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  • 1.
    Chaharsoughi, Mina Shiran
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tordera, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Grimoldi, Andrea
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Engquist, Isak
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fabiano, Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jonsson, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hybrid Plasmonic and Pyroelectric Harvesting of Light Fluctuations2018In: Advanced Optical Materials, ISSN 2162-7568, E-ISSN 2195-1071Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    State-of-the-art solar energy harvesting systems based on photovoltaic technology require constant illumination for optimal operation. However, weather conditions and solar illumination tend to fluctuate. Here, a device is presented that extracts electrical energy from such light fluctuations. The concept combines light-induced heating of gold nanodisks (acting as plasmonic optical nanoantennas), and an organic pyroelectric copolymer film (poly(vinylidenefluoride-co-trifluoroethylene)), that converts temperature changes into electrical signals. This hybrid device can repeatedly generate current pulses, not only upon the onset of illumination, but also when illumination is blocked. Detailed characterization highlights the key role of the polarization state of the copolymer, while the copolymer thickness has minor influence on performance. The results are fully consistent with plasmon-assisted pyroelectric effects, as corroborated by combined optical and thermal simulations that match the experimental results. Owing to the tunability of plasmonic resonances, the presented concept is compatible with harvesting near infrared light while concurrently maintaining visible transparency.

  • 2.
    Elhag, Sami
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tordera, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Deydier, T
    Department of Material Engineering, University of Toulon, FR-83041 Toulon, France .
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    LiU, Xianjie
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Khranovskyy, Volodymyr
    Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Willander, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jonsson, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nur, Omer
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Low-temperature growth of polyethylene glycol-doped BiZn2VO6 nanocompounds with enhanced photoelectrochemical properties2017In: Journal of Materials Chemistry A, ISSN 2050-7488, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 1112-1119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We demonstrate scalable, low-cost and low-temperature (<100 °C) aqueous chemical growth of bismuth–zinc vanadate (BiZn2VO6) nanocompounds by BiVO4 growth on ZnO nanobelts (NBs). The nanocompounds were further doped with polyethylene glycol (PEG) to tune the electronic structure of the materials, as a means to lower the charge carrier recombination rate. The chemical composition, morphology, and detailed nanostructure of the BiZn2VO6 nanocompounds were characterized. They exhibit rice-like morphology, are highly dense on the substrate and possess a good crystalline quality. Photoelectrochemical characterization in 0.1 M lithium perchlorate in carbonate propylene shows that BiZn2VO6 nanocompounds are highly suitable as anodes for solar-driven photoelectrochemical applications, providing significantly better performance than with only ZnO NBs. This performance could be attributed to the heterogeneous catalysis effect at nanocompound and ZnO NB interfaces, which have enhanced the electron transfer process on the electrode surface. Furthermore, the charge collection efficiency could be significantly improved through PEG doping of nanocompounds. The photocurrent density of PEG-doped BiZn2VO6 nanocompounds reached values of 2 mA cm−2 at 1.23 V (vs. Ag/AgCl), over 60% larger than that of undoped BiZn2VO6 nanocompounds. Photoluminescence emission experiments confirmed that PEG plays a crucial role in lowering the charge carrier recombination rate. The presented BiZn2VO6 nanocompounds are shown to provide highly competitive performance compared with other state-of-the art photoelectrodes.

  • 3.
    Jönsson, Gustav
    et al.
    Chalmers University of of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Tordera, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Pakizeh, Tavakol
    K. N. Toosi University of of Technology, Tehran, Iran.
    Jaysankar, Manoj
    Chalmers University of of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Miljkovic, Vladimir
    NILT Sweden Filial, Stena Center 1B, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Tong, Lianming
    Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
    Jonsson, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Dmitriev, Alexandre
    Chalmers University of of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Physics, University of of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, United States.
    Solar Transparent Radiators by Optical Nanoantennas2017In: Nano letters (Print), ISSN 1530-6984, E-ISSN 1530-6992, Vol. 17, no 11, p. 6766-6772Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Architectural windows are a major cause of thermal discomfort as the inner glazing during cold days can be several degrees colder than the indoor air. Mitigating this, the indoor temperature has to be increased, leading to unavoidable thermal losses. Here we present solar thermal surfaces based on complex nanoplasmonic antennas that can raise the temperature of window glazing by up to 8 K upon solar irradiation while transmitting light with a color rendering index of 98.76. The nanoantennas are directional, can be tuned to absorb in different spectral ranges, and possess a structural integrity that is not substrate-dependent, and thus they open up for application on a broad range of surfaces. © 2017 American Chemical Society.

  • 4.
    Kang, Evan S. H.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Chen, Shangzhi
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sardar, Samim
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Tordera, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Armakavicius, Nerijus
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Darakchieva, Vanya
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Shegai, Timur
    Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Strong Plasmon–Exciton Coupling with Directional Absorption Features in Optically Thin Hybrid Nanohole Metasurfaces2018In: ACS Photonics, E-ISSN 2330-4022, p. 4046-4055Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plasmons and excitons can interact to form new hybridized light–matter states, with a multitude of potential applications including optical logic circuits and single-photon switches. Here, we report the first observation of strong coupling based on optically thin plasmonic nanohole films. The absorptive plasmon resonances of these nanohole films lead to suppressed transmission and Fano-shaped extinction peaks. We prepared silver nanohole films by colloidal lithography, which enables large-scale fabrication of nanoholes distributed in a short-range order. When coated with J-aggregate molecules, both extinction and absorption spectra show clear formation of two separated polariton resonances, with vacuum Rabi splitting on the order of 300 meV determined from anticrossing experiments. In accordance with strong coupling theory, the splitting magnitude increases linearly with the square root of molecular concentration. The extinction peak positions are blue-shifted from the absorption polariton positions, as explained by additional Fano interference between the hybridized states and the metal film. This highlights that absorption measurements are important not only to prove strong coupling but also to correctly determine hybridized polariton positions and splitting magnitudes in hybrid plasmonic nanohole systems. The polariton absorption peaks also show strong dependence on illumination direction, as found related to inherent directionality of the plasmonic nanohole metasurface and differences in light interaction with nonhybridized molecules. Importantly, optical simulations could successfully reproduce the experimental results and all coupling features. Furthermore, simulated spatial distribution of the absorption provides additional evidence of strong coupling in the hybrid nanohole system. The work paves the way toward strong coupling applications based on optically thin nanohole systems, as further promoted by the scalable fabrication.

  • 5.
    Sandberg, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Acreo Swedish ICT, Norrköping, Sweden; .
    Tordera, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Granberg, Hjalmar
    Innventia AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sawatdee, Anurak
    Acreo Swedish ICT, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Dedic, Dina
    Innventia AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jonsson, Magnus P
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Photoconductive zinc oxide-composite paper by pilot paper machine manufacturing2016In: Flexible and printed electronics, ISSN 2058-8585, Vol. 1, no 4, article id 044003Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Smartmaterials can be used for awide variety of applications, including sensing and energy harvesting.Implementation of smartmaterials in large area devices requires scalablemanufacturing. The use ofpaper-making techniques would offer an enormous production capacity, allowing for low-cost andlarge-scalemanufacturing. In thisworkwe present a successful pilot scale papermachinemanufacturingof functional composite papers (100mmin−1 with aweb width of 30 cm) based on cellulose fibres andcommercial tetrapodal zinc oxidemicrowhiskers (ZnO-Ts).Carbon electrodes could successfully beprinted on the paper to form complete electronic devices where the paper itself is the active material.Thisenabled development of aZnO-composite paper photosensor,where we characterized its stability,sensitivity and speed. The devices show excellent photosensing properties over awide range of lightirradiances (0.01–1Sun), including short response times (∼10 s) and long-term stability. Under simulatedsunlight and a bias voltage of 1 V, small (0.5 cm2) two-probe interdigitated photosensor devices provided12 μAphotocurrent.Under the same conditions, four-probe measurements of the composite papershowed a sheet resistance of 6.9·107Ω/sq. Four-probe measurements also demonstrated that the paperconductivity varies linearlywith light irradiance. To the best of ourknowledge, this is the first example ofpilot paper machine production of an optoelectronic paper, demonstrating the potential for large-scalepapermanufacturing of active smart paper from low-cost industrial bulk materials.

  • 6.
    Tordera, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zhao, Dan
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Volkov, Anton
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jonsson, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Thermoplasmonic Semitransparent Nanohole Electrodes2017In: Nano letters (Print), ISSN 1530-6984, E-ISSN 1530-6992, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 3145-3151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nonradiative decay of plasmons in metallic nanostructures offers unique means for light-to-heat conversion at the nanoscale. Typical thermoplasmonic systems utilize discrete particles, while metal nanohole arrays were instead considered suitable as heat sinks to reduce heating effects. By contrast, we show for the first time that under uniform broadband illumination (e.g., the sun) ultrathin plasmonic nanohole arrays can be highly competitive plasmonic heaters and provide significantly higher temperatures than analogous nanodisk arrays. Our plasmonic nanohole arrays also heat significantly more than nonstructured metal films, while simultaneously providing superior light transmission. Besides being efficient light-driven heat sources, these thin perforated gold films can simultaneously be used as electrodes. We used this feature to develop "plasmonic thermistors" for electrical monitoring of plasmon-induced temperature changes. The nanohole arrays provided temperature changes up to 7.5 K by simulated sunlight, which is very high compared to previously reported plasmonic systems under similar conditions (solar illumination and ambient conditions). Both temperatures and heating profiles quantitatively agree with combined optical and thermal simulations. Finally, we demonstrate the use of a thermoplasmonic nanohole electrode to power the first hybrid plasmonic ionic thermoelectric device, resulting in strong solar-induced heat gradients and corresponding thermoelectric voltages.

  • 7.
    Valenti, Marco
    et al.
    Delft University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Venugopal, Anirudh
    Delft University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Tordera, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jonsson, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Biskos, George
    Delft University of Technology, Netherlands; Cyprus Institute, Cyprus.
    Schmidt-Ott, Andreas
    Delft University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Smith, Wilson A.
    Delft University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Hot Carrier Generation and Extraction of Plasmonic Alloy Nanoparticles2017In: ACS Photonics, E-ISSN 2330-4022, Vol. 4, no 5, p. 1146-1152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The conversion of light to electrical and chemical energy has the potential to provide meaningful advances to many aspects of daily life, including the production of energy, water purification, and optical sensing. Recently, plasmonic nanoparticles (PNPs) have been increasingly used in artificial photosynthesis (e.g., water splitting) devices in order to extend the visible light utilization of semiconductors to light energies below their band gap. These nanoparticles absorb light and produce hot electrons and holes that can drive artificial photosynthesis reactions. For n-type semiconductor photoanodes decorated with PNPs, hot charge carriers are separated by a process called hot electron injection (HEI), where hot electrons with sufficient energy are transferred to the conduction band of the semiconductor. An important parameter that affects the HEI efficiency is the nanoparticle composition, since the hot electron energy is sensitive to the electronic band structure of the metal. Alloy PNPs are of particular importance for semiconductor/PNPs composites, because by changing the alloy composition their absorption spectra can be tuned to accurately extend the light absorption of the semiconductor. This work experimentally compares the HEI efficiency from Ag, Au, and Ag/Au alloy nanoparticles to TiO2 photoanodes for the photoproduction of hydrogen. Alloy PNPs not only exhibit tunable absorption but can also improve the stability and electronic and catalytic properties of the pure metal PNPs. In this work, we find that the Ag/Au alloy PNPs extend the stability of Ag in water to larger applied potentials while, at the same time, increasing the interband threshold energy of Au. This increasing of the interband energy of Au suppresses the visible-light induced interband excitations, favoring intraband excitations that result in higher hot electron energies and HEI efficiencies.

  • 8.
    Xiong, Kunli
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Tordera, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Emilsson, Gustav
    Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Olsson, Oliver
    rdot AB (559092-9831), Stena Center 1, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Linderhed, Ulrika
    RISE Acreo, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Magnus P
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Dahlin, Andreas B
    Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Switchable Plasmonic Metasurfaces with High Chromaticity Containing Only Abundant Metals2017In: Nano letters (Print), ISSN 1530-6984, E-ISSN 1530-6992, Vol. 17, no 11, p. 7033-7039Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plasmonic color generation offers several advantages but is also limited by the cost and availability of noble metals like gold. In this work, we present color-tunable metasurfaces with high chromaticity and reflectivity consisting of an aluminum mirror, a dielectric spacer, and a plasmonic nanohole array in copper. Copper is shown to be an excellent alternative to gold when properly protected from oxidation and makes it possible to generate a wide RGB gamut covering 27% of the standard RGB. By patterning the metasurfaces into microscale pixel triplets, color photos can be well reproduced with high resolution over wafer-sized areas. Further, we demonstrate active modulation of the reflected intensity using an electrochromic conductive polymer deposited on top of the nanostructures by screen printing. This technology opens up for ultrathin and flexible reflective displays in full color, that is, plasmonic electronic paper, compatible with large-scale sustainable production.

  • 9.
    Xiong, Kunli
    et al.
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Tordera, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. TNO, Netherlands.
    Jonsson, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Dahlin, Andreas B.
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Active control of plasmonic colors: emerging display technologies2019In: Reports on progress in physics (Print), ISSN 0034-4885, E-ISSN 1361-6633, Vol. 82, no 2, article id 024501Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years there has been a growing interest in the use of plasmonic nanostructures for color generation, a technology that dates back to ancient times. Plasmonic structural colors have several attractive features but once the structures arc prepared the colors arc normally fixed. Lately, several concepts have emerged for actively tuning the colors, which opens up for many new potential applications, the most obvious being novel color displays. In this review we summarize recent progress in active control of plasmonic colors and evaluate them with respect to performance criteria for color displays. It is suggested that actively controlled plasmonic colors are generally less interesting for emissive displays but could be useful for new types of electrochromic devices relying on ambient light (electronic paper). Furthermore, there are several other potential applications such as images to be revealed on demand and colorimetric sensors.

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