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  • 1.
    Aichigui, Victor
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Johansson, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Löfberg, Nina
    Karlstad University, SWEDEN.
    Witell, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karlstad University, SWEDEN.
    Servitization in SME manufacturing firms: A one-way road2015In: 13th International Research Symposium on Service Excellence in Management, Shanghai, June 19-21, 2015, 2015, p. 965-968Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance for manufacturing firms to add services to their offerings has been asserted over and over again (Neu and Brown 2005). Adding services to product sales require manufacturing firms to develop other types of offerings such as maintenance services, hybrid offerings or integrated solutions. This implies using new and often unknown practices to be able to provide services. Previous research has focused on the benefits of servitization (Gebauer, Gustafsson, and Witell 2011), albeit in larger firms. Hence, similar research on Small and Medium sized Enterprises (SME) has been scarce. Furthermore, servitization as a unidirectional transition process can be questioned as researchers argue that manufacturing firms might offer different types of services simultaneously and might not have the intention to take the next step that a transition process suggests (Kowalkowski et al. 2015). Moreover, previous research shows that the step from offering after-sales services and repair to offering more advanced services, e.g. process-related services, is rather big. For those services different mindsets are required within the organization; more advanced services would require a service oriented mindset, whereas after-sales services only requires the firm to have a product oriented mindset (Löfberg 2014).

  • 2.
    Johansson, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Managing Quality in a Service Context2013Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, service organizations have had to increase the number of offerings they provide. These organizations face difficulties in changing their internal processes to provide high-quality offerings. With the increase in demand for delivered services and competitive organizations from low-cost countries, service organizations currently face several issues. Today’s service organizations combine products and services into a solution to improve their competitiveness. These organizations experience changes in customer expectations depending on what they offer. That is, expectations, demands,  and wishes change depending on the offering that a customer uses. Thus,  service organizations need to know how expectations for quality change based on offerings and how they can work to change certain emphasized quality aspects. Hence, the aim of this licentiate thesis is to contribute to the knowledge of how to manage quality in a service context.

    This licentiate thesis is based on three different studies. One study is based on a number of self-assessment studies conducted at 138 Swedish service organizations using a total of more than 5,000 respondents. In the second study, data was collected over a five-year period through a literature review, interviews, a document study, and observations to capture the quality profile and associated interventions. The second study was conducted in a service organization in the public transportation industry. In the third study, a literature review was performed to provide theoretical propositions for developing a conceptual model. The conceptual model was built on theories from product quality, service quality, service logic, and solutions.

    The findings revealed that a service organization could change the performance level of a quality principle if the correct interventions are used. Furthermore, a service organization immature in quality management emphasizes one or two quality principles and, after the initial phase focuses on other principles as well. Therefore, if a service organization wants to change its quality profile pattern, it must change its emphasis on certain norms and principles. A further finding is the proposed solution’s quality concept and its six quality dimensions: (i) reliability, (ii) flexibility, (iii) consistency, (iv) empathy, (v) approachability, and (vi) tangibility. Furthermore, a model connecting the empirical findings in a quality concepts model is proposed. This model shows that the need exists to change work activities if the service  organization changes strategic direction, that is, changes the number of offerings offered.

    List of papers
    1. Changing quality initiative - does the quality profile really change?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changing quality initiative - does the quality profile really change?
    2013 (English)In: Total Quality Management and Business Excellence, ISSN 1478-3363, E-ISSN 1478-3371, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 79-90Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    A firm working with quality management over time may change from total quality management to Six Sigma to lean production, but does this actually change the firm's quality profile? This paper seeks to identify specific quality profiles in service firms and how these profiles change over time. The empirical investigation is based on self-assessment studies conducted in 138 Swedish service firms. The results show that service firms often build up a specific quality profile, which they retain over time. The paper develops theoretical and managerial implications based on the research.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Routledge, 2013
    Keywords
    quality management; quality profile; quality principles; change management
    National Category
    Business Administration
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-89629 (URN)10.1080/14783363.2012.707868 (DOI)000327929600006 ()
    Available from: 2013-02-28 Created: 2013-02-28 Last updated: 2017-12-06
    2. Using interventions to change the quality profile of an organisation
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Using interventions to change the quality profile of an organisation
    2013 (English)In: International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, ISSN 1756-669X, E-ISSN 1756-6703, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 32-45Article in journal (Other academic) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose − The purpose of the present study is to investigate how a quality profile can evolve over time and, in particular, how different kinds of interventions can further develop or change an existing quality profile.

    Methodology/approach − Data was collected over a five-year period, including a literature review, interviews, a document study and observations to capture the quality profile and associated interventions. The study was carried out in a service organisation in the public sector.

    Findings − This study shows that the quality profile can change over time due to the use of specific interventions. If a company wants to emphasise a specific quality principle, it must target the quality principle with one or moreinterventions. However, even if a quality principle is targeted, there is no guarantee that the quality principle will show improvement in the quality profile. Also, One main finding is that the quality profile becomes more even over time due to the internal consistency of the quality principles.

    Research limitations/implications − This paper sheds light on the need to study the adoption of individual quality principles and the evolution of the quality profile of an organisation.

    Practical implications − The results can provide insights for organisations aiming to embark on a quality programme, specifically how to design and develop a quality profile.

    Originality/value − This research implies that the quality profile is a recurring, general phenomenon in all quality management improvement programmes. In other words, successful implementation of quality management requires a cohesive quality profile.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2013
    Keywords
    Quality management, Quality principles, Quality profile, Service organisations
    National Category
    Business Administration Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-88729 (URN)10.1108/17566691311316239 (DOI)
    Available from: 2013-02-15 Created: 2013-02-15 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
    3. What is quality in a manufacturing firm?: Understanding the quality of products, services and solutions
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>What is quality in a manufacturing firm?: Understanding the quality of products, services and solutions
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate the possibilities and difficulties that manufacturing firms have regarding the quality of their offerings along the goods-to-services continuum. In particular, the paper identifies different quality dimensions for products, services and solutions.

    Methodology/approach − Conceptual paper.

    Findings − The paper presents a model on how a manufacturing firm can provide quality on offerings along the goods-to-services continuum. Furthermore, the paper identifies the quality dimensions that exist for products, services and solutions. For solutions, the paper identifies six quality dimensions and presents them through an empirical illustration. The six dimensions are (i) reliability, (ii) empathy, (iii) tangibility, (iv) approachability, (v) consistency and (vi) flexibility. A manufacturing firm must provide high-quality products, services and solutions, and the different types of quality might require different principles, practices and techniques.

    Research limitations/implications − The model and the six developed quality dimensions are not tested empirically.

    Originality/value − Few studies have addressed the quality of a solution provided by a manufacturing firm. The present research provides a framework for how solution quality is different from product and service quality. In addition, the paper provides an empirical illustration of how a firm can work with product, service and solution quality for the firm’s offerings.

    Keywords
    Quality management, Quality principles, Quality profile, Service organisations
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-88730 (URN)
    Available from: 2013-02-15 Created: 2013-02-15 Last updated: 2013-02-15Bibliographically approved
  • 3.
    Johansson, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Understanding Solution Quality2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The integration of services and products into solutions can open up new business opportunities for firms. This thesis concerns how firms can provide solutions that are perceived as high quality. Solutions are often provided over several years, which implies a changed customer relationship compared to product provisions. Since the solution aims to support the customer’s activities, firms face new challenges when introducing solutions. One challenge is to integrate all components and activities of the solution, and simultaneously support the customer’s activities. In addition, the firm must ensure that the solution and all of its parts are of high quality.

    Most of the existing research on quality is related to the management of a firm’s internal activities and the interaction during exchange. Within the research on quality, customer orientation means that a firm should manage the relevant product or service to meet customer requirements. When this is achieved, the product or service is of high quality. Since solutions are seen as services and products that are integrated as an outcome, as well as a customer relational process that aims to support the customer’s activities, firms have little to learn from previous research about the quality of solutions.

    The aim of this thesis is to increase knowledge about how to manage solution quality. The thesis combines insights from research on quality with research on solutions and servitization. Three research questions are answered. The first question concerns the content of solution quality; the second deals with how firms can, with support from interventions, meet the new challenges that arise from solution provision; and the third question concerns how customers can be involved to achieve solution quality. The research questions are answered through five papers based on literature studies and empirical data. The papers contribute to an increased knowledge of solution quality and how firms can work to achieve it.

    The results of the thesis suggest that solution quality is built on seven quality dimensions: reliability, communicability, internal consistency, empathy, approachability, tangibility, and adaptability. In addition, knowledge of processes and customer relationships are two prerequisites for the concept. These dimensions and prerequisites are supported by interventions that can provide a change. However, it has become evident that whatever intervention is used must be related to the dimensions that are supposed to be improved. Furthermore, customer involvement is argued to be an intervention to support the prerequisites for solution quality, especially during the solution  development. The results of this thesis extend the research on quality by increasing the knowledge of the solution quality concept and by changing the view of customers and their involvement during solution development.

    List of papers
    1. Changing quality initiative - does the quality profile really change?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changing quality initiative - does the quality profile really change?
    2013 (English)In: Total Quality Management and Business Excellence, ISSN 1478-3363, E-ISSN 1478-3371, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 79-90Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    A firm working with quality management over time may change from total quality management to Six Sigma to lean production, but does this actually change the firm's quality profile? This paper seeks to identify specific quality profiles in service firms and how these profiles change over time. The empirical investigation is based on self-assessment studies conducted in 138 Swedish service firms. The results show that service firms often build up a specific quality profile, which they retain over time. The paper develops theoretical and managerial implications based on the research.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Routledge, 2013
    Keywords
    quality management; quality profile; quality principles; change management
    National Category
    Business Administration
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-89629 (URN)10.1080/14783363.2012.707868 (DOI)000327929600006 ()
    Available from: 2013-02-28 Created: 2013-02-28 Last updated: 2017-12-06
    2. Using interventions to change the quality profile of an organisation
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Using interventions to change the quality profile of an organisation
    2013 (English)In: International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, ISSN 1756-669X, E-ISSN 1756-6703, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 32-45Article in journal (Other academic) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose − The purpose of the present study is to investigate how a quality profile can evolve over time and, in particular, how different kinds of interventions can further develop or change an existing quality profile.

    Methodology/approach − Data was collected over a five-year period, including a literature review, interviews, a document study and observations to capture the quality profile and associated interventions. The study was carried out in a service organisation in the public sector.

    Findings − This study shows that the quality profile can change over time due to the use of specific interventions. If a company wants to emphasise a specific quality principle, it must target the quality principle with one or moreinterventions. However, even if a quality principle is targeted, there is no guarantee that the quality principle will show improvement in the quality profile. Also, One main finding is that the quality profile becomes more even over time due to the internal consistency of the quality principles.

    Research limitations/implications − This paper sheds light on the need to study the adoption of individual quality principles and the evolution of the quality profile of an organisation.

    Practical implications − The results can provide insights for organisations aiming to embark on a quality programme, specifically how to design and develop a quality profile.

    Originality/value − This research implies that the quality profile is a recurring, general phenomenon in all quality management improvement programmes. In other words, successful implementation of quality management requires a cohesive quality profile.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2013
    Keywords
    Quality management, Quality principles, Quality profile, Service organisations
    National Category
    Business Administration Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-88729 (URN)10.1108/17566691311316239 (DOI)
    Available from: 2013-02-15 Created: 2013-02-15 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
  • 4.
    Johansson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Raddats, Chris
    University of Liverpool Management school.
    Witell, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Radical and incremental service innovation in manufacturers: The impact of customer involvement2015In: 13 th international Research Symphosium on Service Excellence in Management, Shanghai, June 19-21, 2015, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Johansson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Raddats, Chris
    Univ Liverpool, England.
    Witell, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karlstad Univ, Sweden.
    The role of customer knowledge development for incremental and radical service innovation in servitized manufacturers2019In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 98, p. 328-338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Service innovation is a key driver of service infusion for manufacturers. Although service innovation is widely researched for service firms, it is less explored for service infusion in manufacturers. Existing research about service infusion considers developing customer knowledge in sales and service delivery, but there is scarce research about how manufacturers develop customer knowledge during new service development (NSD). This study investigates customer knowledge development within manufacturers and considers how it differs between the development of incremental and radical service innovations. A study was undertaken with 239 European manufacturers which revealed multiple drivers of customer knowledge development, service innovation performance, and firm performance. Developing incremental service innovations are more successful when customers participate in NSD teams while developing radical service innovations leads manufacturers to higher firm performance.

  • 6.
    Johansson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Witell, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    What is quality in a manufacturing firm?: Understanding the quality of products, services and solutionsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate the possibilities and difficulties that manufacturing firms have regarding the quality of their offerings along the goods-to-services continuum. In particular, the paper identifies different quality dimensions for products, services and solutions.

    Methodology/approach − Conceptual paper.

    Findings − The paper presents a model on how a manufacturing firm can provide quality on offerings along the goods-to-services continuum. Furthermore, the paper identifies the quality dimensions that exist for products, services and solutions. For solutions, the paper identifies six quality dimensions and presents them through an empirical illustration. The six dimensions are (i) reliability, (ii) empathy, (iii) tangibility, (iv) approachability, (v) consistency and (vi) flexibility. A manufacturing firm must provide high-quality products, services and solutions, and the different types of quality might require different principles, practices and techniques.

    Research limitations/implications − The model and the six developed quality dimensions are not tested empirically.

    Originality/value − Few studies have addressed the quality of a solution provided by a manufacturing firm. The present research provides a framework for how solution quality is different from product and service quality. In addition, the paper provides an empirical illustration of how a firm can work with product, service and solution quality for the firm’s offerings.

  • 7.
    Johansson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Witell, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Elg, Mattias
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Changing quality initiative - does the quality profile really change?2013In: Total Quality Management and Business Excellence, ISSN 1478-3363, E-ISSN 1478-3371, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 79-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A firm working with quality management over time may change from total quality management to Six Sigma to lean production, but does this actually change the firm's quality profile? This paper seeks to identify specific quality profiles in service firms and how these profiles change over time. The empirical investigation is based on self-assessment studies conducted in 138 Swedish service firms. The results show that service firms often build up a specific quality profile, which they retain over time. The paper develops theoretical and managerial implications based on the research.

  • 8.
    Johansson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Witell, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Elg, Mattias
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Evolvement of Quality Profiles in Swedish Service Organizations2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Johansson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Witell, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Elg, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Quality Profiles of Service Firms2011In: 12th International Research Symposium on Service Excellence in Management, Ithaca, June 2-5, 2011, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Johansson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Witell, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Gremyr, Ida
    Elg, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Quality of solutions, products and services in manufacturing firms2014In: Thessaloniki, June 13-15, 2014, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Johansson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Witell, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Rönnbäck, Åsa
    Viktoria Institute.
    Quality management evolution in service companies2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study investigates how a quality profile can evolve over time and how different interventions can develop and change an existing quality profile.

    Methodology/approach: Data was collected over a five-year period, including a literature review, interviews, a document study and observations to capture the quality profile and associated interventions. The study was carried out in a service organisation in the public transportation industry.

    Findings: This study shows that the quality profile can change over time due to the use of specific interventions. If a company wants to emphasise a specific quality principle, it must target the quality principle with one or more interventions. However, even if a quality principle is supported by several interventions, there is no guarantee that the quality principle will show improvement in the quality profile. Also, the quality profile becomes more even over time. This can be explained by the internal consistency of the quality principles.

    Research limitations/implications: This paper sheds light on the need to study the adoption of individual quality principles and the design and evolution of a quality profile.

    Practical implications: The results can provide insights for organisations aiming to embark on a quality programme, specifically how to design and develop a quality profile.

    Originality/value: This research implies that the quality profile is a recurring, general phenomenon in all quality management improvement programmes. In other words, successful implementation of quality management requires a cohesive quality profile. 

  • 12.
    Johansson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Witell, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Rönnbäck, Åsa
    Swedish Institute for Quality (SIQ), Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Using interventions to change the quality profile of an organisation2013In: International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, ISSN 1756-669X, E-ISSN 1756-6703, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 32-45Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose − The purpose of the present study is to investigate how a quality profile can evolve over time and, in particular, how different kinds of interventions can further develop or change an existing quality profile.

    Methodology/approach − Data was collected over a five-year period, including a literature review, interviews, a document study and observations to capture the quality profile and associated interventions. The study was carried out in a service organisation in the public sector.

    Findings − This study shows that the quality profile can change over time due to the use of specific interventions. If a company wants to emphasise a specific quality principle, it must target the quality principle with one or moreinterventions. However, even if a quality principle is targeted, there is no guarantee that the quality principle will show improvement in the quality profile. Also, One main finding is that the quality profile becomes more even over time due to the internal consistency of the quality principles.

    Research limitations/implications − This paper sheds light on the need to study the adoption of individual quality principles and the evolution of the quality profile of an organisation.

    Practical implications − The results can provide insights for organisations aiming to embark on a quality programme, specifically how to design and develop a quality profile.

    Originality/value − This research implies that the quality profile is a recurring, general phenomenon in all quality management improvement programmes. In other words, successful implementation of quality management requires a cohesive quality profile.

  • 13.
    Johansson, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics & Quality Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Witell, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnbäck, Åsa
    Chalmers Tekniska Högskola.
    Why changing a quality profile is easier said than done2011In: 12th International Research Symposium on Service Excellence in Management, Ithaca, June 2-5, 2011, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
1 - 13 of 13
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