudinal social network analyses indicated that friendship selection and influence processes related to aggression depended on the popularity norm within the classroom (i.e., the class-level association between popularity and aggression) rather than the descriptive norm (aggregated average of aggressive behavior). Hence, only in classes where the valence of aggression is high (because it is positively associated with popularity), adolescents tend to select their friends based on similarity in aggression and adopt the aggressive behavior of their friends.

  • 13.
    Rambaran, Ashwin
    et al.
    University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Hopmeyer, Andrea
    Occidental College, USA.
    Schwartz, David
    University of Southern California, USA.
    Steglich, Christian
    University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Badaly, Daryaneh
    University of Michigan, USA.
    Veenstra, René
    University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Academic Functioning and Peer Influences: A Short-Term Longitudinal Study of Network–Behavior Dynamics in Middle Adolescence2017In: Child Development, ISSN 0009-3920, E-ISSN 1467-8624, Vol. 88, no 2, p. 523-543Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, the associations between peer effects and academic functioning in middle adolescence (N = 342;14–15 years old; 48% male) were investigated longitudinally. Similarity in achievement (grade point averages)and unexplained absences (truancy) was explained by both peer selection and peer influence, net of acceptance,and connectedness. Friendships were formed and maintained when adolescents had low levels ofachievement or high levels of truancy. Friends influenced one another to increase rather than decrease inachievement and truancy. Moreover, friends’ popularity moderated peer influences in truancy in reciprocalfriendships but not in unilateral friendships, whereas friends’ acceptance moderated peer influences inachievement in both unilateral and reciprocal friendships. The findings illustrate the dynamic interplay between peer effects and academic functioning.

  • 14.
    Stadtfeld, Christoph
    et al.
    ETH Zurich.
    Snijders, Tom
    University of Groningen.
    Steglich, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    van Duijn, Marijtje
    University of Groningen.
    Statistical Power in Longitudinal Network Studies2018In: Sociological Methods & Research, ISSN 0049-1241, E-ISSN 1552-8294Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Longitudinal social network studies can easily suffer from insufficient statistical power. Studies that simultaneously investigate change of network ties and change of nodal attributes (selection and influence studies) are particularly at risk because the number of nodal observations is typically much lower than the number of observed tie variables. This article presents a simulation-based procedure to evaluate statistical power of longitudinal social network studies in which stochastic actor-oriented models are to be applied. Two detailed case studies illustrate how statistical power is strongly affected by network size, number of data collection waves, effect sizes, missing data, and participant turnover. These issues should thus be explored in the design phase of longitudinal social network studies.

  • 15.
    van der Ploeg, Rozemarijn
    et al.
    University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.
    Steglich, Christian
    University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.
    Veenstra, René
    University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.
    The Support Group Approach in the Dutch KiVa Anti-Bullying Programme: Effects on Victimisation, Defending and Well-Being at School2016In: Educational research (Windsor. Print), ISSN 0013-1881, E-ISSN 1469-5847, Vol. 58, no 3, p. 221-236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: School bullying is a wide-spread problem with severe consequences for victims, bullies and bystanders. Schools are strongly encouraged to implement both schoolwide, preventive interventions and reactive measures to handle existing bullying situations. In the Dutch implementation of the KiVa anti-bullying programme, pervasive-bullying situations are addressed according to the support group approach. The support group approach is widely used for addressing bullying situations, but little is known about its effectiveness.

    Purpose: We investigated the effectiveness of the support group approach in reducing victimisation, increasing defending and improving the victim’s well-being over the course of a school year, over and beyond of the effects of the universal KiVa intervention.

    Programme description: The support group approach is a non-punitive, problem-solving strategy to address pervasive-bullying situations. In this intervention, trained teachers form a support group that consists of 6–8 children, including the bullies and their assistants, defenders or friends of the victim and prosocial classmates. The purpose of the support group isto create mutual concern for the well-being of the victim and to trigger the bullies’ willingness to alter their behaviour.

    Sample: We used data from 66 Dutch elementary schools that participated in the KiVa intervention study. Data were collected inOctober 2012 and 2013, and May 2013 and 2014. The sample usedin the analyses consisted of 38 victims for whom a support group intervention was organised (44.7% boy, Mage = 9.24; SDage = 1.20).

    Design and method: To get insight into the effects above and beyond those of the KiVa programme itself, victims with a support group (N=38) were matched to similar victims without a support group (N=571). Statistical analyses were undertaken to examine whether the changes in victimisation, defending and well-being at school differed between the two groups.

    Result: Victims reported positive effects of the support group approach in reducing victimisation in the short term, but this decrease in victimisation was not lasting over the course of a school year. The intervention also did not improve the victims’ well-being at school inthe longer term. Victims with a support group, however, were found to have more defenders at the end of the school year than victims without a support group.

  • 16.
    van der Ploeg, Rozemarijn
    et al.
    Department of Sociology, University of Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands.
    Steglich, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Veenstra, René
    Department of Sociology, University of Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands.
    The way bullying works: How new ties facilitate the mutual reinforcement of status and bullying in elementary schools2020In: Social Networks, ISSN 0378-8733, E-ISSN 1879-2111, Vol. 60, p. 71-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study addresses the puzzle how high-status bullies in elementary school are able to maintain high status among their classmates despite bullying (some of) them. The dynamic interplay between bullying and status was studied, focusing on how relational bullying affects the creation, dissolution, and maintenance of status attributions, and vice versa. Longitudinal round-robin peer nomination data were obtained from 82 school classes in15 Dutch elementary schools (2055 students; 50% boys) followed over three yearly measurements, starting out in grades 2–5 when students were aged 8-11. An age-dependent effect of bullying on the creation of new status attributions was found. Whereas the youngest group punished bullying by a refusal to attribute status to the bully, this turned into a reward of bullying in the oldest groups. Unexpectedly, high-status bullies seemed to avoid continual bullying of the same victims, pointing to explanations of why their status can persist.

    The full text will be freely available from 2021-01-11 17:54
  • 17.
    van Rijsewijk, Loes
    et al.
    University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.
    Dijkstra, Jan Kornelis
    University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.
    Pattiselanno, Kim
    University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.
    Steglich, Christian
    University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.
    Veenstra, René
    University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.
    Who helps whom?: Investigating the development of adolescent prosocial relationships2016In: Developmental Psychology, ISSN 0012-1649, E-ISSN 1939-0599, Vol. 52, p. 894-908Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated adolescent prosocial relations by examining social networks based on the question “Who helps you (e.g., with homework, with repairing a flat [bicycle] tire, or when you are feeling down?).” The effects of individual characteristics (academic achievement, symptoms of depressive mood, and peer status) on receiving help and giving help were examined, and we investigated the contribution of (dis)similarity between adolescents to the development of prosocial relations. Gender, structural network characteristics, and friendship relations were taken into account. Data were derived from the Social Network Analysis of Risk behavior in Early adolescence (SNARE) study, and contained information on students in 40 secondary school classes across 3 waves (N 840, M age 13.4, 49.7% boys). Results from longitudinal social network analyses (RSiena) revealed tendencies toward reciprocation of help and exchange of help within helping groups. Furthermore, boys were less often mentioned as helpers, particularly by girls. Depressed adolescents were less often mentioned as helpers, especially by low depressed peers. Moreover, lower academic achievers indicated that they received help from their higher achieving peers. Rejected adolescents received help more often, but they less often helped low-rejected peers. Last, low- and high-popular adolescents less often helped each other, and also high-popular adolescents less often helped each other. These findings show that (dis)similarity in these characteristics is an important driving factor underlying the emergence and development of prosocial relations in the peer context, and that prosocial behavior should be defined in terms of benefitting particular others.

  • 18.
    van Rijsewijk, Loes
    et al.
    University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Snijders, Tom
    University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands; University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
    Dijkstra, Jan Kornelis
    University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Steglich, Christian
    University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Veenstra, René
    University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
    The Interplay between Adolescents’ Friendships and the Exchange of Help: A Longitudinal Multiplex Social Network Study2019In: Journal of research on adolescence, ISSN 1050-8392, E-ISSN 1532-7795Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to unravel the interrelatedness of friendship and help, and to examine the characteristics of friendship and help networks. The effects of mutual versus one‐sided help relations on friendship initiation and maintenance, and vice versa, were examined. Friendship and help networks were analyzed (N = 953 students; 41 classrooms; Mage = 12.7). The results illustrate that friendship and help networks show some similarities, but only partly overlap and have distinct characteristics. Longitudinal multiplex social network analyses showed that mutual help was important for the maintenance of friendship, but not for the initiation of friendship. Further, particularly mutual friendships provided a context in which help took place. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  • 19.
    Zander, Lysann
    et al.
    Free University of Berlin, Germany.
    Hannover, Bettina
    Free University of Berlin. Germany.
    Steglich, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, The Institute for Analytical Sociology, IAS. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Baumert, Jürgen
    Max Planck Institut für Bildungsforschung, Germany.
    Soziale Eingebundenheit in immersiven und monolingualen Klassenzimmern2017In: Erfolgreich integrieren - die Staatliche Europaschule Berlin / [ed] J. Möller, F. Hohenstein, J. Fleckenstein, O. Köller, & J. Baumert, Münster, Germany: Waxmann Verlag, 2017, 1, p. 285-303Chapter in book (Refereed)
1 - 19 of 19
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