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  • 1.
    Ajjan, Fátima
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ambrogi, Martina
    Max Planck Institute Colloids and Interfaces, Germany.
    Ayalneh Tiruye, Girum
    IMDEA Energy Institute, Spain.
    Cordella, Daniela
    University of Liege ULg, Belgium.
    Fernandes, Ana M.
    POLYMAT University of Basque Country UPV EHU, Spain.
    Grygiel, Konrad
    Max Planck Institute Colloids and Interfaces, Germany.
    Isik, Mehmet
    POLYMAT University of Basque Country UPV EHU, Spain.
    Patil, Nagaraj
    University of Liege ULg, Belgium.
    Porcarelli, Luca
    POLYMAT University of Basque Country UPV EHU, Spain.
    Rocasalbas, Gillem
    KIOMedPharma, Belgium.
    Vendramientto, Giordano
    University of Bordeaux, France.
    Zeglio, Erica
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Antonietti, Markus
    Max Planck Institute Colloids and Interfaces, Germany.
    Detrembleur, Cristophe
    University of Liege ULg, Belgium.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jerome, Christine
    University of Liege ULg, Belgium.
    Marcilla, Rebeca
    IMDEA Energy Institute, Spain.
    Mecerreyes, David
    POLYMAT University of Basque Country UPV EHU, Spain; Basque Fdn Science, Spain.
    Moreno, Monica
    POLYMAT University of Basque Country UPV EHU, Spain.
    Taton, Daniel
    University of Bordeaux, France.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Yuan, Jiayin
    Max Planck Institute Colloids and Interfaces, Germany.
    Innovative polyelectrolytes/poly(ionic liquid)s for energy and the environment2017In: Polymer international, ISSN 0959-8103, E-ISSN 1097-0126, Vol. 66, no 8, 1119-1128 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the work carried out within the European project RENAISSANCE-ITN, which was dedicated to the development of innovative polyelectrolytes for energy and environmental applications. Within the project different types of innovative polyelectrolytes were synthesized such as poly(ionic liquid)s coming from renewable or natural ions, thiazolium cations, catechol functionalities or from a new generation of cheap deep eutectic monomers. Further, macromolecular architectures such as new poly(ionic liquid) block copolymers and new (semi)conducting polymer/polyelectrolyte complexes were also developed. As the final goal, the application of these innovative polymers in energy and the environment was investigated. Important advances in energy storage technologies included the development of new carbonaceous materials, new lignin/conducting polymer biopolymer electrodes, new iongels and single-ion conducting polymer electrolytes for supercapacitors and batteries and new poly(ionic liquid) binders for batteries. On the other hand, the use of innovative polyelectrolytes in sustainable environmental technologies led to the development of new liquid and dry water, new materials for water cleaning technologies such as flocculants, oil absorbers, new recyclable organocatalyst platforms and new multifunctional polymer coatings with antifouling and antimicrobial properties. All in all this paper demonstrates the potential of poly(ionic liquid)s for high-value applications in energy and enviromental areas. (c) 2017 Society of Chemical Industry

  • 2.
    Das, Biswanath
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Lee, Bao-Lin
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Erik A.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Akermark, Torbjorn
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Shatskiy, Andrey
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Demeshko, Serhiy
    University of Gottingen, Germany.
    Liao, Rong-Zhen
    Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Peoples R China.
    Laine, Tanja M.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Haukka, Matti
    University of Jyvaskyla, Finland.
    Zeglio, Erica
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Abdel-Magied, Ahmed F.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Meyer, Franc
    University of Gottingen, Germany.
    Karkas, Markus D.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Johnston, Eric V.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Nordlander, Ebbe
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Åkermark, Bjorn
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Water oxidation catalyzed by molecular di- and nonanuclear Fe complexes: importance of a proper ligand framework2016In: Dalton Transactions, ISSN 1477-9226, E-ISSN 1477-9234, Vol. 45, no 34, 13289-13293 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The synthesis of two molecular iron complexes, a dinuclear iron(III,III) complex and a nonanuclear iron complex, based on the di-nucleating ligand 2,2-(2-hydroxy-5-methyl-1,3-phenylene)bis(1H-benzo[d]imidazole-4-carboxylic acid) is described. The two iron complexes were found to drive the oxidation of water by the one-electron oxidant [Ru(bpy)(3)](3+).

  • 3.
    Johansson, Patrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Jullesson, David
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Elfwing, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liin, Sara
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Musumeci, Chiara
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Zeglio, Erica
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Elinder, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Electronic polymers in lipid membranes2015In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, no 11242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electrical interfaces between biological cells and man-made electrical devices exist in many forms, but it remains a challenge to bridge the different mechanical and chemical environments of electronic conductors (metals, semiconductors) and biosystems. Here we demonstrate soft electrical interfaces, by integrating the metallic polymer PEDOT-S into lipid membranes. By preparing complexes between alkyl-ammonium salts and PEDOT-S we were able to integrate PEDOT-S into both liposomes and in lipid bilayers on solid surfaces. This is a step towards efficient electronic conduction within lipid membranes. We also demonstrate that the PEDOT-S@alkyl-ammonium: lipid hybrid structures created in this work affect ion channels in the membrane of Xenopus oocytes, which shows the possibility to access and control cell membrane structures with conductive polyelectrolytes.

  • 4.
    Zeglio, Erica
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Self-doped Conjugated Polyelectrolytes for Bioelectronics Applications2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-doped conjugated polyelectrolytes (CPEs) are a class of conducting polymers constituted of a π-conjugated backbone and charged side groups. The ionic groups provide the counterions needed to balance the charged species formed in the CPEs backbones upon oxidation. As a result, addition of external counterions is not required, and the CPEs can be defined as selfdoped. The combination of their unique optical and electrical properties render them the perfect candidates for optoelectronic applications. Additionally, their “soft” nature provide for the mechanical compatibility necessary to interface with biological systems, rendering them promising materials for bioelectronics applications. CPEs solubility, aggregation state, and optoelectronic properties can be easily tuned by different means, such as blending or interaction with oppositely charged species (such as surfactants), in order to produce materials with the desired properties. In this thesis both the strategies have been explored to produce new functional materials that can be deposited to form a thin film and,  therefore, used as an active layer in organic electrochemical transistors (OECTs). Microstructure formation of the films as well as influence on devices operation and performance have been investigated. We also show that these methods can be exploited to produce materials whose uniquecombination of self-doping ability and hydrophobicity allows incorporation into the phospholipid double layer of biomembranes, while retaining their properties. As a result, self-doped CPEs can be used both as sensing elements to probe the physical state of biomembranes, and as functional ones providing them with new functionalities, such as electrical conductivity. Integration of conductive electronic biomembranes into OECTs devices has brought us one step forward on the interface of manmade technologies with biological systems.

    List of papers
    1. Conjugated Polyelectrolyte Blends for Electrochromic and Electrochemical Transistor Devices
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conjugated Polyelectrolyte Blends for Electrochromic and Electrochemical Transistor Devices
    Show others...
    2015 (English)In: Chemistry of Materials, ISSN 0897-4756, E-ISSN 1520-5002, Vol. 27, no 18, 6385-6393 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Two self-doped conjugated polyelectrolytes, having semiconducting and metallic behaviors, respectively, have been blended from aqueous solutions in order to produce materials with enhanced optical and electrical properties. The intimate blend of two anionic conjugated polyelectrolytes combine the electrical and optical properties of these, and can be tuned by blend stoichiometry. In situ conductance measurements have been done during doping of the blends, while UV vis and EPR spectroelectrochemistry allowed the study of the nature of the involved redox species. We have constructed an accumulation/depletion mode organic electrochemical transistor whose characteristics can be tuned by balancing the stoichiometry of the active material.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    AMER CHEMICAL SOC, 2015
    National Category
    Materials Chemistry Condensed Matter Physics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122212 (URN)10.1021/acs.chemmater.5b02501 (DOI)000361935000028 ()
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Marie Curie network "Renaissance"; Knut and Alice Wallenberg foundation through Wallenberg Scholar grant; Swedish Research Council [VR-2014-3079, D0556101]; Carl Trygger Foundation [CTS 12:206]

    Available from: 2015-10-26 Created: 2015-10-23 Last updated: 2017-12-01
    2. Electronic polymers in lipid membranes
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Electronic polymers in lipid membranes
    Show others...
    2015 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, no 11242Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Electrical interfaces between biological cells and man-made electrical devices exist in many forms, but it remains a challenge to bridge the different mechanical and chemical environments of electronic conductors (metals, semiconductors) and biosystems. Here we demonstrate soft electrical interfaces, by integrating the metallic polymer PEDOT-S into lipid membranes. By preparing complexes between alkyl-ammonium salts and PEDOT-S we were able to integrate PEDOT-S into both liposomes and in lipid bilayers on solid surfaces. This is a step towards efficient electronic conduction within lipid membranes. We also demonstrate that the PEDOT-S@alkyl-ammonium: lipid hybrid structures created in this work affect ion channels in the membrane of Xenopus oocytes, which shows the possibility to access and control cell membrane structures with conductive polyelectrolytes.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Nature Publishing Group, 2015
    National Category
    Biophysics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-120045 (URN)10.1038/srep11242 (DOI)000356090400002 ()26059023 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies|Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation; Swedish Research Council

    Available from: 2015-07-06 Created: 2015-07-06 Last updated: 2017-12-04
    3. Conjugated Polyelectrolyte Blend as Photonic Probe of Biomembrane Organization
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conjugated Polyelectrolyte Blend as Photonic Probe of Biomembrane Organization
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: ChemistrySelect, ISSN 2365-6549, Vol. 1, no 14, 4340-4344 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In the following report, a conjugated polyelectrolyte (CPE) blend has been introduced for the first time as a fluorescent probe of membrane organization. Insertion of the blend into the lipid double layer has been rendered possible through formation of a hydrophobic complex by counterion exchange. Changes in membrane physical state from liquid-disordered (Ldis) to liquid-ordered (Lord), and to solid-ordered (Sord) result in red shifts of blend excitation (up to Δλex=+90 nm) and emission (up to Δλnm=+37 nm) maxima attributable to backbone planarization of CPEs. We found that blend stoichiometry can be adjusted to attain the best interplay among single polyelectrolytes properties, such as sensitivity and luminescence. The resulting probes therefore allow a bimodal detection of membrane physical state: changes in absorption permit a direct visualization of membrane organization, while variations in emission spectra demonstrate that CPE-blends are a promising probes that can be used for imaging applications.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    John Wiley & Sons, 2016
    Keyword
    Conjugated Polyelectrolytes, Fluorescent Probes, Liposomes, Membrane Probes, Polyelectrolytes blend
    National Category
    Biomaterials Science Condensed Matter Physics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-132729 (URN)10.1002/slct.201600920 (DOI)000395422000028 ()
    Note

    Funding agencies: Marie Curie network "Renaissance"; Knut and Alice Wallenberg foundation; DFG [GRK 1640]; Elite Study programme, Macromolecular Science at the University of Bayreuth

    Available from: 2016-11-21 Created: 2016-11-21 Last updated: 2017-04-20Bibliographically approved
  • 5.
    Zeglio, Erica
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eriksson, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Sensor Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gabrielsson, Roger
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Highly Stable Conjugated Polyelectrolytes for Water-Based Hybrid Mode Electrochemical Transistors2017In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 29, no 19, 1605787Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hydrophobic, self-doped conjugated polyelectrolytes (CPEs) are introduced as highly stable active materials for organic electrochemical transistors (OECTs). The hydrophobicity of CPEs renders films very stable in aqueous solutions. The devices operate at gate voltages around zero and show no signs of degradation when operated for 10(4) cycles under ambient conditions. These properties make the produced OECTs ideal devices for applications in bioelectronics.

  • 6.
    Zeglio, Erica
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Schmidt, Martina M.
    Chemistry I—Applied Functional Polymers University of Bayreuth Bayreuth, Germany.
    Thelakkat, Mukundan
    Chemistry I—Applied Functional Polymers University of Bayreuth Bayreuth, Germany.
    Gabrielsson, Roger
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Conjugated Polyelectrolyte Blend as Photonic Probe of Biomembrane Organization2016In: ChemistrySelect, ISSN 2365-6549, Vol. 1, no 14, 4340-4344 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the following report, a conjugated polyelectrolyte (CPE) blend has been introduced for the first time as a fluorescent probe of membrane organization. Insertion of the blend into the lipid double layer has been rendered possible through formation of a hydrophobic complex by counterion exchange. Changes in membrane physical state from liquid-disordered (Ldis) to liquid-ordered (Lord), and to solid-ordered (Sord) result in red shifts of blend excitation (up to Δλex=+90 nm) and emission (up to Δλnm=+37 nm) maxima attributable to backbone planarization of CPEs. We found that blend stoichiometry can be adjusted to attain the best interplay among single polyelectrolytes properties, such as sensitivity and luminescence. The resulting probes therefore allow a bimodal detection of membrane physical state: changes in absorption permit a direct visualization of membrane organization, while variations in emission spectra demonstrate that CPE-blends are a promising probes that can be used for imaging applications.

  • 7.
    Zeglio, Erica
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Schmidt, Martina M.
    University of Bayreuth, Germany.
    Thelakkat, Mukundan
    University of Bayreuth, Germany.
    Gabrielsson, Roger
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Soling, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Conjugated Polyelectrolyte Blends for Highly Stable Accumulation Mode Electrochemical Transistors2017In: Chemistry of Materials, ISSN 0897-4756, E-ISSN 1520-5002, Vol. 29, no 10, 4293-4300 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Counterion exchange has been introduced as a method to modify properties of anionic conjugated poly electrolyte (CPE) blends. Blending of two self-doped CPEs having metallic and semiconducting behavior has been achieved from two different solvents, by exchanging the counterion of the metallic component. Different blending conditions lead to films exhibiting different optical properties, depending on the aggregation states of the CPEs. Conductance responses for the blends showed the opportunity to tune threshold voltage of the films both by blending and counterion exchange. Therefore, the blends have been exploited for the fabrication of accumulation mode organic electrochemical transistors. These devices exhibit short switching times and high transconductance, up to 15.3 rnS, as well as high stability upon fast pulsed cycles, retaining 88% of the drain currents after 2 x 10(3) cycles.

  • 8.
    Zeglio, Erica
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Vagin, Mikhail
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Musumeci, Chiara
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ajjan, Fátima
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gabrielsson, Roger
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Trinh, Xuan thang
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nguyen, Son Tien
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Maziz, Ali
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Conjugated Polyelectrolyte Blends for Electrochromic and Electrochemical Transistor Devices2015In: Chemistry of Materials, ISSN 0897-4756, E-ISSN 1520-5002, Vol. 27, no 18, 6385-6393 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two self-doped conjugated polyelectrolytes, having semiconducting and metallic behaviors, respectively, have been blended from aqueous solutions in order to produce materials with enhanced optical and electrical properties. The intimate blend of two anionic conjugated polyelectrolytes combine the electrical and optical properties of these, and can be tuned by blend stoichiometry. In situ conductance measurements have been done during doping of the blends, while UV vis and EPR spectroelectrochemistry allowed the study of the nature of the involved redox species. We have constructed an accumulation/depletion mode organic electrochemical transistor whose characteristics can be tuned by balancing the stoichiometry of the active material.

1 - 8 of 8
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