liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Bolckmans, R.
    et al.
    Oxford Univ Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Singh, S.
    Oxford Univ Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Ratnatunga, K.
    Oxford Univ Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Wickramasinghe, D.
    St Marks Hosp, England.
    Sahnan, K.
    St Marks Hosp, England.
    Adegbola, S.
    St Marks Hosp, England.
    Kalman, Thordis Disa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Jones, H.
    Oxford Univ Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Travis, S.
    Oxford Univ Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Warusavitarne, J.
    St Marks Hosp, England.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    George, B.
    Oxford Univ Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Temporary faecal diversion in ileocolic resection for Crohns disease: is there an impact on long-term surgical recurrence?2020In: Colorectal Disease, ISSN 1462-8910, E-ISSN 1463-1318, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 430-438Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim Temporary faecal diversion after ileocolic resection (ICR) for Crohns disease reduces postoperative anastomotic complications in high-risk patients. The aim of this study was to assess if this approach also reduces long-term surgical recurrence. Method This was a multicentre retrospective review of prospectively maintained databases. Patient demographics, medical and surgical details were collected by three specialist centres. All patients had undergone an ICR between 2000 and 2012. The primary end-point was surgical recurrence. Results Three hundred and twelve patients (80%) underwent an ICR without covering ileostomy (one stage). Seventy-seven (20%) had undergone an ICR with end ileostomy/double-barrel ileostomy/enterocolostomy followed by closure (two stage). The median follow-up was 105 months [interquartile range (IQR) 76-136 months]. The median time to ileostomy closure was 9 months (IQR 5-12 months). There was no significant difference in surgical recurrence between the one- and two-stage groups (18% vs 16%, P = 0.94). We noted that smokers (20% vs 34%, P = 0.01) and patients with penetrating disease (28% vs 52%, P amp;lt; 0.01) were more likely to be defunctioned. A reduced recurrence rate was observed in the small high-risk group of patients who were smokers with penetrating disease behaviour treated with a two-stage strategy (0/10 vs 4/7, P = 0.12). Conclusion Despite having higher baseline risk factors, the results in terms of rate of surgical recurrence over 9 years are similar for patients having a two-stage compared with a one-stage procedure.

  • 2.
    Bolckmans, Roel
    et al.
    Oxford Univ Hosp Natl Hlth Serv Fdn Trust, England.
    Kalman, Thordis Disa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Singh, Sandeep
    Oxford Univ Hosp Natl Hlth Serv Fdn Trust, England.
    Ratnatunga, Keshara C.
    Oxford Univ Hosp Natl Hlth Serv Fdn Trust, England.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Travis, Simon
    Oxford Univ Hosp Natl Hlth Serv Fdn Trust, England.
    George, Bruce D.
    Oxford Univ Hosp Natl Hlth Serv Fdn Trust, England.
    Does Smoking Cessation Reduce Surgical Recurrence After Primary Ileocolic Resection for Crohns Disease?2020In: Diseases of the Colon & Rectum, ISSN 0012-3706, E-ISSN 1530-0358, Vol. 63, no 2, p. 200-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Tobacco smoking is a known risk factor for recurrence of Crohns disease after surgical resection. OBJECTIVE: This study assessed the effect of smoking cessation on long-term surgical recurrence after primary ileocolic resection for Crohns disease. DESIGN: A retrospective review of a prospectively maintained database was conducted. SETTINGS: Patient demographic data and medical and surgical details were combined from 2 specialist centers. After ethical approval, patients were contacted in case of missing data regarding smoking habit. PATIENTS: All patients undergoing ileocolic resection between 2000 and 2012 for histologically confirmed Crohns disease were included. Those with previous intestinal resection, strictureplasty for Crohns disease, leak after ileocolic resection, or who were never reversed were excluded. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary end point was surgical recurrence measured by Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and secondary medical therapy at time of follow-up. RESULTS: Over a 12-year period, 290 patients underwent ileocolic resection. Full smoking data were available for 242 (83%) of 290 patients. There were 169 nonsmokers (70%; group 1), 42 active smokers at the time of ileocolic resection who continued smoking up to last follow-up (17%; group 2), and 31 (13%) who quit smoking after ileocolic resection (group 3). The median time of smoking exposure after ileocolic resection for group 3 was 3 years (interquartile range, 0-6 y), and median follow-up time for the whole group was 112 months (9 mo; interquartile range, 84-148 mo). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed a significantly higher surgical recurrence rate for group 2 compared with group 3 (16/42 (38%) vs 3/31 (10%); p = 0.02; risk ratio = 3.9 (95% CI, 1-12)). In addition, significantly more patients in group 2 without surgical recurrence received immunomodulatory maintenance therapy compared with group 3 (12/26 (46%) vs 4/28 (14%); p = 0.01; risk ratio = 3.2 (95% CI, 1-9)). LIMITATIONS: The study was limited by its retrospective design and small number of patients. CONCLUSIONS: Smoking cessation after primary ileocolic resection for Crohns disease may significantly reduce long-term risk of surgical recurrence and is associated with less use of maintenance therapy. See Video Abstract at http://links.lww.com/DCR/B86.

  • 3.
    Bondi, J.
    et al.
    Akershus University Hospital, Norway; Drammen Hospital, Norway.
    Avdagic, J.
    Akershus University Hospital, Norway; Innlandet Hospital, Norway.
    Karlbom, U.
    Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Kalman, Thordis Disa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Saltyte Benth, J.
    Akershus University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Naimy, N.
    Akershus University Hospital, Norway.
    Oresland, T.
    Akershus University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Randomized clinical trial comparing collagen plug and advancement flap for trans-sphincteric anal fistula2017In: British Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0007-1323, E-ISSN 1365-2168, Vol. 104, no 9, p. 1160-1166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The role of a collagen plug for treating anal fistula is not well established. A randomized prospective multicentre non-inferiority study of surgical treatment of trans-sphincteric cryptogenic fistulas was undertaken, comparing the anal fistula plug with the mucosal advancement flap with regard to fistula recurrence rate and functional outcome. Methods: Patients with an anal fistula were evaluated for eligibility in three centres, and randomized to either mucosal advancement flap surgery or collagen plug, with clinical follow-up at 3 and 12 months. The primary outcome was the fistula recurrence rate. Anal pain (visual analogue scale), anal incontinence (St Marks score) and quality of life (Short Form 36 questionnaire) were also reported. Results: Ninety-four patients were included; 48 were allocated to the plug procedure and 46 to advancement flap surgery. The median follow-up was 12 (range 9-24) months. The recurrence rate at 12 months was 66 per cent (27 of 41 patients) in the plug group and 38 per cent (15 of 40) in the flap group (P = 0.006). Anal pain was reduced after operation in both groups. Anal incontinence did not change in the follow-up period. Patients reported an increased quality of life after 3 months. There were no differences between the groups with regard to pain, incontinence or quality of life. Conclusion: There was a considerably higher recurrence rate after the anal fistula plug procedure than following advancement flap repair.

  • 4.
    Landerholm, Kalle
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ryhov Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Kalman, Thordis Disa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Wallon, Conny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Immunomodulators: Friends or Enemies in Surgery for Crohns Disease?2019In: Current Drug Targets, ISSN 1389-4501, E-ISSN 1873-5592, Vol. 20, no 13, p. 1384-1398Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Crohns disease may severely impact the quality of life and being a chronic disease it requires both medical and surgical treatment aimed at induction and maintenance of remission to prevent relapsing symptoms and the need for further surgery. Surgery in Crohns disease often has to be performed in patients with well-known risk factors of post-operative complications, particularly intra-abdominal septic complications. This review will look at the current knowledge of immunomodulating therapies in the peri-operative phase of Crohns disease. The influence of immunomodulators on postoperative complications is evaluated by reviewing available clinical reports and data from animal studies. Furthermore, the effect of immunomodulators on preventing or deferring primary as well as repeat surgery in Crohns disease is reviewed with particular consideration given to high-risk cohorts and timing of prophylaxis.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-11-01 08:37
1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf