liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 10 of 10
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Cadorin, Eduardo
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Germain-Alamartine, Eloïse
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bienkowska, Dzamila
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, HELIX Competence Centre.
    Klofsten, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Science Parks - University interaction: A literature2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Throughout the history of Science Parks, many studies have shown that Science Parks have ceased to be mere facilitators of physical spaces, to become important providers of services and resources to their tenants. Considering that skilled professionals are one of the most sought after resources by technology and knowledge intensive firms, Science Parks have dedicated numerous activities and means in order to become even more attractive to talents. In this context, universities situated in or next to Science Parks play a key role in developing and attracting talents to Science Parks and to its firms as well as to the region, functioning as a regional node of a large national and international network of universities. Science Parks and universities are vital parts of the entrepreneurial ecosystem of a region and have many complementarities. In this study, we review the literature regarding the relationship existing between Science Parks and universities and the ways in which they can collaborate. Talent, recruitment, and entrepreneurship issues are addressed as the building blocks of these interactions. Other stakeholders, inside and outside a Science Park, are also analysed in order to widen the perspective to the ecosystem of actors involved, allowing a better understanding of the role, the interests, the means and the implications of each one. The purpose of this study is to understand and qualify the university's role in attracting and developing talent that firms in Science Parks can recruit later on. We identify the types of interactions occurring between Science Parks and their nearby universities. We strive to find what kinds of skills are considered relevant by employers, and to describe the initiatives developed by universities and Science Parks – separately and together – aiming at drawing, developing and retaining talents. We also seek to identify who are the actors involved; private or public organisations, or people embodying specific functions in these organisations. In the end, we recognize and point out policy implications, concerning both universities and Science Parks.

  • 2.
    Cadorin, Eduardo
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Germain-Alamartine, Eloïse
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, HELIX Competence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bienkowska, Dzamila
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, HELIX Competence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Klofsten, Magnus
    Linköping University, HELIX Competence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Universities and Science Parks: Engagements and Interactions in Developing and Attracting Talent2019In: Developing Engaged and Entrepreneurial Universities: Theories, Concepts and Empirical Findings / [ed] Thorsten Kliewe, Tobias Kesting, Carolin Plewa, Thomas Baaken, Singapore: Springer, 2019, p. 151-169Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many studies have shown that they have ceased to be mere facilitators of physical spaces to become important providers of services and resources to their tenants. Universities situated in or next to them play a key role in getting engaged in the development and the attraction of talent to Science Parks, to their tenant firms as well as to the region. Considering that skilled professionals are one of the resources that companies seek the most, Science Parks have dedicated numerous activities and means to become even more attractive to talented individuals, who can especially be found in entrepreneurial universities. In this study, we review the literature regarding the interactions existing between Science Parks or their tenants and their local universities. Talent attraction and entrepreneurship issues are addressed as the building blocks of these interactions. We strive to identify types of interactions that could differ in function of the maturity levels of the firms since their aims are not the same: at an early stage, firms tend to focus more on growth, whereas at a later stage, they tend to focus more on their development. We then point out policy implications, concerning both entrepreneurial or engaged universities and Science Parks.

    The full text will be freely available from 2021-09-25 08:00
  • 3.
    Cadorin, Eduardo
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Johansson, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Engineering Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Klofsten, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, HELIX Competence Centre.
    Future developments for Science Parks: Attracting and developing talent2017In: Industry and Higher Education, ISSN 2043-6858, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 156-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the years, science parks have developed and improved their processes to offer better support to their tenants and promote the growth of the region in which they are located. Since regional growth is closely associated with groups of talented people, science parks carry out various activities at the company or individual level to attract and recruit talent. In order to understand how such activities have been and are being performed at Mja¨rdevi Science Park in Sweden, the authors highlight and analyse four talent-related cases. Their aim is to identify how talent can be attracted or recruited and to consider the stakeholders, their relationships and their motivations. The results confirm the importance to a science park of being close to a student community and of being connected to an international network with a well-recognized brand.

  • 4.
    Cadorin, Eduardo
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Klofsten, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Albahari, Alberto
    Etzkowitz, Henry
    Science Parks and the attraction of talents: Activities and challenges2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores activities that Science Parks undertake in order to attract entrepreneurial talent for their tenants. Despite the importance of accessing talent, there are very few studies focusing this research area. The data comes from seven cases studies on talent attraction activities run by three Swedish Science Parks. We show that the parks conduct many different activities in order to attract entrepreneurial talent, which includes headhunting of key personnel for start-ups; organising establishment platforms for foreign companies, as well as facilitating exchanges of knowledge and talent with Higher Education Institutions. Science Parks host firms with different sizes, ages, and business orientation and therefore, park managers should be sensible to respond to real needs of tenant firms when performing talent attraction activities.

  • 5.
    Cadorin, Eduardo
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Klofsten, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, HELIX Competence Centre.
    Albahari, Alberto
    Universidad de Málaga – School of Industrial Engineering, Department of Economics and Business Administration, Malaga, Spain.
    Etzkowitz, Henry
    Science, Technology, and Society, Stanford University, Stanford, USA.
    Science Parks and the attraction of talents: Activities and challenges2019In: Triple Helix Journal, p. 1-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores activities undertaken by Science Parks to attract talent for their tenants. Despite the importance of accessing talent, there are very few studies focusing on this research area. The data in this investigation comes from seven cases studies on talent attraction activities carried out by three Science Parks in Sweden. We show that the parks conduct many different activities to attract talent including headhunting key personnel for start-ups, organising establishment platforms for foreign companies, and facilitating the exchange of knowledge and talent with higher education institu- tions. Science Parks house companies of different sizes, ages, and business orienta- tions and therefore, park managers should be sensitive to the real needs of tenant firms when performing talent attraction activities.

  • 6.
    Cadorin, Eduardo
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Klofsten, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Johansson, Sten Gunnar
    Science parks - recruitment and development of talents2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Science parks have from the very beginning been important and valuable tools for the development of knowledge intensive economies. Most science parks have also strongly attracted talents, ideas, capital, R&D and firms. During the past decades we have witnessed a number of other structures and organisations being established, i.e. innovation hubs, clusters and so forth. We have also seen a very clear trend that the science parks abandon the idea of being strict geographical locations and become more of a function in the city. One issue that quite recently has been recognised, connected to science park development, is the potential they have as attracters of talented individuals. The starting point is, which goes in line with Richard Florida and his thoughts about the “Creative class”, that regions´ ability to attract firms and human capital is a key in their economical development. Talent individuals will undertake entrepreneurial activities and building values for the environment in which they are operating. This paper will describe and analyse the role that science parks could have when it comes to recruiting and developing talents within the region they are operating. More precisely we are interested in the following research questions: 1) What strategies are science parks using to stimulate the attraction of talents in order to enhance innovation and entrepreneurship for their stakeholders? 2) How are these strategies implemented? 3) Why (if so) and in what way have the strategies been successful?

  • 7.
    Cadorin, Eduardo
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Klofsten, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, HELIX Competence Centre.
    Löfsten, Hans
    Department of Technology Management and Economics, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Science Parks, talent attraction and stakeholder involvement: an international study2019In: Journal of Technology Transfer, ISSN 0892-9912, E-ISSN 1573-7047, p. 1-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One aspect of Science Parks development that has come into focus is the attraction of talent, which could include attracting specific expertise, making it easier for firms to be established and reach skilled workers. In order to encompass different contexts, both economic and cultural, a questionnaire was sent to 120 Science Parks, of which 59 (49%) replied. The study included 22 variables, including eleven independent variables according to Science Park stakeholders and characteristics when selecting talent for tenant firms, five control variables, and six variables of Science Park success dimensions. The results show that the characteristics of talent contribute to the park’s success. Universities are the primary source of talent, and the government has a critical role in promoting collaboration between firms and universities. Therefore, park managers should promote links with local universities and the student community as well as strengthen their relationship with government representatives at all levels to receive the necessary support for park development.

  • 8.
    Cadorin, Eduardo
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Klofsten, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sten Gunnar, Johansson
    The development of a modern Science Park: A Swedish good practise2017In: Revista Militar de Ciência E Tecnologia, ISSN 2316-4522, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 55-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to get a deeper understanding of the reasons and activities related to the development of Science Parks of today, identifying actors involved and their relationships. To achieve the goal, we analysed the story of Mjärdevi Science Park (MSP), located in Linköping, Sweden, from its inception to the present. In our study, we could identify the several interactions car-ried out by the MSP with regional, national and even international actors, thus building an extensive network of relationships. Having built a solid foundation, working very close to its tenants, it was pos-sible to maintain a continuous development over the years, even in times of crises and difficulties. In the middle of the 90s, Mjärdevi Science Park was considered the 9th park fastest growing in the world [1] and today is undoubtedly a success story. It has become a ‘good practise’ in the European context regarding the innovative approach of being a park integrated in a regional framework.

  • 9.
    de Almeida Cadorin, Eduardo
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Klofsten, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sten Gunnar, Johansson
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Future Challenges for Science Parks: Attractiveness and Recruitment of Talents2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Science parks have from the very beginning been important and valuable tools for the development of knowledge intensive economies. Most science parks have also strongly attracted talents, ideas, capital, R&D and firms. During the past decades we have witnessed a number of other structures and organizations being established, i.e. innovation hubs, clusters and so forth. We have also seen a very clear trend that the science parks abandon the idea of being strict geographical locations and become more of a function in the city. One issue that quite recently has been recognized, connected to science park development, is the potential they have as attracters of talented individuals. The starting point is, which goes in line with Richard Florida and his thoughts about the “Creative class”, that regions´ ability to attract firms and human capital is a key in their economic development. Talent individuals will undertake entrepreneurial activities and building values for the environment in which they are operating.

  • 10.
    Klofsten, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, HELIX Competence Centre.
    Norrman, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Cadorin, Eduardo
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Löfsten, Hans
    Chalmers tekniska högskola, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Support and development of small and new firms in rural areas2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on small business entrepreneurialism in rural areas and its special conditions and needs. Our aim is to present examples of and suggestions for how to encourage firm start-ups and the continuation possibly also the development and growth of existing firms. The paper is based on three cases that illustrate (1) challenges in the support system in rural areas, (2) various forms of support that could be used in rural areas, and (3) expectations that are eligible to put upon support activities designed for rural areas. The following main conclusions were drawn: Firstly, we found that successful support of rural businesses requires a critical mass of regional entrepreneurs, firms, and support actors. Diversity is critical, and the various actors must be coordinated to carry out the desired measures effectively. We also found that expectations for growth and orientation of the firms must be realistic. Many times, broad support is more important than targeted support. Finally, we were able to show that a cross-boundary collaborative work culture that avoids both thought silos and business silos and places no value on prestige should pervade all areas of business support.

1 - 10 of 10
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf